July 16, 2021: Link Exchange & Discussion

Added to OHD on 7/16/21 - Last OHD Update: 7/23/21 - 160 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

Sharing Guidelines...
1) Include the city, state if it doesn't already show in the link. Also include the build date and price. A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful.
2) No tiny URL's. Link to the agents site or a listing site (Redfin, Realtor, Zillow, etc.) No sites that you have to sign in to view the listing.
3) Paste the link in the comment box below, no HTML knowledge needed. :)

Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.) Not all shares will be added to OHD as it's own post. Feel free to discuss anything you want except for politics.

160 Comments on July 16, 2021: Link Exchange & Discussion

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12784 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Good morning (or afternoon or evening)! I didn’t really look too far into today’s featured home. Forgot yesterday today was Friday, didn’t get a portrait photo ready, next week! 🙂

    I’m thinking of getting rid of some of the lesser clicked listing sites included in the links section up top. Estately, Trulia, possibly Xome, if anyone doesn’t object. Trulia is basically Zillow (status/price change wise, they bought them a while ago.) Xome and Estately frequently change the listing linkage so more often than not those don’t even go to the listing page. I know a few like Movoto because of the photo size, Realtor & Redfin are good at current status/price updates and Zillow is Zillow but it’s the most clicked listing link. If anyone cannot live without any of those three, Estately, Trulia or Xome, I’ll keep them going.

    Gesh, Kelly…something else is in the back of my mind as wanting to tell/ask/say but darn if I can remember. 🙃

    Have a super weekend!!! Thanks for your shares!

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      There are a number of common George F. Barber features on the postcard house but it does not conform to a plan book pattern I recognize. It’s possible the builder just picked up on some of the popular Barber house details and added them to his design. I suppose its also possible the house was a custom Barber design as his strength as a businessman was being able to create plans for almost everyone who sought his design services. He would even shamelessly create his own interpretation of a competitor’s house design if the client insisted upon it. Gotta love Geo. Barber.

      BTW, for the past couple of days, I haven’t seen any OHD post comments arriving in my inbox so wondering if somehow I inadvertently changed the settings? Thanks for the good weekend wishes and the same to you and our fellow old house dreamers as well.

      • MichaelMichael says: 3564 comments
        1979 That 70's show
        Otis Orchards, WA

        John, you aren’t the only one. I haven’t received them either. I thought it was on my end but apparently not!

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12784 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        I just realized why, will get to fixing it now!

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12784 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Think it’s working now…if you get this, it is (I’m testing it with this comment so…here goes!) Edit: YAY! It’s working! Sorry for that. Sorry to M…something that also emailed me about it and I didn’t realize at the time it was a site wide problem (OHD emails often go to spam/junk folders.)

          • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
            OHD Supporter

            It is working now.

          • MichaelMichael says: 3564 comments
            1979 That 70's show
            Otis Orchards, WA

            Thank you for all your work, Kelly. It is greatly appreciated.

            • Agreed, Kelly! This is an awesome site, I adore the community of folks here. Seeing your post in my inbox is the highlight of my day. 🙂 Because it is such a pleasant respite from the rest of the crazy world I am finding myself going back through old posts frequently. Looking at houses maybe I didn’t look at before. Really enjoying reading comments that have been added.

        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          Many thanks, Kelly! Working fine now.

    • MJGMJG says: 2837 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Just looking at this house closely. Love it. But what I love the most is this porch with the pyramidal roof! I love stuff like this. That’s so indicative of this era.
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/img198-43-cc.jpg

  2. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 155 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    Three very nice high-end properties: 

    This beautifully proportioned 1830 Greek Revival is in Oyster Bay, Long Island, not far from Teddy Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill. $4.5 million on five acres, with 14-foot ceilings on the first floor and 9-foot ceilings on the second floor.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/24-Tiffany-Rd-Oyster-Bay-NY-11771/31160362_zpid/

    And in Alexandria, VA, a wonderful 1789 townhouse once owned by Bushrod Washington, heir to Mount Vernon and early Supreme Court Associate Justice. Great brickwork on the front facade in the early images and in the old walls in the final photos. $1.985 million.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/521-Duke-St-Alexandria-VA-22314/192122270_zpid/

    This remarkable 1750 (or is it 1767?) property on 200 acres in Oxford, MD, has been posted previously, but it isn’t every day that you find a listing with a $1,775,000 drop in asking price: now $7,975,000.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/26570-Oxford-Rd-Oxford-MD-21654/219214295_zpid/

  3. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Traveling to Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama today:

    1. 1849 Plantation $3,100,000 Est. $12,509 /mo
    5 bed 3.5 bath 11,716 sqft
    15.32 acre lot
    4084 Highway 311, Houma, LA 70360 [Houma is 58 miles from New Orleans.]
    Simply gorgeous is an understatement. This is one of those times that I wish we were seeing the house fully furnished. Just feast your eyes on that dining room table.
    “Pre-Dating the Civil War, Historic Crescent Farm, was founded in 1827 by William Alexander Shaffer, pioneer from South Carolina. Crescent Farm was the center of operations for the Shaffer family land holdings. Being constructed in 1849 by himself, his son, and his farm workers, the picturesque plantation home was the centerpiece of their sugar cane farm that included its own sugar mill. From the cypress framing continuing horizontally throughout each wall of the second floor as well as the plaster that is still there today, the beauty and workmanship of this family home still stands strong. Crescent Farm continued to be a major producer of sugar cane until the 1920’s and was eventually acquired by corporate processors in the 1930’s. In 1986, Crescent Farm was acquired by its current owner, and went through another renovation utilizing an architecture firm in New Orleans that specialized in top of the line renovations that keep with the integrity of the home and its character. While preserving the grandeur and history of Crescent Farms, additional changes such as new telephone and computer lines have been installed to keep up with the needs of our modern day.”
    Also, the grounds are exquisite. But if I were you, I wouldn’t dangle my tootsies in that canal. Pic 36 shows a round fountain, evocative of the large metal bowls used in sugaring operations.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/4084-Highway-311_Houma_LA_70360_M82247-00848

