1894 Queen Anne – Campbellsburg, IN (George F. Barber)

Details below are from July 2016, sold status has not been verified.
To verify, check the listing links below.

Added to OHD on 7/20/16   -   Last OHD Update: 10/5/20   -   28 Comments
Off Market / Archived

298 N Sycamore St, Campbellsburg, IN 47108

  • $111,500
  • 3 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3361 Sq Ft
  • 0.52 Ac.
WHAT THE SELLER LOVES ABOUT THIS HOME: "The warm feeling you get when you walk in the home after a long day, the exposed brick chimney in the kitchen, the unique round windows with the stained-glass, beautiful natural woodwork, and all the craftsmanship that you expect from a home of the era." - WELCOME HOME TO THIS WELL PRESERVED 1900'S G.F. BARBER VICTORIAN IN A QUAINT SOUTHERN INDIANA TOWN. THE GRAND FOYER INVITES YOU IN WITH A SHOWPIECE STAIRCASE FEATURING HAND-CARVED NATURAL WOODWORK WITH HAND-PAINTED 9 FOOT CEILINGS, HARDWOOD FLOORS, AND STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. SPACIOUS EAT-IN KITCHEN LEADS TO A QUIET DEN OR OVERSIZED PANTRY AND WALKS OUT TO A COZY DECK WITH PEACEFUL VIEWS. CHARMING PRIMITIVE STORAGE BUILDING IS INCLUDED WITH THIS VICTORIAN BEAUTY. SOLD AS IS. CONTRACT AVAILABLE WITH MINIMUM OF 10% DOWN.
Contact Information
Bobbi Benish, Williams Carpenter Realtors
812-275-4401

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
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28 Comments on 1894 Queen Anne – Campbellsburg, IN (George F. Barber)

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12130 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Fairly certain this is a Barber design but I don’t remember which catalog to post the sketch from it.

    • Chris DiMattei says: 268 comments

      Correct Kelly, definitely a Barber design. I believe this one is more of a customized version of a couple of melded designs. I wish I could find an old or historic photo that shows the original porch design.

      • John Shiflet says: 5426 comments

        Chris, if you look next door in streetview, would that be a Barber design as well? Both houses seem to have that Barber design look.

  2. BethanyBethany says: 3450 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    I am in love with this house and I want to be its friend! The light fixtures are frosting on the cake! I wonder if it’s being used as a rectory; a font of holy water inside the front door seems somewhat unusual otherwise.

    • Bethany, I LOOOVE that! I truly want to be this house’s friend as well. The exterior threw me a bit, but once i saw inside . . . WOW!!!!!!!!!! Sooo much to love, unique features, light/airy, gorgeous wood throughout. I AM IN LOVE! And I LOVE the price too – I know it’s all about location, location, location, but this is a dreamy house for a song of a price. Did I mention, I’m in love?!

  3. TracyTracy says: 92 comments

    Holy, shmoly!!!! Drool…

  4. Arkham says: 69 comments

    That is some magnificent woodwork.

  5. Ed Ferris says: 299 comments

    I used to live five miles from Campbellsburg and always found it funny that such a small countrified town could have four George Barber houses in it. The one next door to this is one, there’s a former B&B that was on OHD two years ago, and there’s a deteriorating example downtown. The town does not have a grocery store, but it does have a plastics factory and a gas station. For shopping, heath care, and entertainment one goes to Salem, about ten miles down the road.
    There was a nunnery for sale in Cincinnati in 2012, and they did leave their holy water stoup. The agent showing it to me didn’t know whether the water was piped in or delivered in jugs from the cathedral.

    • Chris DiMattei says: 268 comments

      Ed, you are correct, there are four examples of Barber designed homes in Campbellsburg. All four were built for members of the Wilkins family. These small, countrified places are exactly the niche market for Barber’s architectural services, because towns like that, didn’t have any architects of their own, but they were not so small that the mail didn’t reach them. You would be surprised at just how small a town could be, and still have a Barber designed home in it. There were some Barber designs built in nearby Salem, so it is likely that Barber publications spread from there.

  6. JimHJimH says: 5257 comments
    OHD Supporter

    From the state survey: Thomas Wilkins house, 1894. The front porch was added in 1910s. The summer kitchen has been enclosed with the house. Most windows have been replaced.

    A good house that needs to shed its aluminum skin. The porch is a bit odd and messes up the Barber design somewhat.

    Thomas Wilkins (1866-1950) lived his entire life in Campbellsburg. He was the youngest son of John T. C. Wilkins, who had come to the area from England in 1850 and opened a dry goods store in town. Thomas followed the same trade He was married to his wife Alice for over 60 years. Sadly, their only child died at birth.

  7. Lindsay G says: 531 comments

    The photo of the dog on the bed reminds me of that one famous painting…I don’t know the artist’s name but I always liked that painting.

