Specially selected historic real estate for old house enthusiasts.

Battle Creek, MI

$95,000

For Sale

Added to OHD on 1/14/23   -   Last OHD Update: 1/14/23

26 Fremont St, Battle Creek, MI 49017

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • 5 Bed
  • 4 Bath
  • 3536 Sq Ft
  • 0.23 Ac.
This Historic Beauty will be featured in the summer edition of This Old House magazine; Save This Old House. This house has some Amazing original features in it. Original stained glass window, beveled glass in some rooms, beautiful woodwork and trim, 2 fireplaces with gorgeous side pieces. 3500+ sq. ft., 5 bedrooms 4 full bathrooms, 2 car detached garage. A sleeping porch on 2nd level, walk up attic. The additional kitchen on the second level could be turned back to a bedroom. Some work was completed in 2018. Shingles and some decking for the roof were replaced. New gutters. Side porch was rebuilt. This home is being offered through the Calhoun County Land Bank's Transform This Home Program where buyers agree to rehab the home within a given time frame. This home needs building, mechanical, plumbing, and electrical repairs. Additional inspections are required for Occupancy Permit. Home is being Sold As-Is.
Agent Contact Info

Melissa Kennedy, Troxel Realty Company :: (269) 968-9293

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DJZ
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
13 days ago

Looks like the side porch has remained, so replacing the original top portion details for the main porch would be easily done, just gotta see how those spindles looked like.

M J G
Supporter
8 months ago

Wow. It looked so much better with veranda.

A Victorian without its porch is a tuxedo without its jacket and tie.

Wow this interior has a stunning baseline to work wit! Stunning woodwork, tiles, and art glass. How I’d love to mold this place back into the palace it once was.

Buck's Daughter
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
8 months ago

You can say that again; the Tuxedo comparison is excellent, one of the most fitting I’ve heard in a while. It did look so grand with the veranda, also looks like there was a small veranda to the left opposite corner. Both definitely dressed the house up!!

M J G
Reply to  Buck's Daughter | 155 comments
8 months ago

Thanks. Just came to me. Lol. I’d break the alterations on the exterior into phases for sure. All at one time might be too much money.

Buck's Daughter
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
8 months ago

Upon further inspection, I now see that there have been several major changes to the exterior of the house, bay window turret, chimney relocated, lots of exterior remodels done, would very likely cost a small fortune just to right those wrongs to restore to original design.

ChicagoCooperator
Reply to  Buck's Daughter | 155 comments
14 days ago

Looks like a big addition from the framing in the attic leftover from an older roofline.

DJZ
Reply to  ChicagoCooperator | 368 comments
13 days ago

Actually, for attics in these types of homes, if it was not going to be used, it was often finished like how you see it.

BuffaloJules66
8 months ago

It looks like some of the Barber family might still be around (see photos 16 and 18) hoping that someone will come and make their home beautiful again.

mcgeckogirl
8 months ago

It shows there was a grant in 2019 to restore it but nothing happened 🤷🏻‍♀️I live near Battle Creek if anyone is interested and needs help in acquiring this beauty. I’m not an agent just a lover of old houses and local. If I was 20 years younger and back in my “green salad days”, I’d do it myself!!

Kiwilassy
Reply to  mcgeckogirl | 7 comments
15 days ago

I’m applying to buy this house this week. It’s owned by the city and there’s a bunch of criteria to fulfill to be accepted as a purchaser. I currently reside in Colorado above 8;000ft but my cardiologist wants me below 2,000ft ASAP. My partner’s family are close by to this home in Kalamazoo. Anyway, I would love some help acquiring this beauty!

Melissa
Reply to  Kiwilassy | 5 comments
15 days ago

I just stopped at this house today. Did not go inside but even the outside is stunning because you can just see the potential and the beauty that is there! I would love to see this home get a proper restoration. It’s so lovely. I have been watching it for awhile now. It’s a dream of mine! I live hours away but happened to be traveling nearby and stopped just to see it in person. I love it.

Kiwilassy
Reply to  Melissa | 1 comments
15 days ago

Hi Melissa, that’s fun to hear and reassuring from someone who has seen it for real!

After 30 years of preserving, restoring and sympathetically renovating if needed, antique homes, I can’t help but get excited over this one. My current 1875 miner’s cabin has housed my family for nearly 15 years. I applied for landmarking and after successfully jumping through all those hoops, I was devastated the health department got involved after black mold was found and a third of the house need to be demolished.  😭  I was gutted (perhaps pun intended) when the county made the replacement portion meet modern code!  🙄  I balled my eyes out when the 8′ walls were erected to replace the original shorter walls that accommodated the 7′- 6′ sloping ceiling on the 1920’s addition.

Anyway, I’m an old school carpenter and love working quietly with hand tools.I love to preserve everything that can be preserved like time worn patinas and original windows. I’ll restore what I can by sourcing similar and sometimes almost identical material whenever possible. I love the sleuthing and problem solving needed with any antique work. Don’t ask me about my antique tools… most of them come with cools stories. I can’t thank enough my full Ancestry.com membership for connecting me with all sorts of information.

When modern replacements or repairs are needed I’ll replicate where I can with hands tools. Breaks my heart seeing the overwhelming number of these homes falling into disrepair. But… this one can be saved and I hope I get to be the one to finish bringing her back into the light.

Maybe you’ll come join me for morning tea once that front porch is restored?!