    2. 1930 Cottage $695,000 Est. $2,718 /mo
    3 bed 2 bath 2,100 sqft
    0.29 acre lot
    1420 S 10th St, Oxford, MS 38655
    Wonderful sunroom. Lots of natural light throughout the house. Nice enough kitchen. The grounds are a gardener’s delight. Time to go out and do some artful, reasoned clipping over. This is not a machete project. Many treasures to be revealed. And there are orange daylilies! Love orange daylilies. Well manicured neighborhood with many trees.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1420-S-10th-St_Oxford_MS_38655_M87488-20587

    3. 1960 (I thought it was older.) $549,000 Est. $2,168 /mo
    4 bed 3 bath 2,185 sqft
    0.64 acre lot
    1109 Grant Cir, Oxford, MS 38655
    Very sweet and with yet another lush garden. I would feel comfy cosy living here. Street view reveals a circular driveway in front.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1109-Grant-Cir_Oxford_MS_38655_M87442-74142

    4. 1900 Farmhouse $315,000 ($15K price drop) Est. $1,243 /mo
    3 bed 1 bath 1,200 sqft
    3.5 acre lot
    2812 County Road 852, Crane Hill, AL 35053 {38 miles from Birmingham.]
    Appealing fixer with a lot of unpainted wood. I’d send a lot of time gazing at the view, out those windows in pic 5. Listing says 90 feet of deeded water frontage. A small portion of the property, not near the house, is in a flood zone.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2812-County-Road-852_Crane-Hill_AL_35053_M76771-86623
    The area is nestled at the foot of the Appalachian Mountains, it offers a landscape of rock outcrops and meadows endowed with indigenous plants, wild flowers and a variety of wild animals. Smith Lake and many fresh water streams wind through the hills and rocks offering residents and visitors recreational opportunities.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crane_Hill,_Alabama

  4. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings All-

    I came across this video while on YouTube this week. I have seen the site before as it was shared here The Second Empire Strikes Back.

    Magic Chef Mansion Tour
    https://youtu.be/Gkzak3A_s7M

    What a wonderful house!

  5. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1962, Andes, NY, 688,000
    On 31 acres, a MCM called The Wedge (lots of wedges or angles!) with its loads of windows and wrap around porch. Luscious wood interior. Check out the spaceship wooden….covered bowl? Next the neat older electric stove.
    Wedge house, wedge property.
    https://photos.zillowstatic.com/fp/ef228b5affee6f1bbc9e7be9563f0c77-uncropped_scaled_within_1536_1152.webp
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/19232-New-York-Hwy-30A-Andes-NY-13731/2069547114_zpid/

    • jillieDjillieD says: 163 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1952 Ojai, CA

      Be still my heart.

    • JimHJimH says: 5760 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Very nice – and Andes is almost as quiet as it sounds. I used to take drives in my MGB out that way.
      I found an article that mentions the owner buying the place in 2002 – the seller left a Nakashima table, the beds made and food in the pantry!
      https://nymag.com/nymetro/travel/features/n_9030/

      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7662 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        >Nakashima table / Jacobsen fixtures as left behinds
        The mind spins thinking of how that could have happened. Lucky them. Doubt they “payed that forward”. You’d have to be either completely clueless or just flat nuts!

      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        neat Jim! our house was left with a couple of MCM pieces in the summerhouse (complete with camoflage fabric). It was a very friendly and trusting transfer of stewardship. I look forward to the article!

        • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1936 Cabin

          Jim, As you can imagine, I am glad you have a B. Our A is not the one in my painting, but is one owned by an acquaintance of my husband’s brother who also races. Ours is Iris Blue.

  6. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1955, Rydal, PA, 945,000
    MCM, I love the opening shot of the house floating above the driveway and parking underneath. Lots of natural wood interior, interesting copper roofed fireplace-animated I would say. Beautiful living room with all of that glass and fireplace that floats above the floor. I love the shape of the master bedroom, its built ins and glass.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1030-Leopard-Rd-Rydal-PA-19046/9899563_zpid/?

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7662 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      >cover shot
      That is really beautiful. The mature plantings make it super special. Interesting house.

    • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Simply lovely. And such an interesting privacy strategy for the tub except not really. I guess modesty only goes so far in this house, where a premium is placed on enjoying the sylvan setting.
      Penn’s Woods, indeed.

      ,

  7. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1952, Trumbull, CT, 400,000
    I love the red exterior walls and the symmetry of the four large windows each topped with a transom. Inside those windows provide lots of light, stone fireplace and wood walls.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/86-Canoe-Brook-Rd-Trumbull-CT-06611/57401472_zpid/

  8. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    A 1959 $2,995,000 MCM in St. Michael’s, Maryland and wait until you see the kitchen…wow just plain wow.
    The write-up in today’s Washington Post. A quote from the seller:
    “I think some people do stuff just because it’s old and they think they want new stuff,” Bill said. The sinks and toilets “are better than you can find. … We really went to a lot of trouble to preserve the original characteristics of the house.”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/realestate/a-mid-century-modern-masterpiece-in-st-michaels-md-lists-for-3-million/2021/07/15/4504717a-e27d-11eb-a41e-c8442c213fa8_story.html

    Link to the listing: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/7238-Drum-Point-Rd_St-Michaels_MD_21663_M60526-50687

  9. alfalf says: 33 comments
    OHD Supporter

    IL

    1926 farm with 73 acres, Westby, WI, $839,000

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/S1425-A-Nerison-Rd_Westby_WI_54667_M91175-22728

    Talk about The Heartland! And it’s in the Driftless Area some of you folks have talked about before. Patterned brick farmhouse with dark, dark woodwork. Plain, simple, and straightforward. Well kept and plenty of room. Outbuildings . . . including a 1907 smokehouse, 1920 barn, and a 1931 tobacco shed.

    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      What a neat property, I like the decorative brick, the outbuildings, simple but beautiful interior.

    • 67drake67drake says: 304 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
      Iowa County , WI

      I was just in Westby last weekend. If I would have seen that this farm was for sale I would have checked it out. 🙂
      A little high going by price per acre around here, but that’s how the market is right now. I posted my brother in laws farm for sale in Yuba Wisconsin in last weeks link exchange. City people are coming up here to get away from “the city”, sometimes dropping $500,000 or more without ever visiting the property. Must be nice!
      Anyway Westby is a great little town that values their Nordic heritage. Also home to my favorite antique and resale shop- The Red Shed. Every time we go there, I come home with a truck full of stuff. Dangerous place to take my wife. It took me half an hour to unload my truck Sunday. We know the owners well at this point!

