1817 – Richmond, KY

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Added to OHD on 1/3/20   -   Last OHD Update: 8/13/20   -   25 Comments

1150 Bogie Mill Rd, Richmond, KY 40475

Map: Aerial

  • $165,000
  • 1 Bath
  • 1320 Sq Ft
  • 1.6 Ac.
The sun definitely shines BRIGHT on this OLD KENTUCKY HOME! Don't MISS OUT on your chance to own this BEAUTIFUL, HISTORIC northern Madison County gem! Located less than 10 minutes to I-75 exit 87, this property boasts a charming, historic FARM HOUSE believed to be constructed in 1817 (Cassius Clay has reportedly stayed in the home!) as well as a hand constructed stacked stone outbuilding all nestled on 1 acres bordered by the beautiful Madison County foothills on lower Silver Creek. Stop dreaming of the potential this home could have and make it the showpiece that will be the envy of everyone around! Want a little more land to go with this ANTEBELLUM BEAUTY? A total of 5 tracts have been separated from a 100+ acre farm and are available for purchase as well! See MLS#'s 20001650, 20001656, 20001658 & 20001659. Don't miss out, make a move today!
Contact Information
Anita O. Brown, ERA Professional Hometown Services
(859) 626-8372
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24 Comments on 1817 – Richmond, KY

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12622 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Cassius Clay the 19th century guy not the butterfly-bee one.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassius_Marcellus_Clay_(politician)

    I’ve been pestering husband lately about selling our house and finding something with no neighbors. Anyone else ever feel claustrophobic living around people? I’d love to have a home with such land.

    BTW, the entry room, believe that’s linoleum that’s rippled and not wood.

    +1
    • BethanyBethany says: 3468 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      There are no words to describe how much I want to live where there are NO. PEOPLE. But then I would run into the quandary of NEED. TARGET.

      +1
    • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1680 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
      NC

      He was a real villain. Most in Congress didn’t like him & didn’t trust him. His wife was a collateral ancestor of mine — he treated her horribly always, even moved a mistress or two into their house while she lived there. Eventually he kicked her out with nothing — sad that in those days he could get away with it — she spent the rest of her life living with (and on the charity of) a married daughter.

      Yes, Kelly, I did my city living & for the past 25 or so years have at least lived with some elbow room, though could use fewer neighbors in this house. We are deciding where to retire to & a friend said, “I don’t want to find you at the end of a long dirt road!” Sounds great to me, lol.

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      • I’m very familiar with this area. It’s just across the Kentucky River from Fayette County, KY. Lexington, KY has a population of 322,000 (2017) and keeps growing. Unfortunately, Fayette County is land chocked in that once you go across the old city limits, unless you are on land that has been grandfathered in, you are restricted to buying no less than a forty acre lot. No such restrictions exist in Madison County. My son’s dad’s house and farm (8385 Durbin Ln Lexington) would be the comp for this; if this house and farm were eleven miles west, this would be a million dollar farm. The old family farms in this area have been getting divided up and turned into subdivisions within the last twenty years. These subdivisions home prices range from $200,000 up to $500,000, and some homes are even above that as northern Madison County is a bedroom community to Lexington. An example of a subdivision within ten miles of this home would be Boone’s Trace subdivision. This is the tonier end of Madison County. Madison County is getting ready to sale Battlefield Golf course, their property around Wilgreen Lake, and a few more properties. You can expect that all of these properties will promptly be turned into very expensive subdivisions. Richmond, KY is about twenty minutes away, you can find most of your favorite stores there, except for Target (two exits up from exit 87), and E.K.U. Center for the Arts is excellent. I-75 is close but far enough away to not bother you too much with traffic noise. This property may have a view of the KY River, or at least, you’ll see it on the way to the property.

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        • CarebearCarebear says: 1244 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Before long, it’ll be one big urban area, no rural area at all. Sad.
          Friends of mine are leaving tomorrow, to move to Bowling Green, Ky. Is this at all near there?

