1906 Classical Revival – Ocilla, GA

Added to OHD on 4/18/18   -   Last OHD Update: 7/13/20   -   35 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
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211 N Almond St, Ocilla, GA 31774

Map: Street

  • $149,000
  • 3 Bed
  • 3.5 Bath
  • 5660 Sq Ft
  • 1 Ac.
Built in 1900''s this grand home has over 5600 Square feet of living space. It features wood floors, vintage stain glass, spacious kitchen, and many more large rooms. It has endless sitting rooms, living rooms and bedrooms. It''s 3 or 4 bedrooms and 3 full baths and 1 half bath. There is iron fencing around most of the home with a large yard to enjoy. There is an older barn on the property that can be used as more storage if needed. This home was grand at one time and can be bought back again with a little TLC.
Contact Information
Wendy Story, Coldwell Banker Active Real Estate
(229) 423-7653
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type: ,
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc: ,

35 Comments on 1906 Classical Revival – Ocilla, GA

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  1. Randy C says: 429 comments

    With some additional investment this could be a showplace. I wish they had taken some better pictures of the stained glass. I would want to take down that front facade covering the original pillars and balcony in front. This could be a really fun project.

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  2. CoraCora says: 2077 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    This is huge – and wonderful! Doesn’t appear to need an exorbitant amount of work to to shine again.
    And the price is amazing!

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  3. CarolynCarolyn says: 303 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    Wow, is that a kiddie prison across the street for naughty toddlers? 🙂

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12227 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      LOL It was, I’m not sure it’s open anymore.

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    • Michael Mackin says: 2961 comments

      I hadn’t looked at the street view until your comment. The barb wire at the top of the fence seems a little extreme though!

      The house is big as Cora mentioned. Lucky the exterior is brick and has kept the house intact, except for the porches which all need some attention. I do love the super wide hall and the double farmhouse sinks, though!

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      • Zann says: 517 comments

        Maybe they had a few flight risks and had to keep the runners in somehow?

        All jokes aside, my former elementary school has been turned into a “base” of sorts for the school system. I don’t really know what they do with it, but they tend to keep a fleet of trucks there and it is enclosed in some seriously scary fencing. It’s a depressing thing to see. No matter what the building is used for now, it leaves a very odd impression. If that kind of fencing is unavoidable, at least take down the school sign.

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  4. Zann says: 517 comments

    Elegant yet mysteriously dilapidated mansion across the street from a children’s school building surrounded by a wire topped fence? This is another one I could use to write an R.L. Stine-type book.

    My first impression of the outside was this home had been converted to a business at some point (I have no evidence of that, it was merely a feeling) but the inside doesn’t seem to be anything other than residential. It’s bare now, but I’m sure it was beautiful once upon a time. It still is, really.

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  5. Dr. Peterson says: 94 comments

    There are numerous issues that need attention at this property, especially architecturally and structurally as depicted in the photos. It’s going to take time and serious money to bring this lady back. Too bad there weren’t more interior photos offered. I’d like to have seen the stairway(s), the fenestrations and glazing, and the wood floors. There are hints of distressed wood floors. And I’m particularly interested in the front exterior elevation. Photo #1 has an odd perspective and likely does not show the conditions well or correctly, but the roof lines appear askew. This would be a great property to dig into; and I hope the next owner can successfully perform all the work necessary.

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  6. says: 32 comments

    I was looking around and I saw that they had an estate sale on the property in February. Let me just say, based on the pictures I saw, things looked pretty rough. To me, this place looks like it may have started life as a school or a hospital.

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  7. TomasczTomascz says: 120 comments

    This place actually looks like an old hospital or possibly a college of some sort. That portico at the side entrance (?) is a tear off/total rebuild and that little yellow room w/ the fireplace and the “rough” floor appears to be termite damage. Looks like some of the overhangs have been leaking for some time too.
    This place could be a knockout B&B if the locale would support it.

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12227 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

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      • StevenFStevenF says: 785 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1969 Regency
        Nashville, TN

        Thanks…the picture solves the mystery of the purpose of the green “band” separating the first and second floors. This band is the remnant of the wrap-around porch.

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      • Randy Reeves says: 14 comments

        Thanks for posting Kelly. This house is a few blocks away from me. It has always intrigued me. In the 17th picture the room at the end of the hall with the double door opening was the original operating room with a tiled floor with a drain in the middle and several skylights that gave light for the operating table. The picture you shared was a post card published in a book. My house was built before 1904 and is also pictured in the book. I would love to know exactly what style my house is. Could I send you a picture so you or your readers could give me feedback? Your site is one of the highlights of my day. I’ve registered and am waiting for an email to complete the process. Thanks so much!

