April 16, 2021: Link Exchange & Discussion

Added to OHD on 4/16/21 - Last OHD Update: 4/23/21 - 194 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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194 Comments on April 16, 2021: Link Exchange & Discussion

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12514 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I didn’t research today’s old house photo. Maybe someone can track the home down.

    No portrait for today. The article has no association with the house (the highlighted name was because at the time I didn’t know how to get rid of the highlights at the time I found the article.)

    I guess that’s it…pretty sure. 🙂 Have a good weekend!

    +8
  2. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 143 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    These are a bit later than the properties I usually post, but here are two remarkable 1860s NY homes. Bring money.

    This is The Cliffs, built in 1864 in Victorian Gothic style and considered the first of the Gold Coast mansions—think The Great Gatsby sixty years later—built along the North Shore of Long Island. Offered at $12 million with 16 acres overlooking the water. As an aside, I grew up on the same street as Jim Smiros of Smiros and Smiros Architects.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1026-W-Shore-Rd-Mill-Neck-NY-11765/31164557_zpid/

    And this is the Hurst Pierrepont Estate, an impressive 1867 Gothic Revival on nearly 20 acres in the Hudson Valley across from West Point: $4.95 million.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1070-Route-9d-Garrison-NY-10524/31923451_zpid/

    +7
    • lilithlilith says: 24 comments

      Love the entryway and stairs on the second one!

      +1
    • shellyhorvathshellyhorvath says: 154 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Both of these are spectacular, but my favorite is the Hurst Pierrepont is one of my favorites on this site. It was photographed so well. That shot of the stair bannister crossing and the bedrooms and the exterior shots and, and, and. Thanks soooo much for posting it.

      +3
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Mill Neck:
      https://photos.zillowstatic.com/fp/d7806b4aeadf56c5ef740d84f0ee17d0-uncropped_scaled_within_1536_1152.webp
      I am pretty sure I have seen this one before, but glad to revisit. Just look at that chandelier

      +1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      https://photos.zillowstatic.com/fp/5493248debb272febc9faae085336705-uncropped_scaled_within_1536_1152.webp
      Also love this Garrison property too. enjoy the keyhole staircase, I think I remember that is what it is called. beautiful

      +3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7453 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The house in Mill Neck must have been very impressive and interesting at the start; the tracery windows and the stair give evidence to that. What it has become is rather monstrous – IMO. Currently a great example of how having considerable wealth does not grant one automatic good taste; or the good judgement to hire a capable decorator.

      https://pi.movoto.com/p/482/3284921_0_rfbbFf_l.jpeg

      The place is so uptight, just looking at it made me have to do neck stretches. The sun porch seems like the only place in the whole vast lot of it that you might even have a chance relaxing and feeling comfortable. What is that glass thing in front of the fireplace in the Pepto parlor? Unused fireplaces are sad; but that thing transcends inhuman clinical sterility. Methinks the face in the portrait above it, (obviously chosen for it’s value, and faintly pinkish hue), sums up the place – as is – nicely.

      https://pi.movoto.com/p/482/3284921_0_NERmQ3_l.jpeg

      I love the greenhouse; but even that currently seems stiff and unnatural.
      Clipped anyway.

      +5
      • restoricrestoric says: 63 comments
        1851 Greek Revival
        Anderson, SC

        LOL at your comments and couldn’t agree more. Brings to mind one of my favorite clichés “Noting succeeds like excess”. Ref your ‘Pepto Parlor’, what a waste to have the modernistic glass & brass fire screen at a fireplace that obviously has never been nor ever will be used.

        +2
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 7453 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Normally I’m better at restraining myself, but that place is just silly. 😉

          Excess does not necessarily equate tacky.
          [click on the little TVplay icon at top right-ish for best viewing]
          https://flic.kr/s/aHskRD3bg5

          +2
          • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
            OHD Supporter

            Chuckling…because what else is there to do after viewing all the “items’ in this otherwise beautiful house. It’s as if one person carefully placed THEIR things where THEY wanted them to be and then another, disagreeing with those choices, person came along and placed THEIR OWN items…right on top of the first round of placements.

            +1
          • BemisBemis says: 3 comments

            Wow! That house is amazing! I adore the life every room has-just the right amount of “excess” everywhere. Thanks for sharing!

            0
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 7453 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Also –
          >modernistic glass & brass fire screen
          Really? That looks like 1990’s fare to me.

          +1
    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 789 comments
      OHD Supporter

      What I found curious about The Cliffs is that you have a house in a stunning location overlooking a body of water and yet not one photo taken inside shows a view of same. Normally water views are highlighted to the best possible advantage.

      +7
    • MJGMJG says: 2655 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Stunning that central hall, but I dislike what they did the the woodwork on the stairs walls and ceiling! I can’t tell if it was “pickled” or painted. Or maybe its just the lighting effects?

      0
    • MJGMJG says: 2655 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      THIS HOUSE IS STUNNING! So much is left and in tact. I’m taking the 360 tour and its like a true maze of doors and small staircases. I LOVE IT

      0
      • MJGMJG says: 2655 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        BTW I”m referring tot eh Garrison NY house. People take the 360 tour. Several small hidden stair cases, one very discreet spiral staircase in the sub basement… tons of goodies in this house. Just stunning. I’m gonna take the tour again.

        +2
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2329 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      Ooh, I love the Pierrepont Gothic Revival!! Gorgeous, with too many cool details to list. Neat location, too.

      0
  3. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This might be of interest. There have been a number of comments mentioning Oaks of late. This well illustrated article currently running in the Washington Post, written by their garden columnist Adrian Higgins, is a lovely discussion of them. Included is a delightful description of the superb habitat value of Oaks. Mr Higgins is of the opinion that Oaks are “the perfect tree for troubled times.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/oak-trees-support-life/2021/04/13/2d6b8ed2-961e-11eb-a6d0-13d207aadb78_story.html

    (Does anyone else still miss their late, great garden columnist Henry Mitchell?)–

    +9
    • respectthishouserespectthishouse says: 150 comments
      OHD Supporter

      sweet 50s ranch Nashville, TN

      Aww my son wants me to move to Bedford and the picture is the Bedford Oak.

      +2
      • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Bedford Oak – c. 1500

        corner of Hook Road & Cantitoe Street
        A majestic and venerable white oak tree, “Quercus alba” stands at the corner of Hook Road and the old Bedford Road (now Cantitoe Street). It is estimated to be over 500 years old, its girth is more than 30 feet, and the spread of its branches is 120 feet from tip to tip. From the days when Bedford was Native American Territory, through the Revolutionary War and to the present, this noble tree has seen much history.

