1896 – Montclair, NJ – $1,449,000

Status and price shown on OHD may not be current. Check the links below.
Added to OHD on 3/10/20   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   51 Comments
For Sale
National Register

30 N Mountain Ave, Montclair, NJ 07042

Map: Aerial

  • $1,449,000
  • 11 Bed
  • 4.5 Bath
  • 1.97 Ac.
Welcome to Evergreens, located at 30 North Mountain Avenue, Montclair. This is the family home of the Charles Shultz family, built in 1896 and given to The Montclair History Center in 1996 for use as a museum. The members of the Shultz family were the only occupants of the home until that time100 years. It remains in original condition with the exception of the kitchen stove that was added in the 1920's. The Reception Hall was known as the "living hall" when the home was built and features magnificent oak woodwork, herringbone oak flooring, leaded glass windows and a fireplace. The formal rooms of the home feature exquisite woodwork and ornate detail, including a Delft tile surround in the Dining Room, beautiful wooden glass enclosed shelving in the Library, and a large welcoming fireplace in the Living Room. The Music Room, with its curved walls, was the perfect spot to entertain, by the fire, during the Shultz residency. Both the Living Room and Music Room windows overlook the large wrap around front porch that back in the day would have had wicker furniture for outside entertaining and peaceful viewing of the New York City skyline. Each floor was be accessed by a 1896 state of the art elevator that is still intact. The second floor of the home features 6 family Bedrooms with oversized windows allowing sun to stream in. As was common for the age of the home, there is 1 family bathroom on this floor, although each of the bedrooms have a marble sink for washing up. There are 2 servants quarter rooms and a bath in the west wing of the home. The third floor of the home houses Charles Shultz's workshop, a large Sitting Room with fireplace, and two additional bedrooms and a family Bathroom. There is also "tin room" that was used to store clothes in the summer and an attic on the 4th level. Inside the attic are stairs to a roof top observatory, complete with an early 1900's telescope. The stables in the 2 bedroom carriage house are intact also and are fascinating to see. One can only imagine the horses housed and the carriages stored there! You can just imagine, as you tour this home what life was like in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is truly a home where time has stood still. All lovers of true architectural beauty with an appreciation for unmatched detail will be fascinated by this home. Make this estate quality property, sitting on almost 2 acres of land, your restoration project.
Contact Information
The Chris Lane Team, The Lane Team at Halstead
(201) 478-6735
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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51 Comments on 1896 – Montclair, NJ – $1,449,000

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11869 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I recommend reading the report linked up top.

    8
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Wow. You are not even kidding. What a wonderful resource of information, (short of specifics on the mechanicals – of course πŸ™ ).

      3
  2. r myersr myers says: 16 comments
    1967 raised ranch
    Shawnee, KS

    Love the old stove in the kitchen. But what is the thing next to it? Some type of heater?

    5
  3. natira121natira121 says: 605 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    I wish there were more pictures!!!! Even with all the pics in the article, etc, it’s just… not… enough. This place is just fantastic! I sincerely hope and pray whoever buys it is the right person to do what little needs to be done to carefully preserve it.

    I wonder if the old kitchen stove, likely one of those huge and glorious iron ranges, is stored away somewhere? I’m weird, and would put it back. *grin*

    I want to see everything mentioned, and all the nooks and crannies. I want to poke around in the attic and the basement and the carriage house.

    My husband kept asking me why I was gasping and exclaiming the entire time I was looking at everything. I told him he wouldn’t understand, though he would deeply appreciate the workshop. *smile*

    Thank you Kelly, for posting this! You know I love you, right?

    29
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      > I’m weird
      Me too. πŸ˜‰

      If the stove is gone, another can be found to assume it’s rightful place – and used! Heheheh. The lovely little gas unit there now can be moved somewhere else in the room and used as well.

      2
      • natira121natira121 says: 605 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1877 Vernacular
        Columbia River Gorge, WA

        I’m so glad you’re weird. Sometimes when I post I think to myself “I wonder what Rosewater will say about this place? Or my comment”

        I’m even more glad that I married a weirdo. He’s not into old houses at all, but his skill set is impressive and his knowledge of all sorts of esoteric subjects is nearly legendary… we make a good pair. *grin*

        1
  4. BethanyBethany says: 3473 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    I am hoping this home has something in the contract to assure it continues in this amazing state of museum level preservation. In fact, it was a museum if I understand correctly. Unbelievably cool. Maybe my top listing ever on OHD.

    21
  5. I used to live near this house and have been in it a few times. It is absolutely spectacular! The location is awesome. It’s one of my all time favorite houses because it is so original. The bathrooms, kitchens, everything! And that workshop is so fascinating! I’m surprised it’s being sold. I have so many pictures of the interior and bathrooms!

