December 8, 2017: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 12/8/17 - Last OHD Update: 9/30/19 - 169 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

169 Comments on December 8, 2017: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Today’s old house may be found in Norcatur, Kansas. I don’t know if it still stands as there were multiples of this particular build, long lost their porches and details, (here’s one via street view and it’s this one.) The man on the porch is John Tolle (noted as a farm operator in census reports), his wife Harriette sits opposite. The little girl is Maude, boy on the horse is Chester. I believe this photo was taken around 1905. Harriette died at 56 in 1931, John at 78 in 1953. Chester passed in 1952 at age 56. Maude at the age of 100 in 2000 and is buried in the local cemetery along with her family.

    I think that windmill in the back ground is from this company: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tincup-photo/7121156123

    5
    • Cathy F. says: 2240 comments

      The porch(es) of this/those house(s) certainly added a lot visually – not to mention for relaxation & shade.

    • JimHJimH says: 4949 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Nice old photo and good research! The house is definitely the 2nd link you posted. In 1940, J. Oscar Tolle still owned the house on Kansas Ave at the corner of Opelik. He lived there with his daughter Maude, who was Assistant Postmaster.

      3
    • Deb Hoskins says: 28 comments

      My husbands great-great uncle had the first newspaper in Norcatur. The Norcatur Register. He also had a patent for a double-roller printing press. Unfortunately he passed before it could be developed, and his wife didn’t know who he was working with for the financial arrangements. Seven years latter she received a flyer for the same press.

      1
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      Master Chester look like a real gentleman on his horse. Very sweet!

      1
    • MW says: 877 comments

      Time sure has not been kind to this little house.

      1
    • Michael Mackin says: 2394 comments

      I did a street walk and you weren’t kidding when you said it could be any number of houses. I found almost a dozen that have this shape and roof. Glad Jim found the house! It’s kind of sad though, to see it now.

      Merry Christmas, everyone!

      2
    • SueSue says: 1142 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      What a charming house and family. Their horse is quite lovely too. Once again, a terrific find.

  2. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    This time of year tends to be slow with new house listings so expect fewer posts up until Spring when it takes off again.

    2
  3. tess says: 1 comments

    UPDATE: OHD featured Howey in the Hills, Fl in April and it was later sold. Here is an update on the new owners’ plans. Sorry it’s so long. Couldn’t get the link working.

    Historic Howey Mansion to reopen as wedding, event venue
    Mansion restored after abandoned for nearly a decade
    By Clay LePard – Reporter

    Updated: 6:14 PM, December 07, 2017
    Fla. – The iconic Howey mansion in Lake County hosted the likes of President Calvin Coolidge and the New York Civic Opera.

    For nearly a decade though, the mansion on Citrus Avenue has sat empty and abandoned. But now, with a new owner, the building is being restored to its former glory and is almost ready for a grand reopening.

    Brad Cowherd, who owns Infusion Tea in College Park, along with several other businesses in Orlando, was inspired to buy the former home of citrus grower William Howey, which has sat vacant since 2009.

    Cowherd and his brother purchased the property in July.

    “We really want to open it back up to the public,” Cowherd said. “It really is the jewel of Howey-In-The-Hills.”

    The renovated mansion will be used as a wedding and events venue and eventually a bed and breakfast.

    “My brother and I had a lake house up on Lake Harris and we would visit there with our families,” Cowherd said. “We drove by it a bunch. It was abandoned, spooky old mansion, that hadn’t been touched in a long time.”

    WKMG 1 of 7
    PICTURES: Howey-in-the-Hills mansion restoration

    When word got out that the space would be turned into an event venue, Cowherd said one woman hired a private detective to track him down so she could talk with him about hosting her wedding there.

    “Folks were finding us all sorts of ways to talk about having their weddings there,” Cowherd said.

    Cowherd and his family was impressed with the character of the nearly century-old mansion, with many of its original relics still in tact. Even the mechanism that opens a secret basement, used to store liquor during prohibition, still works.

    “We found all sorts of trash in there but no raccoons,” Cowherd said laughing.

    The new owners spent a little more than $600,000 to purchase the property and invested nearly $600,000 for renovations.

    “We had to restore all the floors,” Cowherd said. “A lot of plaster work inside and out, completely overgrown so a lot of grounds work. We restored the fountain in the middle of the courtyard.”

    The mansion will start showing private tours, including one this weekend, and for residents of Howey-In-The-Hills. Those tours have already sold out, but the owner plans on opening up more tours starting in 2018, when the venue officially opens to host events.

    5
  4. tess says: 306 comments

    Kensington Mansion in South Carolina was storm damaged in 2014. It’s unknown when it will be restored. Long story, corporate owner 🙁

    http://south-carolina-plantations.com/richland/kensington.htm

    The Scarborough-Hamer antique collection, at Kensington, has been relocated. One of the objects is a piece of needlework partially finished with the needle still attached. It makes you wonder why the sewer didn’t return to it. It’s pictured in this link.
    https://www.scarboroughhamer.org/

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Thanks’ Tess. Couldn’t get the first link to work. The second link was fun. I’m MAD for that Late Empire sofa with the super RICH, gorgeous fabric! Yum. I’d guess The lady put down the unfinished, needlepoint runner because all of the fun, creative bit was done and the rest was just tedious filler.

      4
      • Joe says: 755 comments

        I’ve posted before when you have made an Empire Furniture comment before. I see very little that indicates that it is Empire. I believe that the sofa in the link is Victorian. The dates for Empire are 1830-60 whereas this style is post 1860

        1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Huh. Well, the catalog describes it as such: “Transition Empire to Victorian period, c.1850. Walnut frame. Triple arch crown with carved floral and foliage scroll crest rail. Shaped arms with rolled tufted upholstery.” So, “late Empire”, probably a bit less specific. 🙂

          3
  5. SD says: 56 comments

    link above to the Kensington Mansion is missing an “L”

    try this link instead

    http://south-carolina-plantations.com/richland/kensington.html

    2
  6. John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

    Kelly, thanks for sharing the Norcatur, Kansas, house. Sad to learn it has been altered extensively. Interesting as well to see patterned shingles used to ornamentally decorate the porch roof.

