Gothic Revival in Thorntown, IN

Added to OHD on 1/3/20   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   8 Comments
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209 E Bow St, Thorntown, IN 46071

Map: Aerial

  • $35,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 1 Bath
  • 3143 Sq Ft
  • 0.28 Ac.
Wonderful Opportunity To Invest Into A Small Community, Next To A Park And Walk To Downtown. This Home Was Once Beautiful As You Can See By Some Of The Old Trim, Curved Staircase And Incredible Front Window. Could Be Used As A 3 Bedroom With 2 Bonus Rooms. Home Will Need A Complete Rehab And Is Far From Move-In Condition.
Contact Information
Scott Wynkoop, Wynkoop Brokerage Firm
(317) 472-4570
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
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8 Comments on Gothic Revival in Thorntown, IN

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11869 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Gothic Revival are one of the few styles I’d rebuild around the main window. I’m glad to see the stairs are still there.

    11
    • JimHJimH says: 5101 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Cool little house! This was right next to the railroad back in the day, so maybe the 2nd entry was an office of some type. I like the window and stairs too!

      7
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Fortunately that window still retains its interior casing… it could be used as a template to reproduce all of the molding which has been lost around other windows and doors.

      Houses like this offer a little more flexiblity in terms of modernization than houses which still retain their original details… this could be a really fun project with such beautiful potential both inside and out.

      10
  2. SherryLynnSherryLynn says: 100 comments
    Marion, AR

    I love the window in picture #4.

    4
  3. AugusdoAugusdo says: 25 comments
    1911 Farmhouse
    Loretto, TN

    I would love to see what it looked like before it fell into such a sad state.

    2
  4. RosewaterRosewater says: 6683 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    This poor thing has been nearly whipped to death. Cringed hard when I saw it listed. If someone sees this poor, pathetic, cold, wet, puppy dog and bundles it up, feeds it, loves it, makes it whole and puts it right – it will be an absolute miracle, and a true testament to the reach of OHD. Sure hope that happens.

    Thorntown is a right decent little town; close enough to 65 to skip right down to Whitestown / Zionsville; or further into the city.

    One of the most interesting Italianate houses in this state is right on the edge of town; on a very nice chunk of land, with amaaazzzing barn. It has the MOST spectacular, multi-split, principal stairway, of the most gorgeous wood, that I have ever seen in such a house – period. It was last on the market in, (I believe), 2007-ish or so. It is one of my greatest old-house-ica regrets that I did not clip those images, (a time before I collected). Sigh… Seriously – the thing is like right out of M.C. Esher. I still “dream” about it. 🙂

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/02/47/a5/0247a59c426988b37829a59032712dee.jpg

    5
  5. Gregory_KGregory_K says: 457 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Chatsworth, CA

    This house is straight out of Downing. If you couldn’t find a period photograph, and who would have photographed this house – perhaps the Farm Bureau, or one of the WPA projects, then a porch from Downing or Davis would do well.

    This was obviously not an inexpensive home because of it’s size, and the quality of the Gothic window. I absolutely would remove the chimney next to the front door, and I might also remove the bay window. It is not original, and in terrible condition. Removing the siding and bay might provide some molding profile ‘ghosts’ and evidence of the width of the original porch. Retaining it would interfere with the recreation of a full porch, which I believe this home probably had when built.

    2

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