Specially selected historic real estate for old house enthusiasts.

c. 1787 in Chaplin, CT

$379,000

For Sale

Added to OHD on 1/25/23   -   Last OHD Update: 1/25/23

329 Chewink Rd, Chaplin, CT 06235

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • 3 Bed
  • 2.5 Bath
  • 1974 Sq Ft
  • 6.95 Ac.
Charming , welcoming, stirs the soul. Historic Hair Farm is sitting atop a knoll this early cape stands proud overlooking a meadow and babbling brook. The treed lot and established gardens frame this home. Original windows, wide board floors, 3 stone fireplaces on the first floor. Keeping room, with fireplace, kitchen, Living room with fireplace and bedroom or dining room with fireplace. Bathroom on the first floor. Pantry and a entrance from the side of the house to a den. Upstairs a bathroom and 2 bedrooms. There is a newer barn on the property and could lend itself to many possibilities- town approval of course. Oh and an outhouse too! Newer roof. Newer exterior paint.
Agent Contact Info

Jennifer Clark, First Choice Realty :: (860) 779-7460

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bobby white
Supporter
5 days ago

OK. I am in love. Sheer perfection. Complete bliss.And there is a brook. Can I have beavers???? Such gentle creatures. We could splash around together on warm summer days.
Did I mention that I am in love?
I envision myself sitting in that well worn armchair, gazing out at my modest estate. Not being able to sit still for more than five minutes because…
I’m already out planting a plethora of native Kalmia latifolia Mt Laurel. Creating my very own Mt. Laurel Dells. Interesting as well as beautiful.
Ecology
Kalmia latifolia has been marked as a pollinator plant, supporting and attracting butterflies and hummingbirds.[7]
It is also notable for its unusual method of dispensing its pollen. As the flower grows, the filaments of its stamens are bent and brought into tension. When an insect lands on the flower, the tension is released, catapulting the pollen forcefully onto the insect.[8] Experiments have shown the flower capable of flinging its pollen up to 15 cm.[9] Physicist Lyman J. Briggs became fascinated with this phenomenon in the 1950s after his retirement from the National Bureau of Standards and conducted a series of experiments in order to explain it.[10]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalmia_latifolia

MT LAUREL FIRST CHOICE.png
Kirsten
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
5 days ago

I love it when you get effusive Bobby. Makes me grin to see you that delighted in something.

Myself, my jaw dropped when I saw the stone sink in photo 11. It pretty much fell off when I saw the second stone sink in photo 13. Those are a.maz.ing. Gah…

celeste
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
5 days ago

Kirsten, me too! For a split second I thought the first one was a reproduction that we see sometimes, which is nice, but my OHD-y senses took over and were validated in such a giddy way when my eyes fell upon the second.

Kirsten
Reply to  celeste | 110 comments
5 days ago

That was what convinced me, too, Celeste! Sink number 2. Astonishing.

celeste
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
4 days ago

Agreed. ❤️

DeborahH
Reply to  celeste | 110 comments
1 day ago

YES!! The stone sinks got me right in the heart! I came here to rave about them, but you’ve all beaten me to it!

celeste
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
5 days ago

Bobby, I think we’re going to have a love triangle, or more like a… whatever geometric shape with many, many points due to all the like-minded souls here on OHD.
Kudos for introducing me to a wonderful, gorgeous, NATIVE plant. Do you ever imagine what America (The World!) could (will) be like with everyone doing whatever they can in their cities, towns and backyards (heck, balconies, rooftops, etc.) to repair and recreate native ecosystems by planting endemic and suitable, non-invasive flora? And the fauna? Build it and they will come 😺.

bobby white
Reply to  celeste | 110 comments
5 days ago

It’s only January but I’m thinking this wonderful house is going to show up on many end of year favorites lists.
I don’t know if every state has a Native Plant Society but I suspect most do and they’re an excellent source of info on their state’s native flora.
There’s a wonderful book I think you might enjoy. It’s about English hedgerows but certainly has relevance here.
The title is Hedgerow, written by Eric Thomas. Here’s an Amazon review:

5.0 out of 5 stars
 Wonderful book!
Reviewed in the United States on March 20, 2012
Verified Purchase
This book is written with a great deal of sensitivity–for the environment, and for bio-webs. The illustrations are incredible, and include a four-page fold-out. I’ve long wanted to plant a hedgerow–I now feel very motivated to finally do so! This book will not only educate you, but it will make you long for days gone by, and for the lost knowledge of our times. It will also instruct you of how to establish a hedgerow, beginning very simply, and adding to it as the years go by.

