1852 – Westpoint, MS

Off Market / Archived
National Register
Posted October 2018. This home has been archived on OHD. The sold status is unknown.
Added to OHD on 10/19/18   -   Last OHD Update: 12/24/18   -   79 Comments
1852 Waverly Mansion Rd, Westpoint, MS 39773

Map: Aerial

Price

$1,200,000

Beds

5

Baths

2.5

SqFt

8000

Acres

34

Own your own piece of history with the outstanding Waverley Mansion. Waverley boasts grandeur of days gone by with large porticos, double curved staircases reaching up 4 stories, original mirrors, chandeliers, and its distinctive octagonal cupola. The 34 acres of grounds boast a 250-year-old magnolia, English and American boxwood walks, and a beautiful stocked pond. Privately owned since 1962, Waverley is one of only 40 National Historic Landmarks in Mississippi. Home is priced with contents. Exceptional antiques include the 1860's Steinway piano, original mirrors, and so many more unique items that can be seen in listing photos. Call for an appointment today to see all of the details that this beautiful treasure has to offer.
Last Active Agent
Natalie Morgan, Starkville Properties
(662) 769-5907
Links, Photos & Additional Info

79 Comments on 1852 – Westpoint, MS

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  1. Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 9787 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks to all those that have sent this in and shared it over the months (or year?) Too many to name here so a big THANKS! I’ve only put off posting it because exterior photos are lacking, the only one available is such bad quality it’s almost laughable.

    There are a few drone videos of the exterior on YouTube, like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBC2FNvsn88

    9
    • AvatarMary says: 4 comments

      I’d love to see the grounds and water features and esp. the garden. Any hopes for pictures like that?

  2. AvatarShirley Bryant says: 1 comments

    This house, at one time in history, was the 2nd most photographed home in the US, only behind the White House. Also I was told that the uniqueness of this house is the front and back were mirror images of each other. It is so beautiful and has a wonderful story of its history.

    20
    • AvatarGregory K. Hubbard says: 329 comments

      The Gothic Revival ‘Wedding Cake House’ in Kennebunk, Maine, may be a close contender for architectural photographs. There is a pull off across the road because so many drivers and tour buses stop to photograph it.
      This remarkable house is currently in danger because of divided ownership.

      1
  3. MikeMike says: 179 comments

    Kelly, there are some nice photos at this link: http://www.newsouthernview.com/pages/nsv_ie_waverley.html

    13
  4. Avatarzoomey says: 475 comments

    This house should be a museum. The price is off-putting for any organization inclined to turn it into a museum, but it deserves to be shown to the public. What an amazing, extraordinary house! (But of course for $3 million, I’d prefer that the paint weren’t peeling!) I wish this house the best of luck!

    7
    • Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 9787 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Actually it is (or was?) I don’t really see hours or when on the main Westpoint sites.

      2
      • AvatarMorethanyouknow says: 59 comments

        I live near this fine house and have visited the house dozens of times, and known Robert and Madonna Snow since June 1967. It has been open for tours that entire time, every day of the year, daylight until dark, every day except for Christmas. I’ve never known any other old house that was that accessible. Mrs. Snow told me once about 20 years ago that she had gone to Nashville to visit her daughter for two days over Thanksgiving, and that that was the first time she had left the house, other than to go to the grocery store, in over twenty five years.

        I have been a serious student of old houses and have looked at hundreds of them for 50 years, and have owned four and lived in them for over the past forty two years, including one that was featured on OHD purchased just last week. This is the house by which I judge all other old houses. It does not have, nor does it need, things like central àc. I have been there many times on very hot days and it was quite acceptable. If a person is intent on having such things, there are plenty of houses that have that, but this is not the house for them. All it needs is a bit of paint and some dedicated owners to love it the way it is.

        44
        • AvatarMississippi Dude says: 32 comments

          The Snows spent their entire lives both keeping up this house as best they could but also in furnishing it with exquisite antiques of the era, and they also made this their home. The guided tour is well done and really a pittance for the information that is imparted to visitors.

          20
        • Avatarkmmoore says: 292 comments
          Weatherford , TX

          Well said.

          1
  5. MajolicaDavidMajolicaDavid says: 48 comments

    Almost all the furnishings are included with the home. But she does need some TLC!Does not have central heat or a/c. Will take some money to get her all fixed up.I know they had a fund raiser to paint her a few years ago and it was estimated at about 16,000 to paint just the front of the house.Mr Snow passed away this spring so now it is for sale.