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7273 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Well there ya go. That splains it. There is a place really similar to this in Crawfordsville, IN. It was for sale for years: sold in late 2016; and I think it used to be on OHD way back. I always suspected it was a rooming house; but sanatorium would fit just nicely. Here’s and old listing with pix still avail.

      https://www.redfin.com/IN/Crawfordsville/1304-S-Grant-Ave-47933/home/59983605

      Thanks’ as always for the great research John.

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  8. Maria says: 6 comments

    Wow, a mysterious home in a mysterious (and haunted) town! Hope who ever buys this place doesn’t “up and vanish.” https://upandvanished.com/

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  9. Zann says: 517 comments

    Let me revise and expound on some of my earlier comments due to the information you amazing people provided for us.

    1. AH HA! I was right. It gave off that abandoned commercial building vibe.

    2. A former sanitarium being sold as an elegant yet mysteriously dilapidated mansion across the street from a children’s school building surrounded by a wire topped fence? This is another one I could use to write an R.L. Stine-type book. (No, seriously…. that would make a good book.)

    It looks so different now when compared to the picture Kelly provided.

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  10. FERN BENSON says: 29 comments

    Ocilla’s first hospital, with 20 beds, was opened by Dr. Herman Dismuke* and Dr. Gabe Willis in 1914. It originally featured wrap-around porches. Jamie Wilcox Lovett and Cindy Griffin note that this was built by their great-grandfather, Robert Toombs Woolsey. It was replaced by a newer facility in the early 1930s and is now a private residence.

    *Dr. Dismuke was the most beloved physician in Irwin County during his lifetime. He delivered thousands of babies, promoted modern health and sanitary practices through his work with the clinic at Irwinville Farms during the Great Depression and served as the county doctor.

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  11. Amy P. says: 221 comments

    Very cool fixer upper, I like it’s charm… but I couldn’t live in a house that had been a place like that in the past… creepy!

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  12. Glenn Hahn says: 54 comments

    Old sanitariums and hospitals always getting wondering about extra curricular activity. Tis would definitely be a place where I would want to get “the vibe” of the place. RL Stine, might give way to Steven King , if you know what I mean. Seriously, if the porches were reconstructed, what a show place it could be. I thought the front looked too “plain” and I couldn’t figure out the green band around it…now it makes sense. Sure hope there isn;t a basement ( I am getting goosebumps just thinking about walking down there)

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    • Joy says: 2 comments

      There is a small one room basement under the porch, it was waist high in water when we went to get pictures of the building. There were old panty hose ties around pipes. There is also a sky-light coming down from the 3rd floor (attic) that has been covered with ceiling in the 2nd floor at the room at the very end of the hallway on the South end. The room looks to originally be T shaped and I assume it was the operating room at one point and the sky light was used for extra light. The house and property are amazing and I can not wait to get the story we are doing together completely.

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      • Randy Reeves says: 14 comments

        Hi Joy, I’m interested in the story you are putting together. How recently were you able to see the basement? I’d always heard there was one. I live just a few blocks away from this house. An acquaintance of mine is trying to purchase the property if a federal tax lien can be resolved. It can be a beautiful place again with some love and care!

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        • Joy says: 2 comments

          It has been about a month ago. Can you have your friend contact me please. jwoods198318@gmail.com
          I have been wanting to speak with him about what he plans to do with it if the issue gets resolved. I found out about it while trying to write the story so I left the end open for us to cover the sale and restoration if that happens.

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  13. Trish at TheOldPostRoad says: 24 comments

    I went to High School in Ocilla. That “old hospital” was across from the “new” high school back in the 80’s. The high school relocated in the past 25 years. There are so many beautiful old homes in rural Georgia, but unfortunately, there are very few jobs to bring people to the small towns.

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    • Randy Reeves says: 14 comments

      Hi Trish, I am a 1981 graduate of Irwin County High and looked across the street at that house many times when I should have been paying attention to the teacher?. My wife and I have been restoring an early 1900’s house right across from the courthouse in Ocilla. I have a soft spot for old homes that have many stories to tell?

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      • Trish @theOldPostRoad says: 24 comments

        Hi, Randy- which house are you restoring? My aunt had a house circa 1915 right across from the library, but it has fallen into disrepair, I think. I hope it’s that one. Corner of First and Beech? (I graduated in 1987- moved to ocilla in 82).

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        • Randy Reeves says: 14 comments

          Hi Trish, our house is on the corner of Beech and 2nd Street facing the courthouse. The one your aunt had has just recently been purchased and the family is working on making all the necessary repairs. I love the diamond shaped leaded windows in that house. You can use google maps to see the street views of the houses in that neighborhood. Ours is 301 South Beech.

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          • Trish @TheOldPostRoad says: 24 comments

            Randy -You have a great house! I am glad to hear my aunt’s house is going to be cared for! It was a great old house with original pocket doors and those pretty windows. We lived at 201 S. Irwin Ave for several years – that was a well-built house, too. They sure used quality construction materials and techniques 100 years ago, didn’t they?

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  14. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 824 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    SOLD 8/7/2018 (Zillow).

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