        In 1942 Harold Whitman deeded the ground on which the tree stands to the Town of Bedford, in memory of his wife, Georgia Squires Whitman. Then in 1977, 30 acres of land bordering the great tree were sold to a developer. Concerned about encroaching development, the residents of Bedford quickly raised the funds to buy two acres to protect the tree and give it breathing space.

        The land, along with the money remaining in the fund, was donated to the Historical Society. The Historical Society is pledged to take care of the oak – a living monument and cherished symbol to the community
        https://www.bedfordhistoricalsociety.org/bedford-oak

        Bedford, NY sounds like a very good place to live.

        +2
    • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 541 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1782 Quaker Georgian
      Worton, MD

      Well said KEYLIME. We just received a bunch of oak starters to repopulate our woodland dell here in Maryland. Yes, to oaks!

      +1
  4. GretaLynGretaLyn says: 609 comments
    OHD Supporter

    In my continuing ancestry research, I’ve made a brief stop in Joliet, IL. The Great Chicago Fire and the resulting building codes may explain why there aren’t many homes still standing from the era when my ancestors were there (and possibly why they moved on)…but here is a nice example “The J. W. Fitz Gibbons House is a 2 1/2-story, wood clapboard, American Foursquare style structure with Classical Revival detailing, built in 1905 on a Joliet limestone foundation. The front facade is dominated by a full-width, Classical open front porch supported on paired half-height Ionic columns resting on a limestone wall. The house has a flared hip roof with 3′ wide eaves accented by decorative scroll corbels. An original carriage house is located at the rear of the property.”
    $349,900
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/700-Western-Ave_Joliet_IL_60435_M84291-79410

    +7
  5. MattDMattD says: 138 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1870 Classical Revival
    New Orleans, LA

    1955 Mid Century Beauty in New Orleans! $1,485,000.00 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Being sold by original family. Has a guest house and pool on large corner lot. This is the next door to friends that purchased a MCM house 3 years ago (and I shared their house then).

    Mid Century Modern masterpiece designed by John Lawrence, dean of Tulane University’s School of architecture. This gem is situated on an oversize lot with beautiful brick courtyard, back yard, a secluded, landscaped pool area and a cabana with bath. Wonderful architectural features are plentiful. Wall of glass invites the outside in. Interior and exterior clerestory windows, suspended stair case and more fine details. Very private and lovingly maintained by the same family for 57 years. Truly a treasure!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/7507-Dominican-St_New-Orleans_LA_70118_M87475-27499

    +8
  6. Belladog1Belladog1 says: 179 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Sonofsyosset That was some eye candy OHD style!

    +2
  7. shellyhorvathshellyhorvath says: 154 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Three very different houses on the water today. Let’s all go to the beach!

    1. This stunning Colonial revival was built by Fred Savage in 1896. It features views of the iconic Dark Harbor to the north, and to the west 196 feet of waterfront on Ames Cove includes a gravel beach and a six-kayak storage rack with custom launch system providing access to excellent kayaking in the picturesque Gilkey Harbor. Also posting because I have a penchant for yellow houses, and who doesn’t love a knot garden!

    1896 | $2,995,000 | 9 bds | 10 ba | 10,000 soft
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/117-Jetty-Rd-Islesboro,-ME,-04848_rb/2088830948_zpid/

    2. Eastwinds is a charming Victorian, completed in 1903, built by Milton and Georgianna Foster Murray. Mr. Murray owned and operated the Mathews Marine Railway. Besides wonderful views of the East River, this house also showcases a hand painted mural of wisteria vines in the main hall leading to the second floor, painted by Roonie Stone for the Virginia Garden Tour of 1996. Be still my heart! And, deep water at the end of the covered dock is waiting for your sailboat.

    1903 | $1,200,000 | 7 bds | 4 ba | 5,704 soft
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/992-Williams-Wharf-Rd-Mathews,-VA,-23109_rb/79166734_zpid/

    3. I just love this ocean front home at the quiet, north end of Seaside. It sits proudly in a line of much larger houses. Small. but mighty (cute)! It’s a rare find, with much of the original integrity intact. Featuring tongue and groove wood walls and ceiling, old growth fir floors and vintage bathroom fixtures.

    1930 | $899,000 | 3 bds | 2 ba | 1,640 sqft
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/1605-N-Prom-Seaside,-OR,-97138_rb/86294093_zpid/

    +3
  8. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1305-Windsor-Ave-Bristol-TN-37620/42425287_zpid/

    This home is located in Bristol, Tennessee. Asking price is $179,900. Built in 1900. It’s a historic home with many original features, kept in great shape and fitted with modern appliances. Steam heat works beautifully. Radiators were restored a few years ago. Brand new water heater. New washer/dryer. New refrigerator with glass front panel. Porcelain farmhouse kitchen sink in perfect condition. Clawfoot bathtub upstairs. Located in the middle of the town. Backyard borders the Mark Vance bike path. Yard features a koi pond and upper and lower back decks.

    +4
  9. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/717-Columbia-St-Lafayette-IN-47901/92478653_zpid/
    A well beloved 1863 second empire in downtown Lafayette, IN. Not your typical OHD post, needs lots of love!

    +2
  10. Dr.SnyderDr.Snyder says: 75 comments
    1895 PORTAGE, OH

    1881 Castle, 26 Ravenscliffe Ave, Hamilton, ON: C$8,888,888 ($7,102,048 American).

    Castle? A square and round tower…lots of natural woodwork…yikes. I see elements of Queen Ann style here, Roman revival perhaps? I came across this gem when I was looking at properties on Zillo in northeastern Ohio. I wished the photography included summer images. I don’t know if anyone else has shared it; I checked the Canadian posts and didn’t see it, so I thought I’d toss it into the mix.

    For the first time the video is not any more revealing than the photos—there are a number of edits as the videographer jumps from room to room so developing a sense of the space and the flow is somewhat challenging. Still, though…what a property:
    https://www.propertyvision.ca/tour/2078

    +7
    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 789 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Good heavens, what a place! Those first few evening shots showing the winter sky are stunning. You can almost feel the cold just by looking at them. I like this house. There is something appealing about it despite its size. I like the large rooms, like how it’s decorated, like the staircase — like, like, like. Would love to see what it looked liked back in the day. A fascinating find, Dr.Snyder. Thanks.