    7
  6. Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 9787 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Article: http://www.dailytimesleader.com/content/waverly-mansion-sale

    1
  7. AvatarMississippi Dude says: 32 comments

    I had the opportunity with a friend to tour this mansion back in 2016. At that time it had been owned by the same family for fifty years, and they had spend their entire lives keeping the mansion maintained. They bought it after it had been abandoned for almost 40 years (anyone correct me if I’m wrong). The tour guide, the daughter of the owners who gave the tour said that, even though the mansion had been abandoned to time and the elements, teenagers and young adults had known about it for years and that they would have parties in the mansion; but the amazing things was that not a single item had been vandalized, nothing stolen; and there was no graffiti on the walls. In other words back when it was abandoned, there was not the tendency to want to destroy it. Love notes from these teens and young adults were stored in the owners desk, that had many cubby holes. When the family bought it and worked to restore it, they spent their lives refurnishing the rooms with furniture and accessories, like table service, paintings, etc. from the mansion’s heyday. It was part of a 50,000 acre plantation. It was not only self-sufficient, but made straw hats that were sold in Europe and elsewhere. In the back of the mansion was a deep ice well, where blocks of ice were stored and which kept even in the sultry Mississippi summers. A gazebo was built atop this ice house and the cold of the ice kept the gazebo nice and cool. The plantation fed hundreds of people every day. The mansion has just come on the market within the past month, as the family that owned it for decades is finally passing on Waverly’s legacy. They have done a marvelous job of acting as steward for the mansion and the grounds.

    30
    • AvatarMorethanyouknow says: 59 comments

      The house was abandoned for 49 years, from 1913 until bought by the Snows in 1962.

      7
  8. RossRoss says: 2370 comments

    I could spend eternity living here.

    18
    • AvatarLinda R says: 240 comments

      If I had lived in the area during the 50 years of vacancy, I think I would’ve moved into a couple of rooms and called myself the caretaker! The original chandeliers not being destroyed in all that time just amazes me.

      8
  9. AvatarLorrieJo says: 41 comments

    Stunning! Maybe if I win the lottery!

    4
  10. PhillipPhillip says: 175 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    I have toured this mansion several times and was also given the tour by the daughter of Mr. Snow. It is amazing that almost all of the restoration work was done by Mr. Snow himself. The daughter recounted her father some 60 ft up on scaffolding cleaning dirt dauber nests off of the domed ceiling in the middle room. To gaze up at that ceiling from below is just amazing. Great efforts were taken to often not repaint but rather just clean and expose the original existing finish. He wanted it to be the very definition of a sympathetic restoration. Hence the reason no central heat/air and the use of external conduit around the baseboards rather than bashing holes in the plaster to accommodate those things. The antiques in the home are of the finest quality. I would say that this house and Victoria House in Portland Maine are 2 of the finest antebellum homes in existence. You can add Stanton Hall in Natchez MS to that list as well.My hope would be for someone to buy it that does not want to alter it at all. It will be a tragedy if it falls into the clueless hands of someone bent on updating it.

    20
  11. AvatarRyan says: 570 comments

    It’s way too nice and important to be simply a private home. For me anyhow. Talk about spectacular architectute!

    4
  12. AvatarLinda R says: 240 comments

    There are just no words.. gobsmacked comes close. This is the most amazing and incredible story I have heard in ages. Only 2 families to own this home, vacant for nearly 50 freaking years, yet not destroyed by vandals. God Bless the Snow family, they are truly heroes for saving and sharing this fabulous property. $3 million furnished is a great price. My hobby / obsession is touring old houses all over the U.S. I will make a point of following the fate of this property and visiting if it stays publicly accessible.
    The info in the links about all the items produced on the plantation is interesting, but I note a rather obvious omission of the mention of enslaved persons who made all that possible.

    14
    • AvatarMississippi Dude says: 32 comments

      Yes, not destroyed by vandals. In fact, I met one of the college students who used to go to parties in the mansion when it was abandoned. They respected what it was and still managed to have a good time, there.

      5
  13. AvatarTony Bianchini says: 54 comments

    Here’s what the house appeared like with (the original?) cresting: http://www.civilwaralbum.com/misc21/westpointms3.htm

    4
    • Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 9787 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Wow, look at those before photos!

      3
      • JimHJimH says: 3997 comments
        OHD Supporter

        More of the HABS photos from Butters (1936) and Boucher (1975), with high-res files good for desktop wallpaper.
        http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ms0065/

        An awesome place, historically important as an artifact of its period. If only places like this could be seen as great works of art and monuments to the sacrifices of African-Americans, rather than dismissed as the products of slavery. Maybe that’s easy for me to say, but why not?

