1906 Classical Revival – Sparta, GA

SOLD / Archived From 2014
Added to OHD on 3/4/14 - Last OHD Update: 2/14/18 - 20 Comments
Address Withheld

Map: Street View

Price

$190,000

Beds

6

Baths

4

SqFt

6116

Acres

4.3

PRESENTING THE BURRELL- GOSS HOUSE. ACCORDING TO ARCHITECTURE OF MIDDLE GA, OCONEE AREA, PUBLISHED BY U OF GA U PRESS, THIS GRAND 6,116 SQ FT CLASSIC SOUTHERN PLANTATION PROPERTY IS IN THE GREEK REVIVAL STYLE-SIMPLE BUT MASSIVE. LOCATED ON FOUR PLUS ACRES IN THE HISTORIC DISTRICT OF SPARTA GEORGIA. COUNTY TAX RECORDS REFLECT 1880 AS THE YEAR BUILT WHILE THE CURRENT OWNER BELIEVES IT WAS BUILT IN 1913. THE SPARTA HANCOCK COUNTY HISTORIAL SOCIETY STATE THE HOME WAS BUILT BY WILLIAM H. BURWELL IN 1906. HOME HAS GREAT BONES BUT HAS BEEN VACANT FOR SOME TIME AND IN NEED OF REPAIRS.
Sold By
John Mitchell, John Thomas Mitchell      478-453-4200
Links & Additional Info
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20 Comments on 1906 Classical Revival – Sparta, GA

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  1. Mark says: 162 comments

    I’d agree with the current owners ~1913 build date assessment. I don’t see anything to indicate otherwise, although it could have been rebuilt over an older home. It certainly looks more “revival” era than plantation home era.

  2. Jeff says: 13 comments

    When you look at the house on Google maps it looks as though there is a house attached to the rear that may be the earlier build portion. The roof is completely different.

  3. JimmyGlenn Greenway says: 8 comments

    I love the house, but was disappointed with the lack luster main staircase. It is so Blah compared to the impressive front facade and the other nice details.

  4. James R. says: 68 comments

    Wow…1823, 1880, 1913….this one is perfect for the amateur house sleuth.

    There may be a 1823 house under there somewhere, but I don’t see it in these pictures. 1880- that doesn’t seem right either, too late for Greek Revival and too early for Classical Revival. Although Greek Revival hung on a long time in the South, 1880 is pretty late.

    If I just had to guess an era, I’d say it’s a 1900-1910 era Classical Revival. Since 1913 is pretty close to that, I’d therefore guess 1913 is the date of what we are looking at.

  5. JimJim says: 3899 comments

    “And I want 25 foot high Corinthian columns on the Portico – no, make them Composite Order.”

  6. Paul WPaul W says: 569 comments

    It looks to be a “revival home” . Having said that its not at all unusual to see earlier “farmhouse’ types of homes Colonialized.

    Generally older homes have more massive baseboards and higher ceilings. The replace tiles were first used in the 1880’s but there use continued all the way through the 1920’s The mantels appear to be 1900 ish and the beveled leaded window designs are not early colonial.

    Early southern colonials of this size would have 12-14 ft ceilings. I really love these old colonial style homes, even though I’m a Victorian guy. The big thing outside is going to be with the paint which is alligatored and needs to be removed. The column bases are an old fix and I assume the bases of all the columns are shot under that. They might be able to be rebuilt but If you have to replace them? Lots of money! I was involved with a project in SC where they rebuilt a porch (older house) The columns replacement, structural restructure of the porch etc ran 85K by the time they were done. Usually when columns rot they pull the porch structure away from the house. If this is a balloon framed house I’d expect ‘issues’ where the porch meets the house.

    Having said all that this would be magnificent restored and Sparta has some high end housing so the cost would probably be justified.

  7. Lynn says: 67 comments

    I don’t know the Georgia real estate market, but this price seems pretty cheap for such a large house on 4+ acres. It sort of reminds me of the scene from Gone With The Wind when Tara has fallen into disrepair. Kinda romantic in a way. Anyway, I am a Queen Anne girl, but this house is very lovely and for the price too. Makes me say “hmm?”

  8. Trish @TheOldPostRoad says: 33 comments

    I’m no expert, but I would think that is the Colonial Revival or maybe Free Classic? style – after the Victorian period around 1900. We live 45 minutes from this home and my neighbor’s house was built in 1900 and has identical fireplaces and has a curved porch (similar to the curved wall) and their house is noted as a Free Classic style in local books. The exteriors are not similar. I’ve also seen that exterior style called “Southern Colonial”.

    That being said, that is an absolutely GORGEOUS home from the street. Perfect.

    Poor Sparta, as I’ve expressed on this blog, before. “Bless her heart.”

  9. Trish @TheOldPostRoad says: 33 comments

    One more thing –
    We have some older homes in town that were just a small cabin type house in the early 1800’s, and then a magnificent place was built around it – pretty much obliterating any signs of a small one or two roomed cabin. That could be the case, here.

