1869 Italianate – Claverack, NY – $1,500,000

Status and price shown on OHD may not be current. Check the links below.
Added to OHD on 5/7/20   -   Last OHD Update: 7/30/20   -   111 Comments
For Sale

20 Route 9h, Claverack, NY 12513

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • $1,500,000
  • 7370 Sq Ft
  • 11.9 Ac.
The Artist's Compound: Mihail Chemiakin's residence and studio, an iconic Claverack landmark, is being offered for sale for the first time in over 30 years. With a commanding presence in the Hamlet of Claverack, the historic main house is the last remaining building from Claverack College and was built in 1869. The college closed in 1902, and the property has been the summer retreat of a NYC based home for children, a boys boarding school and, from 1988 to 2007, the working studio and residence of the fantastical, Russian artist, Mihail Chemiakin. Chemiakin used the 7000+ sq ft main house as his sculpture and painting studio and the former boys school auditorium as his residence and additional studio space. Shaped by Chemiakin's vision, and dotted with his sculptures, the park-like, 12 acre property also includes a caretakers cottage, a cabin, 2 guesthouses and pond. Just outside the city of Hudson, and 2 hrs north of NYC, this singular, country property awaits it's next incarnation.
Contact Information
Alan Weaver, Alan Weaver Licensed R.E. Brkr
(518) 653-9858
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Listing details may change after the posted date and are not guaranteed to be accurate.
Independent verification is recommended.

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: ,
Features: , | Misc: ,

111 Comments on 1869 Italianate – Claverack, NY – $1,500,000

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. LisaNLisaN says: 71 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1845 Greek Revival
    Ithaca, NY

    Wowieeee this place is the art studio from the gods. I wish there were a few more photos of the inside and the other cottages. This mans work is absolutely incredible and so much of himself is in this property. How extraordinary a place.

    44
  2. HeidiHeidi says: 159 comments
    OHD Supporter

    IL

    This is deliciously creepy. I want to wander around and explore for a day.

    77
  3. LisaNLisaN says: 71 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1845 Greek Revival
    Ithaca, NY

    If there are paintings in the studio, that would be soooo cool. This artist is a phenom. At least he is to me. His paintings are divine but the sculptures you see are really something else and most undoubtedly worth a fortune themselves as they are more rare.

    16
  4. Matt ZMatt Z says: 105 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1893 Shingle Style
    Mamakating Park, NY

    The house was known as the Lulu Thorley Lyons Home when it was an orphanage. There are a few vintage postcard images floating around on google and ebay.

    https://www.hippostcard.com/listing/lulu-thorley-lyons-home-claverack-ny/1860110
    http://oldcolumbiacounty.blogspot.com/2011/06/lulu-thorley-lyons-home-claverack-ny.html

    Here’s one of the children!
    https://www.ebay.ca/itm/CLAVERACK-N-Y-LULU-THORLEY-LYONS-HOME-FOR-CRIPPLED-CHILDREN-ANTIQUE-POSTCARD/392071329411?hash=item5b4945b683:g:hyMAAOSw7mpbL~VT

    19
  5. Anne M.Anne M. says: 957 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Spooooky! I love it.

    8
  6. RossRoss says: 2410 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    Oh my.

    The place is intoxicating.

    Instantly, my mind races with ideas!

    21
    • myoldhouserocksmyoldhouserocks says: 3 comments
      1905 Victorian
      KS

      Hi my name is Rachelle and I am not sure if this is the right place to post this so if I goofed up I am sorry, please delete this if it’s not allowed. I am wanting to ask a question to the gentleman named Ross who purchased the monstrously stunningly beautiful Cross house in Emporia Kansas. I have recently purchased a large victorian house in Independence Kansas. She is beautiful and I love her but she has been seriously neglected and is frankly very tired. I somehow stumbled upon a wonderful interview Ross gave on u tube about his home and he mentioned something called a professional grant writer to help him with his paper work. I have looked online for someone called that and have had no luck. I would like to ask him how to find one of these people to possibly assist me in filling out my historical paper work. It’s mind numbingly complicated and I am afraid I am going to mess it up and be denied any help. I am not trying to bother anyone with this question but any help would be appreciated. I just thought I would reach out to to someone in the same state that I am in too. Thank you

      14
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2121 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        https://restoringross.com/
        Rachelle, above is Ross’s blog/website. He is a delight to read. You can probably contact him through the website if he doesn’t see your comment here.
        Good luck with your home!

        7
      • JoeJoe says: 755 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1820 Federal
        Baltimore, MD

        Ross’s blog is wonderful and you can contact hime through it. Beware, if you start reading the blog from the beginning, you will be doing little else for the next few days to a week. On the other hand, you will learn more about what you can do with your house and the processes that are involved than it would seem possible.
        Link:
        restoringross.com

        Click on the Cross House option first. His other options include a Loy of things that don’t necessarily apply to his house.
        Oops the comment from Kimberly62 was not there when I started writing this.

        6
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Ross is our very own E-celeb thanks to her vid.. 🙂 I see that it is at nearly 400K views to date. https://youtu.be/rLS2iiSdEB8

        You can still see the original OHD post here:
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/08/29/1893-queen-anne-emporia-ks/

        Those KS restoration perks are A+! Good luck Rachel.

        6
        • Karen SKaren S says: 48 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1923 Colonial
          New Rochelle, NY

          Wow! Thanks so much Rosewater for posting the OHD link to Ross’s house. I have been following Ross and OHD for about 2 years and I never knew that Cross House had been posted here. What a delight to see that original post of rooms and exteriors that have become so familiar to me.

          You are correct Ross is our e-celeb and Kelly is a goddess!

          I truly enjoy this old house dreamers community.

          7
  7. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2121 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    http://www.artnet.com/artists/mihail-chemiakin/biography
    I would like to know more about this artist and his life living on this property.
    His artwork is interesting. I want to see more pictures of the property, the buildings both inside and out.

