1899 – Dayton, OH

Added to OHD on 1/17/20   -   Last OHD Update: 11/7/20   -   17 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
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507 Mclain St, Dayton, OH 45403

Map: Street

  • $79,900
  • 3 Bed
  • 2.5 Bath
  • 2700 Sq Ft
Cash sale only. Being sold As-is - No inspections. This St. Anne Historic District home is "wanting to be gorgeous again" and in need of a rehab enthusiast who could turn it back into the showcase it once was. It prominently sits at the end of the street overlooking the park and downtown Dayton. Built in 1899 it boasts gorgeous Hardwood floors, pocket doors and built-ins around fireplace(s) and dining room...all needing to be refinished. Large concrete front porch with possible outside access to a separate office. Kitchen is gutted with floor access to basement. Second floor boasts 3 bedrooms and 2 baths Two outside porches outside of kitchen and 2nd floor overlooks Bomberger Park. Lower level has outside egress as well. Roof and water heater are newer. Located just a couple of blocks from Fifth Street Brewpub, St. Anne the Tart and near many wonderfully renovated historic homes and businesses.
Contact Information
Joanne Cronin, Irongate Realtor
s(937) 436-2700
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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17 Comments on 1899 – Dayton, OH

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  1. MichaelMichael says: 2864 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    I love the look on the outside of this interesting home. The inside needs some help in putting it back together but has some nice original details!

    25
  2. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1046 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Deliciously quirky! The house appears to have had some extensive early twentieth century updates which add even more interest. I appreciate the fact that this house appears to have been designed specifically for its oddly shaped lot and is not a generic plan. Thanks to Cora for finding this!

    29
  3. RossRoss says: 2417 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    That shrieking you hear?

    That’s me. Sorry.

    I’m shrieking for two reasons:

    1) Oh, dear. What somebody did to the interior.
    2) Oh, my! That mantel! The BEST-ever mantel!

    37
  4. TGrantTGrant says: 945 comments
    OHD Supporter

    New Orleans, LA

    That pared down art nouveau mantelpiece is quite the outlier!

    25
  5. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5437 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    A few years ago, I actually stood in front of this house but my attention was directed to the house across the street locally known as the “Steamboat” house because its rounded, double-decker porch is reminiscent of an old steamboat prow. I did take a photo of it: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/14954186624/in/album-72157648433023988/ but did not take one of this house.

    In some of the more marginal neighborhoods of Dayton this might be optimistically priced, it seems fair for the St. Anne Hill neighborhood which has a fair number of fully restored and well maintained period homes. It appears someone may have started a renovation but left it “as is”. Perhaps someone was trying to undo changes made during a rental use period during the home’s history. With the areas requiring repairs fully open and visible, it arguably saves the next restorer some demo time. I think its probable the triple set of windows above the staircase landing once had art glass. (leaded, beveled, or stained) I too keep going back to look at that unique mantel with the upright mirror-at first I think it was an Art Deco item from the 1920’s but agree its likely original to the period of the house.

    St. Anne Hill is a neighborhood trying hard to improve. There was a yard sale going on (on a Saturday) on a restored home nearby and we stopped and spoke with some of the locals. They made it clear that preservation minded newcomers would be welcomed with open arms by their neighbors. While Dayton has a lot of urban issues related to decades of economic decline this would be one of the neighborhoods I’d consider if I chose to live there. Overall, this is not a bad house in a location that I recall as being quiet and stable except for traffic noise from Hwy. 35 below the hill. In summary, this is a fine quality house in one of Dayton’s better neighborhoods. It does need some TLC, though.

    20
    • MaggieMayMaggieMay says: 99 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1945 Craftsman
      Athens, TN

      Thankyou. I always like to know about the neighborhoods and the people who live there. I would think anyone who bought it would have a few of the neighbors volunteering with the exterior. And maybe they have buying incentives from the historic society like grants, etc. Worth checking into. The house you took a picture of is really cool. Choo Choo!!

      1
  6. MaggieMayMaggieMay says: 99 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1945 Craftsman
    Athens, TN

    I love the mantels, the woodwork, the windows, the stairway, and the stone walls around the front with the steps going up to the house. I’m with Emmajoy…25 years younger and filthy rich. I’de make this the Grandest house in Dayton. I wish there were views out the windows overlooking Dayton.

    2
  7. MaggieMayMaggieMay says: 99 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1945 Craftsman
    Athens, TN

    There are some exterior pictures on zillow that appear to be from many years ago. This is a beautiful home.

    1
  8. MaggieMayMaggieMay says: 99 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1945 Craftsman
    Athens, TN

    Says homes in the area have increased in value 9.5% in the last year. That’s quite a jump. I would buy this house if I had the money and have my brother, an interior designer in DC, help me restore it back to it’s original glory. I’m in love with this home.