          +1
      • Jason DanielsJason Daniels says: 58 comments
        Lexington, KY

        I’m sorry, most of that isn’t true. First, he was friends with Abraham Lincoln. He was one of the main reasons we didn’t leave the union. He would go through Kentucky talking about why slavery was wrong, he owned an anti-slavery paper, in Lexington. The people who didn’t like him didn’t like him because he was so strongly against slavery and was very vocal about it. He never moved a mistress into his house. His wife was the one who left him. He didn’t kick her out. He was also one of the biggest badasses in Kentucky history. I could tell so many stories about the man. I’ve read books on the man. He wasn’t perfect, as most people from that time. But he had more good qualities than bad.

        As for the house and property. I love it. I don’t like Richmond, I lived there for about 5 or 6 years. But with that much land that and of a house with so much potential and history, I might be willing to move back there.

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        • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1680 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
          NC

          That era is also one of my great interests, as I can tell it is for you. Clay was an abolitionist and ambassador to Russia (where his affair with a ballerina produced a son while his wife at home managed his estate), as you say. He was personally disliked enough that some of those who knew him commented in diary or letter that they did not regret his passing. He did bring his women into the home to stay while Mary Jane lived there. Their marriage, in histories, is always described as “tumultuous” at best, and whether she left or he kicked her out is rather moot — like “you can’t fire me, I quit!” They were rarely together after he returned from Russia in 1869. He divorced her for abandonment, which is the way it usually went in those days. While Mary Jane had increased the farm’s profitability enough to enlarge their house, install plumbing & heat, and educate all 6 surviving children, after the divorce she was entitled to nothing nor to custody of her minor children. He had heavy debts in Russia and on his return to the U.S., for which the farm paid. Clay made some praiseworthy contributions to this country, no denying that, but he did not leave unqualified positive memories among many who knew him. Their house, White Hall (formerly Clermont) is beautiful — this discussion is irrelevant to the house above, so I apologize for hogging space!

          +1
          • CarebearCarebear says: 1244 comments
            OHD Supporter

            Ok, I’m gong to try this again. I am SO upset at Buffalo throwing away that game, that I must have hit something, and everything I’d typed, disappeared.
            Ok. My 4x grandfather, Levi Blake, supposedly was divorced by his wife, for deserting not her, but the US Army, during the Civil War! According to my grandfather, Levi deserted, then “went west to live with the Indians.” His sister, my great aunt, said my grandfather was f”full of it,” and Levi went home on a farm furlough, to plant or harvest crops, then never reported back to his unit, as he was supposed to. His wife was so ashamed, she divorced him! I know that women couldn’t divorce their husbands, or couldn’t divorce except under some very exceptional circumstances, at the time, so I have to find out more about that. So, maybe Clay did divorce his wife for desertion, after she got fed up, and left the house. Who knows, maybe she just meant until he came to his senses, or they both cooled down? Then, he had the reason to divorce her, under desertion. Its a good thing, Mrs Clay could live with her daughter. I bet a lot of never married, divorced, or widowed women without family to fall back on, ended up in poor houses, or in prostitution until disease/malnutrition killed them. Thank God for Susan B Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton-and one of Clay’s own daughters!
            I love this house! Imagine, the floors fixed, fireplaces all restored/converted to gas, central air installed so there’d be no horrible ugly window air conditioners, all wiring to the house, underground, period light fixtures and furniture and decoration…add some landscaping…

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          • Jason DanielsJason Daniels says: 58 comments
            Lexington, KY

            There really is no proof that he had that affair, it was speculation and most modern historians in the area feel it never happened. The man denied it ever happens up until his death. He wasn’t the kind of guy who cared what others thought, especially as he aged. He never moved another woman into the house until long after his wife left. His wife while she did do a good job running the farm spent a major amount of money renovating that house. If I remember right she went more than 50% over budget. If you talk to local historians they will tell you she did leave. You are right she didn’t get any of the lands because women didn’t have many rights back then. Which is one of the reasons why their daughters were involved in the woman’s suffrage movement. One of them Mary Barr Clay was one of the head leaders of the movement and Laura Clay was one of the first woman to have their names nominated for the presidency at the convention of a major political party. Anyway off subject. He did remarry late in life. she was a dirt poor underage girl who worked on his farm. That was one of the reasons some local people had problems with him. After she left he kept sending her money and allowed her and her new husband to move into the house and work for him. He was a tuff old guy which is why some people didn’t care that he died. He ran like 6 or 7 men off his property by him self when he was in his 80’s, that would rub anyone the wrong way. He felt he was in the right because they came for his wife who didn’t want to go. He is one of my favorite local topics. Him, and the Jouett family.