      +1
  11. Anne M.Anne M. says: 1033 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    The snow is covering the daffodils in Massachusetts & it keeps coming down. Glad to be inside looking at Old Houses.
    1894 Victorian in Warwick, RI $396,500 love the stone, enclosed porch, staircase & art glass windows. Oh & it’s pink!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/140-Norwood-Ave-Warwick-RI-02888/66031465_zpid/
    1820 in Brandon, VT $198,000 love the simplicity of this. comes with an old blacksmith shop
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5-Briggs-Ln-Brandon-VT-05733/92026088_zpid/
    Brandon is a beautiful small town:
    https://neshobe-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/static/images/iStock-1130927881.jpg
    at the opposite end of simple to ornate architecture: Birdcage B&B
    https://flic.kr/p/EZt7q6
    All 243 buildings in downtown Brandon are on the National Register of Historic Places.
    1918 Craftsman in Worcester, MA $390,000 the pantry & the kitchen are just wonderful.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8-Hillcroft-Ave-Worcester-MA-01606/56737437_zpid/

    +7
  12. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Off to southern Vermont for this gem.

    1930 Farmhouse (“reimagined 2011 farmhouse”) $2,000,000 Est. Payment $8,529/mo
    4bed 2.5bath 2,988sqft 33acre lot
    369 Sykes Hollow Rd,
    Rupert, VT, 05761

    Simply lovely and serene. Move-in ready. Excellent “reimagining.” Kitchen made me smile. In a subsequent pic I believe I got a peek at a white (yaaa!) fridge. Included are pics of the interior of the barn/stable.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/369-Sykes-Hollow-Rd_Pawlet_VT_05761_M98414-92183

    +4
  13. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Two Vermont offerings in need of work. I sure like how much land each one comes with.

    1. 1854 Farmhouse $195,000 Est. Payment $1,046/mo
    4bed 2bath 3,026sqft 45acre lot
    230 Mountain View Rd,
    Tinmouth, VT, 05773

    “Fabulous 45 acres of old farm land with superb mountain and valley views with several possible building sites. Half of the land is open pasture and half is pine woodland. Three sides of the property are bounded by town roads so there is easy access to all of the land. The old house has not been lived in for 10+ years and may be a tear down. There is a 20×30 seasonal camp up in the woods at the southern edge of the property that has also not been used for a decade and will require a new driveway for access. There will be a deed restriction prohibiting the placement of single wide manufactured homes on the property.”

    “Tear down?” I don’t see it.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/230-Mountain-View-Rd_Tinmouth_VT_05773_M99960-31151

    2. 1900 Cape $175,000 Est. Payment $1,014/mo
    2bed 1bath 1,086sqft 50acre lot
    3609 Route 30,
    Pawlet, VT, 05761

    “Amazing opportunity to finish this early 1900’s 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath cape nestled within the Mettowee Valley. With 50 Acres of wooded acreage and a 1 1/2 story garage this home is ready to be finished! With a new asphalt shingle roof, newly installed oil boiler, hot water tank and oil tank infrastructure the bones of this home are solid. A great flowing layout with multiple spacious living areas, bay windows, brick fireplace and plenty of potential 3618 Rt 30 is the gem you have been looking for. Property conveyed in AS IS condition, Cash offers only”

    Whenever I see “cash offers only,” I wonder what the deficit is that a bank won’t fund. It seems to be habitable:
    Utilities
    Electric: Electric: Circuit Breaker(s)
    Sewer: Public
    Cable
    Internet – Cable
    Telephone Available
    Water Source: Public

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3609-Route-30_Pawlet_VT_05761_M95337-27289

    +4
  14. C.J.C.J. says: 2 comments

    I have half a mind to drive to Johnstown, PA, to see this one this weekend. 1931 stone “castle” on 4.5 acres for only $225K.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3259-Menoher-Blvd_Johnstown_PA_15905_M31831-94578

    +14
  15. alfalf says: 18 comments
    OHD Supporter

    IL

    Inspired by shellyhorvath’s post, here’s another beach property.

    1914 “The Stone House” on Drummond Island, Michigan, $750,000

    https://www.point2homes.com/US/Home-For-Sale/MI/Drummond-Island/38668-S-Martin-Row/77641080.html

    Welcome to the North Woods. In spite of updates throughout the years, The Stone House, built by Finnish carpenters, retains the simplicity of a family summer home where long days are spent outside and indoor amenities are minimal yet adequate. It reminded me of Carl Larson paintings of his family enjoying summer. Then I discovered the International option in the OHD menu and fell down the rabbit hole starting with Finland . . . .

    +7
  16. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1880 Colonial $1,800,000Est. Payment $7,414/mo
    7bed 1bath 2,228sqft 41acre lot
    114 Town Line Rd,
    Roxbury, CT, 06783

    “The home has not been occupied since the current owner purchased the property and it requires extensive renovation.” Excerpted from a lengthy and decidedly intriguing property description. Unfortunately, interiors are left to our imagination. But the pastoral Litchfield County setting is so lovely that I could not resist posting. Property history gives no clue as to when the current owner purchased it.
    Taxes $7,593

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/114-Town-Line-Rd_Roxbury_CT_M45207-34736

    +2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Wow, sure looks interesting, property alone, but I too would want to see inside.

      +1
      • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I’ve been wondering if, because the property has been vacant, not showing the inside is intended to protect against possible vandals/thieves.

        0
    • JimHJimH says: 5592 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The owners are on Park Ave in NYC and bought the place for $537k in 1999. They kept the lawns mowed, paid their taxes and want to cash out now. Better than a mutual fund! It’s a beautiful place – maybe they were afraid of ticks!

      +4
  17. JkleebJkleeb says: 355 comments
    Seattle, WA

    1958 Madison IN $399,000
    I love the way this house is sited and the stone on the exterior. Not sure the blue paint shows it off as well as another color would. Unfortunately, the kitchen has been updated (no bathroom photos) but also a great indoor pool done well in my opinion.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/404-Fairmount-Dr-Madison-IN-47250/85426100_zpid

    1835 Madison IN Greek Revival $450,000

    Two side by side houses combined into one large funeral business with living area. You have to look past the funeral home decor to see 1835 on the main floor but it is there. Unfortunately, there are a lot of photos of an “open concept” living area that is either on the top floor of the main house or in the huge addition. There are two photos toward the end that show the houses in their former glory. The last one is interesting in the way the photographer captured the speeding vehicle as it went by.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/423-W-Main-St_Madison_IN_47250_M96075-52780

    1835 Alton IL Greek Revival $319,000

    The asymmetry of the facade makes me think the right half was an addition along with the rear portion. Nice surviving Greek Revival mantels and staircase.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/445-E-12th-St-Alton-IL-62002/4994264_zpid