    2
  9. CoraCora says: 2060 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    The house next to it is so close – like maybe an arms length from it – but the surrounding homes seem to have significantly more space in between. Do you think it’s due to the lot shape? Must’ve had some skinny construction guys back in 1899. 😀

    3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5437 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Cora, Probably a case of the most efficient use of available space on a small lot. Not an uncommon manner of use today in coveted neighborhoods where McMansions replace much smaller tear-downs and use the maximum amount of space allowed by building codes. Not sure the footprint of this house would be approved and allowed today.

      3
  10. RosewaterRosewater says: 7180 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    These cute kids bought the house and made a couple of videos about it.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgLTJGkfa_OQaOwIp9V3_sw

    Don’t know if they will upload more or no. Gooood luck to them! 🙂

    1
  11. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5437 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Jay, thanks for sharing the videos link. It’s rare these days to find what used to be called “urban pioneers” but many an old house was saved in the past from the bulldozer because someone was willing to take a chance on a faded old place that needed lots and lots of TLC. No need to ask about how well funded these young folks are because those who can afford to bring in contractors or buy an already renovated house wouldn’t even look at a house like this example in Dayton. The important questions to be answered are how much patience and motivation does the couple have to see this house through the difficult days of renovation ahead? A certain minimum income is also necessary to keep the multitude of projects going. Electrical work can get expensive in a hurry and some projects, like structural work, are beyond the scope of most D-I-Y’ers. Then there’s the attrition factor or, almost inevitably, when the initial charm of living in an old house begins to wear off.

    Everyone begins their old house restoration journey with personal visions of what their project house is going to look like…someday. However, only a few truly have the stamina and determination to see all the projects through to completion. We can only hope that this couple fits into that positive category. It’s good that they are documenting the “before” realities of their home as somewhere on down the line such videos often boost morale when it seems like nothing is getting done, the amount of money spent is busting the budget, and the infinite number of tasks go on forever. I wish this young couple the best as they continue down the road towards their restoration goals.

    1
  12. RosewaterRosewater says: 7180 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Glad you enjoyed that, John. You might be surprised to find that the occurrence of Millennials and Zoomers buying major antique fixers is becoming quite the fad these days; as Elizabeth Circa explained fairly recently on Cavuto;
    https://youtu.be/pQ6BgdUd6i4
    Whether or not the majority of these “new reality” kids will go the distance remains to be seen; but they do have us oldsters out there rooting for them. 🙂

    This guy has his head on straight; but the location, (deeply urban St. Louis), scares me for him! Whooooeeee, not me mister. 🙂
    https://youtu.be/IF8VkcLa1S4

    1
  13. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5437 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Long ago, I recognized that cultural trends sometimes skip a generation before becoming popular again. Back in 1983, professional woodwork restorer Ed Johnson, (author of Old House Woodwork Restoration) opined that the then younger “Boomer” generation could also be called the restoration generation because a national trend of younger individuals seeking old houses to restore grew rapidly following the 1976 Bi-Centennial celebration. A number of popular old house magazines and TV shows like This Old House popped up during that time as well. By the 1990’s, it appears that the next generation entering adulthood was only into new and modern which also manifested as an affinity for the decor and style of the 1950’s and early 1960’s “Atomic Age”. (more commonly referred to as Mid-Century Modern.) Not so surprising then to observe now a younger Millennial and Gen. Z’ers who are again into restoration like their grandparents were when they were young. Of course, I could be way off as I have no scientific evidence to back up my pet theories but at least they seem plausible.

    I can find plenty of economic reasons for a younger generation to embrace old house fixer-uppers (as noted in the Youtube video) as a pragmatic solution for obtaining affordable housing. I’m especially encouraged to see some who recognize the intrinsic value, or “character” often found in old houses that make them so appealing. The fellow in St. Louis decidedly appreciates the old period details he found in his St. Louis Second Empire townhouse. Unlike those who believe wholesale gutting and replacement with new and modern is the only logical approach, he actually wants to keep the house faithful to the original period. I find that approach highly commendable and worthy of others following his example. St. Louis itself is one of those “will it ever get better?” places that has teetered between decline and renaissance for several decades now. I too hope and wish for the fabled city to regain some of the luster it once had and perhaps with enough caring people, it will eventually.

    I recall back in the 1980’s reading an Old House Journal biographical story by a younger “urban pioneer” (as they were called back then) who had bought a derelict St. Louis townhouse on the cheap in the then marginal Soulard Historic District. He detailed the ordeals of trying to make the long vacant and abused house livable by giving a detailed account of the trials of his first winter in a cold and barely livable wreck of a house. He complained that someone kept stealing the salvaged bricks from the back of his house where a portion of the back wall had collapsed. While there wasn’t a follow-up story to his account, it did indicate that progress was gradually being made towards his goal of a full restoration. Extreme patience and great flexibility are essential principles for today’s restorers just as it was during their grandparents’ era, or parents. Some revenue or income is essential, but barter and labor trading can help bridge the gap between available funds and the money necessary to meet a budget to get a task done. Important for these modern day restorers to remember that while they are making a place to call home for themselves, they are also saving a part of our collective built heritage. For those into recycling and “Green” practices, the saying still is that the greenest house is one that is already built. Far too many great old homes continue to be needlessly demolished and then sent to the landfill…I should know.

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