c. 1899 Queen Anne – Murray, KY

Added to OHD on 10/15/15   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   59 Comments
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National Register

103 N 6th St, Murray, KY 42071

  • $109,000
  • 3 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3160 Sq Ft
  • 0.25 Ac.
Victorian house in Murray's historic district has a grand foyer w/double french doors, extra large rooms and is on the Historic Registry. Includes original stained glass windows, ornate staircase with decorate wood paneling, soaring ceilings, transoms over doors, 3 fireplaces with original surrounds, pocket doors, built in china cabinet. Zoned B-3 suitable for offices, retail space, restaurants, hotel, churches. Tax credit available for rehab. Conditional use permit allows for residential/commercial use.
Contact Information
Sue Ann Stevens, Keller Williams Experience Realty
(270) 227-4249

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
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59 Comments on c. 1899 Queen Anne – Murray, KY

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I guess the exposed wood may not be period correct but I like it. Maybe not the ideal location for some but I’d love to be near enough to town to walk to it. Check out Murray in the Google van, it looks rather nice and busy enough to have somewhere to walk to!

    • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      The wood walls would have been originally covered with canvas, with a zillion nails along the edges.

      The canvas would have then been painted or papered.

      Today, the house offers an interesting historical debate. Leave the bare wood as is? Or cover it up again?

      Humm, a debate to ponder about over fine wine.

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        I’d have to leave it bare. Throw in 1920s/1930s furniture, very few decorative items and I’d be happy as a clam (the kitchen would be back dated with a big middle work table, Hoosier cabinets and old fridge (in real life I’d hide a dishwasher, somehow!) Of course, that’s just my taste someone else could go the whole vroom and go with 1890’s style and canvas the hell out of the walls, it’d be cool that way too. For the price…could be wowzers!

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11880 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          I’m adding, not sure but I *think* the one ceiling fan in one of the bedrooms is old, the rest not. But I would rip out the newer ceiling fans and go with either vintage or faux vintage ceiling fans (yup, I’m one of THOSE people!) The bathroom would be a start over. Confession, I love the look of clawfoot tubs but not a fan of actually using them, I feel too claustrophobic. Would haul out the jetted tub though.

          • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
            Emporia, KS

            Well, I have finished a glass of wine…and would have to agree with you, Kelly. I would also leave the exposed wood walls alone. They are historically interesting, and visually, too!

            I would, however, do ONE room as it would have been finished originally.

      • Dale says: 8 comments

        Years ago my parents owned a Victorian of this date in Pacific Grove, California, on lighthouse Avenue. It also had bare, redwood, walls similar to this which had wall-paper plastered directly on the wood. It looked quite nice.

    • Ann says: 90 comments

      I like the wood as well.

  2. I would leave it and paint it.

  3. JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
    OHD Supporter

    In another location and market, I could see restoring the original plaster as part of a costly restoration, but not here. It’s a great thing to have a big livable authentic period home in a decent town for a low cost, and the lower the better! Maybe it’s slightly uncivilized to leave the walls raw, but so is living across the street from a used tractor lot, a big reason the house is so cheap to begin with. (No problem for me, I grew up with tractors in the yard!)

  4. LeesaM says: 2 comments

    I would end up covering over the wood, maybe leave it in a room or two. The wood although visually interesting doesn’t allow all the great unpainted moldings to pop the way they should. No one even sees them in the condition the rooms are in currently. Just my two cents.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I’m with you LeesaM. Leaving the exposed pine boards in secondary rooms would be great. It is a fun look – full of character, (and certainly easier than stretching and finishing canvas treatments; (though I’d end up going back to canvas in the rooms which have painted boards – ick). The primary public rooms with the DELICIOUS Walnut woodwork deserve a more finished treatment to show off all that exquisite wood. The design of those balusters is one of the more interesting and beautiful I’ve ever seen, but it all seems to be a bit naked and washed out amid the pine barrens.

      Three cheers for Sue Ann Stevens!!! Beautifully presented: and A+++ for the tower shot! How fun is that! VERY nicely done…

  5. RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Any ideas what the “mail slot” is in the chimney stack upstairs?

    • Michael Mackin says: 2671 comments

      I was wondering about that as well. It looks a little small to be a clean out and isn’t in the right location for that.