    From a small town in Indiana called Chrisney, (40 miles east of Evansville in the far southern end of the state near the Ohio River) is this bargain priced Queen Anne style home: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/11-E-Market-St-Chrisney-IN-47611/120244619_zpid/?fullpage=true The listing notes that it is the former home of J.B. Chrisney, the town’s founder. It has some characteristics of a published plan design. Although it is being sold “as is” for a mere $11,500…in streetview, it doesn’t look too bad. I would expect the interior, if not badly altered, might be interesting given the prominent heritage of the home.
    In streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/6FoW23EV5pP2 going right around the corner, there’s another Queen Anne style house with a similar design. I expect even though its in a remote small town at this price someone will be interested in it. Personally, I’d prefer the next door Queen Anne which seems largely intact and unchanged but this one might turn out to be a pleasant surprise.

    3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Bruce Wicks has a bunch of good pix from Spencer County, including that house in Chrisney; https://flic.kr/p/dD1z6E

      1
      • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

        Hmmm…the link took me to a photo of a house in Dale, Indiana, which is 15 miles away from Chrisney. Both are in Spencer County but 15 miles apart. I did find a small album posted by Mr. Wicks of Chrisney which shows the two side by side Queen Anne style homes: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tourismguy/albums/72157632305574794 It appears the white painted house must have been under renovation when the photos were take as two upper windows are missing. (I can only hope it isn’t open like that now) Streetview shows the house as being occupied.

        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Yeah John, he didn’t have a specific “Spencer County” gallery, so one would have to skip back and forth in his photostream from that point. I linked that white house because I noticed Chris DiMattei had faved it, and thusly supposing it was a G.F.Barber, thought you’d enjoy that as a starting point. 😉

          1
  7. chad8203 says: 21 comments

    Here is a beautiful estate quality home in excellent condition built in 1940. It is located in Crosby, Texas in what appears to be a very nice setting. The listing agent makes the terrible suggestion that this property can be purchased and a convenience store could be erected after razing the house. An aerial view easily shows several vacant tracts of land that could be used instead for yet another architecturally unaesthetic heap of garbage retail store. Hopefully someone steps in and buys this house and gives it the same love and attention that the previous owner did for over 37 years.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/6422-Fm-2100-Rd_Crosby_TX_77532_M88769-22248

    2
    • Bethany Otto says: 3480 comments

      Thank you for ruining my day; my faith in humanity takes another hit. I am appalled at the listing description for this house. I am not totally naive, I do understand the economic appeal to a certain potential buyer of putting up a strip mall, but …what is wrong with people? Sheesh. The OHD police need to get down there to Texas and do our thing. If I had bottomless pits of $$$ I would go around the country rescuing houses like this one.

      10
      • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1947 Ranch
        OR

        I wonder Bethany, how many times I have said ‘let’s go rescue that house’ to my husband? I probably repeat it every Saturday before we buy our quick pick lottery ticket. LOL.
        This is precisely why I get so angry at realtors. They think about money, but don’t seem to think about those of us who might simply love to restore a beautiful property like this.

        5
  8. MaggieMayMaggieMay says: 28 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1945 Craftsman
    Athens, TN

    Charleston, TN. Main house close to 200 years old!!! Beautiful. Has quite a history!!
    https://www.trulia.com/property/3023847752-373-Market-St-NE-Charleston-TN-37310

    This one is in Niota, TN. The price is great for such a beautiful home.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2125-Highway-11-N_Niota_TN_37826_M70884-77761?ex=TN626963583
    I don’t know enough about architecture to say what kind of houses these are. I just love to admire them, and dream.
    Enjoy!!

    4
  9. CharlesB says: 481 comments

    Of all the styles of historic American architecture I love Greek Revival best, especially the swaggering late examples from the 1840s. Here’s one in Norwich, Connecticut, which had one of the highest per-capita incomes in New England at the time and a population with sophisticated architectural taste to make good use of all that wealth:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3-Crossway-St_Norwich_CT_06360_M33786-72788#photo0

    Here’s another from the same era that I find pleasing (only one photo, drat…):

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/131-Broadway_Norwich_CT_06360_M40400-38379

    3
  10. StevenFStevenF says: 863 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    Wow…it’s amazing what a porch will do to the appearance of a house.

    here are my finds:
    1. This is a cute little 1937 NC brick Tudor with some original details. I’d love to roll-back and restore the screened porch.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/133-Chaney-Ave-Jacksonville-NC-28540/102184272_zpid/?fullpage=true

    2. A diminutive, once proud, center hall colonial in NC that is begging for someone to give it the respect it deserves. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/220-E-Hill-St-Warsaw-NC-28398/102134707_zpid/?fullpage=true

    3. A 1967 marriage of two older colonial structures, also in NC. For some reason I love it when people actually move a house. This place has some nice rooms and would benefit from a few trees in the front yard.
    ttps://www.zillow.com/homedetails/805-Memorial-Dr-Bowdens-NC-28398/102154128_zpid/?fullpage=true

    4. A lovely 1911 Dutch Colonial Revival style home that’s pretty much been rehabbed, and has enough diamond-paned windows to last a lifetime.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1525-Morganton-Rd-Fayetteville-NC-28305/53655265_zpid/?fullpage=true

    5. A MCM in Pittsburgh with some cool proportions. Not sure I’d keep the later tile floors, and might address the original acoustical tile ceilings, but a great house.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/118-Cardiff-Rd-Pittsburgh-PA-15237/11442028_zpid/?fullpage=true

    5
    • EileenM says: 290 comments

      The Warsaw, NC house has so much potential. Someone just needs to love it.