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            • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1680 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
              NC

              Carebear, I’m so sorry about Buffalo! That will wreck anybody’s day!

              Pretty hard to argue about stuff & people from 150 years ago. As the proprietor, Jason, of the plantation while her husband was in Russia, and having increased its output, seems perfectly within her rights also to invest in an increase to the value of the house. What budget? One set by Clay from 4000 miles away? Talk about women’s rights! Debts that needed paying were HIS as a result of his lavish entertaining. Clay’s 2nd wife was a piece of work — took care of Number One first, and seems to have taken him for a ride, as well as others. He did rub people the wrong way for many years — was not personally popular among his gov’t colleagues, if you read their journals, though of course the abolitiionists did agree politically. From what I’ve read, Mary Jane was strongly behind her daughters’ women’s rights work, due to her experience with her husband. I’m not trying to say he didn’t do good and valuable things for the country — and for his own slaves, whom he freed & subsequently paid a wage. He certainly did. I’m just glad he was married to Mary Jane, not to me! Seems you folks from the area are all in for Clay, which is ok. Everybody has faults, though. My direct ancestors were the Warfield bunch of Maryland, and some of them were plain crooks, others (including my grandfather) wacky as bedbugs. Others, not so bad.

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              • Jason DanielsJason Daniels says: 58 comments
                Lexington, KY

                Before he left they discussed expanding the house, and a budget was set. But she went way, way over budget. If you have ever been to the house, which I go every year, you will have noticed the original house and how much bigger it was made. It’s like triple the size. While she was his wife and did have a right to expand it, it should have been a joint decision. After all, he inherited the land. If it wasn’t for him she wouldn’t have had the land Or house at all. The problem most of the politicians had with him was he was so vocal about ending slavery. His own cousin Henry Clay stopped talking to him because he told him to tone down the freeing the slave talk and he didn’t. Henry Clay blamed Cassius for him losing the presidential election. But Cassius was a fighter and he felt strongly about the subject. So people didn’t like him for that fact. But he did have friends and people who respected him. If it wasn’t for him Russia probably wouldn’t have been on our side and Kentucky might have left the union. His 2nd wife definitely was out for herself. But I understand where she was coming from. Being that poor back then was the hardest of lives. She just saw a way to get up in the world and I can’t fault her for that. But she should have treated him better. Should his first wife have gotten some land from the divorce? Sure, but how many men, even great men of that time would have done that? Would you have wanted to be married to any man from back then? My guess would be not. I think mistakes we’re made by both of them. It feels like a lot of the problems they had were from her not trusting him and he shouldn’t have spent so much time overseas, or brought her with him. But I don’t remember if she wanted to go or not. But this man probably had more assassination atemps on his life then anyone at that time. It took real Guts for him to run an anti slavery newspaper out of Lexington and to go to towns where people sent him letters saying if he did come he wouldn’t leave alive. As for everyone here being all for him. Most people don’t even know who he is. I have not lived in Lexington my whole life but I have educated people who have lived here their whole life who didn’t even know he lived. I think his life story would make a great movie. It’s sad that 99% of Americans has no idea who he was. I was pretty excited when they told the story of one of the attempts on his life on Mysteries at the mansion on Travel Chanel.