        14
        • Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 9787 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Thanks for linking to that!

          1
          • RosewaterRosewater says: 4324 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Check out this cool video! It’s a ghost freak vid, (oh brother), but darned if the real deal spirit of Saint Germain doesn’t shine radiantly through Ms. Melanie Snow as she welcomes the ghosties to the home. It darn near knocks the camera guy out! Of course they have no idea what they just experienced; and so on they go about bothering the elementals. The footage from 0:40 through 3:40 is PRICELESS! 🙂
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYgzt7Fo2-4

            Camera drones are fun and I want one!
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBC2FNvsn88

            1
            • JimHJimH says: 3997 comments
              OHD Supporter

              Ms. Melanie’s giggle at 2:20 is the best part, worth the down payment at least.
              Nothing mentioned in the listing about the furnishings, which would take time, expertise and $$$ to replace if not included. It’s sad to see the contents of a great historic home dispersed at auction.

              2
        • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1818 comments

          In pic 19 of the twin staircase… the shadows thrown by the staircases are sooo very cool!

          1
  14. AvatarJeanajoan says: 10 comments

    Beyond beautiful…I hope it is always cared for.

    2
  15. CoraCora says: 1854 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Omg.
    How much thought and effort went into building this masterpiece?

    It’s so stunning. <3

    2
  16. AvatarRon G says: 161 comments

    I’m speechless after viewing the pictures. I do have a question; is that a playhouse or a garden shed, or possible a mausoleum in the back yard?

    • MajolicaDavidMajolicaDavid says: 48 comments

      Ron G it is the old kitchen.

      2
    • AvatarMorethanyouknow says: 59 comments

      If you are talking about the small brick building with four columns just west of the house, that was Col. Young’s office. The Snows had a small antique shop there, mostly furniture. They were dealers in fine antique furniture before they bought Waverley.

      3
  17. AvatarStevenF says: 687 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    I’ll bet the central hall really helped draw out the heat from the rest of the house, venting it through those windows at the top. Architecture was so much more interesting before central air made it all about four walls and windowless bathrooms.

    9
  18. Avatardkzody says: 279 comments

    An absolute WOW of a house. Very palatial. Just give me the staff and I would gladly live here. I do wonder if there is a kitchen in the house?

    • AvatarMorethanyouknow says: 59 comments

      The kitchen and a modern den are located through the dining room door on the Northeast of the house. It is built inside a c. 1900 kitchen so it fits nicely. It is very unobtrusive; with the door shut you would never know is it was there. The bathrooms are hidden in the V shaped closets formed in the spaces where the octagon hall walls meet the square rooms. And the rooms are a shocking 24 X 24 ft.

      2
  19. AvatarMimi says: 8 comments

    I have visited this home twice and was awed by it both times. I was amazed to see it for sale. I hope it remains open and the furniture remains. The home is not far from Columbus Mississippi and they have an incredible house tour each year

    4
  20. MajolicaDavidMajolicaDavid says: 48 comments

    dkzody The kitchen is on the back northeast corner of the house was added when the Snows had it.

    1
  21. AvatarFlaOHDJunkie says: 133 comments

    realtor.com has the style listed as “colonial revival” hmmm

    2
    • Kelly, OHD adminKelly, OHD admin says: 9787 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      The National Register shows it as “OCTAGON MODE”. While I guess the 3rd story is octagon(ish?) it’s really Greek Revival.

      6
  22. AvatarRick says: 50 comments

    I am in lust … ya understand … L-U-S-T … lust!

    7
  23. PhillipPhillip says: 175 comments
    1910 Tudor/craftsman mix

    The pier mirrors that you see downstairs in the center room were also original and set there unmolested the whole time that the house was abandoned. The alcove in the parlor with the ornate plaster cornice was used for weddings. Mr. Snow was a history professor and antique dealer from what I have heard. He was buying fine antiques in the 1960’s. Much of that stuff is big time museum quality. Honestly it is a bargain for 3 million.

    9
  24. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1818 comments

    This house is… amazing!

