c. 1860 – Quincy, IL – $118,000

Status and price shown on OHD may not be current. Check the links below.
Added to OHD on 12/2/20   -   Last OHD Update: 12/14/20   -   28 Comments
For Sale

3201 N 12th St, Quincy, IL 62305

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • $118,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 1 Bath
  • 2542 Sq Ft
  • 3.55 Ac.
Two story farmhouse with multiple buildings on 3.55 acres. This is a local designated landmark. Please see disclosure or call listing agent for details. Home needs renovation. Miscellaneous items in house and in outbuildings will convey. All measurements are approximate. Owner will remove select vehicles on property. Currently zoned R1A. Selling AS-IS.
Contact Information
Janet Arns, Happel
Mobile: 217-617-0751 Office: 217-224-8383
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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28 Comments on c. 1860 – Quincy, IL – $118,000

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  1. shafer8shafer8 says: 60 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1732 Cape Cod
    CT

    Could be real interesting inside. The roof is failing; hoping for the best.

    9
    • ScottjScottj says: 43 comments

      And of course the first thing everyone is going to want to know is what “miscellaneous items in house and in outbuildings will convey.” Could be good, might not, either way I like it when everything is not stripped to the bone when selling these old places. I went to a farm auction awhile back, a house and two 1870’s barns were for sale as well but they were selling off everything in the barns, lightning rods, wood, doors, they even uprooted the antique picket fence (and had it replaced with vinyl) and sold that a section at a time! Made me not want to buy the property even if I was in the market to do so!

      15
      • CindyHCindyH says: 81 comments

        That’s something I always wondered about with these beautiful old houses. What stays? Chandeliers? Appliances? Furniture? None of the above? If you’re looking at a house, is it proper etiquette to ask, “What stays in the house?”?

        5
        • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1197 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1800 cottage
          Upstate, NY

          Asking is more than proper etiquette – it is due diligence, and should be specified in writing in any purchase offer/contract. Typically, anything permanently attached stays – i.e., chandeliers vs. lamps – unless the seller specifies otherwise. Appliances are likely to stay, but not always…

          6
  2. RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Looks super interesting. May we might see more.

    Here’s a better look at the facade.
    https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/whig.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/classifieds/9/fd/9fd1d4d8-a150-5bcc-bae6-e4cf638f82b5/5f907037ef9c6.image.jpg

    10
  3. I would like to see pictures of the interior but there is likely a good reason why there are none. I could be because items were stripped and very bad condition. With the abandoned vehicles that must be removed and contents convey, it’s likely a hoarder either lived here or just “stored” stuff here. Could be a charming home.

    FYI- my elderly parents were packrats and border line hoarders. Because they lived on a large farm, there were many outbuilding and barns used as storage. When my brothers and I cleaned up, we stopped counting at 100 utility trailers we hauled away. We also brought in industrial dumpsters and loaded 3 of them. We sold 7 old vehicles and had another 10 towed away, hauled away 2 old boats, tire disposals. What we didn’t want, we asked people to come by and get what they wanted just so we didn’t have to pay for more haul away. We spent dozens of weekends and nearly $10K on clean up.

    7
    • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      Oh, been there, done that! My ex in laws place was luckily only 2200 sq ft, and just a small yard, but damn! We hauled out 14 TONS of stuff, AFTER we took what we wanted, and had an auction house take everything that was worth selling! (Literally a semi load)

      It took us several months, we caused a rat infestation of the neighborhood, and I had nightmares for weeks after.

      Hoarding and dementia are just terrible

      10
      • AmyBeeAmyBee says: 823 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
        Lockport, NY

        The worst part about growing old is disposing of one’s “stuff,” regardless the circumstances. I had to do it to a small degree with my late mother’s tiny condo after she moved into assisted living. After weeks of clearing out, we had someone give us a few hundred bucks and take it away. It was hearbreaking to lose some family heirlooms, but we were trying to maximize the value for funds to go towards her care.

        My husband and I have no children, and I am an admitted “packrat”. This is something we’ll have to discuss in the coming years, once he retires.

        FYI get rid of anything potentially “embarrassing” before family/friends discover it clearing out your home while you’re still alive! (Trust me, personal experience.😊)

        9
        • GloriaHGloriaH says: 81 comments

          When we had to do my mom’s small place, we went in and got the boxes of photos and a few items we wanted. Very few, really. Mom had furniture from the 1940’s and she loved it, but we didn’t want it. My brother called my mom’s favorite charity, which came and literally emptied the rest of the items, right down to the linens kitchen utensils, brooms and mops, and sold it all in their thrift store or used it to help others get started again. No money changed hand and it was a huge relief.

          1
  4. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 823 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    Interior photos would be illuminating! We can take it, regardless the condition!