  10. Anne M.Anne M. says: 1076 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Hi, Dreamers – hope everyone is well! I forgot to post last week so I have a lot to share (though houses are selling so fast around here that the ones I’ve saved may already be under agreement)
    1890 in Pittsfield, MA $339,900 – lots to like here, beautiful coffered ceilings, not crazy about the “solarium” windows
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/195-Wendell-Ave-Pittsfield-MA-01201/55944194_zpid/
    ***
    1905 in Bellows Falls, VT $489,000 – gorgeous inlaid floor, some original light fixtures, art glass window & the framed-in staircase is definitely worth a look
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/32-Atkinson-St-Bellows-Falls-VT-05101/75475928_zpid/
    ***
    1918 craftsman also in Pittsfield $429,000 – carriage house!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/531-West-St-Pittsfield-MA-01201/55941454_zpid/

  11. Anne M.Anne M. says: 1076 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    1841 colonial in Pittsfield, MA $450,000 a bit confused by some of the updates but overall a property with a lot of potential
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/514-South-St-Pittsfield-MA-01201/55943905_zpid/
    ***
    1900 Colonial Revival in Great Barrington, MA $625,000 huge pantry, nice lot, all around lovely
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/263-Park-St-Great-Barrington-MA-01230/63437037_zpid/
    ***
    1912 also in Great Barrington $339,000 – lots of original charm
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/410-N-Plain-Rd-Great-Barrington-MA-01230/63438575_zpid/

  12. MJGMJG says: 2837 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    Since there have been a few discussion on 19th century central heating versus fire places versus stove heating etc, I figured I’d share a fun book where they give their opinion on the pro’s and con’s of each. It gives a nice little window into some peoples thinking and many of these opinions in the book are consistent with other reads of the time.

    https://archive.org/details/homewarmingventi00here/page/n5/mode/2up

    • alfalf says: 33 comments
      OHD Supporter

      IL

      This is wonderful. I’ve only just started it, but it’s so interesting to get into the thoughts and opinions of the people who built the homes we so admire here on OHD. There are considerations of these authors and the people whom they reflect that I wouldn’t even know to consider since life has changed so since then. Perhaps we can think of this as this week’s portrait that Kelly felt she had to apologize for omitting. (Please don’t ever worry about that, Kelly, at least from my perspective. You do so much the rest of the week, that I don’t ever feel shortchanged if it doesn’t happen.) It’s yet another insight into life in earlier times. Thanks, MJG!

      • MJGMJG says: 2837 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Thanks. It really is a window into the past without the picture. There are several books on archive.org that are just like this. There’s one I just read recently and I can’t remember the name of it but it was person after person’s opinion of modern architecture and the things they like and hated about it. I wish I remember which one it was.

    • I clicked the like thingy 5 times but it just kept toggling on and off. That’s a treat, thank you!

  13. natira121natira121 says: 861 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    Another Friday already! And I have added more stoves to my stove album. I didn’t last week… too freakin’ busy!

  14. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12784 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    It’s cool when an owner comments (and I guess found it via the site?) If anyone remembers this one…yay! (GordonManor comment.)

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2020/07/28/1881-queen-anne-in-denison-ia/

  15. Jbilly70Jbilly70 says: 59 comments

    This one will knock your socks off. It is in Bayview, an unofficial burb of Milwaukee. Great location across from a huge park with lots of amenities but frankly this could sit in the middle of nowhere and still WOW you.
    The ceiling medallions will leave you drooling…..luckily there is a fountain to catch it. 🙂 The Heron glass is the bathroom, the original tile, the flamingo gate outside and did I mention the arched leaded glass window over the GARAGE? The built-ins…….so many lovely things to look at………..but I will let you see for yourself.
    Enjoy!
    Bayview, WI
    1925 Mission/Spanish Revival BungaWOW

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/529-E-Oklahoma-Ave_Milwaukee_WI_53207_M99471-65759

  16. Anne M.Anne M. says: 1076 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    1883 Queen Anne in New Bedford, MA 1.1 million, pretty spectacular; also has an octagonal shaped carriage house.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/404-County-St-New-Bedford-MA-02740/55996489_zpid
    ***
    1906 Queen Anne in Pittsfield, MA $995,000.very large, very nice:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/94-Dawes-Ave-Pittsfield-MA-01201/55946548_zpid/

  17. JkleebJkleeb says: 410 comments
    Seattle, WA

    Lopez Island. WA 1940 rustic beach cabin $1.8 million

    I saved this yesterday and it’s now pending but posting anyway. Tiny cabin is dominated by huge fireplace. I love the simplicity, unpainted fir interior and location.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/166-Tekoa-Ave-Lopez-Island-WA-98261/61001558_zpid

  18. Anne M.Anne M. says: 1076 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    One more – a very old barn (1680) transformed into a house in Newport, RI $1,374,000
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/M48210-33821

    • natira121natira121 says: 861 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      This is the best barn conversion EVER! I absolutely love it! So quirky, and interesting, and just FULL of good vibes. An amazing place.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7662 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Super creative and interesting. Looks like maybe some old hippie is cashing in on a place he maybe bought for a song back when, then DIY’ed with flair and good taste over years. Good on him if so!

  19. CarolynCarolyn says: 313 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    1906 – Newnan GA – $199,000
    It’s bad enough that this sweet little place got HGTVed to death but what happened next is so sad. Scroll through the pictures and wait for it……wait for it……

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/124-E-Broad-St-Newnan-GA-30263/14417563_zpid/

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12784 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Yikes, poor thing!

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        This is the definition of “adding insult to injury”. I wasn’t clear as to whether the tornado damage was done prior to the renovation or after. I assume perhaps because of the price, the photos reflect the post damage state of the house. Sad, whatever its status. Old Houses are survivors subject to neglect, termites, fires, and wanton human destruction. It’s a minor miracle we still have as many as we do nowadays but then imagine how many have been lost over the years.

    • RanunculusRanunculus says: 298 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Tucson, AZ

      I’m confused.