  6. John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

    It’s been on the market for a while but is it really a better house than this Marion, IN example priced for ten thousand less? http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/718-S-Washington-St-Marion-IN-46953/94329820_zpid/ Of course, location trumps all else. The Kentucky Queen Anne is a nice house not altered much which is a good thing. I think that “mail slot” is actually a dumb-waiter door. (to deliver meals upstairs without having to carry them up the stairs)

    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      John, this KY home is terrific for the price but the Marion IN house is at least a level of spectacularity above. Is it really available at that price? Is there something horribly wrong with the house or the location? Unbelievable really; my next research project.

      • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        John, thanks for the Marion house. Wow. WOW!

        Jim, the price makes sense because of its location. It is across the street from a parking lot, and next to one.

        The house is right next to downtown (a plus IMO).

        My own big old house is also not in an ideal location, so location is, to me, not AS important as House and Price. It seems a truism that GREAT HOUSE in GREAT LOCATION = GREAT PRICE. So, if one is willing to give a bit on location, incredible luscious jewels can be had quite reasonably.

        Well John, ya’ made my morning!

      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Yeah Jim, with regard to price, (in Marion anyway), it comes down to (macro) location. Marion is like many other Indiana towns, and not in the best, (being generous), economic shape. Because there aren’t the financially empowered yuppies to turn those neighborhoods around you can find great deals like this in towns like Marion, Muncie, Terre Haute, Evansville, Richmond, – etc. However, realizing your investments in a property with upside potential is problematic for that reason. Most of us know what can be had in Marion for a few dollars more, (and that has lingered on the market for years); https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2011/02/28/1850-greek-revival-marion-in/

        • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Jeff, there are many places where the economics are not good, and many good deals to be had if return on investment isn’t the objective. But they’re still not giving away good real estate in decent locations. For example the great house in Brazil IN went for over $100k and needed quite a bit of work.
          This one in Marion seems to stand out for its great quality and livable condition – not everyone is looking for a big project. The location appears neither very remote or impoverished.
          BTW it’s the Eli Halderman mansion built c.1892; he developed the local trolley system.

          • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
            OHD Supporter

            I meant the Delphi house (not Brazil) which sold for $147k and needed roof repair plus:
            https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/08/13/1885-queen-anne-delphi-in/
            Speaking of Brazil, what happened?
            https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/04/26/1890-mission-revival-brazil-in/

            • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
              Emporia, KS

              Jim, the Delphi house is my all-time favorite ever on OHD.

              The Brazil house is also a remarkable stunner. I, too, wonder about its status.

              • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

                Indiana Landmarks should have stepped in to save that one; it may be unique in the United States with a Scottish (Rennie MacIntosh) Arts & Crafts influenced interior due to the Scottish connection of the original owner(s). Even if that connection cannot be proven, with its Mission Revival exterior and original interior its a one of a kind house. I’m not a huge fan of early Arts & Crafts but this one remains a stunner. Its a sad commentary that such an outstanding house priced so cheaply apparently failed to find a buyer. It’s not the only endangered gem out there getting swallowed up by the weeds. Where’s the philanthropist class when you need them? Oh wait, they’re building another sports stadium or buying a pro sports franchise somewhere; I sometimes forget our history is boring and doesn’t matter. It’s all about bling, sports, and money in our fast paced culture, not our past.

              • jehousejehouse says: 105 comments

                It’s my favorite one too. Those bathrooms…I cry every time I look at them I love them so much!

          • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Sure Jim. I accept you point, absolutely, and I’m not putting Marion down. Your question was about pricing, and that’s why. If there were more economic opportunities, (and other criterion my state falls short on – which I WILL NOT get into), these communities would see far more activity in areas rich with antique houses, and accordingly prices would be higher. Fountain Square down in Indy is RED HOT right now from all the yuppies buying and investing; not so Richmond – and it’s a damn shame. ๐Ÿ™‚

        • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

          Jeff, that’s a sad commentary about Marion with this exquisite Classical Revival mansion being on the market now for almost five years with a price drop. At the risk of over-stating what others have said, buy in a place like that for the house, don’t even think about coming out ahead somewhere in the future. If price appreciation is paramount, skip places like Marion. I can show you two wonderful houses (move in ready) in Muncie’s Old West End District FSBO via the City Preservation Officer for the proverbial song and they are not stripped down shells, either. One of them has that fantastic conservatory you (and I) liked. If too high of a price is preventing you from buying a great old house, look in places where old houses are underpriced and get more for your housing money. But also give up dreams of huge price appreciations and a future windfall when you sell. At best you’ll either break even or make a small profit if you’ve taken good care of the property. Until a way exists to teleport great houses in poor locations to great locations, that’s just something you have to accept but the savings may offset the disappointment.

          • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Yup. That’s why I bought my shrinking shack here in Noblesville. It’s “the worst house on the (second) best street, and by the time I’m done, I’ll be swimming in equity. Sure, I’d much rather be in a bigger, fancier house, but me – I’m ALL about the upside. Around here, every time a house in the village sells the next owner fixes it up, (for better or worse with regard to preservation). Property values continue to move upward every year. I have resale in mind with EVERY decision I make, (without disregarding authenticity of course), and wouldn’t DREAM of over-personalizing a thing. I just can’t (personally) imagine putting in all this work and money for no reward, (or – perish the thought – a loss). I get why people do it, but asked in the end if they would do it again – well – who knows. ๐Ÿ™‚

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Jim, Ross, Jeff, et al…my initial reaction to the Marion IN Queen Anne was similar to yours, mostly disbelief at what is offered for the price. I’m not trying to diminish this Murray, KY property in any way; it has some great features as well and most would say its reasonably priced for its location and details. Now, that said, I too wondered what would put a house in Marion, IN, of that caliber in such a low price category so I switched to streetview. Not a pretty picture…vacant lots everywhere instead of the homes that once filled the empty lots. Commercial encroachment as well…I imagine the convenience store right next door is busy and noisy into the late hours of the night. Maybe its even open 24/7. I can imagine waking up from loud booming rap music coming from a parked car at 3 AM next door. But worse is a loss of residential context and being on a very busy street. Not a big problem for most urban dwellers but certainly not the bucolic, tranquil, picturesque residential setting off a cul-de-sac where the loudest noise comes birds happily chirping in the morning. A more comprehensive streetview tour is not encouraging either, but Marion shares a regional, decades long economic malaise with Kokomo, Muncie, Anderson, Gas City which initially had a late 1880’s natural gas boom and industrialization that lasted only a dozen years or so, then a sharp decline, followed by continued industrial activity and then the economic bottom falling out in the late 20th century when manufacturing made a mass exit from the region and headed south to Mexico and east to Asian countries. Quite a few factories in the area were connected to domestic automobile production supplying parts. As that sector also lost market share and began outsourcing parts, places like Marion almost became ghost towns, literally. Scores or even hundreds of neglected, deteriorating houses required like dying trees with dead limbs, “pruning” in the form of demolitions, hence the hollowed out appearance on some streets around downtown, It took me a while to find any remaining cohesive old residential areas but I can show you almost identical streetscapes in the aforementioned above communities so in that context, this exquisite home seems somewhat less of a bargain. (we spent a week in the area in September but skipped Marion) Of course, old house enthusiasts like us often apply a different set of criteria than the typical house buyer. I think I could live in the Marion Queen Anne and be happy (but doubt I’ll get the chance because even for Marion its priced well) but it would be a compromise between the stellar house and the not so wonderful surroundings. We toured the fantastic landmark Seiberling Mansion museum house in Kokomo (the architect was claimed to be from Marion and this house shares some similar details) but it too, like most of Kokomo, has lost many of its Victorian mansions that were its original neighbors. The Seiberling mansion itself reached such a state of advanced neglect that it was almost lost. Don’t get too excited over potential price appreciation, in the years to come the value of that Queen Anne will appreciate slowly in its location. At some point its likely to be surrounded by commercial venues and it may, in time, become something such as a law office or institutional use. I share everyone’s enthusiasm but feel compelled to share all the caveats that must go with it.

        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Too right John. Like Anderson; after the GM plant closed, the town just up and died. If it was closer to Indy; or if there was still an “Inter-urban” rail system it would have survived. When I visited Richmond this spring it made me wanna cry from all the great old houses rotting away. Sad..

          • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
            Emporia, KS

            Your โ€œInter-urbanโ€ rail system comment got me pondering.

            I would like to wave my magic wand and restore fixed-rail trolly’s to every large American city, and restore Amtrak service to small towns across the land.

            Nothing, nothing would jump-start an economic resurgence of our cities and towns more effectively.

            Fixed-rail trolly’s attract HUGE private development along their right-of-ways.

            Before WWII, almost every large American city had incredible trolly systems. Smart cities are re-installing them. Even Detroit is now installing a single line (more lines are better but one is a start).

            • jehousejehouse says: 105 comments

              You are a man after my own heart, Ross. This is my dream for America, along with reinstating train travel. We live in Atlanta and my son goes to college in Milledgeville. He doesn’t have a car. Every single time he needs to go to or from school, there we go, onto the freeway which is constantly being worked on/always has a wreck, for an interminably long and boring drive. And then we turn around an pollute the air some more for the equally boring long drive home. If he could hop on a train and hop off right on campus, where the old station is, how much of a win-win is that?? Sigh. Thanks for letting me vent, Kelly. ๐Ÿ˜‰

            • Paul W says: 462 comments

              The difference is (and the reason interurban failed ) is Midwesterners love their cars. Also in our more consumer driven society you no longer have local stores around the corner. The interurban didn’t have any competition until cars came along and the freedom of not being bound by a “line” opened commerce up. The average American isn’t going to Costco and try to load 20 bags in the trolley.

              • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
                Emporia, KS

                Paul, the reason why America’s trolly system failed is principally because GM purchased lines across the country and replaced them with…GM buses. They then reduced lines and service, forcing people to buy…GM cars (and other brands). This happened to my own Michigan parents in the 1950s.

                Today, LA is infamous for its nightmare-like road conditions, but the city once had one of the best fixed-rail trolly systems in the country. GM destroyed it.

                However, cities are re-installing fixed-rail trolly’s, and to great success.

                As I stated above, nothing would help our cities and small towns more than re-installing fixed-rail trolly’s, and re-connecting small towns across the land to a hugely improved Amtrak service.

                I now live in a very small-town (pop. 500). Two blocks from my house is a closed train station, although trains rumble by daily. The town is in talks with Amtrak to resume passenger service. This would mean that I could walk two blocks, hop on a train, and, say, spend the weekend in Chicago. I would LOVE to do this, but have zero interest in driving my car to Chicago.

                My Cross House is in Emporia, which is, too, in talks with Amtrak about resuming passenger service. So, once the Cross House is done, I could, say, take the train to big Kansas City for their monthly First Night, and stay the evening. I have zero desire to drive to First Night.

                And Julie, above, beautifully points out the value to her family of improved/resurrected rail service.

                Not everybody in America goes to Costco daily to load up with 20 bags. I have never once been to Costco.

                Kelly, I appreciate that discussing trains is WAY off what OHD is about, but so many comments over the years lament the decline in our cities and small towns. I just wanted to mention one possible, proven solution, and thank you for your indulgence!

                • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1875 Italianate cottage
                  Noblesville, IN

                  Yup. Harvey Firestone / GM / Madison Avenue killed it / them. It’s funny that the, (decidedly flawed) Wiki page doesn’t even mention that whole scheme. Heh.

                  Maybe if people with 20 bags had to schlep them a bit there wouldn’t be so much morbid obesity in Indiana / the midwest. Heh. Hey I’m a realist; I get it; but if there hadn’t been a concerted effort by corporate interests to destroy those lines in the 30’s and 40’s, we might be living in a much different / better world. Just sayin. ๐Ÿ˜‰

              • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
                OHD Supporter

                The trolley died because a better form of transportation was developed – the automobile! Perhaps it makes sense to rebuild light rail in certain cities to reduce downtown traffic, but going back to 1880 is silly.
                Let’s look to the future! Most of the developed world has fiber optic, including a spot in remote Scotland recently posted here, though large areas of the US have crap service.

                • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
                  Emporia, KS

                  Jim,

                  You want to look to the future? OK! Then look to Europe, which understands that the future is about high-speed trains and fixed-rail trolly’s. Europe’s advanced train systems makes ours look like a third-world country.