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          • CarebearCarebear says: 1244 comments
            OHD Supporter

            My 4x grandfather, Levi Blake, joined the Union army in Vermont, then a bit later, became a deserter. My grandfather said that he then disappeared and “went west to live with the Indians,” or, according tommy great aunt, went home from his army unit on a farm furlough. Apparently, the army let you go home to plant or harvest your crops, then you had to return to your unit. Either way, Levi never came back to the army. My great aunt said he stayed home after doing the farm work-and his wife was so ashamed, she divorced him! I have to find out when women got the right to divorce their husbands, as I know that at one time, a woman could not initiatate divorce proceedings in this country. So, maybe Clay’s wife got fed up, left, and he divorced her for desertion. Being a powerful, rich (courtesy of his wife) man, his word probably carried a LOT more weight than hers. Its a good thing, that her daughter took her in, or she’d probably have ended up in a poor house. As I bet a lot of single, divorced women, or widows did in those days.
            This house could really be a beauty! CAn you imagine, the floors all fixed, the fireplaces restored/converted to gas, central air put in so there’d be no horrible window air conditioners hanging out the windows, this place would be wonderful!

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        • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1680 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
          NC

          One more comment — Jason, try reading this. http://www.mrlincolnswhitehouse.org/residents-visitors/notable-visitors/notable-visitors-cassius-m-clay-1810-1903/ It paints a picture similar to everything else I’ve read over about 20 years. He may have bragged about being Lincoln’s friend, but that would have been right in character for him, and Lincoln appears not to have known they were buds. As to the ballerina’s son, sure he denied it! Some coincidence, if it didn’t happen, that he imported a Russian boy the same age & legally adopted him as a way publicly to give him his name — which was the final straw for his wife, who left him. Launey Clay always claimed him as his biological father.
          None of this really matters now, except that I am kind of a purist on accurate history. I think Clay is a lucky guy for you & others to remember him so well!

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          • Jason DanielsJason Daniels says: 58 comments
            Lexington, KY

            Adopting a kid from a friend is not an uncommon practice. If he was so arrogant why would he not want to brag about sleeping with a well-known ballerina when he marriage had ended years before that? I remember him for nothing more than what he was. If you talk to people who specialize in his story you will find out there is a lot of misinformation out there about the man.

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    • ErnieErnie says: 343 comments
      AK

      We live in the boonies, on 15 acres so no close neighbors & we are very happy that way. It’s weird to go into even a big town or a city as the need arises, it can make you nervous as a cat with all of the traffic & goings on. As we get older we think about if/when we will need to be closer to town because we no longer can or want to deal with the firewood & the maintenance & up keep of 15 acres or in case we need to be closer to the dr. or hospital, etc. But right now, we are still very happy with where we are.
      You have posted so many places on here that make us think about how lucky we are to be out here even though the homes are beautiful, they are just so close to the next one. You have also posted homes on here that have made us say…..that one would be doable except again we they are the homes with a lot of acreage so…..

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    • homebodyhomebody says: 130 comments
      1992 Victorian
      Dousman, WI

      I agree, Kelly! I would love to have the peace and quiet of more land! This property has charm and potential! Wish I could have seen a bit more of the out buildings. Keep us posted if this becomes your new home, Kelly!!!

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    • LeetownjenkinsLeetownjenkins says: 14 comments
      1924 American Four Square
      Martinsburg, WV

      Daniel Boone always claimed that “when you can see the smoke from your neighbors chimney its time to move farther west.”

      +1
  2. KarenBKarenB says: 343 comments
    1885 KY farm center chimney cape style
    KY

    There are so many very nice old houses in KY standing empty or rented as this one was. I’ve watched as they deteriorated over the years and some ultimately being torn down. So many farmers just want the land to run cattle and don’t care about living in the old house. Sad. It will be a shame if the property is sold off in smaller parcels. The best neighbors are NO neighbors.

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  3. This area is a beautiful part of the rolling hills and bluegrass of KY. And, for culture and great shopping, Berea and Danville nearby with all that comes with outstanding private colleges in both communities. This fine opportunity will not last long.

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  4. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1062 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    Kelly I’m with you! We moved to where we are now from a 15 acre farm where we had horses. Hubs was transfered and now we live in the city 😢 I’ve never been real happy here.

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  5. Gregory_KGregory_K says: 447 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Chatsworth, CA

    I wish we had more pictures.

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  6. LeetownjenkinsLeetownjenkins says: 14 comments
    1924 American Four Square
    Martinsburg, WV

    Kelly, I understand the desire for no neighbors. Daniel Boone always claimed that “when you can see the smoke from your neighbors chimney its time to move farther west.”

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