    9
  8. dunamovindunamovin says: 172 comments

    The Aadams Family summer home??? Seriously, it’s 2 hrs. to NYC and it would be a great setting for all types of movies. Remake of the Shining maybe?

    14
  9. MJGMJG says: 2282 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    Its actually quite a beautiful masterpiece and a wonderful home that was at one time considered a grand and fashionable mansion and the truth is, and the ONLY thing that is scary is that this mansion has been neglected, gutted and fallen into this state of decay.

    I hope someone will buy this place and restore this gem. Maybe this will help erase all of the silly stereo types that silly shows like Adams Family did to this style, that now come along with historic Victorian homes that I dislike so much. How anyone could see this mansion as spooky or scary is beyond me. Its got so much potential to be quite a place.

    50
    • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1091 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Charleston, SC

      Evidently there was a significant fire in the 1980’s that also contributed to the decline of this once significant mansion grade house. I find those terrible before/ after posts that Kelly’s been doing lately much scarier than this old place.

      13
    • JimHJimH says: 5269 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I agree completely about silly “haunted house” characterizations of large Victorian homes. One of the more famous brick mansions in the Hudson Valley was recently demolished after half a century of neglect and 100 haunted house stories:
      https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ny0191.color.571243c/resource/

      Fortunately, its magnificent neighbor has survived and flourishes again:
      http://wilderstein.org/

      I think we can all agree that this house should be preserved, repaired and made livable. Beyond that, it might be difficult to arrive at a consensus as to what an appropriate degree of restoration would look like, since much of its interior has been lost. Only the lucky buyer has the honor of making those decisions!

      8
      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        I’d been to Wyndcliff a number of times but had not known that it had finally been demolished. Thanks for passing on the sad news. This was the summer home built by the aunt of Edith Wharton. Edith Wharton hated the house and considered it dark and dreary. It is understandable why a child might have felt that way, given how drearily many Victorians kept their homes at that time. I think it may have as a result of her visits here that she created the phrase, “Hudson river bracketed,” if she indeed was the originator of that architectural descriptor.

        3
      • MJGMJG says: 2282 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        OH NO they demolished the old Hudson valley mansion? I was hoping someone would have at least been able to salvage some of it!

        I LOVE Wilderstein. I was able to negotiate a private tour through the entire house including the tower and it is quite a spectacular mansion though needs more funding to help restore more of it. The hallway ceiling is painted a horrible dark brown bronze color but under the paint you can see flecks of the original elaborately stenciled cream, silver and green ceiling.

        5
      • Gregory_KGregory_K says: 452 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Chatsworth, CA

        Wyndclyffe, on Mill Road, in Rhinebeck, N.Y., was both handsome and fascinating. It was probably demolished on speculation, due to limited views of the Hudson River. This is very sad, as the house was worth saving, and could have been saved.

        5
        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          I also was greatly disturbed to hear of Wyndclyffe’s demolition. I visited it several times over the course of a number of years, but stopped going once I saw nothing but more deterioration each time I went, and knew the building was way beyond saving and was in danger of collapsing altogether. I do know efforts were being made to save it since there was evidence of this over the course of my visits to it. It was equally obvious however, that the house was eroding faster than the restorers could undo the damage the elements were doing to it. Without a major outside financial backer, there simply was no hope of saving the house, and I’m sure anyone with such resources would likely have wanted to put his or her money into something that was less far gone, rather than a building in which comparatively little original fabric would actually remain (many expert professional architectural historians and restorers consider the amount of remaining original fabric to be a hallmark factor in considering whether to restore a given building or not). If you saw Wyndclyffe or pictures of what little remained of it at the very end, it might have been more obvious why the building was destroyed, and probably for safety concerns. The best outcome, once it had deteriorated too badly, would have been to build an enormous structure over the top of it to prevent further deterioration, stabilize what remained and allow the public to see it as the ruin that it was. In tidewater Virginia, this is how the pre-Revolutionary War remains of Menokin near Warsaw, Virginia, (the Francis Lightfoot Lee house) have been very creatively preserved for the public to see. Coming up with the money to save an important building early enough in time to save it is critical to differentiating between what gets saved and what doesn’t. As much as an advocate as I am for saving historic buildings, I’ve seen enough to know that unfortunately, the American public at large does not value its architectural history as much as some other nationalities do and it is not an American priority that so many of us wish it were. So, finding money and getting the necessary commitments to restore a damaged building early enough in the process is key to saving it–once the building has deteriorated far enough, even professional preservationists and potential donors feel they need to redirect their efforts and resources elsewhere to projects that are more likely to be successful than to one that is so far gone as to effectively be a “lost cause.” Ultimately, it is we as a country that have to own responsibility for our national priorities, and saving America’s endangered architectural masterpieces is simply not yet very high on that list. Just like so many other good causes that other countries value that the American citizenry as a whole does not.

          10
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Anyone who hasn’t seen the late John Foreman’s article about, and MANY pics of, Wilderstein should not miss it!!

        http://bigoldhouses.blogspot.com/2012/03/

        Also, the carriage house has been much stabilized in the past year or so:
        https://scontent-atl3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/ac1f19284b8900c8e2ca0ba1fd6c9e91/5D528573/t51.2885-15/e35/46767686_608992849520559_3163648899332561486_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-atl3-1.cdninstagram.com

        8
      • BethHBethH says: 234 comments
        1999 Dutchess County, NY

        I didn’t know Wyndclyffe (sp?) was gone! Such a shame.

        Wilderstein IS a treasure. When we first moved to Dutchess County (1981), Margaret Suckley (FDR’s cousin) was still alive and living in Wilderstein. The mansion had been falling into disrepair, and as she was the last surviving family member, she opened the house for Christmas tours (really only the first floor) to make a little money. I think when we were there, the house was about half painted outside. Hard to remember, as it was almost 40 years ago, but I do remember walking the grounds, which, even in December, were breathtaking.

