1896 Queen Anne – Sabina, OH

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National Register
Added to OHD on 4/23/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   39 Comments

149 W Elm St Sabina, OH 45169

Map: Aerial

  • $109,900
  • 6 Bed
  • 1.5 Bath
  • 5270 Sq Ft
  • 2 Ac.
Wonderful investment opportunity. This Historic home has over 4800 SF of living space and is situated on over 2 acres. Too many possibilities to list. Beautiful natural woodwork throughout.
Contact Information
William Miller, Bennett Realty
(937) 382-4427
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
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39 Comments on 1896 Queen Anne – Sabina, OH

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12511 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    2013 photos here: https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/01/22/1896-queen-anne-sabina-oh/

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  2. Nancy Hanle says: 32 comments

    Thank you for the additional pictures – usually women pick out houses and when there are no kitchen pics, it isn’t great – I love old so thank you for the kitchen pics but no bathroom. I called the realtor and he said he would send both – said they were full of stuff so couldn’t take clear shots.

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  3. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2330 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central, NY

    Victorians aren’t my thing, but… the entry hall flooring is beautiful! And I think I might keep its wallpaper, along with the kitchen’s paper – as long as they’re in good shape. And… this home’s location: my first cat’s name was Sabina (‘73-‘91). ?

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  4. BethanyBethany says: 3481 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    I’m dying here. This went on my favorites list on the first picture before I even scrolled down, and I was not disappointed. The old listing even mentions a dumbwaiter and elevator (no pictures though grrrr). I think this might be one of my all time top houses.

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  5. JimHJimH says: 5587 comments
    OHD Supporter

    The architect was W. Lewis Kramer of Findlay OH, who had recently completed the Township Hall & Opera House downtown. That building still stands, although its towers have been snipped:
    https://goo.gl/maps/vSxjrgHCEBR2

    Built for farmer and leading citizen Frank M. Haines (1850-1913), and later owned by his daughter Martha and granddaughter Sara Rose until 2000. The possessions she left here for a museum are now scattered, but the house appears almost as Sara Rose left it, with its details and large property intact. I envy the next owner.

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  6. david penwell says: 3 comments

    My wife and I were at the auction several years ago, and the home had great potential. Sara Rose was an accomplished artist, and we have several pieces of her work in our home.

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  7. david penwell says: 3 comments

    My wife and I attended the auction. Sara Rose was an accomplished artist, and we have several pieces of her artwork in our home. he home is just as I remembered it from the auction….beautiful

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  8. I love this home and wish I had the chance to buy and have tours like the lady had wished that loved it so much. Doesn’t look like upgrades ect were ever done and looks move in ready to me. Reading the story from the past posting just makes me a bit sad, little bit angry and think an audit sounds just. I love the middle column on the little porch upstairs and if you look at the house as a whole makes it in perspective, looking odd without one.

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    • JimHJimH says: 5587 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The central column on the upper porch has no brackets, suggesting it was added later when the cantilevered roof began to sag. Ross can tell you how to fix that.

      They tried the museum for ten years and apparently family friends have owned the house since. House museums rarely draw enough visitors to be sustainable. The house hasn’t been altered and the property is intact 18 years after her death, so “No harm, no foul”.

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      • RossRoss says: 2434 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        While the center column on the upper porch may have been added, it might be original.

        Ditto for the column on the first-floor rounded porch.

        Both these columns are sans brackets. But perhaps the brackets have been lost, or perhaps they never had brackets?

        Archival images could confirm either way, or physical evidence not obvious in an image.

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        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5666 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          I agree, Ross. In the town of Gainesville, Texas, near the Oklahoma border, a number of impressive Victorian homes designed and built by local contractor/architect John Grundy Garrett in the 1890’s, survive. One of Garrett’s signature details seen on several of his homes is an upper floor ornamental (non functional) balcony almost identical to the Sabina example but with a center support posts and brackets: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/10249846593/in/album-72157632685147361/ (Wm. Kilgore House) Therefore, I think as do you that the center support post could be original.