    Those floors are not much earlier than 1890’s – given their narrow width. Then again, they could have all been replaced. I see no signs of trim or doors or mantle indicating anything earlier than 1890’s, but I am not an expert and am looking at photos.

  10. LottieLottie says: 406 comments

    Kelly, something didn’t seem right with this listing. The real estate agent who posted the description for this house got things a little mixed up. This is NOT the Springer-Holten House. (picture on Digital Library of Georgia)

    http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/meta/html/dlg/larc/meta_dlg_larc_jlc0679.html?Welcome

    201 Hamilton Street, Sparta, Ga, is the Burwell-Goss House and was built in 1906 by the Honorable William H. Burwell. For the last ten years I have passed through Sparta, Ga, and have turned down Hamilton St. to go by the majestic Burwell house, mostly to see that it is still there. Some years it had shining paint and a yard full of children and other years it was empty in need of TLC. This house is full of history! A picture of the house is at both websites below.

    http://shchs.org/

    SPARTA HANCOCK COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

    http://home.windstream.net/jpw/spartaindex.html

    SPARTA, HANCOCK COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

    Sparta once had postcards made of the area. Here is one of the Burwell House.

    http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gahanco2/Sparta_16.jpg

    And dear Kathy at A Delightsome Life blog lives next to the Burwell House and blogged about how beautiful the house looked in the snow on January 20th. She has some very interesting pictures of the columns and portico about half way down her post, entitled Snow Day Two.

    http://www.adelightsomelife.com/2014/01/snow-day-two.html

    I hope someone comes along that just needs a house like this and has plenty of money to pour into it! Hamilton St. has beautiful homes along it. The town itself is very depressed. I agree with Trish about Sparta, “Bless her heart”.

    Just wanted to correct the information on the Burwell-Goss House. Just drives me nuts when people don’t know their Georgia history 😀

    • Kelly, Old House DreamsKelly, Old House Dreams says: 9652 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks for the comment about the error. So then this is a 1906 house, not 1913, interesting. I’ll update the build date and include that fabulous old photo of the place. Appreciate it!

    • Kathy says: 1 comments

      Thank you, Lottie for your sweet comment! I am delighted to be able to see the Burwell house from my kitchen window each day. It is an amazing home – I hope someone comes to love and appreciate it soon!

  11. Paul WPaul W says: 569 comments

    That postcard image will be invaluable to anyone who restores this house. It eliminates the guess work of what it looked like and what the column base should look like. I was very lucky to find a photo taken in the 1890’s of my house. Anytime you can restore off an old image its great.

  12. Leon says: 1 comments

    I live near this house and it is a bargain. Wonderful neighbors all around. Sparta is like a convenient village with a little grocery, hardware, pharmacy and anything you need. And towns close by have everything you want. I live here and do not bother to lock my doors at night sometimes. I think the Burwell house is in better shape that the problems on the outside make it look. I love it here in Sparta.

  13. LottieLottie says: 406 comments

    Update: Check out Kathy’s blog for pictures of the interior at the new owner’s open house!

    http://www.adelightsomelife.com/2014/12/dream-house.html#comment-68404

  14. Dan W. Goss II says: 1 comments

    Hopefully, the following history of the Goss house will be of interest to those who have posted past comments. The house was constructed at the turn of the 20th century by a senator in the Georgia legislature. He went bankrupt during the process.

    Mr. W. A. Sands of Columbus Ohio purchased the home and finished it with the purposes of being a hunting lodge. He also purchased 1000 acres about 15 minutes from the home with the intention that a family member would farm it.

    His daughter Helena Sands married Harry Goss and they eventually moved into the home. These were my grandparents. I briefly lived in the home during the early 1970’s. The people of Sparta were amazing. The times I had in Sparta and in “the Sparta House” we’re the best.

    I assisted in moving my a grandmother out of the home in 1987. It was just too much with here living there by herself. We sold the home a few years later- it was part of a family trust created by my beyond wise great grandfather Sands.

  15. Dan, this is Sistie Hudson, a lifetime resident of Sparta, Hancock County, GA. I loved your post and found out things that I did not know! My Daddy, Dr. George Green, called it the Dick Goss Home, and other times the Sands Home—-both were right! He loved the house and hoped one fay to purchase it but he died long before it went on the market. I understand that there was a similar house like this one, built about the same time in Culverton—belonged to a Moore. The only difference was that it was squared on the front, instead of semicircular. I buy all things “Hancock County” and bought several pieces of Burwell House Stationery and gave the new owner a piece. I still have a partially written letter written to “Jane”.–she mentions that she and “Bill”(must be W.H. Burwell) had sold the house 15 years prior to a Northern man and he is here part of the time. This must have been your great grandfather. The letter was never finished or mailed. Such a small world, isn’t it! Would love your contact information. I am Chairman of the Board of Commissioners here, and back in the ;80’s was Mayor—just like Mr. Burrell. He actually was Mayor and also served as Speaker of the House of Representatives. My email is sistiehudson@aol.com and I would love to hear from you!

    1

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