1896 Queen Anne in Overton, TX

Details below are from February 2020, sold status has not been verified.
To verify, check the listing links below.

Added to OHD on 2/14/20   -   Last OHD Update: 4/29/20   -   31 Comments
Off Market / Archived

18846 County Road 261, Overton, TX 75684

Map: Aerial

  • $150,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3000 Sq Ft
  • 10.49 Ac.
Calling all bed & breakfast lovers!!! This 3 story, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom house is the perfect opportunity for someone who loves the Victorian period. The home was built in 1896 and sits on just over 10 acres in Smith County. This home would make a perfect bed & breakfast with a little bit of work! Come tour the home which features bay windows, stained glass, and a very unique design!
Contact Information
Kristi Martin, Keller Williams Realty
(903) 534-6600
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: ,
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31 Comments on 1896 Queen Anne in Overton, TX

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I know this is a planbook design, one I’ve posted before. Someone track down the architect!

    PS, it’s a real shame that OHD Facebook followers are so quick to declare this a tear down. Or that it should be torn down (the word “bonfire” was used.) I don’t get why people follow a page about old houses if they don’t have an inch of preservation spirit. Or people that think looking at some not-so-detailed listing photos is all it takes to determine such a thing. I’m having a difficult time not telling those people to screw off.

    81
    • Gamblerlady717Gamblerlady717 says: 16 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I agree Kelly, while I think the list agents “little bit of work” is understated just a bit it is defiantly salvageable with the right amount of time and money. I have the time and knowledge but sadly not the bank account I’m afraid.

      19
    • shellyhorvathshellyhorvath says: 55 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Well, if you do tell them to screw off I’ve got your back. It’s a puzzle to me too.

      15
    • MJGMJG says: 1720 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Maybe I’ll join the Facebook page (if i had Facebook) and scold them for you if you’d like. 😉

      I never understood people who do that. Why join a site of historic homes if you’ll speak such atrocities. Especially since this house does have some great doors, woodwork and windows still.

      I was involved in a chat and this one individual used to always recommend these drastic changes that would render the house looking modern in the end. It makes you wanna say “what are you doing here?”

      15
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        LOL No, that’s okay. I normally delete/hide the comments but sometimes it’s just too much negativity for me so I delete the whole FB post (I remain an optimist that it’ll be a positive share…lol, silly me.) if it were up to me I’d delete the whole page but there are over a hundred thousand followers that I’d lose, I’d hate to throw away the good ones for a few of the *hats.

        They want to brag that they’ve bought a historic house but not actually live in one. Maybe a nail will be left after their “restoration.”

        20
      • Barbara VBarbara V says: 882 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1800 cottage
        Upstate, NY

        While I’d gladly be first in line to shut down anyone who thinks it appropriate to demolish or modernize a great old house like this, I truly believe such comments are a matter of plain and simple ignorance. Let’s face it, far too many people these days are educated by mass media, which – in addition to HGTV – has given us such classics as “Real Housewives…”, “Naked and Afraid” and the like. Most of which are sponsored by advertisements from companies which would not exist if the world was run by OHD’ers – Home Depot, Lowe’s, various replacement window and siding manufacturers, and the list goes on.

        Years ago, I terminated a subscription to This Old House when they lauded themselves for eviscerating a lovely Queen Anne to create a “beautiful Scandinavian interior” or some such. I included a letter to the editor explaining why I thought they should be ashamed of themselves, and that was that. But lots of people think TOH is the expert in restoration, so it’s coming from every direction…

        Anyway, as angry and heartbroken as the actions and comments of these misguided, thoughtless individuals make us, I think our only chance of success lies in doing our best to educate them, every single chance we get.

        That said, I hope to hell this wonderful house doesn’t fall into any one of their hands…

        5
        • MJGMJG says: 1720 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          Well said!!!