      2
    • Barbara V says: 882 comments

      The Warsaw house is great, with a ton of potential. And kudos to the realtor who wasn’t afraid to post lots of photos, blemishes and all!

      3
    • Cathy F. says: 2240 comments

      House #1 has a cute kitchen, albeit necessary awkward placement of the fridge. I agree re: the porch.

      House #2 isn’t all that diminuative – it’s almost 3000 sq. ft. Lots of potential there for it being, once again, a lovely looking home.

      I love house #4! Lots of very nice features – in addition to the diamond lattice-paned windows.

      2
    • Hoyt Clagwell says: 251 comments

      That house in Fayetteville is one of those that’s not typically my style, but it’s so beautiful that I love it anyway. I’ve never seen diamond-pane transoms before. I’d be curious to know if 1911 isn’t possibly the date of an extensive remodel rather than the original build date, a detail here, the size and proportion of an opening there might be hints that it started out as an Italianate or Gothic Revival era house.

      1
    • TGrantTGrant says: 804 comments
      OHD Supporter

      New Orleans, LA

      Here’s a corrected link for that Bowdens house, and what a house it is! You can certainly see the 60’s influence in the kitchen but the lovely colonial details are still present throughout the rest. Looks like it would make a wonderful family home or for someone who collected colonial furniture or primitive antiques.
      https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/805-Memorial-Dr-Bowdens-NC-28398/102154128_zpid/?fullpage=true

      5
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      I LOVE the kitchen in the brick Tudor.

      2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Fayetteville is a remarkably interesting, bright, spacious home. The windows are a bit much, but who can argue with the VOLUME of them and all the splendid light they flood the whole house with. Nice.

      I’m loving on the Pittsburgh mod for sure! Thanks’ Steven. Sure hope they didn’t cover up stained concrete with all that – meh – tile. Some other update choices were also uninspired at best; but no matter, it’s still a RAD house and could be relatively easily cured of it’s currently thick look.

      1
    • Victoria says: 135 comments

      That very cool MCM in Pittsburgh is crying out for an artist to turn the lower level “family room” into one grand studio.

      1
  11. Sunflower & Poppy says: 50 comments

    I don’t know if anyone else has already noticed this one in Petersburg Virginia: https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Petersburg-VA/2092245517_zpid/13265_rid/0-100000_price/0-369_mp/1700-1840_built/pricea_sort/37.349144,-77.223931,36.989116,-77.685357_rect/10_zm/?

    Build date given as 1800 (probably more like 1815). Other restored early houses in the neighbourhood.

    3
  12. Mike says: 66 comments

    An old tavern & flat in the Canaryville neighborhood of Chicago. It looks like it’s been a tavern for its entire existence!
    https://www.redfin.com/IL/Chicago/517-W-43rd-St-60609/home/13959887

    1
    • Kevin says: 50 comments

      The corner position and wonderful interior detail make it a prime candidate for having been a pharmacy with fountain also…..just a thought. Would be great to re-install the large front windows…might make a great gastropub.

  13. RonnieH says: 81 comments

    Home in Medford, Oregon, $315,000. It has been on and off a couple times and I believe I may have posted on OHD before???? Can’t remember, but anyway, back listed again.

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Medford-OR/2131437404_zpid/5891_rid/1700-1925_built/42.455381,-122.552147,42.156277,-123.135796_rect/10_zm/?

    5
    • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

      Ronnie, thanks for sharing. The house itself is an exercise in small scale Victorian exuberance to the point where I wonder if it was originally this ornate? But the problem here is location…this is the view across the street: https://goo.gl/maps/G4vVPyVyvfx I don’t know any way to fix that unless one were to move the house to a more aesthetically pleasing location. A shame that so much effort was put into renovating the house to its current appearance yet the visual distractions surrounding the house cannot easily be changed. Otherwise, this small wonder of a house offers industrial strength Victorian flavor for those really into such lavish displays of ornate details.

      1
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      Wow. I live in Oregon and I’ve said many times how (seemingly) crazy real estate prices have been going. But lordy, barely over 1000 sq ft and $315,000? That’s the price we’re going to be listing our home for in the spring, but it’s a 1/3 acre lot, 3500+ sq ft, 7 bedroom home. (1935 Tudor) Sheesh.
      It’s quite cute (if a bit full).

      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      There ya go Kelly; not really much to a 20’s kitchen. 😉

      What a FAB little house! Thanks’ Ronnie.

      2
    • Barbara V says: 882 comments

      WOW, this place is like an incredible antique shop, filled top to bottom with the most wonderful things, with the backdrop of this amazing house! I could wander around this place for days, lost in the beauty of the past. What a sad statement that so many people live without the appreciation of something like this, choosing instead to surround themselves with cheap, mass-produced furnishings…
      But enough of the rant… Once I was done wandering, I’d land in that kitchen – a perfect fit for this amazing place. And, BTW, a kitchen which would cost a fraction of what most people pay for a redo today!

      1
    • SueSue says: 1142 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      I adore this everything about this house. I love a bit of theatrics in a home. However, as the location stickler that I am, I agree with John. Much too nice of a home for it’s location. Doesn’t look like the other houses come anywhere close to this houses splendor either and it is only a two bedroom one bath at 315,000? I would think that it would be a hard sell.