                  You also ignore the enormous advantage in re-linking small towns across the land to regular Amtrak service, and the positive impact this could have on millions of great old homes.

                  Fixed-rail trolly’s also attract vast private development along their right-of-way.

                  In addition, there are also huge environmental advantages to trains.

                  Jim, 1880s? Ahh, most American cities had intact trolly systems until the 1950s.

                  And Jim, what does fiber optics have to do with this discussion? Can’t we have both? Is our world so limited that if we choose A we cannot do B C D and so on?

                  • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
                    OHD Supporter

                    Ross, outside of major metro areas, light rail is a non-starter for many reasons we don’t need to get into here. The old trolley systems were slow, dangerous and expensive to build and maintain, which is why they went away.
                    Amtrak doesn’t go most places and folks don’t use it much in outlying areas as it is.
                    No, we can’t have everything – public finances can barely maintain what we have.
                    Fiber optics and connecting rural areas through communication is way more important than finding new ways to get people there IMO.

                    • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
                      Emporia, KS

                      Jim,

                      You add a LOT to OHD, and I mean no disrespect, but the facts simply do not support your statements.

                      American policies hugely FAVOR roads and cars. Policies being the operative word.

                      Hence, we have a national transportation system which is like 95% roads and cars.

                      In Europe, policies favor multiple transportation options. As a result, they have a vastly better transportation system, and one which is vastly better environmentally.

                      Amtrak receives about $1 billion annually in subsidies (the number changes annually).

                      But highways receive around ten times that amount, annually, in subsidies from the general fund of the Treasury to bail out the Highway Trust Fund.

                      And, I never stated that we can have everything. Maintaining our ever-aging Interstate Highway system is extraordinarily expensive. An upgraded Amtrak system would cost far less.

                      And Amtrak brings in revenue (covering 85 percent of its operating costs with ticket sales and other revenues) while the Interstate Highway System generates…zero revenue (excepting 2,900 miles of toll portions of the 46,730-mile Interstate System).

                      Moreover, fixed-rail trolly’s generate massive PRIVATE development along their right-of-ways. Buses generate zero. Highways generate a bit (at interchanges).

                      There is no question in my mind. The future is about a vastly upgraded Amtrak, passenger service being resumed in countless small towns and cities across America, and fixed-rail trolly’s being re-installed in large cities. I do not have much long-term hope for our massively expensive highway system.

                      And Jim, we can also afford fiber optic. It is all a matter of WHERE we choose to spend.

                    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      Ross, these aren’t new ideas and rail advocates have been proposing things for decades. A big problem is that rail systems can’t replace highways, they can only reduce traffic. Unless you ban cars that is, which isn’t going to happen soon, except maybe in Manhattan.
                      It’s true that new transportation systems spur development, often at the expense of abandoned older business districts, and whole towns in rural areas. Many of the disastrous post-war Urban Renewal programs were justified as necessary for transportation improvements. Imagine how many old neighborhoods would be wiped out by creating new rail corridors.
                      Mass transit in urban areas can be much improved and there are various options, all vastly expensive. Like a lot of folks, I would get behind a plan for expanded rail if it were demonstrated to be transformative and cost effective.

                • jehousejehouse says: 105 comments

                  The automobile’s surge as the most popular form of travel is a direct result of Eisenhower’s move to replace rail travel with freeway travel. Trains didn’t just disappear out of a lack of demand. It was an intentional and deliberate move, and Americans ate it up because it was packaged and sold to them as a shiny new toy. Now we are paying the cost.

                  • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
                    OHD Supporter

                    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
                    Emporia, KS

                    Jim,

                    You latest comment takes my breath away.

                    Did I advocate that highways be replaced?

                    Did I advocate that cars be banned?

                    You wrote: “new transportation systems spur development, often at the expense of abandoned older business districts, and whole towns in rural areas.”

                    HUH?

                    You wrote: “Many of the disastrous post-war Urban Renewal programs were justified as necessary for transportation improvements.”

                    Such “improvements” were roads and highways.

                    You wrote: “Imagine how many old neighborhoods would be wiped out by creating new rail corridors.”