          I also saw a view terrible examples of this in This old house which I also sent a letter or two in my time expressing my disgust. One beautiful house the had all of its original art glass windows were removed and replaced with clear glass. But to make matters worse they didn’t save them in the attic, they discarded them because they were claimed to be unsalvageable. They took a few of the pieces of broken glass and hung them on strings from the windows to pay tribute. Pay tribute ? It’s more like the tribal people in the woods who put heads on steaks to show the defeated. Of course that wasn’t all, they wanted an open concept and took all of the walls out of the first floor. Why not just BUY A NEW HOUSE!

          6
          • AllisonAllison says: 36 comments

            I grew up watching This Old House with my parents and still remember the time that Bob Vila had a brick house sand blasted to remove the paint. They turned off the blaster and Bob went to rub the brick and it fell apart in his hand. The entire time, my mom was yelling at Bob to not sand blast the brick. Best. Moment. Ever.

            6
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 985 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1918 Bunkhouse
      WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

      Sometimes the armchair preservationists simply need to be told to STFU. But you are nicer than most people, and we understand why you don’t.

      This house is truly fascinating, and will be spectacular if given some TLC. It strikes me as either a Hopkins or a Shoppell design, though I have not been able to find a matching plan.

      Removing the additions and altered porch would go a long way toward making this place “read” better. The original porch would have been much more interesting and refined. One more thing, to all you people who have proclaimed this house to be a “tear down”, kindly screw off and go tarnish some other site better suited to your interests. Thank you.

      18
    • 2ChihuahuaMom2ChihuahuaMom says: 50 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1944 Cottage
      Bagdad, FL

      At the end of my chain, teeth bared, growling and snarling. Just flip the latch! I did go off on someone on my houses page, and couldn’t have felt better afterward! I know you have to play nice…..sometimes.

      2
    • DaveDave says: 285 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Queen Ann/Stick
      Des Moines, IA

      I certainly agree! I have restored much worse houses, and the one I am currently working on
      was MUCH worse than the house pictured. Teardown is a very last resort, not a solution for lack of ambition/funds.

      4
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Farcebook is cancer.

      I have to admit that the first thing that crossed my mind seeing this was that line from The Color Purple; “Why Miss Celie, you sure is ugly!”, Heheheh. We all know that turned out quite nicely. 🙂

      7
  2. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Bingo, Kelly, and Architectural Observer! The square tower and half-timbering in the gables are very reminiscent of Palliser Bros. design. May I offer this example in Anderson, IN: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/49174143812/in/album-72157659574840968/ I photographed it a few months ago-here’s the Palliser design it’s based on: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/49173439413/in/album-72157659574840968/ The Bridgeport, CT based Palliser firm, like nearly all architectural house plan sellers of that era, did not insist that every last detail in the published design had to be incorporated in built examples so its entirely possible the actual constructed example differs somewhat from published examples. With the offered 10 acres, this looks like a very appealing property. Perish the thought that anyone would demolish this nice specimen of 19th century plan book architecture. I doubt there are many examples in Texas.

    9
  3. OdieKOdieK says: 98 comments

    It’s hard to see the value of this pretty house with the clutter in the way, but once scrubbed down I’m pretty sure you’d see some great stuff to work with. Then the fun would begin! Can you imagine the parade the people in the area would throw for you when you got done putting it all back together? This would be the before and after story of the century.

    7
    • MJGMJG says: 1720 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Ha. Well a fun before and after will be had only if they don’t vinyl side over it inappropriately, rip off the porch and not replace it, replace all the windows with inappropriate vinyl ones (especially those beautiful queen anne windows on the second floor you can see in the exterior photos. i love those) https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/13-18846countyrdcc.jpg and treat it like a modern build with modern deck and stair railings.

      6
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Agreed, MJG. Given the price and rural location, the likelihood of a museum quality restoration is slim to none. More often than not old houses in this region are routinely gutted and renovated with little thought given to historical styles. Fancy old doors are tossed out and replaced by steel clad versions labeled “Victorian” with a small ersatz oval leaded glass pane.

