Dearborn, MO – $215,000

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Added to OHD on 10/14/20   -   Last OHD Update: 10/14/20   -   12 Comments
For Sale

21995 Oil Well Rd, Dearborn, MO 64439

Map: Aerial

  • $215,000
  • 3 Bed
  • 1 Bath
  • 1152 Sq Ft
  • 12.41 Ac.
Investor's dream! Large home tucked behind the trees on a little over 12 acres with a pond! Property houses multiple outbuildings. Minutes from the Dearborn city park, North Platte schools, and I-29. Hunting, fishing, and so much more right in your own back yard!
Contact Information
Michelle Cook, ReeceNichols
816-468-8555
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

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12 Comments on Dearborn, MO – $215,000

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11881 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Build date on record is 1820 although that seems a little too early for this part of the country. The shape seems odd for the Italianate details. It’ll be interesting to uncover the history, if someone is able to find anything.

    12
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11881 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      And because I’m obsessed with historic aerials, 1960: link to map.

      7
      • SharonSharon says: 310 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 Contemporary
        Sedalia, MO

        The population of Platte County, MO, (including Dearborn) was 8,913 in 1820, due to its prime location on the Missouri River. I wonder if a home like this could have started as a prominent settler’s two-story log home and in time progressed into an Italiate. Just musings.

        Here’s the history from Wiki:
        When Missouri entered the union in 1821, the western border of Missouri from Arkansas to Iowa was based on the confluence of the Kansas River and Missouri River in the West Bottoms in Kansas City. Land in what is now the northwest Missouri was deeded to the Ioway, Sac and Fox tribes.

        However, settlers (most notably Joseph Robidoux in St. Joseph, Missouri) began encroaching on the land. Further settlers in northern Missouri were upset about being cut off from the Missouri.

        Excerpt from the Lewis and Clark map of 1814 shows the river identified as the “Little River Platte.”

        In 1836, William Clark (of Lewis and Clark) persuaded the tribes to sell their lands in northwest Missouri. The deal known as the Platte Purchase was named for the river was ratified in 1837 and the tribes were paid $7,500 for an area about the combined size of Delaware and Rhode Island. The land was then annexed to Missouri.

        In 1838 settlers used the river (and the Nodaway River) to reach the heart of the newly available land.

        14
  2. StacyStacy says: 474 comments
    1900 Maybe Craftsmen
    TX

    Wish they would’ve gone ahead with pics inside. Lord she needs some love & care but looks worth it! The area is really pretty & 12 acres is a nice deal! Could be a super charming country home, I hope the right owner comes along, please don’t tear her down!

    5
  3. Missouri was settled long before 1821 when incorporated as a state. St. Genavieve is a good example and older than St Louis.

  4. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11881 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks for some of the info on the area. I’m not sure it being log although maybe. I would have said Federal (or vernacular) but the roof overhang seems a little too big for that. Maybe it was a strange vernacular Italianate, something about it is saying those details were added at a later time.

    1
    • SharonSharon says: 310 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/12-21995oilwellrd.jpg

      Did you check out the brackets tucked under the jerkinhead gables and the eave returns in this image, like the roof and Italianate brackets were created together. So if the roof line is original, I’d be tempted to say the Italianate style is original to the house. That tiny window also suggests Italianate.

      Really makes you wonder about the inside, too!

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11881 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Yeah, that’s the part that had me hung up about it possibly being original but when I look at the front including around the door, it doesn’t make sense.

        1
      • MJGMJG says: 2031 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Truly is an enigma here. I wish I could see the brackets under the gables because I can’t tell if the style was updated in the 1860s, 1870s with those styled brackets or if they are earlier designs. I’ll look later when I have a bigger screen. I agree too that it would great to see inside and see what is left to work with.

        2
  5. St. Genevieve is really nice – great place to visit. The interesting thing about the midwest is that the Mississippi valley was settled earlier than the Chicago area was, so there are older towns out that way (like around the St. Louis area for example).

    1
    • SharonSharon says: 310 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      This home is on the western, not eastern, side of the state — in the area of the Missouri River and Platte River. Population growth here was behind that of eastern Missouri. St. Genevieve County on the Mississippi was established sometime between 1735 and 1750, some 70 years before Platte County in northeast Missouri. Yes, Genevieve is beautiful.

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