    14
  6. JerryJerry says: 77 comments
    1955 Colonial Ranch
    Peoria, IL

    The house, it’s furnishings, and and an endowment were left to the historic society by a long-time member and now they’re selling it. Very sad. This is one of the best-preserved houses of it’s type that I’ve seen. It’s important to remember that when you leave something you value to an organization for a specific purpose, you have no guarantee your wishes will be respected unless you establish your own preservation foundation or trust.

    25
  7. timhildebrandttimhildebrandt says: 98 comments
    1927 arts and crafts
    Indianapolis, IN

    Kelly, you’re killing me. These two Tudors are so wonderful as to defy words. I keep trying to think of a proposal so great that the owners would want to donate the both of them to me just to decorate and live there. But even I cannot live in two houses… Thank you!

    3
  8. DmflaskDmflask says: 44 comments
    1939 Spanish Eclectic
    KS

    Absolutely magnificent! The original condition makes my heart skip a beat. Please please please don’t let it sell to someone who declares the Living Hall too dark and paints it all white.

    14
  9. I am speechless and in awe. Restore? Please do not! It is perfect and just needs the right person who can appreciate the history and grandeur.

    14
  10. KarenZKarenZ says: 1214 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I would gladly be the museum caretaker if I could afford it! This needs to be protected in its pristine state! I would love to explore that workroom! This is a real gem.

    5
    • NonaKNonaK says: 254 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Austin, TX

      I’m retiring soon. And as much as I hate snow, I would deeply consider joining you! What a pleasure to see a house so unspoiled.

      2
  11. MJGMJG says: 1759 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    I want to see a closeup picture of the old electric bell indicator box or annunciator and the speaking tubes under it!! I love early electric (battery) operated fixtures. Common misunderstanding of these boxes in museums and home owners that these were installed only in after houses became electrified. They are referred to and called electric in the mid to late 1800 and are operated by battery. Which is still electric but for some reason it confuses folks.

    5
    • What a Glorious Gem!! I sincerely hope it finds caring owners who respect this Beautiful Mansion in its wonderful preserved condition! What a great place to call home!

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      There are no less four sets of those tubes: meaning four separate “lines” of communication. I’ve never seen that outside of a hotel setting. Woof! This place has my jimmies BOILING. Good grief! πŸ™‚

      2
      • MJGMJG says: 1759 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Not totally uncommon. I’ve seen a few homes with four or five. Mark Twain house was half this size and had 3. Two of the bedrooms and one from the billiard room third floor. The Eustis Estate had 6 discovered during restoration.

        1. Night Nursery

        2. Second Floor Hallway

        3. Third Floor Hallway

        4. China Closet

        5. Master Bed Chamber Dressing Room

        6. Lab

        http://eustis.estate/location/kitchen/ if you folks ever wanna visit a house in Mass.

        2
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          That Eustis kitchen is a thing of rare beauty. I did not realize such an extensive network of separate tubes existed in that house. Thanks’ for a fresh look at it, MJ.

          The wide majority of tube systems in old houses I’ve both seen in pix, and IRL, have been single line systems which, while having multiple terminals throughout a house, are all interconnected by the same centralized line. Perhaps these later period, very grand homes had these separate lines more commonly than I realized.

          One thing is for sure, a house full of servants has gone the way of 0 income tax; so these wonderful bits of arcane tech. are now the nearly sole province of enthusiastic children at play. My cousins and I sure had fun with them when we were kids. Heheheh. πŸ™‚

          2
          • MJGMJG says: 1759 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            I’ve seen those systems as well!! πŸ˜€
            And I totally agree. I would have loved to have been a child around these type of toys to play with. And I know reading some of the journals from the era Many children did love to push the bell pushes and blow through the whistles of speaking tubes. My shock is why anybody would wanna rip one of these out? You could still hear people talk through them so they are still useful.

            I got a used one in an Victorian mansion in Washington DC and I got to hear the silly whistle and listen to the girl upstairs talk into it while I was in the kitchen.

            1
  12. MichaelMichael says: 2388 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    Truly a stunning house! I’m so glad it’s been preserved in it’s original condition, for the most part and still site on a decent sized lot! I agree with Natira, it would be nice to see more pictures. As many pictures as we have, I don’t think we’ve scratched the surface on the stunning house!

    2
  13. doesnotsuckwavecable-comdoesnotsuckwavecable-com says: 142 comments
    PORT ORCHARD, WA

    I’ve never seen a corner fireplace like that! And that shop! Oh, my God!