      I guess the “modernized” house was already on the market & THEN a tornado hit it (or knocked over a tree onto the house). But…

      Does insurance not cover the repairs?? Is it an act of god or something? Why sell it at a loss as-is rather than get the repairs done? The buyer cannot tap the owner’s insurance benefits.

      (This does, of course, assume the owners were wise enough to fully insure their investment.)

      • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
        OHD Supporter

        And I suppose there is also the option of collecting the insurance and then selling instead of dealing with it. Might depend on the age of the seller and their overall financial situation.

  20. IfItWereMineIfItWereMine says: 21 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1951 California ranch
    Sherman Oaks, CA

    A light and airy 1966 time capsule in Amarillo. $675,000. https://ifitweremine.blogspot.com/2021/06/harmony-street-amarillo-texas.html

    The 1950 Rangeland Motel near Yellowstone in Moorcroft, Wyoming. $479,900. https://ifitweremine.blogspot.com/2021/07/rangeland-motel-yellowstone-avenue.html

    Plus here’s more about Sam Stoltz and his Plymouthonians and how I would decorate the the one Kelly featured at https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2021/07/15/1926-tudor-revival-in-sorrento-fl/
    https://ifitweremine.blogspot.com/2021/07/sam-stoltz-plymouthnian-county-road-435.html

    Vicki

  21. 1750’s antique colonial for sale. $295,000. Very motivated seller.
    16 Lisbon Rd, Canterbury
    $295,000 · 4beds · 2baths

    https://apps.realtor.com/mUAZ/e61ac25f

  22. KyleKyle says: 26 comments
    1911 Edwardian flat
    San Francisco, CA

    Here’s a nice row house in St. Louis MO I found in one of my wide-area searches for cheap old houses. It’s got a floorplan and a Matterport to explore!

    4 Bed 1.5 Bath $175,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4001-Cleveland-Ave-Saint-Louis-MO-63110/2989881_zpid/?

    The description kind of scares me when it starts talking about the kitchen, it’s not THAT old but I actually kind of like it how it is! Lots of original details in this one, I didn’t like the upstairs bath until I noticed that was not just paneling but old unpainted wainscoting, the same I have in my bath that has been sadly previously painted and I can’t strip it because it is believed to be encapsulating old lead pain. ANYWAY, I would just clean it up and do some minor cosmetic work, maybe get some reproduction period fixtures in the upstairs bath.

    P.S. Just noticed the corner protector next to the staircase, name of that feature slips my mind if anyone can help with that but it is a really nice detail.

  23. SharonSharon says: 527 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 Contemporary
    Sedalia, MO

    This is torture. I finally found my old house dream in town in a great neighborhood. Beamed ceilings, fireplace with flanking windows and bookcases, unpainted woodwork throughout. Pull out the claustrophobic shrubs, pull up the carpet, take the kitchen back to the 1920s, refresh the paint with Craftsman greens, browns, and yellows… https://artsandcraftshomes.com/exteriors/its-all-about-the-approach

    Circumstances, however, preclude my following through. Guess that’s why we dream.

    In another lifetime………… 😢

    1924 Craftsman
    $175,000
    Sedalia, MO

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1319-S-Barrett-Ave-Sedalia-MO-65301/125482162_zpid/?

  24. NonaKNonaK says: 292 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Austin, TX

    1937 – 5,502 sq ft – Galveston, TX – 7 bed 6.5 bath $1,950,000
    Custom designed by John Staub for W.L. (III) & Mary Moody. Renovated, but lots of era charm still there. Wonderful staircase.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/5115-Avenue-T_Galveston_TX_77551_M84232-15790

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Lovely home inside and out. Rare for a mansion grade home to have been built during the Depression years (roughly end of 1929 to about 1940) and rarer still for it to have been built on Galveston Island. The Moody’s were long among the top families of Galveston’s elite going back to the Victorian era. After the horrific Sept. 1900 Hurricane,(when thousands were lost) Galveston went from being the premiere City in Texas to rapidly fading thereafter with Houston to the north growing and expanding exponentially at the same time. This long period of economic slumber was critical in saving so many of Galveston’s architectural gems from the Victorian era (at least those that the Hurricane didn’t destroy.) This house was probably built as a testament to the Moody family’s faith in Galveston.

    • JkleebJkleeb says: 410 comments
      Seattle, WA

      Wonderful and a bit different for Galveston (see John’s comments). I don’t care for the updates—I think that cold, washed out palate and bathroom updates don’t suit the high style architecture but those things can be easily changed. More importantly, the kept the rest of the house intact. I think it’s very livable for the way many people want to live today.

  25. JkleebJkleeb says: 410 comments
    Seattle, WA

    1937 rustic waterfront compound Brooklin, Maine on 33 acres, $3.8 million
    There’s a little bit of everything, rustic but a bit more interesting and refined than most. Great stove, sinks, decks, towers, etc. I really liked the labels painted on the built in drawers—it’s similar to the way I categorize my own clothes mentally.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/158-High-Head-Dr-Brooklin-ME-04616/2069539506_zpid

  26. Bonita13Bonita13 says: 20 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I would love to hear your comments/thoughts on this pretty girl. I have visions of updating her exterior with a gorgeous three color theme.

    1905 Queen Anne, Princeville, Illinois on 1.5 acres $199,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/205-W-Douglas-St-Princeville-IL-61559/83019417_zpid/

    • MichaelMichael says: 3564 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      It is a nice looking home. It has a nice look on the exterior with the tower and that beautiful wrap around porch. I think your idea for changing the exterior with a three color scheme are good but……the home has vinyl siding according to the listing. It’s hard to say what the original siding looks like under the vinyl siding and if it’s worth it taking it off. I will give the owners credit, the vinyl is installed better than most I have seen!

    • RanunculusRanunculus says: 298 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Tucson, AZ

      Yes, lovely home & practical (and not painted gray!). Seems to be in very good shape.

      Perhaps just a multicolor scheme on the trim–porch, gutters, windows–could compensate some for the off-white siding.

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      A common practice, so I’ve heard, is to select exterior colors based on those seen in the stained glass windows (or at least colors that do not clash with the window colors) As Michael says, vinyl siding is more difficult to paint although I have seen examples of such work. Better to uncover the original siding and show the Queen Anne details which may include patterned shingles and clapboards.

    • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1142 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Charleston, SC

      I always appreciate a period appropriate paint scheme. As far as this house goes, it’s a later version of the Queen Anne style which incorporates classical elements such as the paired Doric porch columns, the Palladian window in the front gable, and much of the interior trim. Online historical sources have the build date as c.1910, and a later build date seems more likely than the listing’s 1890 date.

      The house was once the Seven Oaks Sanitarium
      https://princevilleheritagemuseum.blogspot.com/2012/03/

      After this it was evidently a rest home, a restaurant, and then once again, a private residence.

    • respectthishouserespectthishouse says: 189 comments
      OHD Supporter

      sweet 50s ranch Nashville, TN

      I have a nomenclature question. I have been told repeatedly that Victorian is an era rather than a style. Is the same true for Queen Anne?

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        You’re absolutely correct. Victorian refers to the period when Queen Victoria reigned from 1837 to 1901. Although most popular Victorian styles did not start appearing in large numbers until the 1840’s (unless you consider Greek Revival style homes as Victorian because they were in their heyday in the 1830’s) the Queen’s reign is considered “close enough” for covering that entire era. Some late Victorian styles continued to be built until the eve of WWI so again, Victorian is not a precise set of dates. Informally speaking, “Victorian” is also often a generic term for homes built during the Victorian era but it is incorrect to refer to these homes as being built in the Victorian “style”.

        The Queen Anne style homes were a British import with the prototypes designed by English Architect Richard Norman Shaw (1831-1912) in the 1860’s and 1870’s. Although many of Shaw’s influences were derived from old English homes from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, for obscure reasons, Shaw chose to call his style Queen Anne after the British Queen (1665-1714)

        The first academic formal Queen Anne style house in the U.S. (1875-1876) was designed by the great American architect Henry H. Richardson and was called the William Watts Sherman house in Newport, RI. The decorative freedom inherent in the early Queen Anne examples quickly led to a marriage between American houses that were being called “towered Villas” and British Queen Anne decorative elements so by the end of the 1870’s the Queen Anne style had coalesced into the familiar American house with rounded towers and gables, expansive often wrap-around porches, lavish ornamental details, and sometimes quirky unexpected details like eyebrow dormers and oddly placed corner oriels and turrets. After the 1893 Chicago World’s Columbian exposition in Chicago created a new appreciation for all things Classical and gradually after the reawakening of our Colonial Heritage during the 1876 Centennial, by 1894 Queen Anne styled homes settled into a more predictable, less flamboyant form that year by year gravitated more towards the classical symmetry that the style had originally avoided. More and more Classical/Colonial Revival details replaced the earlier artistic flourishes from the 1880’s and early 1890’s. By the 1900’s only towers, by that time more flattened and often incorporated into corners of rooms identified houses as being of the Queen Anne style. By 1912, the last few identifiable Queen Annes were being built and a few of the emerging Foursquare form homes featured some identifiable Queen Anne style details as well.

        By 1920, the Queen Anne style era had passed but its steady decline had started as early as 1900. Queen Annes are my favorite Victorian style and like many, I appreciate most the earlier examples from the 1880’s and early 1890’s that sometimes have a wonderful artistic surprise around every corner. The best designs from those earlier years were truly a marriage of art and architecture. But 20th century critics soon pounced very harshly on Queen Annes in particular in calling them “fussy” and advocating their mass demolitions as shameful examples of “dishonest” architecture. (apparently because they had strayed from the rigid principle that “form should always follow function”) That rigid line of thinking led eventually to what is called today “Brutalism” architecture which was the antithesis of everything that the Queen Anne style stood for.

        • respectthishouserespectthishouse says: 189 comments
          OHD Supporter

          sweet 50s ranch Nashville, TN

          And those 20th century critics of Queen Anne style were led by Edith Wharton and other aristocrats, yes? Don’t get me started on House of Mirth lol.

          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1897 Queen Anne Colonial
            Cadiz, OH

            When Edith Wharton and Ogden Codman jumped on the anti-Victorian bandwagon with their book The Decoration of Houses in 1897, they were merely joining a movement that was well underway after the national shift towards Classicism following the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893. Influential architects like McKim, Mead, and Stanford White had tried to convince the public that Colonial and Classical architecture was what truly represented America and the sometimes “kooky” exuberant excesses of Victoriana were the problem. (because they felt that architecture was a deadly serious matter and how dare anyone attempt to combine art with architecture!)

            Once that snowball reaction against all things “Victorian” started rolling down the proverbial hill of stylistic tastes, by 1900, it was unstoppable. This anti-Victorian everything reaction only grew with the passing years so that by the 1920’s architects and contractors found a booming business in taking unmistakably Victorian era houses (with Second Empires and Queen Anne style homes being the most favorite) and skillfully remodeling them into Georgian Revivals, Tudors, and non-descript looking boxes that had been through the architectural equivalent of a frontal lobotomy where anything pointing to their Victorian era origin was removed from sight. The chorus of critics calling for the eradication of everything identifiable as from the Victorian era grew louder and more shrill culminating in the post WWII government programs that fell under the heading of “Urban Renewal”. When plans were drawn up for the Interstate system of highways in the early 1950’s, planners often chose to route highways through concentrations of Victorian era housing. It’s true that in many cities, the old Victorian neighborhoods had mostly minority residents as more affluent families had moved out to the fashionable new suburbs. In some cases the Victorian era neighborhoods were considered slums but concurrently, the land in these areas (legally taken through eminent domain laws) was cheaper to acquire as well. None of these 20th centuries trends and changes bode well for survival of the architecture from the Victorian era. As one Preservationist once explained to me about a town which still retained a fairly large number of homes and buildings from the Victorian era: “the reason there are so many still left today is because there were so many more here in the past.” So true.

            • SharonSharon says: 527 comments
              OHD Supporter

              2001 Contemporary
              Sedalia, MO

              Thanks for taking the time to share this wealth of important information! It really increases my appreciation for these beautiful old homes.

            • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 910 comments
              OHD Supporter

              Wow, John, that’s all so fascinating and, yes, sad. I love the early Queen Anne homes which I find very exciting and different — two characteristics not welcome by staid architects of the era who obviously hated change and especially change with the fresh appeal of the Queen Anne.