    1903 Alton IL Georgian Revival (as described) $575,000

    Very high-quality home and materials, however, there are updates that many won’t like. I appreciate that the woodwork on the main floor hasn’t been painted, but it has received a treatment I have described as “pickling” but I am not sure what it is really called–a semi-opaque stain I associate with the 1980s but I’m sure it could be dealt with if one didn’t like it. In scrolling through the photos, it was a relief to get to the dining room that was spared the treatment. Otherwise, a great house and grounds with a very inviting looking swimming pool.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/628-E-15th-St-Alton-IL-62002/4995032_zpid

    +4
  18. JulieJulie says: 403 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Kia Ora from New Zealand,

    I was just perusing the Saturday morning paper when I saw this Devonport, Auckland church and decided it was just too good not to share:

    “St Pauls Church is a beautiful example of 1916 Arts & Crafts heritage, having been at the centre of Devonport life for over a century. This property is a rare large block for Devonport, with the 1,696 m2 of grounds and 670m2 of buildings being on the slopes of Mt Victoria and only 800 metres from the city ferry and Devonport’s vibrant café and restaurant scene. Walking distance to schools, beautiful beaches, parks and other community amenities.

    Included with the property is St Paul’s Church Hall, a large property previously operated as a chess centre, music venue, and venue for many weddings. The current owners have converted the hall into an inviting four bedroom home, with stunning living area and huge space for all. USD 2,463,624.30

    https://www.barfoot.co.nz/property/residential/north-shore-city/devonport/810697

    In other news, New Zealand’s borders, which have been closed for over a year, are opening tomorrow but only for Australians. Likewise we can travel there and neither country will require quarantine. Here is hoping that all goes well. My husband and I will wait until we have gotten the jab and that we see all is going well with the Trans-Tasman Travel Bubble before we go over to visit family because it could get very expensive if either country suddenly goes into a lockdown and we get stuck in Australia or have to spend several thousand to go spend two weeks in a quarantine facility for two weeks upon return to New Zealand.

    +10
  19. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings all, glad to have Friday here and a few days at home with my animals and family. Snow this morning with many house plants on the porch, they are all sturdy and the tropicals that are above the soil are indoors.

    Here is a house that I wish to start out with. a few whimsical details:

    1898, Columbus, OH, 650,000

    I do love the stairway and its sort of circular opening, arched front window with its pile of bubbles and sun rays streaking out behind (feel free to call it what you like). I wish I could see it before it was it was fixed up.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/959-Franklin-Ave-Columbus-OH-43205/33846891_zpid/

    +1
  20. CoraCora says: 2086 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1916. The owners have done a fabulous job of “hidden modernization” on this lovely brick gem. The attic finish is so cozy and interesting. $700K

    Omaha, NE:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3826-Webster-St-Omaha-NE-68131/75819563_zpid/

    +1
  21. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1850, Fly Creek, NY, 350,000

    The house’s history from the listing: “first of record was the Cheney family, holding the property for nearly 100 years, while the home then served as an Inn along the new Turnpike, to which the location resulted from an approval by Judge William Cooper, who recognized Joseph Cheney as an enterprising individual in the community and allowed the turnpike location near his Inn. Rumor has it Amelia Earhart once stayed at this Inn, as she gave flying lessons nearby. The third and current owner has adored this property for 75 years highlighting the kitchen with vintage Youngstown sink & cabinets and an early American Glenwood cast iron stove”
    Gently cared for home.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6119-State-Highway-28-Fly-Creek-NY-13337/31636736_zpid/

    +6
  22. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1859, Lyons, NY 169,900

    History from the listing: “built in 1859 by Saxon B Gavitt, founder of The Gavitt National Bank which merged with Lyons National Bank during the Great Depression”
    When I first saw this house, I thought what an odd mix of old and new. But then with the older portions decoration, I decided to take a look. All the updates seem to suffocate the original, but at least we end on an original shot of the house, perhaps for a future owner to contemplate.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/20-Holley-St-Lyons-NY-14489/209135045_zpid/

    +1
  23. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1935, Guerneville, CA, 350,000

    I can see something simple wooden and beautiful in this cabin, just look at the cupboards and the light in slide 8.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/14686-Canyon-1-Rd-Guerneville-CA-95446/15810055_zpid/

    +5
    • CarlasueCarlasue says: 17 comments

      Love love love this! My parents had a house like this that burned in the Carr fire. They are in their 80’s and live in an apartment in town now. Dad says he’s too old to start over. 🙁

      0
  24. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1922, Oakland, CA, 1,195,000

    Wooden cabin up amongst the live oaks. Paneled wood interior, open spaces with large windows taking in the woodland outside.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5726-Shepherd-Canyon-Rd-Oakland-CA-94611/24813978_zpid/

    +3
  25. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    a little more La Jolla:

    1905, La Jolla, CA, 4,400,000

    History from the listing: “Built in approximately 1905, it was formerly owned by the icons of Helms Bakery fame, reportedly constructed to be a family beach get away in the first part of the 1900s.”
    I like the opening shot with the flat low roof line on the shingled natural siding, green window and door trim, prominent stone stair and landscaping on each side. The house is surrounded by landscaping. I love the open wood interior with all the windows and ocean views. And finally primrose wall and ceiling paper in the bath on slide 34.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1570-Virginia-Way-La-Jolla-CA-92037/140174883_zpid/

    +4
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      “A little more La Jolla” (above), infers there was the previously shared La Jolla, which I did not share. So here it is, a rather fanciful house designed by the architect as his residence while he worked on an ocean side resort:

      1924, La Jolla, CA, 8+ million

      From the listing: “This English Tudor landmark estate is a fixture within La Jolla’s historic Beach Barber Tract neighborhood that is widely admired for its architectural beauty, its unusually large corner lot with surrounding gardens, and its prime location that’s just a block from the ocean. Available to purchase for the first time in nearly 60 years, this timeless home was originally designed in 1924 by famed architect Edgar V. Ullrich as his personal residence during his commission of the seaside resort-turned-retirement-community, Casa de Mañana, and was later home to Philip Barber while developing his surrounding self-named tract.”
      Lots of interesting interior details, including what appears to be an older kitchen-I like the wall clock in the kitchen that is part of the paneling. (but such a little detail, compared to the entire residence).
      Below are a couple of links, one a PDF of the brochure for the resort he designed, and historic photos of the resort.

      https://library.ucsd.edu/dc/object/bb20846899/_1.pdf
      https://calisphere.org/item/54f7d27d7a785b628a7efb30c9a78bf0/
      https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7231-Monte-Vista-Ave-La-Jolla-CA-92037/65398479_zpid/

      +1
      • shellyhorvathshellyhorvath says: 154 comments
        OHD Supporter

        That open work hedge is something else.