        3
        • JimHJimH says: 5269 comments
          OHD Supporter

          I’m sure I’ve posted this before – a few photos of Wilderstein from 1988 before the restoration (hit Full Screen):
          https://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/19/ghosts-of-the-hudson-valley/

          The first one with Daisy is perfect. It’s wonderful that it’s been restored so people go see it and support the place, but the mystique of the intact but unrestored house is gone. Like the caption says: “The drawing room with its 1888 decoration never looked better than it does here, a hundred years old with the damask hanging in shreds”.

          5
          • BethHBethH says: 234 comments
            1999 Dutchess County, NY

            That’s what I remember the outside looking like, the first time we were there – I thought there had been some painting done, but probably faulty memory on my part! That may have been a later visit.

          • MJGMJG says: 2282 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            Nice article written about Wilderstein.
            The floor of the drawing room was equipped with little button snaps embedded into the floor around the perimeter as well as snaps sewn into the wall to wall carpet so it can be easily snapped up and removed for cleaning. What a great idea. Using snaps to put down your carpet and hold in place. Though sadly the rug is in bad shape and not in the room. (that was a few years ago i was there last i think)

            According to legend, the house was painted that plum, green trim and pumpkin color clapboards when it was first built and the mistress of the house thought it was terrible and had it painted brown quickly after. The house today restored the first paint scheme which is quite nice to see.

            1
          • MJGMJG says: 2282 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            OH! The photo of the staircase is wrong. It has been reversed by accident. Whoops.

            1
      • Karen SKaren S says: 48 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1923 Colonial
        New Rochelle, NY

        Thank you for these links JimH. I live in Westchester, very close to the Hudson Valley. What a tradegy about Wyndcliffe! I have not been to Wilderstrin but thanks to your post I will go this summer.

        Hers’s an old blog our OHD crowd might enjoy http://www.hudsonvalleyruins.org

        1
    • SharonSharon says: 601 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      Spooky? Again? Sigh. Thanks for keeping it real, MJG.

      2
      • MJGMJG says: 2282 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Anytime Sharon.

        I was sad to learn this house had a fire and that probably contributed to the damage of this house. Which is more scary than any horror film. It will take a lot of money to recreate all that was lost sadly. Those porches, that tower, and who know what type of damaged woodwork inside would need to be recreated to bring this back. But hopefully someone who has that type of funding will step up.

        6
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5428 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          Consider the example of the Shingle Style masterpiece by Boston’s Peabody & Stearns: Kragsyde (1883-1885). The lavish mansion that cost $60,000 to build in the 1880’s was sadly demolished in 1929. The landscape architect was Frederick Law Olmstead, America’s premier landscape designer in the latter 1800’s. The original mansion was located at Manchester-by-the-Sea near Boston. In 1982, a replica (plans were mirror reversed) was constructed in Maine using the original Peabody & Stearns’ blueprints. I recall seeing the replica featured in one of the This Old House episodes and to my eyes everything looked to be 1880’s period correct. I shudder to think how much this replica must have cost but it illustrates that there are people with the resources and vision to see a landmark home like this rebuilt and restored. On a smaller scale, the Shamakians of Painesville, Ohio bought the ruins of the 1867 Steele Mansion, (local article: http://www.lakeerieliving.com/Main/Articles/Back_From_the_Ashes_731.aspx ) long a local landmark yet in ruins from neglect and a fire. Most locals considered the former mansion beyond saving but these visionaries decided to save it from the wrecking ball. It wouldn’t have taken much to bring the remaining walls down as the upstairs had suffered a fire, the upstairs floor had collapsed into the first floor and basement but despite the extensive damage and ruin, the couple could see a future as a reconstructed boutique hotel. The once hopeless mansion is now the toast of the town. The Shamakian family spent millions to see the project through to completion. Given these “extreme” examples, this mansion is no more of a challenge but finding someone with resources and vision to take on this project could take time and this property doesn’t have years or decades to sit there before someone saves it. The National Trust for Historic Preservation should have this home added to their most endangered list. I’m keeping my fingers crossed for a miracle here.

          1
          • MJGMJG says: 2282 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            Yeah totally possible. Very costly. Great examples. Did you know there is a push to rebuild the original Penn Station? What a masterpiece and a huge loss for NYC. A grand hall at 150 feet, bigger than Grand Central Terminals 120 feet with coffered ceiling and Corinthian, Ionic and Doric Columns? As well as a giant Glass ceiling and floor train shed unlike the dark tunnels of Grand Central (though they had been enclosed years before the demo)
            The price tag that comes with that is high but there are some countries that have totally rebuilt masterpieces that were destroyed in wars. Its doable. Who is willing to foot the bill.

            5
    • Awww, a little bit of Hollywood spooky never hurt anyone! It is a magnificent house but honestly I thought it would make a great movie-set. I do hope it gets restored and we can see the finished product.

    • I completely agree with your comments on this property. I have studied it extensively before it was even featured on here. I have the 4 copies of post cards of this property and have compared them to the ruins of the house. I am a home improvement specialist and redesign distressed properties and love this place. As much as I love this started as a private residence, the fact that it later transitioned for multiple other uses meant the funds weren’t set aside to properly maintain it. The extensive photos for the listing on Realtor dot com have been recently updated again (thank God) which now appropriately reflects the horrible deterioration especially interior to almost full gut. I love the fact it has multiple buildings on the property. It will be a huge Money pit investment to return the original structure to it’s former glory meaning someone will not only need the expertise, experience, patience, resources, passion but a vision. It will take an incredible painstaking labor of love to make this an attraction. I’ve been in love with it for over a year since I found it. It’s a nightmare task of revival. But can be done.

  10. JimHJimH says: 5269 comments
    OHD Supporter

    The house was built for Rev. Alonzo Flack (1823-1885), the president and effectively the owner of Claverack College, a private school for boys since the Revolution (and girls later). With hundreds of students, and a tuition of $400 a year (1869), it was a respected institution and a profitable business. After Flack’s death the College faded away and Mrs. Flack (Mary Elizabeth Johnson, a Schuyler descendant), eventually sold the property.