  14. robinjn says: 253 comments

    A gorgeous 1908 home in Columbia, MO. I’m not sure what style to call it. It’s on old brick streets. This is one of the most sought-after and gorgeous parts of the city, known as the old Southwest. It’s very walkable, with a park nearby. Columbia’s thriving downtown is less than a mile away. Someone will be very lucky with this one. The woodwork is incredible and though the kitchen and baths have been updated I don’t find them objectionable and several bathrooms retain their original tile floors.

    https://www.trulia.com/property/5033278494-111-S-Glenwood-Ave-Columbia-MO-65203

    3
    • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

      Hi Robin JN,
      The TYPE of house here is usually called an American Foursquare. Houses of this kind received the Foursquare name because the most common versions had four symmetrically arranged rooms downstairs and four rooms upstairs giving such homes a boxy, square look. Dormers were commonly added to the attic. Now, as far as STYLE, this house shows Classical and Colonial Revival details because from about 1895 until WW I (about 1915) Classicism ruled the domestic American architectural market. Buildings built during the same period in Classical style were often called Beaux Arts after the Ecole Des Beaux Arts (School of Fine Arts) in Paris where Classical design was highly favored. American students who attended this prestigious institution brought Classical design back with them and all things Classical became popular again across the country.
      I wholeheartedly agree with you about the lavish display of fine millwork, leaded glass, and other period details. The vintage brick street fronting the property is the proverbial icing on the cake. Thanks for sharing.

      • Robinjn says: 253 comments

        Thanks John. I had “Foursquare” in my head but wasn’t sure if it would be called Victorian or what. I will remember American Foursquare. It’s a gorgeous thing. On a corner lot. It’s three easy blocks from a tiny little park, and 4 blocks to the public library. A mile puts you in the middle of downtown. Also nearby (within a mile) is the MKT Trial spur, which if you are so ambitious could take you completely across the state. Cars drive slow and many neighbors will be seen gardening or walking their dogs. Everyone says hello. It’s a dream house in a dream location in an eclectic, thriving, mid-sized town.

      • Hoyt Clagwell says: 251 comments

        With it’s rather grand center hall configuration, this house doesn’t really fit the template of a foursquare, not even enough to even be called a modified foursquare. Stylistically, overall I’d place it more in the craftsman camp with classical details, rather than anything strictly classical or colonial revival, but either way it’s a very confidently and competently designed house that successfully merges influences from each.

        That’s a fantastic light fixture in the living room.

      • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1947 Ranch
        OR

        Hi John S. Do I detect a bit of ‘Praire Style’ in this foursquare home?

        3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      It’s a “Prairie Box”, (after Frank LLoyd Wright – I learned that this year), and a very, VERY nice one at that! I’m with you Robin, thinking the kitchen and bathrooms not only passable, I’ll go a couple of steps further and say that they are quite nicely done. They are in keeping with the architectural and design aesthetic of the house; are not at all over-personalized; and are each quality jobs installed with quality fittings. Very nicely done! I was really hoping for basement shots; and I’ll wager it’s just as nice as anything else here, quite tall, and with daylight windows. Amazing. On a gorgeous lot; with original radiant heat; and a whole set of great original light fixtures in a pear tree: what could be finer?! Nice. LUCKY buyer.

      1
      • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

        In reply to Hoyt, as far as I know, “Craftsman” style technically only refers to those homes which were featured in the house plans shared in the popular magazine, THE CRAFTSMAN, published by Gustav Stickley. It was a relatively short-lived publication, launching its first issue in October 1901 and its last in December 1916. I was referring to the house form and still, to my eyes, it most closely resembles a Foursquare just as a cottage with a wide overhanging front porch built during the first decades of the 20th century would be described in form as a Bungalow. (Craftsman Bungalow refer to those featured in the magazine although there were many other similar designs by others being described by the same Craftsman style name) There are some horizontal elements of the Prairie style as well but many more elements of Classical/Colonial Revival, inside. In summary, stylistic purity isn’t present in this fine home but instead a combination of details that the architect and homeowner found acceptable at the time the house was built. I also doubt there was very much debate about styles when this house was designed; it merely combined those architectural details that were very popular at the time. I supposed one could call the result “Eclectic” or a hybrid of styles to be more accurate but again, to me it most closely resembled a Foursquare type (not style) of home. Of course, others are free and welcome to reach their own conclusions about styles and I respect that.

        • Barbara V says: 882 comments

          With all respect to the experts, and maybe it is a hair-splitting matter of semantics, but I do not believe that “Craftsman style” technically only refers only to the houses featured in Stickley’s magazine. (Rather, such houses would properly called a “Craftsman.”)Although he was the one to put forth the design, thousands of houses were built (and continue to be)in the Craftsman style, hence are deserving of the name as a descriptor.

          And, again in my amateur opinion, I believe the house that started this dialog would be best described as being of the “Prairie style.”

          2
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Yeah John, I didn’t even know that particular derivation existed, or that it was a style directly inspired by Wright. The discussion popped up about a house Kelly posted and labeled as “Prairie” earlier on this year. I picked a nit with her about that designation vs. what I felt sure was a better description of it as a rather standard example of a basic “foursquare”. Someone chimed in, (with I believe a 1st comment), that they lived in one nearly exactly alike, and that it was indeed a “Prairie box”. I love it when I learn new stuff on these threads, and have had my eye peeled for “Prairie Boxes” all year! Heheheh.
          Of course a house could still be described as simply a “Foursquare” if none or little of the specific “Prairie” traits were present.
          https://architecturestyles.org/prairie/ https://www.archivosweb.com/prairie-box-house-plans/ 🙂

          • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

            Hi Jeff,
            I find it interesting that the “Prairie Box” link takes one to a page with house examples and the title to the page is: “Prairie Box House Plans-69 best American Four Square images on Foursquare”. From that, I get that the name Foursquare and Prairie Box are interchangeable, or, alternately, that Prairie Box is a sub-type within the Foursquare family. Not to be confused, of course, with the formal Prairie Style (with its horizontal design emphasis) most well known from the design work of Frank Lloyd Wright and a number of his architect colleagues largely based in the American Midwest.

            1
      • Gemma says: 116 comments

        Yes, indeed. Will hopefully remember to blog this one.

  15. RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    I’m probably not the only architecture / house fiend out there who will start looking at listings and rooting around the internet for interesting properties when a particular place catches my attention in the news of the day for this or that reason; at least I hope not. Hideous wildfires AGAIN in California this week had me doing just that for interesting places in and around LA. I found three worth sharing, and one is actually for sale; not that it has a chance on OHD, but if you like interesting, unique, mid-mods, you’re gonna want it for your girl! It’s badass.