        +1
        • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Unless I’m badly mistaken, the open work hedge effect you see is created with creeping fig vines and serves as an excellent illustration of how a vine can serve beautifully in a place too narrow for a hedge and/or where it is desired to show off an existing structure. For a good close up of this plant:
          https://www.gardenista.com/garden-design-101/vines/creeping-fig-ficus-pumila/

          And for more info, but ignore the admonition to eliminate horizontal growth. In addition to growing as a solid sheet, this plant can be artfully sculpted to reveal a branching structure that only becomes more beautiful with age, I did exactly that for probably 10 years with one that grows on a cement retaining wall in the Berkeley hills…about 40 years old, 4′ high and 50’+ long. Loved working on it. The trick with this plant, however it is grown, is to religiously clip (not shear) the older leaves. Time consuming and wonderful to do. If I’m wrong and that’s not creeping fig, well it could have been and, if I had any say, would have been.
          https://www.gardenista.com/posts/gardening-101-creeping-fig-vine-plant-guide/

          +2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7453 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      >the opening shot
      Very dramatic and impressive. Wish I could have found a better image post of it, (I tried). The over emphasized eyebrow vents with their almost Prairie eves which match the main roof are super interesting. I love overly emphasized elements like that in these low slung Craftsmans.

      +1
  26. CoraCora says: 2086 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1900. Usually I scroll past this house style – typically there isn’t anything remarkable about their interiors. I’m glad I looked at this one! Great pocket doors, wonderful woodwork, charming old kitchen. Everything has been so well maintained! Seems like a fantastic deal at $50K.

    Fairbury, NE:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1201-5th-St-Fairbury-NE-68352/108888295_zpid/

    +5
  27. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1962, West Hartford, CT, 900,000

    Posting for the elegant spare design in the public rooms and exterior— on the front elevation.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/78-Ledyard-Rd-West-Hartford-CT-06117/58155762_zpid/

    +1
  28. JohnJohn says: 55 comments
    1872 New England Farmhouse
    Shoreham, VT

    Hi All,
    I have been meaning to do this for a long time and not sure if I am doing this correctly however, this is a link to a story about my Uncle’s house that he built back in the 1920’s. The house is crumbling now and may be demolished by now but it was a really cool place! I spent a great deal of time at the house growing up and was fascinated by it, but it did not have central heat, so my aunt & uncle moved into a small apartment in the building next door about 1957, so I didn’t get into it much after I was about 14. The interior was as unique as the exterior, with a large fireplace, stucco walls, large dark beams, a small stained glass window going up the stairs, etc.
    https://thisnewenglandtown.com/my-uncles-house/
    thisnewenglandtown.com is my website. Just learning…if anyone would like to contribute an article just let me know. I just don’t have a lot of time for writing.

    +9
  29. JpdillonJpdillon says: 46 comments
    1965 Levitt House
    Stony Brook, NY

    I found this one while snooping around the Victorian Village in Columbus, OH.

    1227 Neil Ave- Listed for $750,000- unlike a lot of the homes in the area, which have recently been gutted and “flipped”, this one appears to be in very good shape- a lot of really beautiful original woodwork and fixtures in place, a really stately and beautiful Bricktorian Queen Anne in a stunning neighborhood.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1227-Neil-Ave-Columbus-OH-43201/33835391_zpid/?

    +4
  30. Sandy BSandy B says: 920 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    Lovely 1789 stone gem on 18.5 beautiful mountain acres in Cochranville, PA for $850,000. I love the orchard and the setting. And of course have always been partial to attributes that come with stone houses….those deep window wells for one. Lots of interesting stuff here.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3051-Bryson-Rd-Cochranville-PA-19330/54745023_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo_savedhomeremind4-image&utm_term=urn:msg:20210416122935ec8297b9658c1777

    +7
    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 789 comments
      OHD Supporter

      What a lovely house and grounds! Love the kitchen!

      +1
    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 609 comments
      OHD Supporter

      GLORIOUS! I’d love to see this one featured….saved to my “stone cottages” folder!
      Thanks for sharing, SandyB!

      +1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Sandy, this is a beautiful property and so special to see it in spring. Thank you for sharing. I love seeing the kitchen with its older electric cook top.

      +1
      • Sandy BSandy B says: 920 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 craftsman farmhouse
        Bainbridge Island, WA

        Kimberly, for some reason I like those older appliances also (although I love my gas cooktop)…they don’t build them to last like those did. I love the picture of the property in tile over the range. I so appreciate the 47 years the owner spent loving and restoring this property. The lengths he went to do it authentically is absolutely amazing. I would adore living the rest of my days here and have the feeling I was carrying on a legacy.

        +2
        • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1936 Cabin

          Sandy, I appreciate gas too, I love to cook. Our cabin came with my grandmother’s second hand convection stove, moved down to the cabin by the previous owner, my elder cousins. I hope to eventually have gas down there as well. But seeing that electric burner set up in your share, makes me want to move to that house and keep it. I might have a gas stove put in as well. I just love to keep the history going. smile

          +1
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1219 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I love old stone houses, like the kind you find in Eastern Pa. We have some, here in Western NY, made of stone dug up when they put the Erie Canal through, especialy here in Lockport, where a huge ridge of stone had to be blasted and dug through.
      This house is one of the best I’ve seen on Old House, with one thing I’d change. Some may think its a little thing, but its absolutely necessary to have counter space on either side of the stove! I’d find a way to add that, and maybe put in a breakfast bar along the wall, and get rid of any table. The table seems to block the flow to what looks like a fireplace.
      I wish they’d shown the inside of the barn! I bet this property is just beautiful right now, with flowers coming out.

      +2
    • respectthishouserespectthishouse says: 150 comments
      OHD Supporter

      sweet 50s ranch Nashville, TN

      I love both this house, which is close to where I grew up, and the agent’s excellent listing.

      0
    • Um, yeah, I live in Cochranville and we don’t have any mountains. But that is a beautiful house.

      I was driving near here from Lancaster the other day and saw an old shell that I wanted to buy and restore 40 years ago. They told me then and told me now they were going to fix it up.

      +1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5666 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        It is often said that the road to Hades is paved with good intentions. It’s kind of like compulsive animal collectors. These would be old house restorers usually have good intentions but they end up loving and neglecting their old houses to death. I’ve known of a several of old house collectors in the past that bought multiple properties only to see one house after another deteriorate past the point of oblivion. Maybe the owner of the house you have an interest in will have a change of heart. Wishing you good luck.