        HGTV has a Bentonville, AR (Walmart headquarters) based renovation show called from Fixer to Fabulous https://www.latimes.com/business/real-estate/story/2019-11-01/hgtv-fixer-fabulous-walmart-reality-realty where the show’s house makeover couple re-do primarily older houses. They seem to have been heavily influenced by Chip and Joanna Gaines but restoration is decidedly not their game. Wish I lived closer to this rural location so that I could drive by and do dumpster diving when the demo work is being done. (doors, windows, etc.)

        This is one property where I would consider being a preservation consultant on a pro-bono (free) basis if the owners wanted guidance for an authentic restoration. Hired contractors are critical-if a local remodeling type is brought in, there’s little hope the “after” results will even resemble the house details it has now. Sad in a way, IMO. Not sure if I’ve ever seen another Palliser Bros. design in Texas or not so they are surely pretty rare in this neck of the woods.

        5
        • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 985 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1918 Bunkhouse
          WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

          Hopefully the new owner will take you up on your generous offer! You could help the house retain more of its integrity and save the new owners a lot of money by encouraging them to retain items that do not need to be replaced.

          The overwhelming majority of contractors in rural areas have nothing but contempt for historic buildings and can do irreversible damage to the historic fabric of a structure if not supervised every second. Many today seem to want to do the bare minimum and quickly move on to a newer (easier) house to work on.

          These days, if you want it done respectfully, you pretty much have to do it yourself. Thanks for the link to the Times story… as I don’t even own a TV
          I see HGTV very rarely and didn’t know about this program. It will be nice to have something else to make my blood pressure spike besides the usual lineup of wanton destruction and cliché makeovers.

          5
  4. 59classic59classic says: 44 comments
    Hot Springs, SD

    Ok well this ‘needs some work’. But I dont think its a tear down. Mostly it needs to be decluttered and cleaned. I think it could be a very gratifying project. And 10 acres!

    5
  5. LadyTexasLadyTexas says: 183 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1979 Traditional
    Plano, TX

    Wow, good eye, Kelly. That explains the extra enclosures on the house that don’t look like they belong there. Could be beautiful once again. Overton, Tx. is in the east, near Marshall which puts it in the Piney Woods area. Rusk County, I think. Small town, but pretty. This house could be the jewel again.

    1
  6. woeismewoeisme says: 136 comments
    1990 suburban
    Vacaville, CA

    A house like this with lots of character in the middle of your own woods, What’s not to like?
    10 wonderful acres of privacy. Wow!

    3
  7. MaggieMayMaggieMay says: 54 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1945 Craftsman
    Athens, TN

    This house is incredible. So much history. I would love to see the wall hangings closer. I love the roof. The red door towards the back looks freshly painted on the Realtordotcom site. Does anyone know what the tall “tubey” things out front are? I see native American, early western, hispanic and a touch of modern era influences inside and out. The stained glass, the staircase, the house number etched in the glass above the front door, the little details of different era’s and cultures make this home very unique and special. I can imagine the stories that were shared on that front porch. Keep everything. If anything needs to be taken out, use it somewhere else in the house. Even as decoration. There is a lot to work with here. I love it!

    2
  8. BoobtubeBoobtube says: 220 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1984 Post and Beam saltbox
    NY

    I think it’s that initial photo that kind of scares people. The porch roof hanging on for dear life, defying gravity. But as you look at the other pictures, you can see there’s plenty of good to work with. Just getting that exterior cleaned up would change someone’s outlook considerably.

    5
  9. StacyStacy says: 394 comments
    1900 Maybe Craftsmen
    TX

    Poor thing.. Definitely needs more than a little bit of work I’d say, but there’s still a beautiful home just waiting to be brought back to life & I hope someone will give it that! The Piney woods areas of Texas are really pretty. This property just needs to be cleaned up around the house & the 10 acres would be fun to have!

    1
  10. jimtownjimtown says: 88 comments
    1920-1970's farmhouse, midcentmod
    upmiusa, MI

    Enchanting place, probably previously owned by an artist, creative person or color lover.

    2

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