              In the midst of this campaign against Queen Anne homes was there anyone in the architectural community who ignored the hoopla and carried on building them if a client wanted same? Or did everyone, especially those more well known, join in the demand to dispense with them? It’s astonishing that such extremes were used — I mean, changing the appearance of a house, turning it into something it wasn’t nor ever meant to be. This is awesome information and thank you so much for sharing it.

              • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1897 Queen Anne Colonial
                Cadiz, OH

                Changing house styles from one to another goes back a long way. I recall seeing ads from the 1880’s suggesting altering early to mid-19th century homes to something more “modern” and stylish looking. Nothing was immune from these recommended “updates” including the then over a century old authentic Colonials from the 1700’s. So, it was hardly surprising in the late teens, twenties, and thirties to see ads for remodeling Victorian eta homes into something more 20th century looking. Countless Queen Anne style homes had their towers and turret decapitated. Here’s an example in Carthage, IL, from today: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/49008500478/in/album-72157711630098258/ and a look at it back when it was new: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/49169957037/in/album-72157711630098258/ Two corner towers have disappeared. Some remodelings were more extereme to the point where you would have to see a photo of the original to ever believe the much newer looking house once looked like that. Houses built in more recent decades have little emphasis on style anymore. Except for custom builds, style usually represents a mish-mash of details to give the house forms that are vaguely reminiscent of other styles like Norman, French Chateauesque, Tudor, and eclectic. Doubtful that many people go to look at tract housing in the suburbs and ever ask even one question about style. And if they do, the agent’s reply will likely be “Modern” with all that doesn’t imply. Look at automobiles…they have evolved from stylish streamline modern designs from the thirties to the tailfins and furturistic details in the ’50’s and early 60’s to today’s
                amorphous boxes with four wheels that have very little to do with style.

  27. Bonita13Bonita13 says: 20 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This house confuses and intrigues me all at the same time. To me, it looks like a Victorian and an MCM had a hybrid baby.

    Assumption, Illinois, 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 3,759 sqft, 1 acre lot, $239,900
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/877-E-1800-North-Rd_Assumption_IL_62510_M80735-49633

    • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      It would be fascinating to remove the vinyl siding and see what’s hiding under there. Speaking of removal, anyone want that desk? That loft/den is going to be my loft bedroom. The space that desk thingy is occupying looks like a great place for a bed, and I already have a desk. Where I go, so goes my two-file-cabinets-and-a-board desk. A thing of beauty and a joy forever, as it were. Virtual tour is worth taking.
      The land around this house is serenely sylvan, with many shrubs pruned to an appealingly rounded shape; I wish we could get a closer look at that attractive gazebo.

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Agreed. Doesn’t seem there’s much point in leaving clues to the house’s past life as a Victorian. Those faux timber “beams”? C’mon now, they might be rustic and appropriate for a genuine early 1800’s or Colonial era house but here they add nothing. If you want a modern house, then obliterate all traces of the past (like on the HGTV show “Good Bones”) and just build a new looking house in its place. That small turret on the roof is as useful as Longhorns mounted on a Cadillac grill. What were they assuming in Assumption? Thanks for sharing.

    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      to me this harkens to deconstructionist/postmodernist -where we breakdown history from different time frames and mix it up to create new visions.

  28. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Two beautiful offerings from wonderful Bolinas, Marin County. Each is already spoken for but one can still dream. Lots of unpainted wood and much natural light in each one. Bolinas is the place where you have to know how to get there because the locals enjoy taking down the turnoff sign just as fast as the state could put it up. I think I’ve read that the state has just given up.
    1936 Pending $1,995,000
    “Bohemian Bolinas surf retreat is like stepping back in time when all that mattered was a beautiful view, a nice set of waves and a cozy place to enjoy the good vibes…”
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/10-Canyon-Ave_Bolinas_CA_94924_M10205-71966

    1958 Contingent $4,695,000
    “Nestled on over 2 acres of nature on the North-East side of the Bolinas Lagoon…”
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1015-Olema-Bolinas-Rd_Bolinas_CA_94924_M16589-64190

  29. CoraCora says: 2098 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1950. A friend just sent this to me…and I can’t even accurately describe what’s going on here. It’s fabulous. $524K

    Rydal, PA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1471-Autumn-Rd-Rydal-PA-19046/9891128_zpid/

    • respectthishouserespectthishouse says: 189 comments
      OHD Supporter

      sweet 50s ranch Nashville, TN

      All I can say is yippee!!!

    • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I understand why the listing agent thought it important to mention that “This home has been lovingly maintained and kept by the original owners, who had commissioned the home to be built and custom designed.”
      GOOD FOR THEM!! They knew what they wanted and, By God, they got it. I hope they loved every minute of living there.

    • JkleebJkleeb says: 410 comments
      Seattle, WA

      What a great time capsule! Is this what people were doing in the 70s if they weren’t into earth tones? It looks like it has held up very well and was quality work. I would want to buy the furniture and preserve the ensemble. I seriously like the bar area on the lower level. I hope someone who can appreciate this vision buys it.

    • SharonSharon says: 527 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      Hey, y’all!!!!!! You gotta see this to believe it! It’s so full of vibrant colors and textures and more. Totally daring! I’m going back for seconds. What a delight! Wow and wow! And more wow…… Owners should open it for monthly tours!

    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Cora, I see this place and wonder how they thought to create such metallic opulence. I then wonder how I could live there and sustain the house’s history. I see myself having to take off chunks of the original idea-such as replace the floor in the kitchen–something beyond my asthetic. Some rooms are just too off for my taste. I would hope that this house finds an owner that can love and care for its original idea. Perhaps it is too bad it is being sold, and could not have been preserved by one of the children that may have grown up here -now as their main or secondary
      residence.

      In my stewardship of my great grandparents/family cabin, I am going through this week and pulling everything out of the cabinets that hold dishes, glasses and mugs. I am trying to preserve what came from the cabin from the beginning. My cousins kept notes. I found one mug that they noted as the last from the original household and I am keeping it. Another example is the glassware that my great grandfather and his good friend used to drink whiskey out of, now just a singular glass left, that they had applied decals to (outside you see a woman in Victorian dress, inside the glass, she wears no clothing). Crude yes, but funny and part of the history.