HEDGEROW.png
celeste
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
4 days ago

Oooh, hedgerows…. One day I’m going to England, but I’ll read this book first, thanks!

Ernie
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
4 days ago

You could have beavers if you want your neighbors down stream to dislike you & you want your property to flood.  😆 

bobby white
Reply to  Ernie | 398 comments
4 days ago

Beavers offer many advantages and their dams can be managed There has been a lot of recent research on this.Two links on the subject:

Pond Levelers

A pond leveler is simply a pipe through a dam. The pipe is set at a height that prevents further flooding, but retains enough water so that beavers can remain onsite. A cage is placed around the inlet of the pipe to prevent beavers from plugging it with mud and sticks. These devices require very little maintenance

(3-4 check-ups per year), and can last indefinitely

https://beaversnw.org/flooding-reduction. There are pics.

Brief excerpt from a lengthy UMASS article:
As climate change causes extreme storms in some areas and intense drought in others, scientists are finding that beavers’ small-scale natural interventions are valuable(link is external)
. In dry areas, beaver ponds restore moisture to the soil; in wet zones, their dams and ponds can help to slow floodwaters. These ecological services are so useful that land managers are translocating beavers in the U.S.(link is external)
 and the United Kingdom(link is external)
 to help restore ecosystems and make them more resilient to climate change…

…Cool, wet soil also serves as a buffer against wildfires. Recent studies in the western U.S. have found that vegetation in beaver-dammed river corridors is more fire-resistant(link is external)
 than in areas without beavers because it is well watered and lush, so it doesn’t burn as easily. As a result, areas near beaver dams provide temporary refuge for wildlife(link is external)
 when surrounding areas burn(link is external)
https://extension.umass.edu/riversmart/news/beavers-offer-lessons-about-managing-water-changing-climate-whether-challenge-drought-or-floods.
.

JDmiddleson
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
4 days ago

Thank you, Bobby! We owned property at one time that had a cabin on it and quite a few beavers up and down the stream. Not only did we benefit from the watershed they saved but it was a huge draw to all kinds of animals, birds and insects, not to mention fish! Still great memories!

bobby white
Reply to  JDmiddleson | 5050 comments
4 days ago

I’m jealous. For better angle, click on pic.

BEAVER !!!!!!.png
celeste
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
4 days ago

When reading the history of America and therefore of European commercial enterprises, mostly in furs and fish, I try to imagine the land filled with the furry critters, all of them. I mean, there had to be (unsure of exact numbers) copious quantities of critters considering the numbers of pelts extracted. 😿
My relatives in Newfoundland, as well as in books on the subject, mention being able to practically walk on the cod fish, they were so plentiful. Talk about Edenic!

celeste
Reply to  JDmiddleson | 5050 comments
4 days ago

Wonderful to hear, and like Bobby, I’m jealous! But so happy that you got to experience… any baby beavers?!

JDmiddleson
Reply to  celeste | 110 comments
4 days ago

We owned about 60 acres, most of it in a small valley with a stream so small, you could step over any part of it. There were an abundance of willows, brush and small trees so thick, you couldn’t walk through it. It was perfect for beavers. There were a series of dams up and down the small creek, creating one small pond after another. Yea, lots of baby beavers. I loved to watch them, from a distance, of course. It was amazing the variety of wildlife that thrived in that environment!

bobby white
Reply to  JDmiddleson | 5050 comments
3 days ago

As I’m sure you know, the single best way to attract wildlife is to provide a reliable water source. And when there are thickets adjoining it, that provides small creatures with protection from raptors, increasing their likely use of that water.

Purista
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
3 days ago

Interesting, I have been familiar with Kalmia latifolia since college days but it suddenly dawned on me as I read the name right here that the discoverer could have been Swedish explorer and renaissance man Peter Kalm. So I looked on Wiki and they have it as Finnish explorer Pehr Kalm….who is apparently one and the same as Peter. Ironically enough, some of our best accounts of American life and architecture in the 1700s come from the annals of foreign visitor Peter Kalm.

bobby white
Reply to  Purista | 432 comments
2 days ago

Following your lead, I did some reading. Selected excerpts follow:

Pehr Kalm

[Sidebar] A picture commonly believed to portray Kalm, although some modern-day historians have suggested it may be of Kalm’s colleague Pehr Gadd.[1] Painted by Johan Georg Geitel, 1764.

