1889 Shingle – Nashua, NH

Added to OHD on 7/17/15   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   19 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
Are you the new owner? Comment below, we'd love to say hi!

Nashua, NH 03064

  • $425,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 2.5 Bath
  • 3376 Sq Ft
  • 0.51 Ac.
TURN BACK THE CLOCK. Incredible Opportunity to Bring this Historic North End Victorian back to its former glory. This is the first time that the home has ever been on the market. Spectacular original unpainted woodwork throughout, 2 story stained glass window, 4 ornate fireplaces, refurbished slate roof, 3 story carriage house. If you have dreamed of restoring an untouched relic this will be well worth your labor. One of a kind!
Contact Information
Cheryl Kisiday, Keller Williams Realty
603-883-8400
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: ,

19 Comments on 1889 Shingle – Nashua, NH

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. RossRoss says: 2411 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    Ohhh, baby!

    This house just revs my heart right up!

    Please realtor, pretty please, more interior pics?

    1
  2. says: 5 comments

    DROOL. And take a Google street view cruise….Lovely homes everywhere!

  3. Sapphy says: 377 comments

    Just when i was getting excited, the interior photos came to an abrupt end. This is a huge house, and needs more photos of the rooms inside it.

  4. John Shiflet says: 5357 comments

    The house looks a few years older than 1889 with the Aesthetic Movement themed stained glass windows. Nice details throughout. Nashua, NH, brass/bronze hardware from the Aethetic period is highly prized and among the most beautiful created in the Victorian age. Wonderful house overall but I know nothing about local real estate values. I’m also terrified to ask about the property taxes for this one.

  5. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11866 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    A few more photos were added. No full room pics although we get to see what looks like the kitchen.

  6. Sapphy says: 377 comments

    So beautiful, and thanks for the extra photos. But do you see what i mean about kitchens? This house is stunning. And then you see the kitchen. It’s tiny and doesn’t look like it belongs in the home. Surrounded by all these grand rooms and open spaces, no wonder the kitchen looks dark and sad.

    • John Shiflet says: 5357 comments

      Original Victorian era kitchens were often small, cramped, and furnished in a very spartan manner that is at odds with the opulent other (public) rooms downstairs. Why? Because kitchens back then were the domain of the hired help (cooks, servants, butlers, scullery maids) and only close members of the family would dare step foot in the kitchen usually to consult with the cooks about meal choices. Today’s concept of the kitchen as the center of a household did not begin until the labor shortages during World War I. The whole staff of servants to keep up a household was disappearing in those years as the lady of the house took on some of the cooking duties. After the 1920’s kitchens began to change rapidly with labor and space saving devices filling in for the absence of hired help. That trend has continued over the years to what is now perhaps the most important room in some households. When I saw a photo of the kitchen here I thought “time capsule” because this is what many Victorian era kitchens looked like even in grand mansions. The challenge for a buyer today would be to create a new kitchen that still reflects the time period of the house. One need not hide modern appliances behind false fronts but choices in cabinets, counter-tops, hardware, and lighting can go a long ways towards having a modern functional kitchen that is not completely disconnected from the original style and decor of the house. The best kitchen makeovers look like they’ve always been there yet are still functionally modern. If in doubt, consult a kitchen designer familiar with historic styles. In an earlier issue a couple of months ago, the Old House Journal had an extensive how-to article about kitchens in old houses.

      • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
        Emporia, KS

        Hi John,

        I agree that pre-WWI kitchens were the domain of servants, and were spartan, but disagree with the notion that old kitchens are small.

        While a small house might well have a small kitchen, in my experience pre-WWI kitchens are of a size commensurate to the scale of a house.

        In my 1894 pile, the kitchen is of a very good size. When you add in the attached spaces (a pantry, a butler’s pantry, and servant’s hall), the kitchen is quite large.

        Yes, my house is not normal (almost 9,000 square feet) but even average homes before WWI had good-size kitchens and with pantries. It is quite rare that such kitchens were also not FILLED with light, as daylight was critical. My kitchen has a gigantic double south-facing window.