        0
  31. James @ HarrodsburgJames @ Harrodsburg says: 38 comments
    1810 Georgian/Greek Revival

    I really like this historic home. The Elisha Camp House, aka Camp Manor, is a brick Greek revival with federal interior features onstructed in 1814. It is being sold outside the family for the first time in over 200 years of continuous ownership.

    Love the hand blocked wallpaper. A must see in located in Sackett’s Harbor, NY and, to me, seems reasonably priced at $525,000. If only I could afford the annual property taxes.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/M3154279202

    +6
  32. Tony BianchiniTony Bianchini says: 79 comments
    Alvord, TX

    Some TX selections:

    Italy, TX, built 1917, $250K:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/132-S-Ward-St_Italy_TX_76651_M84080-08840

    Midlothian, TX, built 1915, $479.9K, open house today:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/117-S-7th-St_Midlothian_TX_76065_M84002-78862

    Bailey, TX, built 1937, $199.9K:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/103-E-Church_Bailey_TX_75413_M96548-77415

    Mount Pleasant, TX, built 1958, $599K:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2509-Cedar-Creek-Dr_Mt-Pleasant_TX_75455_M76446-87205

    West, TX, built 1888, $489.9K. A flip that was on the market 2 years ago for $225K. Is this Chip and Jo’s handy work? Only 30 minutes from Waco:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/400-N-Roberts-St_West_TX_76691_M83406-81143

    Bonham, TX, built 1910, $349K:

    https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/tx/bonham/512-arledge-st/pid_40836387/

    Enjoy!

    +1
  33. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1920, Old Westbury, NY, 2,375,000
    Posting for the Chapel: “OLD WESTBURY. Restored & Rebuilt, This Architectural Masterpiece Was Once The Original Chapel Within The E.D Morgan Estate, Designed by Stanford White.”
    The Chapel is part of a larger home, but I thought it important to see the chapel, now a living space, because of the reuse of a chapel and that it was designed by Stanford White. Paneling and beautiful stained glass windows. Check out the view through those windows from the outside of that chapel from a bedroom. what a connection.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/45-Clock-Tower-Ln-Old-Westbury-NY-11568/31145506_zpid/

    +2
  34. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Last week I had collected a lot of houses (something I like to do just for my own entertainment), but did not post them. Now looking back, I may share a few. This one I enjoyed, and I may find more. I hope over the past week, I did not miss another one here sharing this, if so perhaps a second view is okay to see.

    1860, Mohawk, NY, 249,000
    47 acres of mixed open land and forest and a lovely farmhouse and outbuildings.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3187-State-Route-168-Mohawk-NY-13407/30523941_zpid/

    +5
  35. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1938, Pollock Pines, CA, 200,000
    This property is accepting backups.
    Beautiful location in the Sierra Mountains. Rustic cabin that I am posting because I am smitten with the mural that wraps around the small living space at an angle from the wall up to the ceiling. The rest of the cabin is pretty neat too, but sharing for the mural in this simple cabin. The rest of the cabin could be brought back to a more rustic state (that would be my interest).
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/21-Thirty-Mile-Stone-Trac-Pollock-Pines-CA-95726/2071974573_zpid/

    +2
  36. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1926, Placerville, CA, 169,000
    Pending offer.
    Neat little shingled cottage with some Victorian decoration to the small porch. No interior pictures, but I like to dream. I hope it will be respected by the next owner. Perhaps it is just a shack, or considered so and will be considered for the location and land.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/859-Goldner-Ct-Placerville-CA-95667/18566955_zpid/

    +3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5666 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      The price and taxes are modest but then its only 520 sq. feet. Might be a suitable alternative to a tiny house for a single or young couple to start out with. There are so many California houses in the million dollar plus range that I consciously wonder if there are that many millionaires available to buy them?

      +2
      • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
        OHD Supporter

        John, I don’t know who the likely buyer is with this house (year round resident or vacation home) but many of those incredibly priced in the million dollar plus range houses in this state are bought by foreign or out of state investors. In addition to the million dollar properties, those “investors” get particularly active during economic downturns, often to the detriment of what had been affordably priced (for lower income earners) rental properties in “iffy” areas. Typically, those houses get withdrawn from the rental market, “fancied up” a bit and sold. With the predictable detrimental effect on affordable housing.

        I guess, one way or the other, someone will always be looking for gold in California.

        0
  37. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 920 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    Sometimes I poke around France for old homes and I came across this 17th century stone farmhouse in Normandy for what seems to be a reasonable 118,000 euros. The main home appears fully habitable, and there is a second home and some outbuildings too. There is an American WWII cemetary in this area. https://www.lbvimmo.com/property-details/4664672/normandy-1

    +5
  38. Horace Franklin Rogers House in Fort Smith, Arkansas / 1904 / 895,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2900-Rogers-Ave-Fort-Smith-AR-72901/210374443_zpid/?

    +2
  39. RTRTRRTRTR says: 138 comments

    Harrisburg, PA. 179K. 1856. Brig. Gen. Joseph F. Kline house. Barely hanging on in the face of America’s road building/city bulldozing habit. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/329-S-Front-St-Harrisburg-PA-17104/93624114_zpid/?

    South Hero, VT. 399K. 1900. Cute cottage. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/67-Kibbe-Farm-Rd-South-Hero-VT-05486/231167746_zpid/

    Bridgton, ME. 1.75M. Not sure at this price point the rustic cottage will stay, but who knows? There’s enough acreage to build a newer structure. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/78-Davis-Ln-Bridgton-ME-04009/2075422022_zpid/?

    Paul Smiths, NY. 4.25M. 1921 Cottage. I wonder about some of the furniture here. Will it convey? I guess with enough money:-) https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8927-State-Route-30-Paul-Smiths-NY-12970/2083369260_zpid/

    +5
  40. Tony BianchiniTony Bianchini says: 79 comments
    Alvord, TX

    Fort Worth, TX, built 1946, $895K, already under contract. AMAZING look at elegant living during that era:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/6141-Locke-Ave_Fort-Worth_TX_76116_M75847-58833

    +1
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5666 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      The Housing market in Fort Worth has really heated up in the past few years. (we should know as we sold our home there last October after trying for a dozen years) Locke Avenue is a decent area and because of all the features available in this house, the price isn’t surprising either. What a grand indoor pool…

      0
  41. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Here’s an article from the San Francisco Chronicle about the still existing earthquake shacks. Excerpts from the article, which also contains an interactive map with pics and locations of some of them:

    There were once 5,610 refugee shacks in 11 San Francisco parks, assembled with lightning speed in the months after the April 18, 1906, earthquake and fire. Today, there are fewer than 50 identified in the city. But those that remain are a symbol of civic vision, built in a bureaucracy-free utopia that included a partnership among city officials, labor unions and the U.S. Army. They’re also a symbol of post-crisis rebirth, designed to house the displaced workers who built back San Francisco better than ever.