Pehr Kalm (6 March 1716 – 16 November 1779), also known as Peter Kalm, was a Swedish explorer, botanist, naturalist, and agricultural economist. He was one of the most important apostles of Carl Linnaeus.

In 1747, he was commissioned by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to travel to the North American colonies in order to bring back seeds and plants that might be useful to agriculture. Among his many scientific accomplishments, Kalm can be credited with the first description of Niagara Falls written by a trained scientist.[2] In addition, he published the first scientific paper on the North American 17-year periodical cicada, Magicicada septendecim.

Kalm wrote an account of his travels that was translated into numerous European languages; a 20th-century translation remains in print in English as Peter Kalm’s Travels in North America: The English Version of 1770, translated by Swedish-American scholar Adolph B. Benson…

Kalm studied at the Royal Academy of Turku from 1735. In 1740, he entered the University of Uppsala, where he became one of the first students of the renowned naturalist Carl Linnaeus. In Uppsala, Kalm became the superintendent of an experimental plantation owned by his patron, Baron Sten Karl Bielke.[4]…

he was also appointed by Linnaeus and the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (of which he had been a member since 1745) to travel to North America to find seeds and plants that might prove useful for agriculture or industry. In particular, they wanted him to bring back the red mulberry in the hope of starting a silk industry in Finland (which was then an integral part of Sweden, today also known as Sweden-Finland.

On his journey from Sweden to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Kalm spent six months in England, where he met many of the important botanists of the day. Kalm arrived in Pennsylvania in 1748; there he was befriended by Benjamin Franklin and naturalist John Bartram...

In his Species Plantarum, Linnaeus cites Kalm for 90 species, 60 of them new, including the genus Kalmia, which Linnaeus named after Kalm. Kalmia latifolia (Mountain-laurel) is the state flower of Pennsylvania and Connecticut.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pehr_Kalm

A side note: John and son William discovered the subsequently named tree, Franklinia alatamaha.

“No tree which ornaments our gardens has a more romantic history,” begins a lengthy 1933 article published in The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. The history of Franklinia’s discovery in coastal Georgia, followed by disappearance in the wild, and saved only by its ability to grow, flower, and seed in the Philadelphia garden of its initial collector entail the main thread of the unusual botanical history.[9]
Philadelphia botanists John and William Bartram first observed the tree growing along the Altamaha River near Fort Barrington in the British colony of Georgia in October 1765. John Bartram recorded “severall very curious shrubs” in his journal entry for October 1, 1765. William Bartram returned several times to the sameto the American South, funded by Dr. John Fothergill of London. William Bartram collected F. alatamaha seeds during this extended trip to the South from 1773 through 1776, a journey described in his book Bartram’s Travels published in Philadelphia in 1791. William Bartram brought seed back to Philadelphia in 1777 at which time William reported to his father that he had relocated the plant, but this time had been able to retrieve its seeds although it was not until after John’s death (1777) that he was able to achieve flowering plants (1781). After several years of study, William Bartram assigned the “rare and elegant flowering shrub” to a new genus Franklinia, named in honor of his father’s great friend Benjamin Franklin. The new plant name, Franklinia alatamaha, was first published by a Bartram cousin, Humphry Marshall, in 1785 in his catalogue of North American trees and shrubs entitled Arbustrum Americanum. (Marshall 1785: 48–50; Fry 2001).

Franklinia alatamaha is a small deciduous tree growing to 10 m (33 ft) tall, but commonly 4.5–7.5 m (15–25 ft).[6] It is prized for its fragrant white flowers, similar to single white Camellia blossoms; the smell may remind some of orange blossoms or honeysuckle.[7] The tree has a symmetrical, somewhat pyramidal shape, often with different individuals of the species forming almost identical crowns. It frequently suckers and can form several vertical trunks close to ground level. The bark is gray with vertical white striations and has a ridged texture. The alternate, obovate leaves are up to 6 in (15 cm) in length and turn a bright orange-red in the fall. Although difficult to transplant, once established, F. alatamaha can live a century or more.