        • John Shiflet says: 5357 comments

          Ross, I was thinking it might have been larger originally but had to go with the photo lacking further evidence. Also, some of the kitchen duties (including laundry) were relegated to the basement which is where the scullery maid, a cook’s apprentice who cleaned the pots and pans and did other menial kitchen jobs, might have worked. Kitchens back then were large enough to serve the needs of the household but from the photo, this one looks cramped to me.

          • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
            Emporia, KS

            Hi John,

            I think it does a disservice to this cool house to state that it has a small kitchen.

            There is but a single image. And the image is a close-up.

            The kitchen could be thirty-feet-long and we would never know from the single image provided.

            Also, considering the scale of the house (massive) I would be very surprised that the kitchen is small. It is a big house!

            Oh, my house has a huge laundry room in the basement, and with large south-facing windows. It was linked to the kitchen above via a dumbwaiter, and laundry chute (going up the second floor). The former is gone but I am recreating it; the latter is partially extant and I am also recreating what has been lost. Cool stuff!

            • John Shiflet says: 5357 comments

              Ross, I have no wish to do a “disservice” to this house by making an assumption about kitchen size. You’re correct in that the one photo gives no idea of actual room size and in the absence of a floor plan or measurements it could be small or auditorium size. What else do you want me to say?

    • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Hi Sapphy ,

      The one image of the kitchen (a close-up also) cannot possibly convey its size. The image is also poor one; I suspect that it is not dark in person.

      The one image also thrilled me, for I see what may be an original cabinet and sink, which may be restorable!!!

  7. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11866 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Flipped. link to photos. $1,399,000

    • RossRoss says: 2411 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Sigh.

      A great old house now looks…kinda like a new McMansion.

      Sigh.

      I am deeply grateful that they at least did not paint over all the gorgeous woodwork.

      But they tore out the radiators (the best way to heat a big old house) and installed central heat/air.

      They removed the old lighting and installed Home Depot.

      They removed the amazing ORIGINAL stone sink! The sink was incredibly rare, and such sinks polish up GORGEOUS.

      Sigh.

      There are no images of the old bathrooms so I have no idea of how much additional history was thrown into the dumpster. However, why didn’t they at least install vintage marble vanities? These are readily available in salvage yards. And vintage mirrors, and vintage bathroom lighting? Why didn’t they install period-correct wall and floor tiling? Instead of having bathrooms which look exactly like McMansion bathrooms, they could have had bathrooms as wonderful and distinctive as the rest of the house (and for about the same cost).

      Ditto for the EXPANSIVE new kitchen. With (eeeeeek!) CAN LIGHTS!

      And the exterior colors do not complement the brick and dark roof.

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11866 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Yes, a sigh of relief about the unpainted wood work but I’m scratching my head at why removing some of the old light fixtures was a good idea. The exterior is an even bigger WTF. At least they didn’t paint the brick.

  8. Sapphy says: 377 comments

    Sigh. And let’s not forget that the average house price in this area is somewhere near 300,000.00. Selling a million dollar home in this area is going to be a challenge.

  9. PlainJ says: 1 comments

    I pass by this home all the time. It is in the City’s Historic District, which varies more greatly in price than the general area. There are other antique homes worth roughly half a million dollars to three quarters of a million. A few mansions may ocassionally reach or exceed a million. Another mansion across the street once went on the market for at least $1.2 million a few years ago. They never disclosed what it eventually sold for, but the cost for such a home is possible.

  10. RosewaterRosewater says: 6683 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Can’t believe I missed this. Outstanding. The “renovated” version is currently on the market. Google it if you’re currently feeling a bit too happy.

Comment Here


To keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents, comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved. Keep topics to the home, history, local attractions or general history/house talk.

Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.
Click here to read the comment rules, updated 1/12/20.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified. Do not contact the agent unless you are interested in the property.