    Claverack is an ancient village settled by the Dutch in the 17th Century which retains a lot of its history and old buildings, including the 1767 church. (Some of my family lived there 1680-1820.) With the revival of the adjacent City of Hudson, it’s become a hip and multicultural little place with a Buddhist retreat, art center, etc. There was an art foundry in the area a few years back (on OHD with a bronze rhino iirc), probably one of the reasons Chemiakin moved here. It’s a fascinating property, and a preservation-minded restoration here respecting his influence would be best.

    21
    • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1091 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Charleston, SC

      Rev. Flack called his mansion Fairview Manor. It’s mentioned on the NRHP multiple property listing for the Hamlet of Claverack as an example of the Second Empire style. This appears to be based on the main mass having a mansard roof, albeit with an overall form and design details more typical of Italianate architecture.

      https://npgallery.nps.gov/NRHP/GetAsset/NRHP/64500446_text

      8
      • JimHJimH says: 5269 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Thanks – I was looking for that! The report mentions a “fire in
        the 1980s did considerable damage to the interior which has yet to be fully restored”. That explains some of the condition issues.

        A couple more fuzzy photos:
        http://oldcolumbiacounty.blogspot.com/2011/06/lulu-thorley-lyons-home-claverack-ny.html

        http://oldcolumbiacounty.blogspot.com/2012/02/lyons-home-for-crippled-and-delicate.html

        4
      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        Having been to and inside the house a number of years ago, I can’t imagine that someone would conclude that merely because it had a mansard roof that the house was 2nd Empire rather than Italianate–I definitely considered it the latter, but I guess the presence of a mansard roof trumps everything else…

        3
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5428 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          The Second Empire question remains debatable and a point of disagreement among historic architectural enthusiasts. A very narrow interpretation contends that any mansard roof even if it is just a small platform at the top of a tower on an otherwise non-mansard roofed house is adequate to classify it as Second Empire. A broader interpretation insists that there must be a main roof in the mansard form to qualify as Second Empire. I personally align more with the more strict interpretation because if a house was consciously given a mansard roof, no matter how small, it was at least an effort to identify it with the Second Empire style. (I suppose informally one could call it “Second Empire, lite”)

          3
          • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1850 Italianate, classical
            New Haven, CT

            I can’t believe I’m actually disagreeing with you! But I am. And we may just have to agree that we disagree. As a later comment notes, and which I knew already, this house is a greatly amplified version of Richard Upjohn’s Edward King villa in Newport, R.I., which has been widely imitated in a number of states across the country since it was originally built. It’s first, and virtually all subsequent incarnations of it that I know about, were clearly nothing but pure Italianate. Mansard roofs became very popular in the 1860’s and like so many other houses, the builder of this house incorporated it into parts of this structure. I challenge the claim that this house qualifies for being labeled Second Empire because a mansard roof was placed on the single largest block of the building (and I’m not even convinced that it is the largest block of the building). I question, given that I see 3 mansard roofs on the original building (one of which only capped a very small tower) but at least 4 large Italianate roofs on the rest of it if this is really a legitimate way to distinguish a Second Empire building from an Italianate one. I’m not even sure that the most square footage of the house’s footprint is covered by mansard roofs or by Italianate roofs. But what I do know is that the windows, piazzas, massing, brackets with wide, overhanging eaves, towers, balconies, Italianate-style columns on either side of the clearly Italianate front door, the house which inspired this one, etc., etc., are all clearly Italianate and not Second Empire. Choosing only one dimension (in this case, the roof of the supposedly largest block of the house) to classify a building is putting all the emphasis on only one aspect of part of the building, and absurd when the totality of the roofs of the building are actually of two very distinctly different styles. I would barely even call this building Franco-Italianate for this reason. Yes, it has a mansard-like roof in 2 sizeable places (but I wouldn’t even call those 2 roofs classically mansard–one is not high enough to likely have created a full story, as mansards were intended to do, and neither has any windows, suggesting that the spaces they covered were clearly not intended for living but likely simply for storage, which is again totally at odds with what a true mansard is supposed to do–i.e., create an additional floor for living space but under the guise of creating a roof). The third mansard roof, now gone, capped a very narrow tower (again, an Italianate design element far more than a Second Empire one), which was very small spatially, and did have windows as any lookout space would be expected to have. But I strongly suspect that the architect chose a Second Empire roof for the house’s observation point simply because he wanted the house to look very up-to-date and fashionable, and mansard roofs are in fact often more pleasing to the eye on very small towers than are their Italianate counterparts. So, I think the architect may have been making an aesthetic concession here, but was clearly not trying to establish the style of the house as something other than Italianate. The house is overwhelmingly not Second Empire in virtually all other regards, and no one has the right to determine that a single design element (i.e., the roof), only partially executed on the totality of the building, shall determine stylistically what that building is without further qualification. I also seriously question the assertion that by choosing to put a mansard room on a building means that the architect is choosing to identify with the Second Empire Style, particularly when 2 roofs are only quasi-mansard, the third is purely decorative on a very small tower not intended as living space (as mansard roofs were essentially intended to create), and all 4 of the other roofs are unequivocally sizeable and Italianate (i.e., low pitched with wide overhanging eaves, etc). Again, why not conclude that because the architect overwhelming choose to use an Italianate vocabulary in designing the house, that simply makes it Italianate with some Second Empire roofing? I don’t think choosing to use a Second Empire design element as a small part in designing an otherwise overwhelming Italianate house means that the architect is “identifying” with the Second Empire, even if we label it Second Empire “lite” (though I do acknowledge and admire you attempt to be somewhat concessionary on this point!). And as a final thought, who are we to decide what the architect intended the building to be stylistically called in the first place, or with what he was “identifying”? Identity is something only a person should claim for himself or herself and not something that should be imposed externally on him or her by others. I write this all in good fun and hope you receive it in that spirit!