The seed capsules require 12–14 months to mature. Unlike almost all angiosperms, Franklinia alatamaha exhibits zygotic dormancy. It pollinates in late summer or early autumn, is then dormant over winter, and only sets fruit during the subsequent summer. Female gametophytes are mature prior to pollination, with double fertilization occurring soon after pollination. The zygote becomes dormant immediately after fertilization with delay of development until the following summer. Initial development of endosperm occurs for up to 3 months after fertilization but comes to a standstill at winter’s onset. With onset of the following summer, embryogenesis begins and endosperm development restarts. This overwinter zygotic dormancy is extremely rare among temperate angiosperms.[8] When ripe the pentavalved spherical capsules split above and below in a unique manner.

The tree was last verified in the wild in 1803 by the English plant collector John Lyon (although there are hints it may have been present into at least the 1840s).[11] The cause of its extinction in the wild is not known, but has been attributed to a number of causes including fire, flood, overcollection by plant collectors, and fungal disease introduced with the cultivation of cotton plants.[12]

All the Franklin trees known to exist today are descended from seed collected by William Bartram and propagated at Bartram’s Garden in Philadelphia. It has now been cultivated in over 1000 sites worldwide including botanical gardens, private homes, parks, and cemeteries.[13][14] It is suggested that more than one tree was sampled by Bartram during his original collection in Georgia and the diversity was maintained over the years.[15] To mark the 300th anniversary of John Bartram’s birth in 1998, Bartram’s Garden launched a project to locate as many Franklinia trees as possible.[14]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bartram
Botanical drawing below:

(In an atypical show of restraint, I shall not add commentary on the genus Fothergilla, except to note its pleasing form, sweetness of flower, and bright Autumn leaf color.)

FRANK DRAWING.png
Purista
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
2 days ago

The importance of Peter Kalm’s journals to architectural historians is that he talks about his journey, and, if memory serves, what the roads and mature forests were like, how the architecture and customs changed as he went, say, from Deutsch PA into Walloon/Huguenot and Dutch parts of NY, and how the different houses were configured and the rooms used, etc.

JimH
Reply to  Purista | 432 comments
2 days ago
Purista
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
2 days ago

Thanks for that, Jim, I was just (re)reading Kalm’s book on another site, but the one you sent is easier to navigate. I tried to copy from the other site, as you have here, but what it pasted was about a mile of numerical code. Wonder what Kalm would have made of that! He was Sweden’s Jefferson or Franklin. He talks about staying in a Quaker grocer’s house and what was covered under his lodging fee and what wasn’t.

bobby white
Reply to  Purista | 432 comments
2 days ago

Not 100% but quite often/usually in my experience, if you look through all that code, starting at the beginning, until you find the ? and then delete everything beyond it, it turns into a clickable link, meant for normal human beings.

Purista
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
2 days ago

This isn’t practical joke, is it, Bobby  😄  “How to keep the architectural historian busy.”

bobby white
Reply to  Purista | 432 comments
2 days ago

Nope. It’s something I’ve done multiple times. It gives me a sense of accomplishment. Start at the beginning. It won’t take you long. The ? is always closer to the beginning. Honest.

Remember, delete everything beyond the ? Beyond.

Simple things make me happy.

Purista
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
2 days ago

Early chronicle of human-caused environmental problems: the writing on the wall. This from Kalm, on deforestation and agricultural use and diversion. This is 1748 talking about how water was abundant and reliable in 1688 when the mills were built but now (1748), with deforestation the water supply is extremely intermittent:

“The water in rivers and brooks likewise decreases. Mills, which sixty years ago were built on rivers, and at that time had a sufficient supply of water almost all the year long, have at present so little, that they cannot be used, but after a heavy rain, or when the snow melts in spring. This decrease of water, in part, arises from the great quantity of land which is now cultivated, and from the extirpation of great forests for that purpose.”

bobby white
Reply to  Purista | 432 comments
2 days ago

I intend to read that book. Soon. Thanks.

Purista
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
2 days ago

I just read a fascinating passage from Kalm’s time in NY City, 1748, where he talks about how the British government forbade colonists from mining gold and silver, etc., or if they did it had to go directly to England, how they monitored all trade, etc., and how the colonists, supported by Germans, Dutch, and Swedes here, were getting fed up with it and that it could soon lead to rebellion. Prescient.

And, this is the interesting part, how the colonists had their hands full constantly fighting the French, whom the British could have trounced in a minute…had they wanted to. But that, in fact, the British were well aware that if the colonists had to fight the French and Indians constantly, they would have little time and resources to rebel against the English. So the British let the French (and Indians) keep up the raids.