    • MJGMJG says: 2837 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Even though this house is totally off something I want, and I would never buy a house like this, I do love places that appear to be untouched for so long and just hope someone who buys it next is someone who respects it. I respect the idea that went into it back in the day and will appreciate it for that reason. It is a total window to the past. I was shocked that the patio furniture and grill were from present day and not from THAT era.

  30. natira121natira121 says: 861 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    Wow.

    Should we call that Flea Market Liberace? I think it needs some of those big ‘garage butterflys’ or something to dress it up on the outside, it’s MUCH too sedate!

    And where on earth do you get a neon lime green patent leather chair?!?!

    I kida reminds me of that completely over-the-top house a few years ago… in Detroit?

  31. shafer8shafer8 says: 83 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1732 Cape Cod
    CT

    Culture shock. From the outside you’d have no idea. Looks like Korean or Chinese Chic. Funny that the realtor makes NO mention of the “decor.”

  32. GayHermitGayHermit says: 14 comments
    IL

    Some Illinois listings. Top 10 “Best”.
    -Zillow was insane this weekend with all kinds of Illinois opportunities. Have two lists here, the top 10 “best” of this weekends search, and three “problem children” that I thought some might find interesting.
    -Not sure if it was just my weekend for finding listings or if it was my different search parameters, but I included multi-family in my Zillow search this time and had way more potential old houses show up with this search.

    Built 1875, $52,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/208-S-Michigan-St-Tower-Hill-IL-62571/115746676_zpid/ Large house. Original woodwork.

    Built 1920, $55,000 Rented to students until May of 2022.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/423-N-McArthur-St-Macomb-IL-61455/116471625_zpid/ Decent amount of period details / woodwork. Large lot.

    Built 1910, $58,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/329-E-Court-St-Hennepin-IL-61327/115729836_zpid/ Lots of period charm. Original unpainted woodwork. Stained glass. Definitely a potential dream house to check out.

    Built 1900, $65,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/319-E-Cortland-St-Avon-IL-61415/105599523_zpid/ Unpainted woodwork on main floor, built in cabinet, good staircase, stained glass. Removed wall to addition may not work for some. Upstairs could use some restoration / polishing.

    Built 1882, $74,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/421-N-8th-St-Quincy-IL-62301/91322551_zpid/ Excellent foyer / staircase and lots of original woodwork. Kitchen could stand a bit of work.

    Built 1911, $75,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/129-N-5th-St-Albion-IL-62806/115613971_zpid/ Stone block house. Unpainted woodwork, scrollwork in one “door”way. Could use some help getting out of the 70’s.

    Built 1900, $89,500
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/139-N-College-St-Decatur-IL-62522/84811802_zpid/ Very good exterior paint. Lots of original interior woodwork.

    Built 1858, $104,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/319-N-Long-St-Shelbyville-IL-62565/115745970_zpid/ Brick house. Lots of period woodwork / details. ( One room may need a spiritual deep cleaning. Hopefully it didn’t affect the rest of the house. )

    Built 1920, $104,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1315-E-Hillcrest-Pl-Peoria-IL-61603/5140797_zpid/ Incredible Bungalow style house.

    Built 1892, $109,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/102-S-Walnut-St-Roberts-IL-60962/112572177_zpid/ Incredible foyer / main staircase, lots of original woodwork, kitchen could use some help.

  33. GayHermitGayHermit says: 14 comments
    IL

    Illinois listings, problem child edition.

    Built 1890, $39,900 4 unit configuration. Needs work.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/211-2nd-Ave-Rock-Falls-IL-61071/84842911_zpid/ Unique building with possible restoration potential, no interior pics in listing. Two separate buildings on lot. Rear building looks like it needs more work than unique building.

    Built 1922, $55,000 Warning, currently condemned.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1102-7th-St-Rockford-IL-61104/2077140156_zpid/ Always wanted to restore an old brick building with stores on the main floor? Here’s a potential opportunity. Place needs a lot of work. Listed cost does not include back taxes, liens, etc. City has info on what is needed to make space occupiable. (Since It is in Rockford, might want to check neighborhood too.) 2 apartments on second floor.

    Built 1928, $58,500 Total interior gut to studs.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/601-College-Ave-Rockford-IL-61104/5558641_zpid/ All brick building with original era windows. Exterior looks cool. Interior needs tons of work.

    • JimHJimH says: 5760 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I recall the peculiar house in Rock Falls from a previous life in the 1970’s. The Gothic gables and Italianate tower were built 50 years before the later brick and stone cladding changed the Victorian character. The house is shown on early maps and was likely built shortly after the town was platted in 1867. William W. Brown (1839-1887) & Susan M. Wheeler married in 1868; he was a carpenter and she was the daughter of an early businessman and mayor there. Susan stayed in the home with a daughter and grandchildren until she died in 1923, and the home was remodeled. I wonder if anything of the original house is left inside.

      I also remember the old Keystone Manufacturing plant on the river, built 150 years ago of limestone quarried from the riverbed. The factory later became part of International Harvester, and employed hundreds of workers for almost a century. I see they tore it down a few years ago:
      https://goo.gl/maps/NfHdsvZ5omjoC2uw7

    • RanunculusRanunculus says: 298 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Tucson, AZ

      This type of “doozy” properties seems akin to the 1€ “houses” (they use the term loosely) in Italy–they should ALL come with the stipulation that the buyer be under 40 years old!

      SO much energy, faith, and persistence is required, not just able-bodied-ness. Maybe a special loan program could help save dilapidated buildings while housing the generation being squeezed out of the housing market.