Warmly, Michelle

tyreval
8 months ago

Ah, the fieldstone basement (picture 40). I am of two minds about this. One one hand, living with a similar situation for more than 20 years didn’t kill me. But the spring melt meant everything had to be kept on pallets.

roxxx
Reply to  tyreval | 184 comments
8 months ago

That is a good fact to know about. thanks

Warren Stewart
Reply to  tyreval | 184 comments
8 months ago

That’s usually more an issue of the grade around the house or poor downspout locations than the stone itself. The water table and tuckpointing also play a big role.If everything is the way it should be, water shouldn’t come in, even with a stone removed.

M J G
Reply to  Warren Stewart | 86 comments
8 months ago

Ha. I have lived in houses with field stone basements and newer concrete. BOTH had water leaks. So it really does depend too like going said where the house is, how water is being drained away from the house. Etc.

Marksmagic
Supporter
8 months ago

Finally! A photographer that takes photos of the detail. Beautiful fireplace.

M J G
Reply to  Marksmagic | 12 comments
8 months ago

EXACTLY! Someone who understands the type of people who would buy this house and focuses on the detail. As well as none of this foolish looking washed out or high contrast filtering over the photo. Just real life photos.

JDmiddleson
Reply to  Marksmagic | 12 comments
8 months ago

Ditto about the photos! Not every photographer is an old house nut and understands the kind of details and pictures old house people like to see. This one does!

BcCoffee
Reply to  Marksmagic | 12 comments
6 months ago

It’s the details that make this house worth it… We’d probably buy it if it had a bigger lot.

M J G
Supporter
16 days ago

I would buy this just for what remains. I’m horrified it’s still on the market and makes my palms sweat if it falls into the wrong hands.

Kiwilassy
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
15 days ago

Working hard of it ending up in my hands!

M J G
Reply to  Kiwilassy | 5 comments
15 days ago

Fingers crossed you get it. We all beg you if you buy it not to paint all that woodwork or gut it to be an open floor plan 🙂

Kiwilassy
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
15 days ago

Good grief! No begging needed. No way would I paint or open her up. Nah-uh!!! Quite frankly I think open-plan home are ridiculous. So noisy and everyone always up in everybody else’s business. I’ll take a antique home over a new one any day, unless it’s built by me.  😀 

I’m utterly dying to scour Ancestry.com to find more relatives and perhaps even unlock more stories, find more old photos and fill in some gaps, but I don’t want to fall down that rabbit hole until I know I truly have a chance at being her next custodian.

Thanks for crossing your fingers!

M J G
Reply to  Kiwilassy | 5 comments
15 days ago

Great to know. You’re exactly the type of person this home needs. As you may or may not have seen on this site. Many home end up getting destroy to the modern trend. Right now it’s the Gray decade. Everyone is putting everything in gray tones including floors and woodwork. Gag. Woodwork and stained glass Ike his needs total respect. Houses like this from this era may have elaborate stencil patterns on the ceilings and walls under layers of paint too. Keep that in mind if you have to tear off plaster or doing work. Lightly sanding through layers may expose it too.

John Shiflet
Supporter
16 days ago

Almost every superlative word imaginable has been used to describe this house. It deserves the praise but apparently, the house hasn’t found the right buyer yet. Someday, maybe soon, it will, and the house can again become the pride of the neighborhood. Keeping my fingers crossed for this one.

Robert
16 days ago

The staircase and foyer fireplace are beautiful! The stained glass windows on the landing are as well. If I see it correctly, much of the blue glass is beveled. The craftsmanship that went into these glorious old homes is amazing. Imagine trying to duplicate that today.

Kirsten
Reply to  Robert | 114 comments
15 days ago

Yes, that is definitely beveled glass…as is the white glass in photo #26. Having grown up in a Queen Anne that had beveled, leaded white glass in the front picture window, I was very excited to see all the beveled glass in this place.

M J G
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
15 days ago

Can you imagine that with strong sun shining through and the warm colored light a prism effects ?

Roger55
15 days ago

I have seen this beauty for sale on the Calhoun County Land Bank website. The property was cleaned up by volunteers and has been promoted for quite some time. I would love to get it except for the fact that we have three dogs and they need room to run. I don’t think we can ever go back to city living with the noise, air pollution, and crime. I also need room for a garden. I will keep looking, some day I will find our diamond in the rough.

Powers
14 days ago

Little late on this one, was busy re-wiring all week. A lot has already been said which I agree with. This is the type of gem I always saw myself restoring. Photo #37 is curious though. Was there an early addition to this houses? I never saw a roof line go into the attic like that. It appear part of a roof which an addition was added then an opening was created. The foundation appears as one with no additions and the photo provided of it in its prime shows I must be incorrect but still interesting.

I Love Old Houses
13 days ago

This is a beautiful home…. one worth saving for sure! I took a virtual stroll around the neighborhood and boy’ oh’ boy! Gorgeous homes surround this beauty! I hope the person above does indeed get this house and get it to it’s fullest potential! Good Luck!

starry
9 days ago

This house if full of Norse symbolism. I did a little research on the history of it and it seems that the wife of the builder’s genealogy goes back to Ireland during the Vikingd occupatio the 2nd time.

starry
Reply to  starry | 9 comments
9 days ago

All the stair and banisters are carved with what looks like a simple flower but it is actually the daisy, the Norse flower. It is all over the house. The owl on the fireplace by the stairs is Norse symbologily for Wisdom and the 2 doves are for love and pease in their mythology. There are tree branches on the sides of the surround and stars all theough them. The branches represent the continum of life and the stars are for wisdom. This house needs to be restored by somone who understands what it is—there is a message here and I don’t quite get it…on the stained glass windows there are grapes — for Vineland—from the Vikings. and there are runes on the bttom of the fireplace.

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