  25. RosewaterRosewater says: 4324 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    A VERY famous house for sure. What a treat to see so many wonderful, DRAMATIC, beautifully shot images of the interior! Holy _______ WOW! Let me just pick my jaw off the floor after staring longingly at that STARTLINGLY fabulous bedroom with the red satin, Renaissance Revival set. THAT BED! Oh mercy, those untouched walls and details: scuffed, faded, smoky stained, ORIGINAL. These folks deserve a gold medal for preservation. This house simply MUST be purchased furnished; and then maintained, but NOT TOUCHED! Gazing into these rooms is seeing this house at it’s greatest potential during it’s belle epoch. Amazing. It’s like looking at the “Longwood” interior if it had been finished. – And on, and, on, and on. Sooooo many beautiful, VERY fine things. Wowski. Someone could make a fortune on a B&B here. I’d scrimp and save to experience it, and I’ll bet many others would pay big for the experience as well. Damn…

    6
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4324 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Is there anything more beautiful or evocative of the past than monumentally scaled pier mirrors which have NOT been re-silvered? Sigh…..

      Imagine being able to restore and interpret your own divinely scaled temple to cooking if one could actually OWN this place. Man.

      4
  26. Daughter of GeorgeDaughter of George says: 759 comments

    At a time when it’s common for unremarkable houses to list for $1 million, $2 million and upward, it takes a house like THIS to see true quality and value. The workmanship, the artistry, the integrity of this home that continues to stand the test of time, continues to humble and astonish with its extraordinary beauty … worth every penny and more.

    10
  27. Avatarkathywhoelse1@gmail.com says: 210 comments

    wow, wouldnt ya hate to have to change those light bulbs? hehe

    3
  28. AvatarBarreleh says: 40 comments

    My gosh, is that GORGEOUS. However, I’m wondering why no pix of the kitchen.

    3
  29. AvatarCarolyn says: 241 comments

    I am speechless!

  30. AvatarGlorybe says: 150 comments

    The word glorious comes to mind! The staircases are just splendid and the views looking down from the staircases seem heavenly. Every detail is just stunning and it sure would be a joy to tour this amazing Beauty!

    1
  31. AvatarTina Reuwsaat says: 52 comments

    Whenever I see an antebellum plantation I can not help but feel the aura of tragedy and suffering imposed by the practice of slavery. Some historic sites are now researching and addressing the lives and remnants of these invisible people. I hope the same is happening at Waverly. I suspect that is where the true hauntings lie.

    3
    • AvatarPatty Lawson says: 4 comments

      Tina, thank you. Of all the comments to this post, yours was the only one that went to the heart of this plantation’s history. I would have brought up the fact that slaves built this place, if you had not. There has been no mention of their lives, living conditions, or contributions to the “successful ” running of this antebellum prison. How many lived and died here? Where are they buried? Where were the slave quarters? That’s the true history of this place, not the furnishings or wall coverings. If their souls could only speak to us. I have only a couple stories of my great-grandfather when he was a slave. Wish I had more. Everyone should know the entire story of the Peculiar Institution.

      7
    • Daughter of GeorgeDaughter of George says: 759 comments

      Tina, these magnificent homes were built by skilled artisans and craftsmen, to include enslaved and freed black people. We should never deny the lessons of history — yet rather than seeing tragedy, I see the exceptional talent of these people.

      3
      • AvatarGregory_K says: 329 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Chatsworth, CA

        I agree with Daughter of George, slavery is part of the history of these great houses, not all their history. Remember that this particular house was restored in the 1960’s, when no one was talking about slavery. It’s up to the next generation of owners to fill in the tragic slavery part of its history.

        3
        • Daughter of GeorgeDaughter of George says: 759 comments

          Thanks Gregory, you put it best. My concern is that if antebellum buildings are seen mainly through the lens of slavery, historic preservation can be diminished, and properties can be lost. I think it’s important to think not just of the suffering of enslaved people, but the beauty they helped create — and how it stands the test of time.

          1
  32. Avatarmichelle ferrer says: 129 comments

    I am totally stunned by the beauty of this home. It’s worth a trip to Westpoint, Ms. solely to see the house. Goodness, it would have been an honor to have been an invited guest back in the day.

    1
  33. AvatarBrenda Pelloni says: 1 comments

    I have loved Waverly since 1989 when I saw a photo spread of homes in Columbus, Ms. in Colonial Homes magazine. I saved the copy and I finally visited the home on May 20, 2012. What a wonderful experience. Mr Snow was cutting the grass and his nephew gave us the tour. I hope someone will care for the home as the Snow family has done. Also the cemetery is near by where Uncle Billy and family are buried. A tree had fallen on some of the graves and it needed to be cleaned.

    3
  34. TimothyTimothy says: 154 comments

    As my friends and family will attest I am rarely at a loss for words but this home achieves that goal… !

    1
  35. AvatarSuziFritz says: 8 comments

    Just takes my breath away

    1
  36. AvatarClaudia Moore says: 11 comments

    I had the pleasure of touring this home with Mr. Snow back in the early 1990’s. Words cannot express the devotion the Snow family made in bringing Waverly back to life. I hope their legacy lives on with its new owners that will carry on the care of this grand old home. It is truly a work of art.