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        • MichaelMichael says: 3255 comments
          1979 That 70's show
          Otis Orchards, WA

          When you blow up the image in the upper porch, you can see that the center column is a different design than the colums on each side. It doesn’t look as if it ever had brackets. I think you are right, the center column was either added or never had brackets!
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Haines_House.jpg

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          • JimHJimH says: 5587 comments
            OHD Supporter

            That’s a great photo showing a lot of detail. I love the ornate finial on the dormer; the one on the turret has lost something.
            The center column is definitely different, but also in a more exposed location. Whether it’s a replacement or a later addition – the jury is hung, lacking conclusive evidence.

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          • RossRoss says: 2434 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
            Emporia, KS

            Thanks, Michael!

            The fact that the center column is different could mean:
            1) It replaces a rotted column.
            2) It is original and a quirky design decision by the architect. My house has a LOT of columns, but one is different than all the rest and there is no doubt it is original.
            3) The column was added later.

            It is not possible to answer any of these questions via images.

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            • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5666 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1897 Queen Anne Colonial
              Cadiz, OH

              My vote is with yours, Ross. I could imagine at some point the original center post, which is the most exposed to the weather elements, deteriorated to the point where it needed replacement after a century. This could have occurred when Sara Rose was living there and perhaps she had a handyman do a makeshift repair on a failing support post. In the mid-20th century when everything Victorian was generally despised no one cared if delicate brackets or other exterior millwork items were put back on the houses built during the “lapse of good taste” as critics of that time used to described ornate homes of the Victorian era. Thankfully, with the passage of time, the reputation of Victorian architecture has been rehabilitated to where one seldom hears the houses from that time now being described as “monstrosities”. We’re lucky to have examples like the Sabina house still around given how far they fell out of favor in the mid 20th century.

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              • JimHJimH says: 5587 comments
                OHD Supporter

                Agree that we’re lucky to have the Sara Rose house and other fine examples of late Victorian architecture.

                I also agree with you and Ross that the center column may be a quirky original feature, although I don’t get why three guys, 5 comments and 40+ lines are needed to make the point – it’s not that big a deal. (The center post reminded me of Ross’ cantilevered porch, which he has since restored.)

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      • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1067 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Absence of brackets in this case only suggests that brackets are missing. The tower-like corner of the wrap-around porch has a similar column centered in it as well; there is no reason to think that the center column of either porch is not original. Lots of porch roofs of this period were similarly supported. Cantilevering these roofs would have been an unlikely goal here; they would look odd without visible support. The only thing to “fix” is replacing the missing brackets.

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  9. KentDLDKentDLD says: 17 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I was born and raised in Sabina. Lived there until 1960 (7th grade.) A true slice of Americana, and this house is the centerpiece of the town. It’s 15 minutes from Wilmington (on which I commented in an earlier post), and a quaint place indeed. Beautiful countryside. Whoever buys this house will be the envy of many long time residents who have worried for years about its future. Hopefully the new owners will allay those folks fears.

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  10. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5666 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    I’m surprised this fine Queen Anne style home hasn’t found a permanent family or owners in the time since it was last on the market. (2013) Perhaps the small population of about 2,500 is a factor or the fact that this architectural gem is alone in a town lacking other historic mansions. While Wilmington and Washington Court House are fairly close, Dayton is 40 miles to the northwest and Columbus 53 miles to the north making work commutes to these towns difficult. Fine home though, even if the location isn’t ideal for job opportunities.

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  11. Kenneth Lee Benjamin says: 59 comments

    I always loved this house,really thought about buying it last time it was for sale but not sure about living in that area.May have to rethink it.Love all the wood work and stairs.

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  12. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12511 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Posted last year, price recently reduced so moved to the front page for another look. Comments above may be older.

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  13. CLMCLM says: 113 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1940 Cottage
    Bradford, TN

    I think I’m in love…again. That hall floor is awesome! That hall floor is fab. The middle looks like encaustic tile, but the edges look like a design that is usually comprised of various wood species. Very interesting!