    May I suggest listening to this while viewing 🙂
    Both were performed live on the BBC the same year the house was built, 1971.
    ** OPEN IN NEW TAB ** https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJFTVKOQKQA
    AND / OR
    ** OPEN IN NEW TAB ** https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBI669Ac3cg
    **************************************************
    HIGH above it all – like the ultimate tree house, or an eagle’s nest: unless you look down you’ll see nothing but sky and canyon and the city beyond = AMAZING! There are two options to get up there; buns of steel stair; OR fun FUN funicular! How fun is that!?! Random example = http://goo.gl/q4QZ7Z
    UP WE GO! http://goo.gl/Mr5hFk
    Heheheh. Heaven.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1675-N-Beverly-Glen-Blvd-Los-Angeles-CA-90077/20529720_zpid/?fullpage=true
    Fingers crossed it makes it through. There is no currently direct threat.

    ALSO +++
    Two houses by FLLW apprentices who actually studied under the master.

    The greatest of them all John Lautner above Silverlake: {“Less Than Zero”}:
    http://filming.90210locations.info/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/clays_house.jpg
    http://architectureforsale.com/silvertop/images.php

    Here’s another acolyte, Earl Wear; far less creative, but still a very good knock off, and the location in Topanga Canyon could not be lovelier ;
    http://www.topangamalibuproperty.com/19974-sischo-dr-topanga-ca-90290-1799000-00/
    https://www.openlistings.com/p/19974-sischo-drive-topanga-ca-90290

    🙂

    1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Imagine the view from the, (not nearly as cool), house even significantly higher than the cool one! Good lord. Pretty sure that has access from the road on the canyon ridge. http://goo.gl/VBRiFV

      1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Here’s a stills vid of the A.Q.Jones/Billy Haines famous Brody house in Holmby Hills as it was photographed before it’s first sale out of the original family in the late 2000’s, with much of it’s original furnishings and interiors intact. It sold in 2010 for under $20M, and sold lastly in 2014 for $55M! That Ellen Degeneres is a luxe flip wizzard!
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgFu6IUGbzA

      2
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      Rosewater, thank you for those links to Carole King, it tore me back through the years to being a freshman in college, in love with my college sweetheart. Oh, how heartbreaking. I’m weeping, but in a good way…
      Very good house listings too I might add.

      2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Not a whole lot of mid-mod fans out there in OHD land, but a few, and I am certainly one! Glad you enjoyed them Jekl. Carole King is a timeless delight! 🙂

        4
      • Cathy F. says: 2240 comments

        jekls – Have you seen Carole King in concert? If not, highly recommend, should the opportunity show up!

        2
        • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1947 Ranch
          OR

          To Rosewater and Cathy F. No, unfortunately I have not had the great good fortune to see Carole K live. She is on my short list of favorite recording artists on my youth along with Billy J (piano man!), Sir Elton (Goodbye Yellow Brick Road!), Boz Scaggs (too many to name) and a few others. When I hear their music, esp from the late ’60s through the ’70s I get completely undone. Kind of like I am when I see an old house, no matter WHAT style it is, LOL. Maybe it’s a sickness….?
          BTW, my dad was a master carpenter working in the Topanga area (all of LA really) all through the 1950s and ’60s. I wonder if he saw the gems you posted Rosewater?

          1
  16. Joseph says: 44 comments

    Here’s an old house for sale that has such a low asking price, it makes for a tempting target.
    https://www.homepath.com/listing/506-annapolis-ave-sheffield-al-35660-46326202

    2
    • SueSue says: 1142 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Wow on that price. Cannot imagine why it is so low. With a little work this house would be lovely.

      • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

        Seems to be a true bargain here but some later alterations inside are evident. (replacement windows?) I pulled it up in streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/T4K8W9Kkcfm and the neighborhood looks fairly decent. Perhaps Fannie Mae (this is a Home Path foreclosed property) wants the property off the books by the end of the year or there’s some other explanation to account for the low selling price. Nice find, Joseph, and thanks for sharing.

  17. Gemma says: 116 comments

    Purchased “Cupola House” as a Christmas present for myself. Mabel Leigh Hunt is a fabulous writer. I think all OHDers would enjoy the book, especially the kids’ enthusiasm at finding the way to the cupola.

    3
    • RobynMeRobynMe says: 116 comments
      1907 George F. Barber
      Hamlet, NC

      For a second there I thought you’d bought yourself an actual house for Xmas… although I’m sure the book is good too.

      5
      • Gemma says: 116 comments

        LOL! The book takes place in Winfield (State not stated) in 1906. Halfway through the book, the cupola catches fire and the rest of the book is spent in raising money for the replacement. If this house actually does exist, I wouldn’t mind knowing where.

        1
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      Hi Gemma, I am an artist and writer in my real life. I write suspense mysteries that all having a central theme of…you guessed it. Old homes/mansions. Murder and mystery in an old house, what could be better than that? LOL!

      3
      • Gemma says: 116 comments

        Sounds like the board game “Clue”. There’s a lady in KY who wrote the “Ky Home Mysteries.” Haven’t heard anything about the series in years, so not sure what’s going on there. First-time writers are encouraged to start with an established genre. Since the major character ends up deceased in the stories that have come to me, I kinda defaulted to the murder mystery genre.

      • SueSue says: 1142 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1802 Cape
        ME

        Jeklstudio, I would love to read some of your books. Would you share some of them so I can look them up on Amazon?

        • jeklstudio says: 1139 comments

          Hi Sue, thanks for that…
          My nomme de plume is E.D. Degenfelder. I have published two novels (of a trilogy) and a novella so far, with the third of the trilogy poised for publication in just a few weeks. Thanks and I hope you enjoy them 🙂

          • Gemma says: 116 comments

            jeklstudio, please pardon my lack of manners. I am about to enter another production phase, and usually avoid reading other people’s work. I will keep your works in mind, though. I was reading Cupola House because the memory of my friend reading it kept haunting me. Ms. Hunt’s books are lost treasures, and should be promoted. Blessings on your career.