            3
            • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5428 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1897 Queen Anne Colonial
              Cadiz, OH

              AJ,
              My comments about the on-going debate concerning how much Mansard Roof constitutes a Second Empire style house wasn’t directed towards this house but regrettably seems to have been taken to mean that. I agree with you in that this house began as an architect designed pure Italianate. Later additions do not transform the house automatically into a Second Empire. The most I could claim is that this house started out as an Italianate and was later augmented with Second Empire details. I would therefore consider this house as a HYBRID of the two styles (Eclectic) albeit, with the Second Empire details being later additions. In summary, I don’t think we are in disagreement here. However, I don’t think the discussion over what constitutes a Second Empire to be settled. It certainly isn’t applicable to houses that started out as something other than the Second Empire style. (as this house did)

              1
              • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1850 Italianate, classical
                New Haven, CT

                I certainly can agree with you that this is a “hybrid” or eclectic house, no argument there. But let me clarify the following–I strongly suspect that the mansard roofs, where they were used, were part of the original architect’s designs for the house, and were not something that was added later. I think we would need photos showing the house without any mansard roofs before we could conclude that the mansards were additions to the original house rather than integral features of its original design. I basically think the architect designed the house with some mansard roofs simply because they were in style when the house was built, whereas the prototype for the house (i.e., Richard Upjohn’s villa for Edward King in Newport, R.I.) was purely Italianate because mansards had not yet become fashionable when the Newport house was built.

                1
    • Nancy CNancy C says: 133 comments
      OHD Supporter

      abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

      Oh Rosewater, the photos show that the entire top of the tower is gone. What a splendid house — it needs tending to right away, doesn’t it!

      6
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Sure does Nancy. Toes crossed. That’s a lot of $$$ for the ask, so hopefully the buyer will be loaded, and motivated!

        4
        • JoeJoe says: 755 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1820 Federal
          Baltimore, MD

          I was wondering if the art of Mihail Chemiakin, which the agent’s description when referring to the landscape says “dotted with his sculptures”, was the reason for the high price. The art may be worth the asking price, but there is the history of his occupancy to consider if a buyer of the property needed to sell the art in order to purchase it.

          3
      • Gail M.Gail M. says: 199 comments
        1964 Brutalist midmod condo
        Saint Paul, MN

        Nancy – I no longer see your well written comments and miss them. Whatever happened to you?

        2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Seconded.
        Hope you are well, Nancy.

        1
        • Nancy CNancy C says: 133 comments
          OHD Supporter

          abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

          I am honored to have been noticed by other OHD devotees. A few months ago while washing my small dog in the kitchen sink in the middle of the night, we both landed on the brick floor and I knew on the way down that I was going to break something.

          As the result, there have been a few months of physical therapy to get all of me working again, and I have become an OHD lurker, keeping up with all of ya’ll and with Kelly’s adventures for us. Back on my feet with a vengeance, I will turn my attention to occasionally sending out my brain ramblings concerning the daily offerings.

          2
          • RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Cheers Nancy! So pleased to hear that you are well and on the mend. Having fallen out of my attic to the floor below a few months back; I can surely relate. Oooof. Heheheh. Keep stretching! 🙂

  11. RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Dug and dug and dug, but couldn’t find any more pix.

    Check out this super weird detail on a house in the village! 95 Church St, Claverack,NY

    https://p.rdcpix.com/v01/lc0f4c142-m1xd-w640_h480_q80.jpg

    11
  12. RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Anyone else notice what looks to be 10 or more MASSIVE, cast iron urns?

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/13-20route9h.jpg

    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/14-20route9h.jpg

    This place is FASCINATING!

    Pretty, pretty, please someone go get some more pix! 🙂

    13
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5428 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      It appears the previous owner collected assorted artifacts so difficult to tell if the urns are original to the property or not. J.W. Fiske was a big maker of ornamental urns, and landscaping ironworks. They were contemporaries of the original house construction era and were New York based so they could have placed urns here when the house was built. Here’s an 1865 Fiske catalog showing some of their products: (Internet Archive) https://archive.org/details/IllustratedCatalogOfIronVasesManufacturedByJ.w.FiskeOrnamentalIron Did you notice the outdoor display of Terra Cotta plaques, corbels, and other architectural artifacts? In the 1960’s urban renewal hit New York City in a big way so dozens and dozens of block of mid-19th century flats and townhomes were demolished. (The South Bronx comes to mind) A number of folks recognized the high quality artisan made architectural details from these buildings, collected and brought them back home to create private collections from them. Nice to see a few of them on display here.

      7
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        I’ll bet you’re right about the architectural fragments, John. That’s an interesting space they are displayed in.

        Just noticed the last pic posted has a sort of close up of one of the urns overturned.
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/81-20route9h.jpg
        Hard to say how old they are; but at that impressive size, they would have to have been cast at a very serious foundry. They have to be worth a fortune if old: and as a set of 10+!

        5
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5428 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          Based on the photo, I doubt that the urns were products of the J.W. Fiske Company. Fiske products in the 1865 catalog appear to have an affinity for the Rococo (Revival) style which was at its peak between about 1855 and 1870. The graceful curves and curlicues are signature flourishes of the style. The huge urns here are difficult to determined stylistically-the basket weave pattern in the middle section isn’t associated with a particular style that I know of. I can’t see the patterned edge at the top of the urn well enough to determine if it is an egg and dart pattern or something different. As you said, a set of 10+ of these monumental size urns would have considerable value. The chances of finding another set are extremely unlikely.

          2
      • mischamccmischamcc says: 4 comments
        1903 Mill Valley, CA

        The urns were not on the property when we sold it to Mihail Chemiakin.

        1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          Thank you for saying so! Looking again; there seem to be some rather large looking, sort of blob things (heheheh) up the line of urns in front of the house = molds? Very possible I suppose considering all the info so far.

          1
    • Karen SKaren S says: 48 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1923 Colonial
      New Rochelle, NY

      I can make visit this summer and take pix!