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  14. LynnLynn says: 74 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I fell in love with this house the moment I saw it! This just has to be my house and now that the price is reasonable, I want it soooooo bad. I have a list of features that my old house must have and this one checks off all the boxes! If I didn’t have a husband (he’s not into old houses like me) I would be at the bank today. First saw this house in September last year and haven’t stopped thinking about it since. Sigh! Maybe by some miracle it will work out. Btw the current owner lives about 15 minutes from me and no where near Ohio. Coincidence?

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    • ZannZann says: 513 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1940 Cottage
      Mobile, AL

      Now I’m personally invested.

      Have you tried to talk your husband into it? Maybe pull the “Let’s take a trip, honey. And while we’re on that trip, we can see this house for fun.” It has been known to work…..

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      • CLMCLM says: 113 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1940 Cottage
        Bradford, TN

        It has been known to work. I wasn’t doing anything in particular and decided to make a 2 1/2 hr trip to see a house. Not only did we buy the house, I married the man that posted it (on another site). Strange thing can happen!

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    • LynnLynn says: 74 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Awww thanks guys for the support. I have thought of doing that but problem is he doesn’t get much time off from work. However he is always saying we should get away for a weekend. My cousin lives in Cincinnati so maybe I can pose it as a get away and a visit to my cousin! I’m gonna give it a try. I’m retired and he doesn’t have a lot longer to go, so if I can pose this as our retirement project, my dream, then just maybe. It’s about a 6 hour drive so not a horribly long distance. Thanks again for the encouragement!

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  15. CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1093 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Charleston, SC

    Seems like a whole lotta house for what’s likely to be a sub-$100k sale price. Location is everything in real estate, so I assumed, at this price, it must be across the street from a toxic waste dump. Nope, it’s on a nice street in an area of other older houses easy walking distance from the center of town. I don’t know much about Ohio, other than that’s where half the people moving down here are from, but I’d think being halfway between Cincinnati and Columbus, and a short distance from the interstate that runs between the two, would be a decent spot.

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    • GearGirlGearGirl says: 205 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1909 Arts and Crafts
      Scottsdale, AZ

      Actually, it backs up to a railroad track. Unless that stretch of track is in a designated quiet zone, might as well be a toxic waste dump. Ever had to listen to 15-20 seconds of train horn at a time, day and night? I can tell you it is not pleasant.

      I plan to contact the realtor and ask my usual questions this week. I’ll post my findings…

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  16. MichaelMichael says: 3255 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    My desire for this beautiful house has not diminished over time. It’s still as striking as the first time I saw it. I do wish there were more pictures, though. While it backs up to the train tracks, that doesn’t actually bother me as I live close to the tracks now and I’m used to it. Besides, if the property goes all the way to the tracks, that’s quite a backyard!

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  17. says: 1 comments

    I went and saw this beautiful house last night. I could not believe how remarkably untouched everything is. Every transom still has the original working hardware. The elevator is still intact, as well as the dumbwaiter.
    My biggest concerns is that I think the slate roof may be at the end of it’s longevity, there were a few minor leaks inside that were visible mainly on the second floor. The second floor bathroom was very strangely configured, the shower plumbing and tray were in the bathroom, with no shower surround, you could walk straight through the shower into another room. This is when I really started noticing the moisture coming into the home.
    I also did not go out on the balcony, it needs some major repairs and looks like someone has bungee corded a tarp over most of it to protect the wood. To answer the questions about the center balcony post, the existing post pictured is not original, it has at some point been replaced, however it is my belief that there was always a post there.
    In the disclosure it states that the mechanical systems are not working either, but they were in place in the basement. Perhaps it’s something that could just be repaired. I’d be curious as to how an inspection would turn out. Aside from the mechanicals, roof and baths, most of the work needed is cosmetic.
    I spent two hours here with the realtor and could have spent longer. I’d love to be able to save this house and bring it back to it’s glory.

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