    And today, 115 years after the disaster, they’re the most visible reminder of the city’s most defining event — preserved by a shifting collection of regular citizens and nonprofit history organizations, advocates so dedicated to the shacks that they feel like a religious order….

    The great majority of earthquake shacks were 10 by 14 feet, or 14 by 18 feet, with a stove but no kitchen or plumbing. Most were altered to add a bathroom and expand the living space — often by linking multiple shacks together like houses in the board game Monopoly. (They were even painted the same color — park-bench green.) Elliott thought her space was two shacks, only to discover her bedroom was a converted chicken coop built some time in the first half of the 20th century.

    https://www.sfchronicle.com/oursf/article/San-Franciscans-still-live-in-1906-earthquake-16104760.php

    A few months ago, I posted a SF cottage that I first took to possibly be a former and enlarged earthquake shack until I saw the 1900 date. Interesting that it predates the quake. Sold for way above asking.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1359-47th-Ave_San-Francisco_CA_94122_M28516-40595#photo27
    1900 Cottage 2 beds 1 bath 900 sq ft 2,996 sqft lot
    03/05/2021 Sold $1,100,000
    01/28/2021 Listed $799,000
    05/14/1991 Sold $205,000

    +4
  42. JkleebJkleeb says: 355 comments
    Seattle, WA

    1841 Greek Revival, Bath Maine $525,000
    This home was a women’s club from 1915 until a few years ago when it was purchased and redone, maintained as a single family home. I suspect walls separating parlors were removed during the club house years. I believe there was some concern about its fate but the new owners did a great job (even if the kitchen and baths are a little too of the moment for me) with the restoration. The prominent location ( on the park, near the library, bandstand and a few blocks from down town) would be perfect for my needs.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/894-Washington-St-Bath-ME-04530/325804092_zpid

    +1
  43. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1890 Sonoma County Farmhouse $2,100,000 Est. Payment $9,894/mo
    2bed1.5bath 1,227sqft 5acre lot
    2150 W Dry Creek Rd,
    Healdsburg, CA, 95448

    Listing description: Vintage West Dry Creek Farmhouse on 5 level acres with enchanting creek frontage just three scenic miles from downtown Healdsburg. Originally built circa 1890 and owned by the same family since the 1940’s, this 2+ bedroom residence has the perfect location and all the elements for a high-end modern farmhouse restoration. This unique property has amazing potential and is possibly the best ‘fixer’ opportunity in the area. The property includes a redwood barn, winemakers workshop, numerous established fruit trees and an organically farmed old-vine zinfandel vineyard. As one walks through the vineyard gate a secret meadow fronting Dry Creek appears in a park-like setting ideal for family and friends to picnic, swim and play. Must see to fully appreciate.

    Uhmmn..let’s skip that “high-end modern farmhouse restoration,” shall we?

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2150-W-Dry-Creek-Rd_Healdsburg_CA_95448_M10311-35961

    +3
  44. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1914 Georgian style $13,500,000 Est. Payment $63,602/mo
    8bed 6.5bath 9,856sqft 1.21acre lot
    233 W Santa Inez Ave,
    Hillsborough, CA, 94010 [Located in San Mateo Cty. & about 20 miles south of SF]

    The listing, which does not exaggerate: This elegant Georgian style home offers an impressive pedigree. The grace of this home has been enjoyed by some of the most influential families past, present, and now future. This magnificent residence offers flexibility for 8 bedrooms and 6.5 baths in the main house with Aupair quarters and a full bath. The home features fine details and craftsmanship, plus a light-filled floor plan. The home is the definition of comfort and elegance. The grounds provide an additional dimension with an enormous patio that has two large white pergolas that run the width of the home. From here you are surrounded by gorgeous gardens, groves of redwoods, and a sparkling pool and level lawn. The grounds offer room for a tennis court or guest house. The possibilities are endless. Tucked behind private gates, this impressive estate offers you a rare retreat, just minutes from the amenities the Peninsula has to offer.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/233-W-Santa-Inez-Ave_Hillsborough_CA_94010_M18658-71032

    What I was able to find: “Originally built by Edward J. Tobin whose family name and fortune helped shape Hillsborough’s unique legacy (as evidenced by The Tobin Clark area which bares their name), and later, the home of Randolph Hearst, heir to publisher William Randolph Hearst..”
    https://www.sanguinettigreenmangroup.com/property/233-west-santa-inez-avenue-hillsborough-ca-94010-usa

    AND: Patty Hearst childhood home
    In 1974, reporters camped outside 233 West Santa Inez Ave in the exclusive Hillsborough (CA) community, just south of San Francisco.
    This was the home of a kidnapped Patty Hearst’s parents Randolph Apperson Hearst (birthday today) and Catherine Hearst.
    Randolph, later the last surviving son of William Randolph Hearst, worked for Hearst Corporation, managing the San Francisco Examiner.
    But at the time, he did not have as much disposable income as her kidnappers believed. This house was for sale but had no takers. Reporters camped outside here and on Feb 13, 1974, they listened to Patty Hearst on a recording, being heard for the first time since her kidnapping:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItdyuxBNxrE
    It was recorded Feb 8, 1974. She was kidnapped Feb 4
    https://findery.com/Chung123/notes/patty-hearst-childhood-home.

    +1
    • the DeKalb house has two anomalies, one sorta strange, the other very weird (to me).

      For a house this size, it seems to have no grand room(s). It has a bunch of parlors, but none the size one would expect in a house this grand. I’ve commented on this on other houses.

      The weird part is the stairway in the main bathroom. I’ve never seen anything like this before on this site, or in real life–that I recall. (Reddit has some “bad design” subreddits that may have something like this.)

      +2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5666 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      It apppears the escalation in housing prices has gotten to Illinois as well. (there are still many bargains there to be had, if you know where to look) I like the Chenoa house even though its an older (1870’s?) house that was later altered into a Queen Anne style home. The Earlville house is decidedly in the fixer upper category but with its fine stonework, outbuildings, and 37 acres, there’s a lot to work with. Thanks for sharing.