    • Scott Cunningham says: 392 comments

      Would love any other recommendations you might have on books about living in old historic houses.

      I did read one this past summer called “The Big House” about an old family house on the seashore, and all the memories a family had during their last summer there before it was sold.

      1
      • Cathy F. says: 2240 comments

        Scott C. – Bill Bryson’s “At Home” is my recommendation.

        1
      • Gemma says: 116 comments

        “Vickie Barnes, Junior Hospital Volunteer” has her family living in what sounds like a QueenCube, as I call Victorian Foursquares. Vickie’s room has what the author calls a cupola, but it sounds more like a tower. I also like the respect the girl has for the guy she likes, and how she won’t impose her will on him regarding medical school. The author contrasts that with the girl who tries to control him.

        The Thoroughbred series for young readers also has everyone living in historic houses in the Lexington/Versailles, KY, area. I’ve been trying for years to get a “Super Edition” written regarding the major character’s 1790 farmhouse and what they find during post-tornado renovations. (I was about to ask research assistance from OHD readers). HarperCollins had been discussing reprinting the series. Perhaps if I can get this written, they will reprint.

  18. Jason Wheeler says: 9 comments

    For all those who love George F. Barber, here is one of his stranger designs:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1406-Washington-St-E-Lewisburg-WV-24901/2093004151_zpid/

    3
    • Ron G says: 172 comments

      This is definitely a Barber and of the most unusual house designs from him I have seen. This house was posted on the site in December 2012. Not sure if its still available.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      As much as I find the “updates” in this house REALLY obnoxious; I have to admit that the “rock climb” from the kid bedroom into the attic is pretty freakin RAD. What kid wouldn’t beg their parents to buy the place just for that. 😉

      3
    • JimHJimH says: 4949 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The alterations haven’t helped the design at all. The porch has lost all its detail and the amorphous space inside the front door originally was divided into a hall and parlor by an elaborate column and grille affair that someone got tired of dusting.
      https://archive.org/stream/moderndwellings00archgoog#page/n43/mode/1up

      4
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      The Lewisburg Barber, was one of the early posts I made on OHD, since deleted as the old listing photos were pretty bad. I remember being disappointed in the new updates though. The exterior was white back then, if I recall.

    • SueSue says: 1142 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      I really like this quirky house. It’s very charming. I think he had fun here. I would replace all that wrought iron outside back to the original design.

  19. Anne Hamilton says: 210 comments

    Some info on Kensington Palace in SC. It’s Owned by a major Timber company. There are major timber tracts on the land. Roof repaired with standing seam copper after the storm damage. There are no plans to do anything with it at this point. The folks who were managing it as a museum had to vacate, and that is why the collection was moved. Seems to have been some sort of dissagreement with the Timber folks who own it. It’s tragic a wonderfull piece of historical architecture like this in SC cannot be avaliable to the public. Hopefully in future something will work out so it will be again.

    2
  20. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Don’t judge a book by it’s cover…Have a look inside. The owners were thoughtful to preserve all its built-ins and woodwork.

    Kansas City, MO:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/2356038_zpid/

    1
    • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

      Hi Cora,
      Although I’ve yet to attempt a house flip, this one would probably be an excellent candidate except for one thing: the location. It’s less than a block away from the formerly posh Prospect Avenue that ended up becoming an urban slum in the late 20th century. In 2000, during our first trip through KC, we took a wrong turn and ended up going down Prospect Avenue heading south. Block after block of early 20th century homes, some of mansion quality, were reduced to a Detroit level of neglect, vandalism, and abandonment. I think Prospect Ave. has taken a slight turn for the better in recent years (many vacant lots where homes once stood) but in a marginal neighborhood like this one, putting significant money into any house would likely make it a person’s first and last house flip. The comps on the neighborhood map shows almost a uniform pattern of houses in the $45-60K range with most towards the lower figure. Thus, there’s no money to be made or investment justification for renovating this otherwise once fine home. Kind of sad when you think about the neighborhood’s and this home’s plight but it is what it is. Thanks for sharing.

      1
      • Scott Cunningham says: 392 comments

        All of these slums usually started out with the best of intentions. However, human nature being what it is, many of these neighborhoods go into downward spirals of crime, poverty, neglect, and overall crappiness that results in real estate, and classic old homes becoming additional victims. As you mentioned, its sad to see, but there isn’t much you can do. The only hope is when young, ambitious sorts see the value in getting a place with potential at a rock-bottom entry price, and then slowly improving the home over time. Get enough of these types into a neighborhood and you can reach a tipping point where the property values start increasing. Of course the SJW’s will march in and denounce the “gentrification of old historic neighborhoods”, but I’m usually a big supporter of it. Slums don’t do any city any good, and whenever one gets turned around and becomes a nice neighborhood again, I’m happy to see it.

        1
  21. RobynMeRobynMe says: 116 comments
    1907 George F. Barber
    Hamlet, NC

    NOT AN OLD HOUSE
    (could be argued, not a house at all)

    There’s snow here, and at the moment the freezing rain is tap-tap-tapping on my window panes. Blech. Which explains what had me looking at the southern-most town in the 50 states. I know it’s all about location, but I have a serious issue with asking over $60K for a freekin’ *YURT*!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/94-6565-Lewa-Lani-St-Naalehu-HI-96772/2103967316_zpid/
    …even if it does come with a trash compactor.

    I gotta go shovel. 🙁

    3
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      There’s a local yurt…camper…ground, something…near us.
      http://www.georgiamountaininn.com/yurts.htm

      I thought about dragging my husband to one a few years ago, just to say we spent the night in a yurt, never did try it. Now I guess we have our own yurt, although out of wood rather than a tarp and called a storage building. lol

      1
    • SueSue says: 1142 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      I am a huge Hawaii fan. Have been many times. I am not a fan of yuts though. Here you are paying for the land, land I might add that is the path of the active volcanoes lava. It is not on the “safe” side of the island. That is a lot of money to take a change on losing it all.