    1
  14. RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    I am sad to see this absolutely priceless time capsule for sale. πŸ™ A. because I can’t have it; and B. because anyone else who buys it will most likely TOUCH IT! This marvel of impossibly well preserved houseflesh should be left alone – and shared…

    4
  15. RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Some excellent, expansive, additional shots. Enjoy! πŸ™‚

    Big kitchen shot = nice!
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/montclair-nj-1896-bb.jpg

    Single pipe steam boiler up close!
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/montclair-nj-1896-b2ab.jpg

    THE SHOP! Just beyond ——–
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/montclair-nj-1896-e.jpg

    The view!! I mean — wooooowwwwww — Just imagine at night!
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/montclair-nj-1896-c.jpg

    The bright, kindly, Mr. Shultze. Love this guy!
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/montclair-nj-1896-d2.jpg

    The carriage house, (limited view).
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/montclair-nj-1896-f.jpg

    2
  16. RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    These shots are by Matt Z.
    https://live.staticflickr.com/4147/5193291798_630f553f3e_b.jpg
    https://live.staticflickr.com/4111/5193255232_5b24b334b6_b.jpg
    https://live.staticflickr.com/4108/5193294890_5a618e284c_b.jpg

    The well.
    https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/p720x720/43738974_716721662017346_4657074356638187520_o.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_sid=e007fa&_nc_ohc=TiY6hiS1Ad0AX94xAa1&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&_nc_tp=6&oh=55d992b7ee4d71fea179147a0dba753c&oe=5EA5CC47

    Meow!
    https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/p960x960/70476938_10159277933826151_835601422333509632_o.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_sid=2d5d41&_nc_ohc=y665TWDUT9cAX99QiT0&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&_nc_tp=6&oh=40867aa689ea0e14106f92f7f60a1d76&oe=5E8DCFCF

    Monogram.
    https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/p960x960/70916823_10159282772951151_8396840473053888512_o.jpg?_nc_cat=103&_nc_sid=2d5d41&_nc_ohc=6Ie_BfVNaZ0AX-vJQfz&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&_nc_tp=6&oh=2e0b5a0e44115d818ab3560d0dc52f4c&oe=5EA4E934

    Detail.
    https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/p960x960/74605547_10159481824136151_6619037484992954368_o.jpg?_nc_cat=107&_nc_sid=2d5d41&_nc_ohc=WGroDw-Q7X4AX8EFBmb&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&_nc_tp=6&oh=4a66e5668817d50ad5640031fc034ee0&oe=5EA3B329

    Lovely Christmas arrangement.
    https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/s960x960/79220112_10159548428356151_739367474566266880_o.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_sid=2d5d41&_nc_ohc=plBmsQx7UtIAX9msoE6&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&_nc_tp=7&oh=34e34aa0eeb3deed2da327b5bf966cf5&oe=5E8DD3D6

    3
  17. RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Obsessed? I’m not obsessed. Sheesh..

    4
    • MichaelMichael says: 2388 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      I look forward to your posts every day! Your enthusiasm is commended and greatly appreciated!

      5
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        You guys are SO sweet. πŸ™‚ I love sharing my thoughts and observations about these old houses with Y’all. Wish we had time to really stew over these really good ones like we did in the olden OHD days. Great houses fly right by these days, and it’s hard to keep up.

        1
    • natira121natira121 says: 605 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      You go right ahead an BE OBSESSED! We all benefit from it. Speaking only for myself, I welcome obsessionists here… like minds, and all

      2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6216 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Being a geek about some things is noble, methinks. Heheheh. Possibly less so a sperg; but I’m glad there are those out there like your dear self, Julie, who enjoy reading my comments, and occasional paroxysms of pontificating and prognosticating in my playful, plebeian, prose. πŸ˜‰

        1
  18. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5409 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Not much I can add to the conversation but to share that I’m glad this ornate home predates the later Tudors from the 20th century. As the first decade of the 20th century ended, Tudor style homes adapted well to market tastes even in the smaller Bungalow examples. But the lavish details seen in this fine mansion grade home had by 1910 been drastically toned down and simplified. It’s great to see this high end example that compares favorably with the mansions being built in the 1890’s in places like Newport, RI, as well as the new gated developer/architect planned posh neighborhoods in larger American cities.

    Last, I feel what this house truly needs the most is not a new owner but a custodian type caretaker-an owner who can enjoy living there surrounded by tangible history while preserving this home’s remarkably intact interior. The worst outcome would be for it to be bought by new (clueless) owners who only see an old house needing to be brought into the 21st century with all that kind of drastic makeover implies. If that were to occur, I would want to park right next to the demo dumpster every day. I pray that is not the fate of this almost unique grand home-it deserves a far better outcome than that.