    7
  5. shafer8shafer8 says: 60 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1732 Cape Cod
    CT

    I guess “American Pickers” managed to depict a romanticized, profitable side to hoarding. The exception to the rule. I have to be careful myself. I recently donated some stuff to an art school that has a tag sale every year (they managed to have one this year thankfully) to raise funds, what a relief to move that stuff and for a good cause. I don’t miss any of it.

    5
  6. HeidiHeidi says: 157 comments
    OHD Supporter

    IL

    I have a close friend that works for Happel (although this is not her listing) let me see what I can do.

    5
  7. HeidiHeidi says: 157 comments
    OHD Supporter

    IL

    Okay…I went to see this house today. In no way is it a tear down….its a lot of work but its super solid. I have pictures if Kelly can help me post them….I dont see an attachment button

    3
  8. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Hi Folks,
    Ah yes, the plucky town of Quincy, Illinois…it’s one of those old Mississippi riverboat towns that in the mid-19th century was almost unbelievably prosperous but in the post 20th century era of the Midwestern “Rustbelt” economy, the decline there has been especially steep and painful. However, the town’s architectural riches from the Victorian era glory days are almost beyond compare. There are literally blocks of faded grand homes in Quincy that in more prosperous places might individually be considered historic landmarks but here they languish in obscurity as they continue to fade away. Demolitions of architecturally significant structures still occur regularly in Quincy and I see no recourse for stopping them. Without going into detail, the Illinois business climate is not favorable for bringing back a robust economy. Property taxes are almost universally high in the Land of Lincoln so much so that there are few incentives for folks to come in and buy the abundance of great old houses in Quincy and other historic towns in the region. I’ve given this local situation a great deal of thought but in our present national climate of economic crisis what chance does Quincy have to suddenly improve?

    Problems aside, this lovely brick house is a nice vernacular mid-19th century version of what is often called an “I-House” due to its distinct shape. I’d date this house to the late 1850’s to late 1860’s based on the photographic details Heidi kindly shared from her visit. (Many thanks!) The not painted over paneled doors still feature rare faux graining artwork which reached a peak of popularity in the mid-19th century. The shapely newel post is still early enough to not be one of the hexagonal or octagonal factory made Italianate style newels so commonly found but it is still later than the often thin “toothpick” type Greek Revival newels from a few years earlier. The simple balusters are turned and the arched entry with sidelights indicates a stylistic transition from Greek Revival to Italianate. The facade remains symmetrical.

    I too see numerous things worth saving here. If one looks through the archived examples on this site from the mid-19th century era, many of the (missing) mantels may have been simple carpenter made versions as was common then in Southern cottages of that period. I would not be surprised that they could have also been faux grained to realistically resemble fine marble or exotic woods. Quincy was an important riverport town so shipped in factory made mantels were also readily available but this example appears to have been a fairly simple yet nicely built farmhouse located on the outskirts of town at the time it was built. It’s quite likely the original acreage was much larger at the time as well but it’s still large for a city lot at 3.55 acres. For those who might be inclined, I feel this house could be nicely restored to its mid-19th century appearance but again, considering the locale, such lofty dreams unfortunately seem a bit far fetched.

    I could personally show you scores of 19th and early 20th century homes in Quincy awaiting someone willing to show them a little TLC again. My (impossible) dream would be for the entire Quincy region to be classified as economically disadvantaged and then provided a big reduction in property taxes as incentives for new investment. I took a few old house photos in Quincy during a short visit there a couple of years ago: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157711267170898 I’ll keep my fingers crossed for this one.

    2
    • HeidiHeidi says: 157 comments
      OHD Supporter

      IL

      While I do agree that we have played fast and loose with some historic homes/buildings. There is quiet a big historic presence in Quincy that does attempt to save old buildings. The raise money by doing preservation tours, which have fantastic turnouts. However, there are other people and businesses that think parking lots are more important. The local newspaper tore down 421 Jersey and I haven’t bought a paper since. The largest problem with our historic homes, at least the structures on the north side of town is they were divided into apartments 40 years ago and they have become absolute slum lord housing. That get worse and worse until they go on the fix or flatten list. Unfortunately because of the neighborhoods they are in….flatten usually wins.

      1
  9. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Low end housing landlords (I don’t object to some being called slumlords) are the bane of many historic districts. Richmond, Indiana, for example, has one of the most wonderful collection of late 19th and early 20th century architecture in the country but the historic districts there are being held back by the heavy presence of cheap rentals which support a large transient population including hard drug users. Where such situations exist, it’s difficult to find preservation minded people willing to come in and try to revitalize a neighborhood. I agree that Quincy does have some bright spots in of areas with well kept historic homes but it also has a fair number of areas (the northwest side between 8th and Hwy. 24 comes to mind) where the preponderance of cheap rentals and the transient population they house negate any potential efforts to restore and preserve historic homes in the area. Sad, because there are some spectacular period homes still standing in this district.

    1

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