    5
  37. AvatarDeb Crocker says: 52 comments

    All is I can say is wow

  38. AvatarDeb Crocker says: 52 comments

    This is majestic. It’s almost looks like a government building from Washington, DC. Kudos to the current home owners for their per serving ationist values

  39. AvatarGwenKubberness says: 11 comments

    I am in love, this is my dream house I have to win the lottery and move.

    1
  40. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9787 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Back on the market, lower price. New agent, new photos. Moved to front page, comments above may be older.

    Many more photos on the agents site or any listing site, including furniture pics.

    5
  41. AvatarJimC says: 47 comments

    For those interested in the history of Waverly, you might find this interesting.

    http://www.mdah.ms.gov/new/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Waverly-Plantation.pdf

    6
  42. TGrantTGrant says: 525 comments
    OHD Supporter

    New Orleans, LA

    So Waverly is back on the market. One of the South’s most magnificent plantation houses. Oh to win the lottery.

    4
  43. RosewaterRosewater says: 4324 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    My favorite house posted on OHD in 2017. The new pix are sublime.

    7
  44. AvatarWarbon says: 119 comments

    A most gorgeous home. It’s stunning. I get so jealous when people can afford to furnish a house like this in the style it should be. Just makes it all the more beautiful. I know you posted it before, but, in my opinion, you can wait another year and post it again!

    2
  45. AvatarMW says: 695 comments

    If you click the aerial link and then try to do the streetview, you can actually google tour around outside AND inside the house.

    https://goo.gl/maps/aH91JGzZMmy

  46. AvatarJRichard says: 233 comments

    Let me add my voice to the chorus of OHD followers who have praised the Snow family for their careful preservation and wonderful taste. I hope it lands in the possession of someone who will continue their good work. What a gem.

    3
  47. Avatarkmmoore says: 292 comments
    Weatherford , TX

    This is the Mansion by which I will compare all other mansions from now on. This is, truly, a place of dreams.

    1
  48. AvatarBéné says: 6 comments

    Amazing, wahou !!! But how can it drop from 3 millions to 1.2 millions in 1 year ?!

    1
    • AvatarJoseph says: 309 comments

      Just the reality of the market, and my guess that the current owner doesn’t want to hold it forever. A few major maintenance items on a property like this could wipe someone out financially (see comments about painting).

      While it may be a low price, it’s the upkeep that you need to keep in mind.

      1
      • AvatarMW says: 695 comments

        Yes, it is probably just the reality of the location and area it is in. It is probably in an area that just doesn’t support the value and cost of keeping up a house like this. The value of any house 1st starts primarily with location. What the house actually is is a distant secondary value. Plenty of great old houses are just not in areas that are desirable to people with enough money to want to live there. That works ok when the house is small enough that people of market appropriate means can still afford to maintain them. But when a house gets to be too large and expensive to maintain for most people in the area, then it takes special people to want to step in and keep putting effort and money into something that likely won’t have a good financial return anytime soon, if ever.

        The first time the house was left abandoned was probably the result of the market of the farming that was its original purpose. This time around, the struggle is likely the basic economics and demographics of the local area just not in synch to support a high economic value for it. It doesn’t mean that local people don’t value it. But it likely means they can’t value it financially as there just isn’t the means for most people who live there, or would want to.

  49. AvatarWilliam Walkington says: 63 comments

    I spent a magical and fondly remembered summer afternoon in Waverly. My grandmother, mother, and I were given a long leisurely tour by Mrs Snow. We were the only visitors that day, so we got extra time and attention. Though both Grandma and Mrs Snow were of an age, and both from Southern heritage, my grandmother was raised dirt poor. Obviously Mrs Snow was raised with a bit more privilege and more secure finances than my grandmother, but they got along like a house afire! Biscuit recipes were traded, Depression Era make-dos were discussed, and Mrs Snow told a funny story about her very young son going “tinkle” through those magnificent stair railings while his mother gave a ladies tea luncheon group a tour down below. Her melodious laughter is with me to this day. This magnificent house deserves to be preserved as a national treasure. Not only is it a stunning example of the dwindling number of antebellum plantation mansions left, it is also a priceless example of ingenious regional architecture. WAVERLY MUST BE SAVED!

    2
  50. AvatarGeorgia Girl says: 58 comments

    I am left breathless.
    Absolutely stunning! A place on earth even angels cannot help but envy.

    1

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