c. 1870 Second Empire – Ashburnham, MA

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Added to OHD on 6/9/20   -   Last OHD Update: 10/5/20   -   34 Comments

16 Pleasant St, Ashburnham, MA 01430

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • $250,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 3 Bath
  • 5214 Sq Ft
  • 0.63 Ac.
FIRST SHOWINGS TO BEGIN ON SUNDAY JUNE 14TH from 12PM-2PM. Own your own Second Empire Historic Mansion in a beautiful residential neighborhood in Ashburnham! This unique style property is zoned for both residential and commercial and offers ample parking including an attached two-story barn perfect for extra storage, larger vehicles, and work area. There's 3 main levels including 5 bedrooms, 5,000 plus square feet of living space, a handicap ramp, two kitchens, high ceilings, hand carved walnut woodwork, 3 fireplaces with decorative tiles and mantels, tin ceilings, over sized windows, grand staircase, hardwood floors throughout, and a newer roof. City town water/sewer. This unique property offers so much value and serves so many different possibilities for both your business and housing needs. Come take advantage of this spectacular location now!
Contact Information
Albert Surabian, Keller Williams Realty
(508) 754-3020
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: ,
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34 Comments on c. 1870 Second Empire – Ashburnham, MA

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  1. BethanyBethany says: 3478 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    Deliciously dilapidated! And inside it looks like lots of original features left.

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  2. JoeJoe says: 758 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1820 Federal
    Baltimore, MD

    I fell in love with the exterior, yet the interior appears to have had a complete redo, when Eastlake was in fashion. It has a nice large lot, but seeing a field laid out for football right up to the rear property line is not encouraging. Prep high schools like the Cushing Academy next door tend to have lots of events that generate sports noise. This is perfect for a member of the Cushing School community who loves Second Empire exteriors, Eastlake interiors, Is able to invest a lot of money above the purchase price.

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    • MJGMJG says: 2663 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      I love this house too. Amazing it still has so much original exterior details and carriage house is exciting.
      Looks like someone cclosed up the hall, but that can be easily fixed. Thank goodness they didn’t pull out that amazing newel. This is early “Eastlake”! I love 1870s Modern Gothic, and the Eastlake movement. Which I love so much. Its style is heavy and bold!

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      • AmyBeeAmyBee says: 897 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
        Lockport, NY

        MJG
        That CARRIAGE house has to be one of the most phenomenal I’ve ever seen! And to match such an impressive Second Empire is astounding! I only wish there were MORE photos!

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  3. MichaelMichael says: 3296 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    The exterior is dreamy! The inside needs all of the commercial aspects taken out. Hopefully they didn’t destroy too much of the original fabric of the interior in making those changes!

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  4. ddbackerddbacker says: 485 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1971 Uninspired split-level
    Prairie Village, KS

    Awesome mini-me carriage house.

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  5. RosewaterRosewater says: 7471 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Just IMAGINE what this house looked like the day it was opened! Judging by the quality and design of the remaining details; it must have been one of the most beautiful, opulent, spectacularly kitted out and decorated, Aesthetic Movement showplaces anywhere around.

    How VERY fortunate that all of the luscious, honey golden, wood work details have survived the vagaries of time. It is all in such wonderful, well maintained, condition too; which is puzzling considering. Gorge. I believe the inset tile in the shown mantle are Minton, from an Arthurian legendry set. Nice.

    That carriage house is a remarkable survivor! This WHOLE PLACE is a remarkable survivor!! Imagine buying it; and then finding a cache of all of the original, in tact, gasoliers and sconces squirreled away in a garret cubby. Fingers crossed for the new owner! 🙂

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  6. JimHJimH says: 5602 comments
    OHD Supporter

    The house was built for businessman Ohio Whitney Jr (1813-1879), his wife Mary Brooks and their 6 children. Portrait and bio:
    https://archive.org/details/historyofashburn00stea/page/486

    Towered Second Empire, intact with carriage house – you don’t have to say much more! Not cheap, but enough original content remains to make period restoration well worth the effort and expense.
    http://mhc-macris.net/Details.aspx?MhcId=ASB.132

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  7. roxxxroxxx says: 515 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Be sure and take an aerial view. Check out behind the property.

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  8. Daughter of GeorgeDaughter of George says: 1045 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1905 Neoclassic & 1937 Deco

    Nice house, but I’ll have the garage.

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  9. DianeEGDianeEG says: 585 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1896 Farmhouse W/Swedish roots
    Rural, IL

    Could be stunning again. The CA behind wouldn’t bother me at all. Lots of trees already in place to help with sound but how fun to hear your own marching band, cheers and kid fun. Tearing out much of the asphalt, added walls, hanging ceilings, kitchens and odd stuff would take some $$ and muscle but lots of old beauty to be had. And then the satisfaction of painting the two structures – oh my! Should it remain all white wedding cake or be tricked out in colors allowing the ornamentation to stand out?

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    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      After seeing the mid-20th C pictures with the primary color as white, I was just wondering what the original colors were when I came to your question. Almost certainly, the original primary color was not white. Only paint analysis expertly done (which I’m sure many OHD readers can probably do quite competently) would tell us for sure what the original paint colors were, but short of that, a nice combination of earth tones would always be a safe bet. Many OHD are quite expert in their knowledge of some of the most common color schemes of this period and might like to offer some good suggestions!