                    HUH? Fixed-rail trolly’s would be created on EXISTING streets. Improving Amtrak would happen on EXISTING rail lines.

                    You keep mentioning expense, wholly ignoring that our current transportation polices hugely favoring roads and highways are THE most expensive. And environmentally THE most destructive.

                    Jim, I have great respect for all that you add to OHD (you are, indeed, a wonder), but I will no longer respond to your comments on this issue.

                    And Kelly, I appreciate your letting this issue continue for so long. Thank you.

                    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      Ross, first on the trolleys, I apologize. Since the conversation started with Inter-city trolleys and I thought you were advocating redeveloping a massive new system, it didn’t occur to me that you were actually talking about Inner-city trolleys, which already exist in most of the big cities. I thought you were proposing something new.
                      You said “Maintaining our ever-aging Interstate Highway system is extraordinarily expensive. An upgraded Amtrak system would cost far less.” Your statement suggested there was a reduced cost benefit from upgrading Amtrak, when all you’re saying is the additional money for Amtrak isn’t that much. Fair enough, though it’s still more money for an unpopular system.

          • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

            There was a small ray of hope as we drove by a completely modern new Chrysler-Dodge Transmission factory just outside of Tipton, IN so while industrial production is way down from the peak, its not entirely gone and investment in modern factories is still being made. We also saw another modern (Ford?) parts production facility in Kokomo so encouraging signs can be found.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Really – a dumbwaiter – in pic 14 – ? Maybe, but those would have to be some itty bitty meals no doubt. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      What a gorgeous, solid house up there in Marion! I’d say that one has John Shiflet written all over it. Hard to pick a favorite. I’d have to see the attic and basements to decide – heh heh..

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Ok, Jeff, I thought you were referring to that white framed thing in photo # 12 from the top. In photo # 14, I feel since it goes into a chimney vent, it may have been used to drop discarded paper and junk mail down into the hearth below for starting a fire. (or possibly to used as a venturi effect to pull air out of the room and create airflow but its seems too small for that purpose. That’s my best guess.

        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Huh. Well that would be VERY curious indeed! Heh heh, thank’s for guessing. I just love those little details. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Michael Mackin says: 2671 comments

      John, Isn’t that a flue cover right above it? It also looks a little small for a dumbwaiter door. Could it have been a fresh air intake for a wood kitchen stove?

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        Yes, in the conversation thread, the photo Rosewater mentioned and the one I thought was the subject were not the same. Yes, that is a stove flue cover above the “mail slot” metal door. It could very well have been a fresh air intake to help vent the chimney as you suggested. The “dumbwaiter door” I referred to is painted white, looks like a picture frame and seems to be in a home office area.

  7. Daughter of GeorgeDaughter of George says: 1025 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1905 Neoclassic & 1937 Deco

    I had never heard of the painted canvas wall coverings before. I always learn something new here!

    • Lynn says: 80 comments

      I visited a historic home in Portsmouth, NH that had a painted canvas that began in the 1st floor entryway, extended up the staircase to the 2nd floor and down the hall. Each section was original and unique…one long painting that never repeated. It was fabulous!!

  8. Paul W says: 462 comments

    I am personally torn by this. The house would be at a completely different level with real walls . “Cabin chic” just doesn’t work for me. The house is a product of someone who was too lazy (more than likely lacked the funds) to properly restore it. Personally I don’t want to do anything that may “inspire” others to further ‘de-victorianize” historic homes. Pinterest is bad enough.

    This isn’t preservation. This house was never intended to look this way on the inside. If someone had covered the interior with 1960’s paneling everyone here would be up in arms about how this house was remuddled, this is no different in my opinion.

    Doesn’t work for me personally, and a great negotiating point to get the price down.

    • JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      “The house is a product of someone who was too lazy (more than likely lacked the funds) to properly restore it.”
      Not true. The house was purchased in 1971 by the Murray Art Guild who happily used it as an art gallery in this condition for 35 years, and registered it with the NRHP as is: http://focus.nps.gov/pdfhost/docs/NRHP/Photos/80001491.pdf
      Paul, you previously advised to remedy the raw walls by installing sheetrock over them. I respect your opinion and work in the field, but that isn’t Preservation either, or an acceptable aesthetic solution!