JimH
Reply to  Purista | 432 comments
2 days ago

The Seven Years/French & Indian War was just a few years later and most of the Americans that fought for the Brits were strongly against them in the Revolution. I have a bunch of ancestors in that boat who didn’t appreciate being treated as serfs and pawns in the British game of world domination.

Purista
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 day ago

Yikes, according to Kalm his friend Ben Franklin gifted an asbestos purse! And asbestos paper. “Mountain flax” sounds very benign.

“The mountain flax , * or that kind of ftone, which Bishop Browallius calls Amiantus fibri’s fe- parabilibus molliufculis , in his lectures on minera- logy, which were published in 1739, or the amiant with foft fibres, which can eafily be fepa-* rated, is found abundantly in P enfylvania . Some pieces are very foft, others pretty tough : Mr. Franklin told me, that, , twenty and feme odd years ago, when he made a voyage to England , he had a little purfe with him, made of the mountain flax of this country, which he pre- fented to Sir Hans Sloane. I have like wife feen paper made of this ftone ; and I have likewife received fome imall pieces of it, which I keep in my cabinet. Mr. Franklin had been told by others, that, on expofing this mountain flax to the open air in winter, and leaving it in the cold and wet, it would grow together…”

bobby white
Reply to  Purista | 432 comments
23 hours ago

YIKES indeed.This is a description of turning another member of this genus into paper. One can wonder about the effects upon those doing such work with Mt Flax grown under those conditions. 

THE PAPER-MAKING PROPERTIES OF PHORMIUM
TENAX (NEW ZEALAND FLAX)
By Merle B. Shaw, George W. Bicking, and Martin J. O’Leary

. V. CONCLUSIONS
From the results obtained in the tests it is apparent that phormium needs to be thoroughly cleaned mechanically before being submitted to paper-making processes. The scutched material, that from which the greatest amount of the non fibrous tissue has been removed previous to being marketed, has the best possibilities.

Additional Mechanical cleaning is required in the paper mill, however, preparatory to the pulping operation. A method suggested is that the phormium be passed through a machine to loosen it; placed upon conveyors of wire screening, for sorters to pick out weeds, roots,dead plants, etc., that may have escaped removal at time of preparation; and dusted to remove all remaining fine foreign material, such as fruit seeds, sand, etc., before being cut into desired lengths for boiling.

The best digestion procedure depends somewhat upon mill conditions. In the work at the bureau either the caustic soda processor the two-stage cooks using sodium sulphite and caustic soda,respectively, gave very good results, on the basis of both quality of fiber produced and yield obtained. No special equipment is required for the caustic-soda process; whereas when sodium sulphite is employed, the boiler should be of an acid-resistant material. An ordinary iron rotary boiler was used at the bureau, but considerable trouble was caused by iron rust from the sodium sulphite digestion.The process is believed to be very promising, however.

The experimental tests indicate that phormium is a promising material for the manufacture of wrapping or writing papers.
Washington, January 13, 1931
https://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/jres/6/jresv6n3p411_A2b.pdf

Your post also mentions Bishop Browallius, an interesting character in his own right.
Johannes Browallius (30 August 1707 – 25 July 1755), also called John Browall, was a Finnish and Swedish Lutheran theologianphysicistbotanist and at one time friend of Swedish taxonomist Carl Linnaeus.

The plot thickens:
In 1735 seeds of a plant collected in Panama by Robert Millar were donated to Philip Miller of the Chelsea Physic Garden in London. The plants were grown on and forwarded to the Royal Society but with the name Dalea. This plant was named Browallia (Species Plantarum 2: 631. 1753 [1 May 1753]; Genera Plantarum ed. 5, 1754) by the famous plant taxonomist Carl Linnaeus in honour of his fellow countryman and botanical colleague.