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  10. pamibachpamibach says: 114 comments

    I am so wanting to put on my jeans and get busy here, this house could be fun!

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  11. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12536 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    New agent, photos and price. Updated and moved to the front page, comments above are older and may reference the old photos.

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  12. MichaelMichael says: 3296 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    Quite a stunning house with so much of it’s exterior intact! I agree with Jay that the shutters need to be back to a dark color. I could see myself taking my lawn chair to the back of the property and watching the Saturday football games!

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  13. TGrantTGrant says: 1079 comments
    OHD Supporter

    New Orleans, LA

    This one makes me think of that old Judy Garland musical, Meet Me in St. Louis.

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  14. I grew up in this area. The reason why it’s zoned both residential and commercial is because it was a doctor’s office for many years. Since this is a small town many people who lived in the area had him as their primary care physician, including my dad. I remember going there with him once when I was young and driving past it many times growing up. It always looked run down, not quite as bad as it is today but similar with peeling paint and worn floors. He never took good care of it.

    That said they’re very cool buildings, some of the best in the downtown Ashburnham area. It wouldn’t take a lot to make the exterior looking beautiful again.

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  15. RosewaterRosewater says: 7471 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Thrrrillled to have an A++ shot of that fireplace with the Minton tiles to clip! Yay!

    Clipped, edited and enhanced. Photoshop liberties taken, (out of love):
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/ashburnham-ma-1870-a.jpeg

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  16. A real beauty in my opinion! Noticed the stairs looking dark or almost black and wondered if it was a thing to use a dark varnish on the stairs? I was curious because I have seen this before in old homes with significant wear telling me it was done long ago. Definitely has a Meet Me In St Louis look to it, love it!

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  17. GabrielGabriel says: 91 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Gorgeous, gorgeous and then more gorgeous. I absolutely love Second Empires and this one is very special.

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  18. JTGJTG says: 44 comments
    1834 Greek Revival
    Boston - Metrowest, MA

    This one is interesting to me. I’ve always had a love-hate relationship with the Second Empire style. This is probably from my childhood experience of being forced to go to the child psychologist on the 3rd floor of a former sea-captain’s Second Empire mansion (converted to institutional use) in New London, CT. I understand how it was popular at the time and tried to mimic what was going on in France. I think the planning in the Back Bay salutes Baron Haussmann’s vision for Paris – only using brick instead of buff stone. The result: Commonwealth Avenue or Marlborough Street becomes the backbone of Boston with all those Mansard-capped row-houses on a grand boulevard scheme. The pattern houses on the other hand (like this one) are not as successful at capturing that spirit in my opinion. They always appear very rigid and doomed for institutional uses in the 20th Century. Featured as haunted houses, boarding houses or ultimately met demolition because they project those feelings. Great to see this one survived in its “elegant decay” state. That said, the Eastlake features in this one are nice, and the barn is exquisite. Its amazing how the iron cresting is still extant on the turret. Some selective demolition, repurposing and renewal will make this the showpiece of Ashburnham. Concrete wheelchair ramp and parking have to go. Hydrangeas are fantastic.

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  19. Stu908Stu908 says: 4 comments

    Hi everyone, I am the lucky one that is buying this house. I am excited to bring it back to it’s original glory. It will not be white. I am thinking of a three or four color scheme. Coastal sand for the base and cream for the trim with black shutters. If anyone has any ideas or tips for anything I would really appreciate it

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12536 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Congratulations! Please tell us you plan on sharing your progress as you go along. 🙂

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    • JoeJoe says: 758 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1820 Federal
      Baltimore, MD

      Hi Stu908,
      You have a wonderful house there. I am not about to make a recommendation as to how you choose your colors on the house, but FYI there are professional paint analysts who are able to determine what colors were used when the house was built. They take samples from whatever painted surfaces inside and outside throughout the property that you want to know about. I believe that they do an analysis that can tell you every color the house was painted and refer you to how to match the color pretty accurately. They can also determine the original paint scheme, i.e. window frames, sash, and trim were all different colors, so you might use your own color choices substituting them accurately to the original if that makes sense. Of course they charge per sample taken. A true purist would hire one of these professionals and paint the house the same colors that the original owners painted it. I think it is reasonable to paint the house any color that you like. If you do have the work done, and don’t choose to use the original colors, keeping a record of what the original colors were might be helpful to a future owner.

      By the way research might also determine what is original, such as are they the original shutters, or if the house didn’t originally have shutters at all.

      I will throw no stones at those who find it an unnecessary expense, or as in my case don’t have the funds in my budget to do the analysis on my c. 1820 house. Most of my rooms were never painted and had wall and ceiling papers. I have stripped those papers, soaking multiple layers apart to see the way the wall treatments changed. Probably TMI. I am glad that you seem to be intent on restring this beautiful old house.

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      • Stu908Stu908 says: 4 comments

        Hi Joe, I plan on doing my homework on this house. I will use your idea and get the paint analized. Not sure how expensive that is. I will gladly take any ideas or suggestions you or anyone else has. Thank yoy

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7471 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      You could paint it black. Doing so is very trendy these days. Seems like every time I turn around another old house has been painted black; including the one across the street from me. 🙁

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