  22. PepperReed says: 55 comments

    For all you old house fans and bakers out there… :^)

    http://www.preservationmaryland.org/ultimate-gingerbread-architectural-style-guide/

    8
    • Cathy F. says: 2240 comments

      Wow! And talk about needing a whole lotta patience to produce one of those!

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      WOW! Tons of fun. Thanks’ Pepper. My fave was Killough’s Music in North Carolina by Kelsey Sewell.

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      That 1st “Second Empire Style Gingerbread” is freaking awesome! They were all good but that was my favorite…I think, I liked the store/buildings too!

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Was just looking at these again = so cool; and realized I know one of those buildings depicted in gingerbread! The second church shown under the heading “Gothic Revival” is an old family church on my dad’s side, “Saint Boniface Roman Catholic” on N Wabash Ave. in Evansville, Indiana. Can’t wait to show my Auntie at X-mas! http://goo.gl/oDLfYk http://goo.gl/az3yzb Thanks’ again Pepper

  23. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    A lovely 1902 SoCal home:

    Redlands, CA:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/17264976_zpid/

    3
  24. jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1947 Ranch
    OR

    That’s a sad but true testament to the world today. When I look at a once very sweet home like that and know what its fate will likely be, I want to weep.

    1
  25. Joseph says: 367 comments

    Here’s one near me; a nice brick Federal compound with all updates, beautifully done (I think I know who the owner is/was, which would explain the tastefulness – although it now appears to be staged for sale). While it may seem expensive, it is actually no more than a new “McMansion” in this town. But with this, you’d be the only house in town with that tower!

    2
    • Cathy F. says: 2240 comments

      I don’t remember seeing the Albany house before, and it’s (IMO) lovely. Plus… it’s across the street from a park, close to downtown, yet right off Western Ave. – making easy access to other parts of town, too.

      2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Oooohhhhh! How SUPER interesting RT! Thank you. YOU WIN for house of the week this week for the townhouse in Albany, no doubt about it! Soooo much going on there: and unfortunately so much left unseen. That’s the sort of house which really begs 100 pix.

      The, (probably original), electrically back-lit light screen, art glass windows in the DR are SUPER rare, and VERY cool, (if somewhat underwhelming lit by their original, single bulbs at the bottom – easily fixed).
      The probably 30’s red tile fireplace in the master = YUM.
      The contemporary master, double vanity and mirror are GORGEOUS.
      The contemporary attic room with penthouse above are B E Y O N D!
      The back garden and rear elevation are stunning.
      Sooooo many goodies there, top to bottom and inside and out. Lucky buyer!

      2
  26. ChrisICU says: 638 comments

    We see lots of church conversions, but not a lot of firehouse conversions… https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/41-Central-St_Providence_RI_02907_M32400-06705

    1
  27. TheParkThePark says: 25 comments

    Denver, CO and only 1.6 million. I don’t believe the electronic keyboard conveys with the house. Seriously though…. Interesting woodwork.

    https://m.trulia.com/property/3152283769-1444-Stuart-St-Denver-CO-80204

    Don’t have 1.6 million laying around?? …. A little further east, Salina, KS. Your own estate for $215,000

    https://m.trulia.com/property/5031812190-211-W-Prescott-Ave-Salina-KS-67401

    Still in Kansas – Junction City. Ornate woodwork. My brother and I would of destroyed the lattace and stained glass windows in about a week. (we destroyed everything).

    https://m.trulia.com/property/1064957576-503-W-1st-St-Junction-City-KS-66441

    Enjoy!

    3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The Colfax, Denver house is a gem! This link has better pix in view large;
      https://www.movoto.com/denver-co/1444-stuart-st-denver-co-80204-521_5263826/for-sale/

      1
    • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

      The Park, Thanks for sharing. While I would expect any house in the million plus category to be impressive, the better deal here is in the Salina and Junction City, Kansas, homes, IMO. The towered Second Empire is a scarce style of home to find in many regions of the country. It does seem to have been popular in Kansas although many examples have been demolished or altered beyond recognition in recent decades.

    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      I am not a fan of wallpaper and heavy draperies, but virtually EVERYTHING else in the Salina KS house is fantastic. Not the least of which are the actual working exterior shutters! What a lovely place!

    • Jeanette says: 17 comments

      OH MY! My dad was in the Air Force and when I was a young girl (about 12) we lived in Salina, KS while my dad was in Korea. I fell in love with that Salina house and dreamed about it for years! I’m quite seasoned now, so it’s an absolute THRILL to be able to see the inside of it after wondering about it all these years! Thank you!

  28. skyluna says: 5 comments

    This house is from my home town. When my hubby and I were dating, we would go on bike rides through this college town (my alma mater, Central Michigan University) and we would bike past these two twin houses, next to each other. One was in disrepair (the one for sale) and the other was fixed up nicely. I’ve always wanted to see the inside and thought they were just the most beautiful houses. Now I see one is for sale (it needs some love, but that kitchen! WOW!)

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/301-E-High-St_Mount-Pleasant_MI_48858_M42103-48047#photo0

    4
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The oak DR set seemingly left behind in that house is GORGE! There are also some VERY interesting pieces of art pottery apparently left as well scattered about. It’s a great house, but the remaining stuff has my interest! Thanks’ That’s the kind of stuff one dreams of finding left for the new owner, and then cherishes for a lifetime. 🙂

      2
    • Barbara V says: 882 comments

      THAT is a beautiful house, right down to the awkward kitchen and vintage wallpaper. All it needs are the antique stove, refrigerator and farm sink which are currently waiting in my garage for a new home…

    • Cathy F. says: 2240 comments

      A pretty, gracious house, inside & out. Repainting & papering will (IMO) do wonders!

