Queen Anne in Jamestown, OH

Added to OHD on 2/19/20   -   Last OHD Update: 6/10/20   -   17 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
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44 W Washington St, Jamestown, OH 45335

Map: Street

  • $155,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 4398 Sq Ft
  • 0.63 Ac.
Once in a lifetime a property like this comes on the market. Huge rooms, over sized lot, barn and garage. Needs some updates, but will make for an amazing signature property, right in the center of town. In addition to the kitchen appliances there is a full sized freezer.
Contact Information
Kamela Kordik, Kamela & Company Realty
(855) 849-2916
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
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17 Comments on Queen Anne in Jamestown, OH

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  1. RosewaterRosewater says: 6699 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Such an interesting house; full of contradictions. On the one hand, most of the decorative, trim elements are nicely preserved; on the other hand – -. Heheheh. I can’t remember the last time, if ever, seeing a whole house full of radiators which have never been painted; nor an entire house like this covered in that sort of paneling. Huh.

    What’s the deal with the panel above the parlor fireplace? Search me. My first thought, (considering), was that it might be a translucent plastic panel containing a fluorescent fixture; which was later painted brown (?). But having a closer look, it does seem to be wooden; though a different sort of wood from the original trim, and stained a darker hue. Got me. I’ll be interested to read your guesses.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/42-44wwashingtonst0219.jpg

    My guess is that the good news will be how well preserved the floors are under the carpet; and likely the original, exterior cladding under the aluminum as well.

    The big added room in back has the potential to be a very exciting space. The less than fortunate location of the vintage fireplace on the landing, (?), might be made a positive by adding a wood stove on the half floor above and tying it into the existing chimney. That way you’d have the ambience of the fire in the living space where you could enjoy it; and the real benefit of inexpensively heating that space, which I suspect is now used three season due to the expense of heating it conventionally with that, (likely less than adequate), baseboard unit.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/351-44wwashingtonst0219.jpg

    I really like this house – a lot. IMO – this will be an easier restoration job then it may at first seem; since most of the issues here seem decorative, as opposed to structural or functional.

    The vintage baths are keepers! 🙂

    I’m sensing a very good outcome for this one. Toes crossed.

    10
  2. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5356 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    A blend here of period details in the towered Queen Anne style combined with more modern changes. I don’t see much from the modern era that couldn’t be reverted back to a more period look if wished. I suspect there may be some nice wood (possibly patterned?) floors waiting to be uncovered underneath the carpeting. There is what appears to be a thoroughly modern addition to the back of the house. The challenge there would be to tie it in stylistically with the Victorian era front rooms. The basement looks dry, always a plus, and although old house buyers probably don’t give it much thought, during severe storms or extraordinary winter events like ice storms, interruptions in electrical power can mean that furnaces can be interrupted as well. Nothing worse for most folks than to be inside a chilly house with outside below zero temps and an inoperable furnace due to power failure. Having an emergency generator (ideally natural gas powered) is in my opinion a very wise investment even if it is seldom used.

    I suspect that the modern touches date from the 1970s-a time when very few folks with old houses would even consider making them look like they did in the 1890’s. A less expensive compromise might be to keep the back section with its “Brady Bunch” era decor because that period too is on its way to becoming historic, and focusing on reinforcing (removing modernization touches) from the 1890’s sections of the original house. The front and upper porches need some period appropriate columns. At 4,398 sq. feet, the house seems quite spacious with room for a large family.

    1
    • MikeMike says: 368 comments
      1886 Queen Anne Victorian
      IL

      As usual, I agree with John; I think that the rear addition would be best restored to a groovy 70s vibe, while the front of the house would go back to the 1890s. And like Rosewater, the vintage baths would stay as well. I love old houses, especially mine, but I don’t live in a museum and don’t think I would really want to…I like a house that reflects the best of the changes it has been through over the years.

      2
      • MJGMJG says: 2165 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Sorry Jim, though you and I usually see eye to eye, this one I’d have to take a crowbar to all of the 70s decor, becoming historic or not. I couldn’t live with that. I really do loathe that period of design and architecture. If I was to purchase this house it would have to be full restore. I’d find a way to change it into something period. No more 70s paneling or columns etc. A good question is, what could I do with it historically? An 1890s art studio?

        Anyone else notice what appears to be the original metal roof?

        5
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5356 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          I hear what you are saying, MJG. Hence, I used the word “compromise” to suggest if the budget or personal tastes did not allow for a total Victorian makeover, then a less expensive compromise would be to keep the 1970’s parts which were never part of the original house to begin with. If enough money is in the budget, anything is possible. That said, its going to take a fair amount of money just to restore back the original Victorian areas.

          • MJGMJG says: 2165 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            That’s for sure. It’s too bad that it’s so expensive to make it happen. Though you being a porch expert I bet you know tricks.

            1
            • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5356 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1897 Queen Anne Colonial
              Cadiz, OH

              I know how to build, reconstruct, and repair old porches. Here, some replacement columns will be needed. On a house of this size, I’d guesstimate 20 or more columns (plus capitals and bases) at $1,000 a copy or more. To “Victorianize” the 1970’s areas, the sky’s the limit depending on what an owner wants and can afford. A good case study might be the unique “more is more” Queen Anne that Dr. Coleman built by totally making over in the 1980’s a rather non-descript 1906 house in Seattle, WA. Streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/BS87eXCDwc7R5wSi6 It shows what is possible with an unlimited budget and a fertile imagination. Dr. Coleman is a passionate collector of all things Victorian. I’ve seen a few interior photos and the house is literally a museum of Victorian collectibles.

              • WishingAnDreamingWishingAnDreaming says: 141 comments
                Longview, TX

                OMG! I’m in love! I could turn that into my own little hobbit hole…
                The sunflowers on the front and the writing on the town, the flower roof, be still my heart.

                1
                • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5356 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1897 Queen Anne Colonial
                  Cadiz, OH

                  The inscription around the tower frieze reads: Quo Amplius Eo Amplius in Latin which loosely translates to “More is more”. (a direct whimsical contradiction to 20th century minimalist modern architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s well known saying that Less is More)

                  1
              • MJGMJG says: 2165 comments
                OHD Supporter

                CT

                Ah I’ve seen this house around a few times!!

                1
  3. MichaelMichael says: 2671 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    It looks like a plan book home but I can’t identify who it was done by. It still has good bones, at least in the front but all the vinyl siding and lack of original columns make it hard to see the original beauty of this place.

  4. JulieJulie says: 49 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I came to the comments to say how interesting and fascinating it was to me to see the different eras preserved and coexisting with each other and I see a couple of other people have also thought the same.

    2
  5. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 83 comments

    Wonderful old house. I believe the pink tile in the bathroom dates to the 1940’s. When my house had extensive remodeling during that period, the exact same tile except in an equivalent yellow was used for the kitchen counter and backsplash, which reaches to just below the windows. The yellow has the same black trim and also has that narrow band of black tile, set across this pink tile, across my backsplash section. That narrow band has a pattern in it that I’ve named “floating feathers.” for lack of a better term.

    I’m wondering if anyone knows anything about the company that made those tiles. It’s my understanding that the companies that resurface bathtubs can also change tile colors and I’m thinking of changing the black tiles to white.

    1

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