      1
  13. MWMW says: 919 comments

    Whoa, now this is something a bit different than usual! And I guess the art is staying. Was that main building still be used in 2007? If so, it’s seen some rough previous 12 years.

    1
  14. ScottScott says: 348 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    Thanks for those who did some recon on this one. I spent about 10 minutes on Google and decided that the listing agent was slightly mistaken with his assessment of the original use of the structure. But in my brief research I could not figure out the right answer. Thanks Jim, Matt, and Rose!

    6
  15. JimHJimH says: 5269 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Right across the road for only $200k. I’ll take both!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/13-Route-9h-Hudson-NY-12534/2084719420_zpid/

    7
  16. OfftocampOfftocamp says: 26 comments
    Sewickley, PA

    I could wander around exploring there for weeks! Absolutely wonderful!

    1
  17. SusieLovesOtisSusieLovesOtis says: 27 comments
    SusieLovesOtis RIVERSIDE, CA

    Love it!

  18. peeweebcpeeweebc says: 1066 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1885 Italianate.
    MI

    I don’t find this house creepy at all! It is super cool! Just wish more interior pics. The statues are one of a kind, and will go with the sale most likely? So, whoever is the lucky dog to get this, they’ll get his artwork too? OMG.

    2
  19. Gregory_KGregory_K says: 452 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Chatsworth, CA

    My thanks to all the folks who conducted research on this home. The photograph in which the brick is very red is my memory of the house.

    I hope that I am not offending anyone, however I am very upset about this mansion’s condition. This home’s terrible condition shows you what can happen when no one takes responsibility for tracking a town’s historic resources.

    It was intact when I saw it years ago. It was painted, and the tower roof and extensive and very ornate porches were intact. I took many photographs, but they are packed in storage now, or I’d have sent them along to Kelly.

    When I was photographing, I was surprised that there was good quality furniture in it. It might have belonged to the first owner’s family. I was told it was too heavy to move, so owner after owner simply left it in place.

    It is one of a number of variations on Upjohn’s Edward King villa in Newport, Rhode Island, one of the early Newport ‘cottages.’ The paired, unequal towers with a loggia between, over the entry doors is a very satisfying design. This is simply a grander version, in the French Renaissance style. There are a surprising number of King House variations, but this was one of the three best. Another very good variation was by Upjohn himself, and I believe that it has been featured here.

    I find the open framing visible above the staircase, on the second floor, is scary. Who knows what has happened on the second floor?

    Outside, the tarpaper wrap on what was an open arcade on the second floor entry facade is also scary. The missing porches are scary.

    Forgive me, but I guess I am disgusted. It was simply spectacular.

    This house has to be seen in person. It commands the rise on which it sits, dominating this part of the village. I explored the Hudson valley while teaching at the C.I.A., and I do not believe that I missed a single back road or town. So I saw many, many Victorians. I feel that this home is one of the best Victorians in the entire valley, and that is saying something.

    It is still very much worth the asking price. I’d buy it in a minute.
    As a final note, Claverack is a beautiful village, with many historic buildings. It is well worth a visit, if for no other reason than to see this still magnificent home.

    4
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12133 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Someone mentioned a fire so maybe you saw it before that?

      1
      • Gregory_KGregory_K says: 452 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Chatsworth, CA

        Sorry I missed your note. I’m certain it must have been before the fire. I was a student as well as teacher at the C.I.A. from 1983-1985. So probably just before the fire. It was, and is, spectacular.

        The town has more empty lots and unfortunate new buildings, but it still stuffed with 18th and 19th century treasures.

        There’s a Gothic house on Union Street with a miniature tower, and another Upjohn King Villa variation. This one is very close to the published Upjohn plans. The second floor open loggia has been enclosed, but otherwise Edward King and Richard Upjohn would recognize it.

        I think there are also two G.B. Croff houses as well. Remember he designed lots of buildings across New York State. There’s a particularly good example of his work in Rhinebeck, and of course the 1876 New York State Pavilion in Philadelphia….I’m probably insulting your intelligence, but I used to teach, so I’m not bothered by telling people things they probably already know. I’m keeping my mouth closed about the Croff houses until I look through my pattern books and research.

        There’s also a huge Mansard roofed house on the outskirts of downtown, but its been stripped for aluminum siding, so I’ll need old photographs for that one. All in all, one heck of a town.

        2
        • Gregory_KGregory_K says: 452 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Chatsworth, CA

          Well I feel really silly. Somehow when I copied my comments, I left out the part about Union Street being in Hudson, then returning to talk about Claverack. Worse I left out more addresses. Today, there isn’t enough coffee in the western hemisphere to salvage the day for me.

    • RossRoss says: 2410 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Thank you for your comment, Gregory.

      At some point, if you can access your images, even years from now, I would LOVE to see them, and would LOVE to add them to the blog post I did on this house (see my comment below). Such images would also likely be invaluable to anybody interested in restoring the house.

      As I wrote below, I’m not buying the whole fire thing. Fire doesn’t consume plaster. And leave wood intact! It seems that since your last visit somebody tore off all the porches, decapitated the one tower, and pulled down all the plaster. So, I share your pain at the current condition of the house.

      3
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12133 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        (Let me rephrase what I wrote earlier), the water trying to put out the fire may have ruined the plaster.

        1
        • RossRoss says: 2410 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
          Emporia, KS

          Thanks, Kelly!

          While there was reportedly a fire, the few interior images offer no such indication.

          What IS telling is the roof. In looking at the red roofs, these are clearly not original, and their attendant dramatic cornices have also been lost.

          Rosewater posted this image, which clearly shows the change in roofs:
          https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LWFsK8z3zds/T0Bj83AwLgI/AAAAAAAAUa8/f2bjhX-3rPI/s1600/Hudson+NY,+Lulu+Thorney+Lyn+Home.jpg

          So, if there was a fire, was it a roof fire? This may account, too, for the loss of the tower roof. If any fire involved the roof only, this would explain why the interior wood appears undamaged (from what little we can see).