  8. Paul W says: 465 comments

    The fretwork, the fretwork, the fretwork ! Have not seen this fretwork design before. The polychroming of the medallion detail on the staircase is unexpected. High level of intactness on the interior. The porch presents and interesting issue, as it makes the overall design too heavy. Although those concrete columns sell for about 500 each, if might help defray the cost of rebuilding a correct porch.

  9. chichipox says: 201 comments

    Could be a beautiful home.

  10. Julie AA says: 10 comments

    WOW!!! this is an amazing house for an amazing price. there are so many details still intact. I would love to re-do the kitchen and bathroom for that price(except for the 3rd floor bath, that’s perfect). I hope someone really appreciates the beauty of it all and restores it to it’s former glory. Thanks for all the history from all the other posters on OHD. I love to hear about who used to live in these beauties.

  11. lara janelara jane says: 469 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Those two front windows in the bays are appealing but the porch was so ‘meh’ that I almost didn’t look at this one, and I would’ve missed out!

    The pocket doors with fretwork are killing me. I’m seeing a couple of great light fixtures. And the beadboard bathroom could really be amazing again.

    I feel like the price is a bit optimistic with the work this needs, not just to get it “OHD-approved” but to make the kitchen functional, ditch the vinyl floors, etc. Apart from any of the boring (read: hidden) updates it might need, I would want to start working on the exterior/porch first. I’m breathing a prayer that there are clapboards and shingles under that vinyl siding! This could be truly spectacular if the next owner wants to invest the time and money to restore it.

  12. Rick says: 70 comments

    I almost hate to opine but myself I like the front porch. So much to like about this place, amazing taxes check, central air a big check per Ed Ferris only ten miles for all your needs check being proud to showing off the interior absolutely.

  13. Carolyn says: 304 comments

    That round window on the second floor just looks so “off” to me. I’d love to know what it originally looked like.

    • Paul W says: 465 comments

      That “round window” is one of the most desired features in this Barber Design and the fact its still there is rare because many have been ruthlessly covered over as part of remuddling.

    • Ed Ferris says: 299 comments

      It’s an original feature; all the Barber houses in that town have it. It’s called a “horseshoe” window by the realtor. As you see on the exterior photos, it contains an operating rectangular window.
      The stair is the same as shown in The Cottage Souvenir No.2, page 120, in the Egleston house in Knoxville. “The small rosettes shown throughout the work are of tinted embossed tile of handsome pattern, and a very beautiful effect is obtained by their use.”
      Salem, Indiana, is itself a small town. They just got a Wal-Mart, or so I’m told. But it does have health services, groceries, and a McDonald’s.

      • Chris DiMattei says: 268 comments

        I believe that John T. C. Wilkins built the first Barber design in 1893. He chose to build the same design that was built a year earlier, in nearby Bedford, IN. The Bedford example prominently featured the horseshoe window, which Wilkins must have fallen in love with because it is featured on all the Campbellsburg examples, as Ed has mentioned. It never ceases to amaze me just how fast Barber’s architecture spread, and without the internet, no less.

      • Carolyn says: 304 comments

        I’m sorry, I didn’t state that very well. I love the round window but the square part looks “off” like it’s a replacement window that doesn’t quite fit in. Do you think that is original also?

        • JimHJimH says: 5257 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Carolyn, you’re right that the modern double-hung window set in place of the original sash isn’t quite the same. On this other Barber house in Campbellsburg, a large fixed-sash window is there now, though the design Kelly posted shows a multi-paned window. Each design was a little different, and all the windows were made to order.
          It’s just one of many details here that could be restored if the owner was so inclined, and has the expertise to do it right.
          https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/07/26/1894-queen-anne-cambellsburg-in-george-f-barber/

        • cheryl plato says: 174 comments

          Don’t think so- next door looks like the same build time, their front door is like that too- I think they design stained glass around the squared window or door. It is on a very lovely old street with lots of older homes and mature trees. Nice!

  14. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12130 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Here’s a good example of what the round window would have looked like once. Click on the old photo to see a larger size.

    http://architecturetourist.blogspot.com/2014/09/happening-now-painting-1890-victorian.html

    • Carolyn says: 304 comments

      Much better! The trim is flat and the circular trim around the window is painted the same color as the window frame.
      The window on the posted house looks like a big metal storm window frame. Just looks out of place. Thanks Kelly for finding that!

  15. Kellee says: 2 comments

    Wow! This house is a steal. I’d probably buy it for the staircase alone. I see a trip to Campbellsburg in my immediate future.

    • Bobbi Benish says: 1 comments

      This grand Victorian home is now available for $117,500. Give me a call or text to take a look!
      765-437-3650
      Bobbi Benish, Realtor
      Williams Carpenter Realtors

  16. ErnieErnie says: 323 comments
    AK

    Yowza! That porch is amazing, the interior is wonderful especially the pocket doors. The only thing that made me say ummm is the square/circle window.

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