  34. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1920 USFS Cabin$160,000 Est. $752 /mo 2 bed 1 bath 896 sqft
    0.99 acre lot
    19803 US Highway 50, Twin Bridges, CA 95735 [150 miles, give or take, to The Bay Area.]
    Directions: Just before Sierra at Tahoe Ski Resort Rd on left.
    Listing Two has a few more pics.
    “…Seasonal water (?) and year round creek…”
    A perfect cabin for me; I don’t have much more in the way of furniture than the current occupants seem to have. And I LOVE sleeping with windows wide open. Wouldn’t mind at all if I could fall asleep to the sound of the creek.
    btw: This cabin is going to sell for way over asking. Way over. I wonder why the Forest Service is selling.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/19803-US-Highway-50_Twin-Bridges_CA_95735_M96108-46688

  35. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2540 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    A handmade house in Ipswich video from PBS: Painting and Travel with Roger and Sarah Bansemer

    Grandfather’s House episode 308
    I have not seen this show before today, the house is very intriguing but to get to it, you will have to move through his painting of the house before you can see Sarah’s travels thru her summer place. This 1908 house is a labor of love with lots of ingenuity and practicality at the same time.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-8on8l9WK8

  36. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    A MAJOR California fixer. The last pic will win your heart…if it’s still necessary.
    1920 $175,000 Est. $823/mo
    Studio 14,509 sqft 0.69 acre lot
    500 Elm St, Westwood, CA 96137 [83 miles to Reno, NV. 122 miles to Sacramento, CA]
    “Don’t miss your chance to own a piece of history! The Historic Westwood Hospital was built in 1914 by the same Red River Logging Company that brought us the stories of Paul Bunyan and Babe the big blue ox. The Hospital features multiple wings of patient rooms, an elevator, a giant kitchen, multiple waiting rooms, large fireplace, a spacious third story apartment, and so many other fascinating features just waiting to be discovered. The hospital operated clear through the 1970s, and is a treasure trove of rich American and logging history. With possible funding available for the restoration of this once glorious building there is so much potential for just about anything you can imagine here. This incredible diamond in the ruff is located in the small town of Westwood California.”
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/500-Elm-St_Westwood_CA_96137_M94492-99972

  37. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 1136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    A 133 year old Victorian in Oakland is available for the taking. Move it and it’s yours. “…the home at 2428 Chestnut Street, less than a block away from McClymonds High, is being offered up for free. The home is not protected by the California Register of Historical Resources so it can be demolished, but the developer must first demonstrate a good-faith effort to relocate it.” There are also two industrial buildings that can be similarly acquired.
    https://www.sfgate.com/realestate/article/oakland-victorian-home-free-moving-relocation-16311439.php

  38. JkleebJkleeb says: 410 comments
    Seattle, WA

    North Bend, WA 1969 Brutalist rural retreat $1.498,088
    The original builder/designer is an architectural artist (not sure I understand that term) and the furnishings and personlization make this place hold together in a way that I would want to buy the contents and all. It is a great location at the base of a mountain, on a river. He and his artist wife seem to lived a wonderful life here per the description from the article I have read but now can’t access to post (paywall issues). I love the fact that they used the room with the parquet floor as their “ballroom” and also have a small stable, tennis court, and canning kitchen. Any place with a ballroom and a canning kitchen speaks to well rounded people in my opinion.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8505-436th-Ave-SE-North-Bend-WA-98045/48873325_zpid/?

  39. sadly a lot of the houses in my town list as sold because of foreclosure. i live in a beautifully historic town and its sad to see the ones that are not maintained
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/124-W-Commerce-St-Smyrna-DE-19977/48148138_zpid/?
    ^although this house is listed as sold, there is (and has been) a for sale sign in the front. i hope no one gives up on this beauty. it has stained glass windows, looks fairly kept up on the inside. it was built in 1900 and is priced at 133,000 (?). the outside does need work- some wood is rotting and desperately needs a paint job. sits on a lovely downtown street with other old homes 🙂
    was supposed to move into this house but could not afford it. would love to see it lived in and loved!

  40. Bonita13Bonita13 says: 20 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This house looks like it had a big update in the early 70s and nothing since then. It’s a definite trip to the past! $65,000, 3 bed 2 bath 2,072 sqft

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/470-Ullin-Ave_Ullin_IL_62992_M80176-30236

  41. JulieJulie says: 57 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Over 8,200 sq. ft in Elmira, NY. Built in 1900. $99,900

    Someone may have posted this one already so forgive me if this is a repeat. Posted on 7/14 and listed as contingent already, but still worth mentioning!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/615-Columbia-St-Elmira-NY-14901/29955925_zpid/?utm_campaign=iosappmessage&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=txtshare

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7662 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      To find it on OHD, just type Elmira in the search box and hit enter. You might enjoy all of the comments. 😊

  42. cdleoncdleon says: 1 comments

    https://carieleon.wixsite.com/606smainst

    Please consider posting this beautiful 1907 greek revival mansion. thank you, Carie Leon, Realtor®, Licensed in Iowa

  43. respectthishouserespectthishouse says: 189 comments
    OHD Supporter

    sweet 50s ranch Nashville, TN

    Wonderful outside, a few nice touches left inside. The decor does it no justice.

  44. JulieJulie says: 57 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1,024 sq ft built in 1930, $299,000, Gainesville FL

    The people who built this may not have had money to build a large house, but they built the fanciest little house they could! I also love that the realtor appreciates what this house has to offer, which is not so common for some of these old houses.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/302-NW-4th-Ave-Gainesville-FL-32601/42735907_zpid

  45. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5916 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    First I’m not entirely sure of this house being from 1930. (the year when the Great Depression was being felt from Coast to Coast) The house form (Bungalow) suggests 1920’s but the details were very puzzling to me until I looked in Streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/qVNB4odH1xHDBxqXA The landmark quality Victorian Queen Anne across the street almost demanded that this house be designed and constructed in a manner that was sympathetic to its grand neighbor on the other side of the narrow street. It’s a minor miracle that both houses remain standing. Makes me wonder if owners of the one of a kind Bungalow had a family connection to the owners of the house across the street? Even if built in the 1920’s, this Bungalow represents one of the earliest examples of a Victorian revival house I’ve seen. The fact that many of the ornate details were rendered in concrete makes this house even more amazing. I think even the Victorian type mantels inside were constructed of concrete. The contractor must have been a wizard at making concrete mold designs to create something like this.

    There are signs in the surrounding neighborhood that this house and adjacent houses went though a long period of decline and I suspect the neighborhood was marginal in the not too distant past. I’m intrigued enough by the two homes to want to know more about them. The fact that the Bungalow may have been constructed with Victorian decorative details at a time when all things from the Victorian era were pretty much disliked is even more remarkable. “Unique” is an often overused term when the subject is old houses but this one cannot be described in any other way. Thanks for sharing this very unusual home.

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