Browall had advised the young Linnaeus to finish his studies abroad, then marry a rich girl – even though he was already engaged to Sara Lisa Moraea.[4] Linnaeus did, indeed, spend the winter of 1737–1738 in Leiden, travelling on to France. While abroad, he was sent news that “his best friend B.” had taken advantage of his absence to court Sara Lisa Moraea and had almost succeeded in persuading her that her fiance would never return to Sweden. However, the bishop’s suit failed; Sara Lisa and Linnaeus were married in 1739. The entry under Browallia grandiflora in Curtis’s Botanical Magazine of 1831 reports:

 Linnaeus’s principles of botanical nomenclature were first expounded in Fundamenta Botanica of 1736 and these were later elaborated, with numerous examples, in his Critica Botanica of 1737. The book was published in Germany when Linnaeus was 29 and the title page carries a discursus by Johannes Browall. The friendship was not to last. Coombes notes “Browallia demissa (weak). Renamed by Linnaeus from B. elata (tall) after falling out with Browall.”[3]

The intimacy and subsequent rupture between Browall and Linnaeus were commemorated by the latter in the specific appellations which he bestowed on the only three individuals of the genus then known. B. elata expresses the degree of their union; B. demissa its cessation; while the ambiguous name of a third species, B. alienata, while it intimates the uncertain characteristics of the plant, implies the subsequent difference between the two parties.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Browallius

BROWELLA .png
CvZ1200
5 days ago

Remarkably well preserved house in a lovely setting!

Grant
Supporter
5 days ago

They certainly left behind enough wingback armchairs! Wonderfully homey though.

natira
Supporter
5 days ago

I have officially died and gone to heaven, but then you guys probably suspected that, didn’t you? *grin*

The ONLY thing that would be better is if it had a big ol bank barn! I’ll build a root cellar and springhouse myself… if there is no spring, I’ll just divert a bit of creek (Shhhhh, don’t tell on me)

Honestly, this is me.

And BobbyWhite, you can come and help design the gardens!

bobby white
Reply to  natira | 1131 comments
5 days ago

It’s a deal! Can I sleep in the barn while I’m working on the garden?

Shouldn’t take more than 20 years or so to get everything right.

Morna
Reply to  natira | 1131 comments
5 days ago

Yes. This just about right for me as well. I think we’re more on the bare bones primitive side of OHD. This listing needs more photos, tho. What is the walk out lower level? Where are these 2.5 bathrooms? I see the .5, but not the 2. Regardless, I am ready to move in.

Sören
Reply to  Morna | 328 comments
5 days ago

Are they counting the outhouse?

Kimberly62
Reply to  Morna | 328 comments
5 days ago

bare bones primitive side…I love how this house is all plaster and wood and stone. I see no need to change a thing, I love it as is. I too would love to see where the walk out goes to, presumably a stone and dirt cellar, but I would not want to see the outside water come in. beautiful kitchen and pantry, bookmarked.

natira
Reply to  Morna | 328 comments
4 days ago

More pictures, Yes! I wanna see EVERYTHING!

celeste
Reply to  natira | 1131 comments
5 days ago

Natira, I love it when I get more and more excited as I look at the pictures, read the description (only sometimes because they can be irksome, to put it kindly) and look at street/aerial view all the while thinking or even saying out loud how certain OHDers, especially, are going GaGa at the same things. I think that’s what makes this site extraordinarily wonderful. Thank you, Kelly! And everyone who contributes their knowledge, expertise and humor, thanks ad infinitum.

Komiza
Supporter
5 days ago

I’m ready to move in. Wonderful home.

bobby white
Supporter
5 days ago

On a serious note, I’m wondering about the structure that is being called a barn. It has a lot of windows and, from what we see, there aren’t any clues about animals on the property. I’m curious as to why it was built and wish there were some pics.
Nothing about it is a deal breaker; I’m just curious.

ChicagoCooperator
5 days ago

What an intriguing place – it barely looks modernized at all. I can see a toilet and some light bulbs but what about heat and cooking? Very bright and yet cozy at least from the photos.

KC in TC
5 days ago

Yeah you guys- this is gorgeous!! Such wonderful patina everywhere!! I agree, more inside photos (of house and BARN!)
I love everything- but… I’m trying to move out of Northeast. Taxes are high. Winters are cold!!
As for the wonderful Kalmia garden, better be prepared to fence or spray for deer! They love to dine on it!!

bobby white
Reply to  KC in TC | 248 comments
5 days ago

There’s always something, isn’t there?