  29. TheParkThePark says: 25 comments

    Hannibal, Missouri $300,000
    https://m.trulia.com/property/1062809276-225-N-Maple-Ave-Hannibal-MO-63401

    I like the old paint job better. Scroll down the one labeled “Mo13”
    http://faculty.wcas.northwestern.edu/~infocom/scndempr/missouri/outevgal01.html

    Andrew J. Settles – store owner, politician and judge. The following link mentions he lived at 221 N Maple St, but currently there is no such address. I wonder when the address changed from 221 to 225? Oh, he was apparently fat too. He weighed 5 lbs more than some other bigwig. ?
    http://www.hannibal.net/news/20161203/history-in-hannibal-rivalry-carries-weight
    Enjoy!

  30. JimHJimH says: 4949 comments
    OHD Supporter

    An 1830’s bluestone house built for Silas Brainard, who operated the first bluestone quarry in the region on this property.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/25-Centerville-Church-Rd-Saugerties-NY-12477/32867772_zpid/

    1
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6048 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Cool! I’m assuming the attached structure was the quarry office. Listing says “tavern”, but – mmmmm – probably not.

      • JimHJimH says: 4949 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Yeah, probably not a tavern but I just don’t know. A later owner named Atkinson Hunt was a founder of the Methodist church down the road which was moved 15 miles from Kingston. Perhaps the addition was a small chapel before that.

        1
  31. John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

    For handy-person types, in Northwest Indiana in the town of Goodland: (near Earl Park and Kentland) https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/502-S-Newton-St-Goodland-IN-47948/94536951_zpid/?fullpage=true The house appears to be from about 1900 with 3,752 sq. feet, five bedrooms, and 1.3 acre lot all for $39,900. Looks pretty solid in the photos but despite some remodeling being attempted, doesn’t look like it would be that difficult to put it back together. This area seems sparsely populated (we visited Earl Park and Kentland a few years ago) but isn’t far from larger cities with Lafayette and Terre Haute, IN, to the south and Chicago to the north.

    1
    • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

      Found a much better photo of this house: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tourismguy/5556016054/in/album-72157626339931702/ (Bruce Wicks, a/k/a “Tourism Guy” on Flickr)

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Wow, I looked at the exterior listing photo and thought it was a small house! It’s so frustrating to see that photo showing amazing potential and the listing photo kind of makes me go “meh” when it’s definitely not a “meh” house!

        • John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

          Agreed. Listing photos can be misleading both in a positive and negative way. The linked-to Flickr photo as you noted shows a large brick home. That said, more work is obviously needed inside but for a brick dwelling of this size and a 1.3 acre lot, it seems like a good value. Wish I had the wherewithal to go see some of these old house “bargains” in person followed by sharing with OHD readers a far more detailed personal report (as I have with a select few posted OHD homes in the past) but we have to work with the limited resources we have. Thanks for your comments.

  32. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I’m going to be adding “quick tags” to posts, although old posts will take time to add. Things like “barn”, “stone house”, “carriage house”, “brick house”…all the things that I think people may want to see of. I won’t be doing color tags. “Fireplace” will be one but I’m unable to have “working” or “non working”, there are some things I couldn’t know just by looking at pics.

    If you want to give suggestions, leave a comment or shoot me an email kelly@oldhousedreams.com

    1
  33. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Stunning woodwork, just a gorgeous 1909 home. Check out the vintage fridge in photo 34 and stove in photo 38:

    Troy, KS:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/113177704_zpid/

  34. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Pretty kitchen and butler’s pantry. 1914:

    Weston, MO:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/2486719_zpid/

    1
  35. Mike says: 66 comments

    Somebody save/move this house!!

    It’s a house with ties to the House Of Tomorrow exhibit at the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago that was ‘discovered’ on a piece of property in Winnetka. The owners don’t want to demolish it and have mentioned perhaps giving it to anyone who’d be willing to move it.

    http://www.chicagobusiness.com/realestate/20171212/CRED0701/171219979/worlds-fair-home-found-on-wilmette-lot

    2
  36. SueSue says: 1142 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    This immense Post Modern ranch has been udated some (do not like the kitchen) but it retains many of it’s original design. I am not a huge fan of this style but I really like this house. Comes with land too.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/104-Hillsdale-Rd_Monroe_NC_28112_M53236-60922#photo39

    1
    • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1139 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1947 Ranch
      OR

      I’ve seen this one before. I agree the kitchen does nothing for me, but the parts that are (near) original are quite spectacular. Get your cardio by going from one end to the other at a jog.

      1
  37. 67drake67drake says: 265 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    Have not been here in a while,so I don’t know if this one has been posted. My favorite area of the state,that I hope to retire to someday. Oh,if I had the $$-
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8900-Mckenzie-Ln-Hollandale-WI-53544/90126037_zpid/

    3
  38. I’ve been driving by this place (en route to one of the barns where I work) for many years, and always loved it, wondered what the interior looked like. It’s set among beautiful mostly old/historic homes, in the horse country of New Jersey.
    It was worth the wait. Wow..
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/34-Burrell-Rd-Lebanon-NJ-08833/38865121_zpid/

    2
  39. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1920, small farmhouse:

    Bladenboro, NC:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/112140040_zpid/

  40. CoraCora says: 2057 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    !@#?!

    Paintsville, KY:
    https://zillow.com/homedetails/105838255_zpid/

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11893 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      It’s a Barber. I use to have interior pics (it’s been for sale before.) I wish I could say what it looked like inside, I think the listing pics for this home has always been bad.

  41. John Shiflet says: 5363 comments

    The Streetview from 2014 https://goo.gl/maps/fJCLujtq7tG2 shows a for sale sign back then. There are nicer apartments right across the street but this house and the street its on are somewhat isolated with not much of a residential context. Thanks for the George F. Barber design confirmation

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