  9. Chris-6386 says: 4 comments

    Regarding this home…Smokey the Bear would ask that the new owner to please help prevent Queen Anne Fires and either sheetrock/re-plaster or in some way consistently cover exposed sheathing, as the thousands of small air gaps between the wall cladding members creates a common interstitial chaseway which can mean that fire spreads easier, quicker and more completely. An ad hoc furnace if you will, replete with the power of convection.

    First post, loving this site and the many interesting comments, offered by interested people. Also, thank you Kelly!

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Muy interesante amigo. ๐Ÿ˜‰ You are clearly, absolutely correct. It’s a very good point, and thanks’ for making it!

      • Chris-6386 says: 4 comments

        You’re welcome, nice to meet you. Maybe I’m too much of an alarmist, but I see these buildings biting the dust so frequently…you know what I mean

        • RosewaterRosewater says: 6727 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          One can never be too careful when it comes to preventing house fires. I’m a little obsessed about it really. Nice to meet you too. Hope you’ll chime in when you see something pressing like this in that regard. Cheers! J

          • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
            Emporia, KS

            I agree.

            In my old house I never ever ever EVER use a heat gun on the house, and anybody working on the house is FORBIDDEN to use a heat gun.

            I am OK with a heat gun being used on X material which has been removed from the house (like a door).

            The previous owner set the house on fire via a heat gun. They are scary dangerous.

            The fabulous Uppark mansion was almost destroyed after a contractor ignored the ban of “hot work” (heat guns, blow torches, etc.).

            Uppark has, miraculously, been restored, and here is a fine article which will bring tears to your eyes (in a good way):

            http://westdeanconservation.com/2013/03/24/after-uppark-burned-down-reflections/

            One of my favorite books is UPPARK RESTORED.

            You can purchase it on Amazon. Make sure though to first click thru via OHD. Kelly will get a small cut!

            https://www.oldhousedreams.com/bookstore/

  10. JimHJimH says: 5105 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Ross, are you talking about muslin, which is a much lighter fabric? I’ve read about and John Shiflet has explained tacked and wetted muslin wall finishes a few times here as a prep for wallpaper, but never mentioned paint as a final finish. Perhaps someone can explain or provide a reference.
    Shiflet:
    “Shiplap covered with muslin followed by glued on wallpapers was very common”
    “muslin would be tacked up loosely. Then it would be wetted so it shrank. Finally, cloth or paper would be glued to the muslin to create the finished look. There are a few contractors statewide who practice this art, but they arenโ€™t cheap or easy to come by.”

    • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Jim, you are correct. Muslin rather than canvas!

      • John Shiflet says: 5356 comments

        According to a factual Old House Journal “how to” about papering over shiplap interior boards, UNBLEACHED muslin which has the quality of shrinking as it dries after being wetted, was the material of choice for that purpose. As it shrunk, it tightened and provided a smooth surface to paste wallpapers on. Very few practice this old technique today but it would certainly be easier than putting on another layer of thin sheetrock or a three coat plaster wall. There is a plaster cover up for damaged plaster walls and ceiling called “Nu-Wall”. It is glued down over existing plaster to also provide a smooth surface that can be papered over or painted. It might work in place of unbleached muslin and be more durable. The old muslin after a century tends to be fragile and has the consistency of cheese cloth, sometimes too weak to even hold wallpaper any more. It would be worth investigating or experimenting with Nu Wall to see how it would perform but how effective its adhesive on wood is remains to be determined. I have no direct experience with either method.

  11. Nancy says: 171 comments

    Haven’t been able to get on here for awhile. Got rid of our cable package over a year ago. Just got internet back at home. I have lots of catching up to do! I live in Aurora IN. and work in Cincinnati (where I am from)Wonderful old gems of houses all over the state. Low taxes. Nowhere to work. Schools not great. It’s sad to so many of these beautiful houses empty and neglected. We lucked out by being able to live in an old IN house close enough to work in Cincinnati. That Marion house is wonderful, but I wouldn’t want to live in Marion. This KY house, I would have to do something with the walls. I know Kelly would love the wood look though. Stained glass, big porch, wonderful woodwork, all for next to nothing sigh……

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