1870 – Canton, IL

Added to OHD on 6/1/20   -   Last OHD Update: 9/14/20   -   21 Comments
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229 N 3rd Ave, Canton, IL 61520

Map: Street

  • $150,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 4785 Sq Ft
  • 1.39 Ac.
Here's your opportunity to acquire a piece of our Nation's agricultural history in the heart of Illinois. This home was built in 1870 by W.J. Orendorff, the "O" in P&O Plow, predecessor to International Harvester Company in Canton. After serving as a Rectory for St.Mary's Catholic Church for 80 years, this historic home was purchased at auction in 1999 by the current owners.
Contact Information
Edward Ketcham, Jim Maloof Realtor
(309) 692-3900 / 309-224-9540
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: ,
Features: ,

21 Comments on 1870 – Canton, IL

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  1. MichaelMichael says: 3193 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    Hardwood floors with stripes! How cool is that?

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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5643 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Zebra striped floors as seen above appear to have had a period of popularity from about 1850-1875. They predated the later factory made inlaid parquet flooring that was so popular in the 1880’s and 1890’s. I have seen an 1870’s Italianate with hand made inlaid pattern floor details in the vestibule instead of the more common encaustic tiles. This house seems understated on the exterior and interior but that may be a legacy from when it was a Church rectory. However, the hardware items of that period constitute works of art as seen in the beautiful ornate brass hinge photo. Lots of unpainted woodwork as well. Seems reasonably priced considering what is offered.

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  2. BethanyBethany says: 3492 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    Cool stove hiding in that meh kitchen. I love it! It does look like the tower-like area should have a peaked roof, no?

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7399 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Great original space in that kitchen though! I’m sure you’d agree. All the original windows and doors seem present. One certainly wouldn’t hesitate to get in there and do something appropriate and fun. No worry about wasting money tearing out someone’s, (and now your), expensive, over personalized, inappropriate mistake. This is the perfect candidate for a reproduction, period Victorian, (minimal), kitchen it seems to me. It definitely needs a good wood/coal stove for sure. The gas range stays. 🙂

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    • Love the vintage stove too!

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  3. JonJon says: 128 comments
    TN

    Bless her heart — she done gone and lost her hat.

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    • tcmchickietcmchickie says: 185 comments
      OHD Supporter

      TX

      I had the same reaction- I felt embarrassment for this house akin to what a person might feel when they see someone right after their wig has been snatched off their head.

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  4. tomdg1-7gmail-comtomdg1-7gmail-com says: 66 comments
    1890 Three Bay Italianate
    Grinnell, IA

    There is undoubtedly a picture somewhere showing how the tower looked before decapitation.
    Anyone? Anyone?

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7399 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Well, I can say for sure now that there was one; and from the bare peek provided, it does conform to my estimation. Nice!

      http://www.illinoisancestors.org/fulton/photographs/mrs_orendorff_residence.jpg

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7399 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I think this artist’s rendering may be a bit stylized from what was actually there; judging by the previous photo:
      https://i.pinimg.com/236x/75/59/2b/75592b9832f521498a92a02227e38237–illinois.jpg

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      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        Thanks for finding and sharing those, Rosewater! The 2nd one in particular showed what I couldn’t believe was nowhere to be found on this house before you found that lithograph, which otherwise confused me with its 1870’s build date, it golden-colored brick, its seemingly gothic revival style roof (i.e., all pitched, gable-like things, but no bargeboards or pinnacles), its Italianate window caps, etc. That missing element was a mansard roof, which the tower actually sported a clear and IMO credible variant of. The lithograph seemed extremely credible in a way that the current house does not because the litho does not show the golden brick, but does show an essentially Italianate front porch, an Italianate tower (with a mansard roof), iron railing on part of the roof (which greatly increases the credibility of roof’s 1870 construction date), possible bargeboards on some of the gables and lots of other decorative elements of various styles consistent with 1870. Aside from the gold brick, the one thing I still find hard to believe is the relative simplicity of the woodwork around the door and windows, although not the striped floors or staircases (altho the photos don’t show them being surrounded by really dramatic entry-ways as I would have anticipated, but maybe that is just because of the where the photos were shot from, and not actually true of the house itself).

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    • PaulPaul says: 115 comments
      Arlington, VA

      I found an illustration on Pinterest, but not sure how to copy/share it if you don’t have an account. It was quite elaborate tower, as was the rest of the house. Love the house overall too.

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  5. JulieJulie says: 403 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Are those doors and windows cherry wood? The colour is gorgeous.

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  6. ScottScott says: 350 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    Do we have two different build dates here? The one stair hall with a simpler railing and painted woodwork has a fancy zebra stripe floor while the stair hall with the fancy railing and natural woodwork has a simple floor. It is a confusing combination.

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    • JimHJimH says: 5544 comments
      OHD Supporter

      It looks like much of the original flooring was replaced in “modern times” with the standard oak you see in the front hall. It’s quicker and easier, if not always cheaper, to just replace something than to seek out a specialist to have it restored properly. Who knows what other fine details and finishes were in this house 150 years ago? Pretty amazing place for less than a suburban condo somewhere.

      Here’s another industrialist’s mansion in the Illinois River valley, virtually intact since 1876, preserved by the original family:
      200+ photos on Google

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      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        Ah yes, the Carus-Hegler mansion. I always thought if the Texas mansion pictured in the mid-1950’s move “Giant” were real rather than a Hollywood studio fabrication, its architect would have been William Boyington, who designed the vastly larger Carus-Hegler mansion in 1874.

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  7. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12439 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Reduced in price, updated and moved to the front page.

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  8. wrappmanwrappman says: 11 comments

    It looks like the interior woodwork in most of the rooms was simplified at some point with the extra built up moldings being removed. The kitchen plus the office with the white woodwork both seem to still have the full original moldings in place. I’m happy that the interior is otherwise very intact with original doors and hardware still present.

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  9. She is beautiful and her grounds are fantastic!! Now if I could actually fill the house with furniture it would be great!
    Question; I have seen these beautiful old homes that are filled with the Victorian furniture… would it be “wrong” to just not? I’m so not a fan of that period furniture but love the homes..

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    • says: 16 comments

      I am not a big fan of Victorian furniture either. I prefer a simpler aesthetic. That being said, you put whatever you want in your home, because when you are the one with the key, it really doesn’t matter what others think. The important thing is the house is saved. When done properly, people will be so enthralled with the house, you could have patio furniture in there and nobody would notice 😉

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