      +2
  45. KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I use refdesk.com as my homepage. Among other worthwhile offerings, each day they present a “site of the day.” Today’s site is:
    Old Book Illustrations
    We hope to be a destination of choice for visitors more particularly interested in Victorian and French Romantic illustrations.
    https://www.oldbookillustrations.com/subjects/

    It’s very clear to me that a person could easily spend forever on this wonderful site. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

    +5
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2407 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      I love it, thank you!

      +2
      • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
        OHD Supporter

        You’re very welcome. I’m still exploring the site, which appears to be a never-ending treasure trove. I haven’t read all of this yet, but I aspire to:

        Front page of L’Illustration No. 53, March 2, 1844
        L’Illustration was a weekly French newspaper created just one year after the Illustrated London News, from which its publishers drew some of their inspiration. It met with great success throughout the remainder of the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth, thanks to its editorial policy offering information about the world at large and, of course, to its dedication to let illustrations play a prominent part in the exposure of newsworthy events. It also managed to attract some of the most renowned artists and craftsmen of its time. The last issue to bear the original title was released in 1944.

        On March 2, 1844, however, L’Illustration was celebrating its first birthday, and on this occasion it published the following article, entitled “Les mystères de L’Illustration.” Beside indulging in hyperbolic self-praise, it allowed readers to take a glimpse at what happened behind the scenes and to better understand the process which resulted in the illustrated newspaper spread out before their very eyes.

        The Mysteries of L’Illustration

        Let not this title frighten the most timid and delicate among you: don’t worry, dear subscribers, I merely want to let you know today how L’Illustration manages every week to solve the problem of existing. After showing you two of the three main action centers where the ideas which give it birth are conceived and carried out—namely, the editorial office, the engravers’ workshop, and the printing house—I wish, in very few words, to give you some little known details about the different intellectual and material operations through which the editors, artists, engravers and printers of your newspaper must take turns. If this matter is of no interest to you, don’t read what follows.

        It was on March 4, 1843, (a day to be forever remembered) at three forty-seven, that the first issue of the first year of L’Illustration came out of its mother’s womb—Messrs Lacrampe & Company’s machine. Giving it birth had been long and laborious, but despite some apparent weakness, the newborn suggested a robust constitution and competent observers were not to be misled: they predicted its future would be long and glorious. What other prediction was accomplished more swiftly? Only just had it come into being that the young L’Illustration proved itself worthy of the beautiful name its family had given it.
        Before the end of its first month, it worked enough wonders to astonish the world. Never had a newspaper made so much progress in so little time. The great news spread with lightning speed from one end of the world to the other. In less than a year, L’Illustration truly became a universal newspaper[1]. Is it necessary to remind you of what it did to deserve its success?… If it wasn’t equally fortunate in every one of its endeavors, you must grant that it didn’t stop at any obstacle, that no sacrifice was too great. Besides, shouldn’t we forgive youth for its lack of experience and the few mistakes that came with it? [And that’s just the warmup. More follows,]
        https://www.oldbookillustrations.com/articles/lillustration-weekly-newspaper/

        0
  46. GretaLynGretaLyn says: 609 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Slightly off topic….Does anybody know if THIS George Barber https://www.barbermuseum.org/the-barber-story/
    (there are some VERY cool motorcycles which I thought Morna and others might enjoy)
    is somehow related to the architect George F Barber of OHD dreams?
    Thanks in advance.

    0
  47. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5666 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Well Barber is a fairly common family name. Most of George Franklin Barber’s family settled around his business center in Knoxville, TN (since a couple of his descendants occasionally pop up on social media sites, apparently, there are still some in the region) His son was a formally trained architect but he came on the scene too late for the Victorian era designs that his Father, G.F. Barber, was well known for. I’d imagine this Alabama George Barber would at most be a distant relative of the long deceased (1915) architect by the same name. Or, he could be of no relation at all.

    +3
  48. Tony BianchiniTony Bianchini says: 79 comments
    Alvord, TX

    1985 build in Pittsburg, TX, asking $4.995M, Rare example of Chateau type architecture/estate in TX, interesting background:

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/candaceevans/2021/04/16/former-palace-of-texas-chicken-tycoon-returns-to-market-as-exurb-resurgence-boosts-east-texas-real-estate/?sh=542eb3e16297

    +3
  49. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12514 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Will someone look into this one? Was wondering if there was a reason it was torn down, fire or just a normal (idiot) demolition to build something “better”?
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/11/19/1930-colonial-revival-in-winston-salem-nc/

    0
    • natira121natira121 says: 817 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      Sorry Kelly, I tried! I couldn’t find anything in the news search, nor at the county website. Maybe someone else will have some luck…. someone more local than either of us perhaps?

      I hate to think of that glorious house being torn down for ANY reason!

      +2
  50. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/904-N-Pennsylvania-Ave-Yardley-PA-19067/9021045_zpid/

    1923 Tudor cottage in Lower Makefield, Pennsylvania in the first subdivision in the township

    +1
  51. msjeanne28msjeanne28 says: 45 comments
    Palmer, AK

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/221-8th-St_Brookings_SD_57006_M82299-40272

    interesting little house that still retains a lot of the old interior.
    1915, 4bed 3bath 1,751sqf, SD. many built ins and some leaded glass. Kitchen reminds me of a late 50s do over in part.

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  52. ZooZoo says: 537 comments

    I just wanted to leave a note for Kelly:
    Thank you so much for this site! I’ve just read the article in The New York Times about how many of us are “languishing” due to the pandemic https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/19/well/mind/covid-mental-health-languishing.html.
    I’m certain that I’m “languishing” too–feeling fog-brained, unable to concentrate for long, unfocused on any goal.
    But, when have that “what do I do now?” feeling, I log into OHD, and I find lots of dreams and hope and like-minded individuals who love original 1920s subway tile and unpainted woodwork as much as I do. It revives my excitement about living and shaping the future, which has been so curtailed by the pandemic.
    You’ve done a wonderful job of creating a unique community here on the web, a safe place in the midst of this crazy pandemic that’s hurt so many of us.
    Please keep up the great work! It’s so appreciated! And so needed right now.
    Best, Zoo

    +3
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12514 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Wow, thanks for that. I’m glad that so many find the site a happy place, at least the majority of the time. We are going through the Covid fog too, it’s been over a year since we’ve stepped into a grocery or antique store or whatnot. When you start having naked school dreams except it’s forgetting to wear a mask, the time of normalcy cannot come fast enough.

      +3
    • KEYLIMEKEYLIME says: 919 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’d like to second that. This site has, on so many days and in so many ways been an island of sanity. Thank you for all the hard work you do, Kelly…much of which I’m sure we haven’t a clue about.

      0

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