          I agree that a lot of water being poured onto the house would damage plaster on brick. The brick would have absorbed tons of water, and the plaster would have had to be removed in order for the brick to dry out.

          NOTE: A fire would not likely account for the loss of all the porches.

          My house has had two fires, and both were in the attic. Luckily, these caused little damage!

          4
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      OK Gregory, time to start searching for those pix! PLEASE! 🙂

      7
    • MJGMJG says: 2282 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Gregory, I’ll be over tomorrow at 5 to start going through boxes. I’ll have pizza for dinner. Thanks. 😉

      1
      • Gregory_KGregory_K says: 452 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Chatsworth, CA

        If you’re anywhere near the San Fernando Valley – where Valley Girls from – I’d be happy to supply the pizza. There’s a great place on Devonshire Avenue. When I first moved here to help my mother, I actually overheard a couple of girls saying ‘…for sure..’ and ‘..gag me to the max with a spoon..’ It was unnerving.

        Sadly, I was beaten in jr. high school gym, 50 years ago this year. My back is now really shot, and I’m having repairs done in July, so I cannot even lift empty boxes. I’ll need someone’s help. My brother might help.

        I promise I will be happy to send copies of the slides to anyone who wants them. Each time I look at the listing photographs, I see more damage. However, I still think it is well worth buying, and it sits on a very large piece of land, so there’s lots of space to roam around. With everything going on, You’ll need to remind me.

        Kelly, how does this work? Can I list my e-mail here, or is that inappropriate?

        2
  20. TimothyTimothy says: 141 comments

    This wonderful home is potential, potential, potential. I love it and hope that there will be that one special person who will restore it to it’s former glory!

    2
  21. AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1850 Italianate, classical
    New Haven, CT

    I visited this house many years ago when it was one of the private properties being shown by Hudson River Heritage as part of its annual fall “Country Seats Tour,” the local equivalent of “Natchez Pilgrimage.” The house was indeed one of the most spectacular that I have ever seen, and clearly one of the largest private homes built in the US at the time of its construction. As I remember it, very little of the interior remained from the disastrous fire that was previously mentioned, but it was quite majestic as a barely habitable or usable (?as a studio?) ruin. The pictures shown above suggest that its windows, as I recall, were virtually all destroyed in the fire. There was virtually nothing left for the elements to destroy, so that may be why they have not been replaced. The grand staircase had somehow managed to escape the fire, but almost all, if not all, of the plaster was gone, I think, as a result of all the water that was poured into the building to put out the fire. The house was so enormous that I honestly can’t see, in light of the amount of damage that was done, anyone being interested in trying to restore it from a financial perspective alone–indeed, how many people would ever need, much less want, that much space to live in for that cost (aside from members and readers of this website, of course)? So, I’m not surprised to see the house appears no different than when I saw it (?maybe 20 years ago?). I’d write more about it if there were more to tell, but given the damage done by the fire, there’s little else I can think of to say except that it was a truly remarkable experience seeing it. I’m sorry you all were not there with me.

    6
    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      On further examination, I did ascertain that the larger mansard roof did have a window on one (but only one, as nearly as I can tell) side. I think this clearly suggest that that roof was not intended for living purposes, given that all other floors in that tower block had a plethora of windows, clearly demarcating them as active living spaces, which I do not think this mansard roof was, particularly in light of the fact that it was on the fourth floor of the house.

  22. beckybecky says: 102 comments
    OHD Supporter

    bass lake, CA

    I agree with MJG… and I love that gazebo. Somebody is going to need some seriously deep pockets for this one!

    2
  23. timhildebrandttimhildebrandt says: 97 comments
    1927 arts and crafts
    Indianapolis, IN

    Wow! Kelly, I am still logged in, and all I did was clear an hour of history. What a wonderful thing. Maybe I’ll just stay logged in?
    At any rate, I love Mihail Chemiakin’s residence. I’d move right into that one.

    Thanks again for everything!
    Tim

    1
  24. JasonJason says: 25 comments
    LI, NY

    Great place! Pictures and acres are definitely deceiving. Makes you think you are out in the middle of nowhere but people are right on top of this place in street/overhead

    1
  25. RossRoss says: 2410 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    I did a blog post on the property:

    https://restoringross.com/can-this-house-be-saved-fairview-manor-claverack-new-york/

    As I wrote: “It was reported that a fire damaged much of the interior but I am not buying this. Fire does NOT consume plaster while leaving wood intact. Also, in a serious fire, stairwells act like flues and wood staircases are the first to go. So, while the house may have had a fire at some point (my Cross House has had at least two fires, and with no visible damage), the interior, at least from the limited images available, show a glorious intact stair, glorious tall arched doors, and intact trim.”

    5
    • ScottScott says: 348 comments
      1951 Grants Pass, OR

      Ross, my uneducated guess is that the fire originated on the second floor or attic space of this part of the house. My guess is based on the smoke damage evident on the bricks in the corner shown on this picture:

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/115-20route9h.jpg

      I believe that the fire burned off that portion of the roof to the right of the tower. When you mentioned that the cornice has been lost, you are partially correct. I think that after the fire, some pre-made roof trusses were thrown up there, and a cheap 3-tab roof put on just to close up the roof. See how there is a gable facing the camera in the modern photo and the historical picture shows a hip roof configuration?

      https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LWFsK8z3zds/T0Bj83AwLgI/AAAAAAAAUa8/f2bjhX-3rPI/s1600/Hudson+NY,+Lulu+Thorney+Lyn+Home.jpg

      If someone has a subscription to a site like newspapers.com or similar, we might get a news account of the fire. Probably afterwards, the owner decided to “restore” the house by gutting it (as is all too common) before running out of money. Maybe the subsequent owner, perhaps the artist, valued the home as-is as a sort art installation, and decided not to repair the home.

      Just speculation on my part, but I would like to know the truth.