Joseph
Supporter
5 days ago

A lovely house in a lovely place. Photo 22 is heartbreaking. The simple, unadorned 18th-century interior defines my idea of home.

fireskin
5 days ago

I think this is my favorite `1700s house I’ve seen so far.

celeste
Supporter
5 days ago

Oh my, it just keeps getting better as I just checked out the aerial view and there is a state trail meandering through across the street!

bobby white
Reply to  celeste | 110 comments
4 days ago

Good catch! I was so focused on the course of the stream that I didn’t see the trail.
It’s the Air Line State Park Trail. The website provides extensive history and current information. Selected Excerpts:
The trail takes its name from the imaginary line drawn from New York to Boston, through the “air” so to speak, to illustrate the shortest possible route between these two major east coast cities. Building a completely new rail line however proved economically infeasible so, for practical reasons, the “Air Line” as it came to be called, used existing rails from New York to New Haven and began its journey to the northeast from there. On its way to Boston, the Air Line overcame tremendous obstacles in Connecticut’s eastern highlands including ridges, valleys and of course, politics…
Though the rails are long gone, this rail bed once offered fashionable, rapid transit from New York to Boston. Those who travel the corridor today witness the same inspiring panoramas and absorb the same solitude that has greeted travelers since the line was constructed. Stretching across eastern Connecticut from Thompson to East Hampton, this linear trail dates from the 1870s, and today draws walkers, hikers, horseback riders and bikers from across the state for the views, the relaxation and the solitude.
Air Line State Park Trail
Portland, East Hampton, Colchester, Hebron, Columbia, Lebanon,
Windham, Chaplin, Hampton, Pomfret, Putnam, Thompson
https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/State-Parks/Parks/Air-Line-State-Park-Trail/Overview

J.Bell
5 days ago

I love this … WAY MORE … knowing that the Home Depot is 7 minutes (3.6 miles) away !!! LOL

bobby white
Reply to  J.Bell | 33 comments
5 days ago

Do they carry deer fencing?

Darby10
4 days ago

 😍  we should all chip in and buy this gorgeous property!  😉 

Michaeljoe62
4 days ago

😍😍😍 In Colonial love…

Ernie
4 days ago

What a place, what a piece of history. I know one of the first things I would so is gutters & downspouts to save my foundation & cellar.

Melissa
Reply to  Ernie | 398 comments
3 days ago

The seller may have installed french drains in the course of her stewardship, which would serve that purpose.

Beebs
4 days ago

WOW! 😍  This is exactly what I am looking for in a home but unfortunately would never convince my wife to join me on this type of venture. Everything about it including the Gunstock posts, Granite sinks, Cedar shakes and wide pine floors. Just the simplicity of it all with nothing being too extravagent is what attracts me. The only thing that I would change just by looking at the pictures would be taking care of those White Pines. Just too close to the house if you ask me. Especially after the ice storm we recently witnessed here in the northeast. That just makes me a little nervous and the Pines would be replaced with Sugar Maples or Chestnuts of course.

JDmiddleson
4 days ago

I just have to throw my hat into the ring as well. Outstanding home! Love the stone sinks! The people who own this house currently deserve a big thanks for keeping the character of the house and not trying to change it into a plastic box store remodel. Homes this age and in this condition are becoming increasingly rare. Thanks for saving this gem!

JimH
Moderator
4 days ago

A wonderful house and property! The owner died in September after a long battle with cancer. From her obit:
“In July 1996, after a long search, they bought their dream home — a carefully preserved Cape Cod built in 1787, in the small town of Chaplin, Conn. From there, they traveled all over New England and the Midwest to buy and sell antiques.”

She had been trying to sell the home to a fellow antiquarian. A few nice photos of the home furnished with her antiques:
https://www.antiquehomesmagazine.com/property/CT/chaplin/329-chewink-road/06235/home/26047/

Although the finish/decor is in an intentional Primitive style, most of the home presents as the authentic antique that it is. The simple paneling of ancient wide boards, the great rock hearth of the kitchen, and the lovely grounds especially appeal to me.

In the 19th Century, the property was part of the 122 acre farm of blacksmith Henry A. Farnham (1807-1882), and before that Luther Ashley (1781-1860), an original town selectman, owned the place. Records might prove that the house was built by his father Jonathan Ashley (1747-1831), son of early settler Abner Ashley, after his marriage to Lydia Humphrey in 1773.

The surrounding 27 acres are owned by the Fin, Fur & Feather Club, with a local address. I would want to inquire as to their intentions for that property going forward. The setting seems ideal for someone wanting a semi-rural antique haven with civilization nearby but not encroaching.