    5
  19. JTGJTG says: 35 comments
    1834 Greek Revival
    Boston - Metrowest, MA

    This house is spectacular. Hopefully some developer will not buy the property to solely take advantage of it’s Manhattan views, discarding its architectural significance. Hopefully the town’s demolition moratorium will be effective. This is what happened to two of its neighbors last year, and makes me sick to my stomach:

    https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/essex/montclair/2019/02/21/after-montclair-nj-mansions-razed-town-puts-moratorium-demolition/2929318002/

    1
  20. PuristaPurista says: 98 comments

    ”Money is the worst enemy of old houses,” my mentor, Abbott Lowell Cummings, said far more than once. When the money is $1.5M, it’s a death sentence. Sure, it’s possible, if remotely so, the Montclair History Center will find a buyer who will pay $1.5M assuring them this spectacularly original house’s integrity will be respected. And it will make for some good press. But consider this: In real estate boom times where houses are not places to live but money-making commodities to be ”flipped” (think 2000-2006), the average period of ownership in the US is about 4 years. That grows to 10 in quieter times. So we’ll call it an average of 7 years. This house is 124 years old. It is so miraculously preserved because it was tended to by one respectful family. In the next 124 years it is likely to have 18 different owners. It takes just one of those 18 owners to ”This Old House-ize” or ”Hamptons-ize” or ”granite-and-stainless-steel-ize” this place to destroy its integrity and archaeological and cultural value forever. It’s a one way street. If one of those 18 likely owners is too selfish or doesn’t appreciate the cultural value, it is lost.

    There is a solution the History Center does not mention when it discusses the house’s fate here:

    https://www.montclairhistory.org/new-blog/2020/3/4/update-on-the-shultz-house-evergreens

    And that is, sell the house for $250,000 to $500,000 with full covenants/easements over the entire property, meaning the land and all the features of the house inside and out. If the new owner wants to put in more up-to-date heating and electrical systems, e.g., that can be done, but only in a nearly 100-percent reversible manner so that little or no original fabric is destroyed. All original elements must be maintained in good condition. These protections would run with the house forever. The proper stewards will accept them gladly because they’re getting an amazing house at an amazing price by doing what they would have done anyway given their preservation ethic.

    3
    • ZooZoo says: 534 comments

      Yes, that would be a great idea, but I imagine the historical society could use that $1.5 million to preserve other structures. Giving this house away for $250-500K would mean the loss of a million dollars for their budget.
      I’m sure the historical society doesn’t want to sell this house, but if its maintenance requires 40% of their budget, it’s nonsensical to keep it. Sad, terribly sad, but that’s the reality.
      I would buy it for $250K and do not a single thing to it, except preserve it! I’d love to live in such a museum! And I’d even agree to hold tours periodically. What a terrible shame to lose this piece of history. I predict the new owners will modernize it, and ruin it, turn it into a lovely $4-6 million house (those views are priceless!) with all the modern conveniences.
      I’d love to let my mechanically inclined children have a go at that workshop! What treasures must live within!
      One more note: Recently I’ve been looking at breathtakingly beautiful houses built around the turn of the previous century that are either torn down or left to molder in place because no new owner can be found to maintain them. These houses seem to be monuments to the egos of their newly rich original owners, who built them without thinking about the future fate of their residence. Very rich people don’t want old houses! They want new, new, new! So these huge houses become albatrosses, or they get torn down. It makes me so, so sad to see this, on the one hand, but on the other hand, the original owners ought to have thought of this.
      Oh, and that new house that will be built to replace the $3 million Montclair Civil War era mansion will, in a century or so, have the same fate. It will be torn down or neglected or turned into apartments. These ego-driven monstrously huge houses have no future, no future that will be preserved for the most part.
      Gawd, I love this Schultz house. I can’t look at it any more because I’m imagining its fate, and it’s not good. I’d preserve it, but after I’m gone, who will do so? Will it become a gigantic McMansion someday? I imagine so. I hope for a different future for this lovely place (that stove! that elevator!), but I’m not optimistic.

    • ZooZoo says: 534 comments

      Regarding money being the enemy of old houses: A distant relation of mine had a huge house built in the 1920s, a stunning, solidly built, well-designed masterpiece. When my relation was no longer able to live there in her 90s, she sold the house, which had water views (a magnificent piece of property on a hill) to an oil mogul who planned on living there during the summers. As you might imagine, the new owner “renovated” this perfect masterpiece of a house, and it was beyond destroyed!! I went to visit it and had a tour conducted by a sympathetic contractor. I could barely believe my eyes! The perfect proportions of the house were ruined by an enormous carbuncle of a massive addition out the back that included an indoor pool, a tower, gigantic stained glass windows, gargantuan master suite, ugh, ugh, ugh!!!!!! That’s what money does to a perfect old house. Sigh. I so miss that lovely house, which was HUGE. Why, oh, why do people with too much money feel the need for even larger, inhuman-sized houses? Why?

  21. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1603 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    How did I miss this house? It is amazing and such wonderful conversation. I am definetly saving it to my favorites. Thanks Kelly!

    1

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