ChaplinCT329ChewinkInt.png
bobby white
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
4 days ago

Thank you so much JimH. The description answers many questions:
Professionally restored, historically significant home with a meandering stream on seven rolling acres with beautiful views in Connecticut’s quiet corner. Exterior features include a 32′ x 48′ barn built January 2018, house painted in June 2018, original stone herb garden and a cedar roof. Interior features include: paneling in every room, wide-board flooring throughout, handmade tin sconces light the interior, all systems are well hidden, three cut-granite fireplaces, old kitchen fireplace is 66″ wide x 50″ tall with functional bake oven, two full bathrooms, first floor laundry, oil furnace, three stone sinks, original shelved buttery, six over six windows all with old glass, very private upstairs includes two large bedrooms, sitting area and full bath, eat-in kitchen with walk-in pantry, and much more makes this house the most original 18th century home on the market today. Very rural, quiet and private setting with no other homes visible from the property, yet just a short drive to shopping, restaurants and hospital. Featured recently in two national magazines and several books. Live in the 18th century with all the modern amenities! Don’t let this incredible home get away!

JimH
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
4 days ago

Evidently, an early barn burned in the 1950’s and was replaced by another that was removed in recent years – you can still see the concrete floor behind the new barn on the aerial view:

https://connecticutbarns.org/find/details/id-14959

Americangothic95
4 days ago

I have driven by this house many times. It is absolutely beautiful! I agree with all of you that I would love to have this house!

Cora
Moderator
4 days ago

I can’t afford it, but I’m moving in. Who wants to come with and share the cost? I’ll do all the cooking! It’d just be heaven on earth…

Kat
4 days ago

While it’s too primitive for me to comfortably live in, I still love seeing places like this.

socalnanynan
Supporter
4 days ago

Are those leaves on the roof of the home? What kind of roof is that? Too bad the antiques don’t come with the home.

Melissa
Reply to  socalnanynan | 375 comments
3 days ago

those are pine needles that blew off the nearby pines (cutting those down would be my first action post closing!) and landed on the cedar shake roof. Wonder how old that is.

Melissa
3 days ago

Wow!!! What a place – I died twice when I saw the wide board wall panels – blissfully bare and not violated by a swipe of white paint just as they were originally. I grew up in CT and have never heard of this town, but it is a beauty. Hope it goes to a deserving buyer who will be a gentle steward

Melissa
3 days ago

In several of the photos (16 specifically) there are squares of flooring that clearly fit into a hole cut into the floor boards – I wonder if she had hot water lines run under the floors to serve as radiant floor heat and those sections open to shut off valves?

JimH
Reply to  Melissa | 242 comments
3 days ago

The listing indicates hot air heating and those look like the registers, seen most clearly in #12.

Purista
3 days ago

A good four-bay (as opposed to the normal five) plank-walled 18th century Connecticut cape with mild hewn gable overhang and original fireplace system intact. There are hundreds of these, which makes it fascinating that this one catches so much attention and I think the reasons are two: one, it’s painted the “antique red” that, a few decades ago was the most popular color for old houses next to white, and two, it has a true wood-shingled roof. It’s amazing what a difference just those two things make. It is beautiful. The wood shingles above the first-floor level on the gables are very attractive, too. Would help to restore the plaster to the ceiling in the rear room with exposed beams.

Morna
Reply to  Purista | 432 comments
2 days ago

For me, the roof factors, but it’s mostly the interior, plus enough land. And it’s for sale. No point in dreaming about houses no one is letting go on the market.

Dream On
Supporter
3 days ago

I can’t believe this perfectly preserved 18th century home has escaped being overly “updated”. This is, by far, my favorite period and this is my all time favorite OHD listing. I pray the next owner does no more than apply a fresh coat of whitewash to the plaster and a fresh coat of paint to the woodwork.

Purista
Reply to  Dream On | 241 comments
2 days ago

In a house like this, before I painted any interior surface, I would make sure that I wasn’t about to paint over early or original treatments. I love the look of the interior as it is because it’s one of the few remaining old houses that still feels and looks like one and not a new reproduction of one.

That said, my strong guess is that the antique-dealer former owners did a fair amount of retouching of these surfaces. In Photo 14, for example, it looks like they used a red wash on a wall that perhaps had fading remnants of earlier red paint. The H-L hinges are now red, as is the interior side of the cupboard door. Antique dealers are good at this kind of thing because they often color-match and blend on furniture with colored surfaces.

dhh177
2 days ago

I’ll take this over the Tudor! Love this!

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