      1
      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        I’m sure we all would like to know the truth. But at least the explanation given when I saw the house, if I remember correctly, was that there was a tremendous amount of water damage to it which would explain why wood and brick survived, but not plaster. Good luck with your investigation–I would think the local fire dept or some other official local or state agency must have investigated the place after the fire, have made photos of the damage, etc, to determine if arson should have been suspected, which apparently was not the case from what little that I know. I would think that any fire as late as the 1980’s must have required an official investigation. It’d be interesting to know if the house was insured or not, as the insurer most definitely would wanted a full understanding of the cause of the fire. But it seems unlikely that it was insured, which is probably why it was not rebuilt.

        1
      • CharleneJCharleneJ says: 9 comments
        Cary, NC

        The local paper was The Register Star, published in Hudson, NY. If you contact the newspaper, they may have the article(s) in their archives. This is a link to the newspaper site: https://www.hudsonvalley360.com/

        1
    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      I’ve addressed the plaster issue elsewhere–that it was supposedly destroyed by the water poured into the house to put out the fire, so that is why so much of the wood survived. I’m sure you’ve seen the damage that a leaky roof can do to plaster–it basically melts it away, so you can imagine what would happen to plaster on the walls of a house that was deliberately inundated with tons of water to put out a fire. If I recall correctly, the explanation about the stairwell was that it was in a far corner of the house, distant from the fire and its doors were closed, which is why the stairs and surrounding woodwork survived (but not the plaster under the stairs or in the stairwell, given the amount of water that was poured in). I’m not saying this is true, but this is the explanation that I recall hearing many years ago.

  26. CharleneJCharleneJ says: 9 comments
    Cary, NC

    This was a magnificent home in the past, but it was not well maintained for many years. I am from the Claverack area and remember when it was used as a school or retreat for boys around the early 1970s. We knew it as “The House of the Rising Sun”. If I am not mistaken, that is because the owners at the time had painted the exterior a series of colors from bottom to top. It would be wonderful if someone with time, money, patience and skill would purchase the home and restore it authentically and to its former glory.

    • ScottScott says: 348 comments
      1951 Grants Pass, OR

      Any idea what the school was called at that time? Or who owned it at the time of the fire?

      • CharleneJCharleneJ says: 9 comments
        Cary, NC

        I do not know the “official” name of the school. I believe it was some sort of “free” or “progressive” school, and that most of the students were from New York City. I was friends with one of the boys who lived there. His name was Michael, and I believe he came from a fairly well-to-do family who wanted him to have a more liberal education. I believe the owner(s) at that time was a couple who were artists.

      • mischamccmischamcc says: 4 comments
        1903 Mill Valley, CA

        The school was originally called The Open Community School. The name was later changed to The Allegro School. My parents owned the property from 1968 until they sold it to Mihail Chemiakin. He has owned the property since 1987.

        2
  27. RossRoss says: 2410 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    ZOUNDS!

    A previous owner sent me some incredible images!

    I did a blog post:

    https://restoringross.com/can-this-house-be-saved-fairview-manor-claverack-new-york-part-ii/

    5
  28. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12133 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    From Scott, old (not sure how old):

    • ScottScott says: 348 comments
      1951 Grants Pass, OR

      Kelly, I dug around on the interwebs and this map appears to be from an 1873 atlas of Columbia County, New York.

      1
    • JoeJoe says: 755 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1820 Federal
      Baltimore, MD

      I love the little panhandle that the lot has, which gives a narrow frontage on the railroad tracks. Maybe the train would stop for deliveries, and/or the trains would stop for the owners if they wanted to travel.

      2
  29. TimothyTimothy says: 141 comments

    The amazingly large amount of comments generated by this home is both wonderful and educational. I really look forward my morning cup of coffee and reading about these fascinating homes. Thank you so much to Kelly for taking the time to share!

    2
  30. CharleneJCharleneJ says: 9 comments
    Cary, NC

    Wow! I just read some of the comments which were posted after my comment on 6/6/19 and was delighted to see the blog about a lady named Mishra who lived in the house from 1968 to 1987 who confirmed it was, indeed, known as “The House of the Rising Sun” because of the colors painted on the exterior. I was friends with a boy named Michael who lived in the house during that time. It was my understanding a number of young children/teens during the late 1960s and early 1970s and were attending some sort of “free” or “progressive school” there.

  31. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12133 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks for sharing his response.

    1
  32. Saw this house is now listed as pending on realtor and “accepting backup offers” on zillow! Hopefully this means that it will be saved!!

    1
  33. PinkPink says: 1 comments

    A postscript to the mysterious fire that consumed Fairview Manor on December 2 1987:

    BLAZE CHARS MANSION RESTORATION PAINT STRIPPING BLAMED IN CLAVERACK FIRE
    Liz Walsh Staff writer PUBLICATION: Times Union, The (Albany, NY)
    SECTION: LOCAL DATE: December 3, 1987
    EDITION: FIVE STAR
    Page: B1 \
    What was once a stately Victorian mansion high on a hill in this Columbia County town was a charred brick shell Wednesday night.
    Fire, believed to have been started by workers who were stripping paint on the second floor of the 20-plus room home, destroyed the attic and the second and third floors of the structure.
    Bought by Soviet-born artist Mikhail Chemiakin in June, the estate had been undergoing restoration since October, said Boris Fedoff, the restoration manager who has been living on the site since renovation began. Chemiakin purchased the house and 12 1/2 acres for $500,000 in June, Fedoff said.
    Chemiakin, well-known in French art circles and now living in New York City, had been notified of the fire, Fedoff said.
    Firefighters from 10 volunteer fire companies in Columbia County responded to the mutual aid alarm that was sounded about 1 p.m., said Ned Keeler, chief of the A.B. Shaw Fire Company in Claverack.
    The firehouse, located at the intersection of Routes 23B and 9H, is directly across the street from the mansion, but Keeler said when firefighters climbed the steep driveway to the house, flames were shooting from the attic windows and the roof.
    No one was injured in the blaze, which took about two hours to bring under control, Keeler said. At 6 p.m. pockets of flame could still be seen in second-floor windows. “I can’t believe, I can’t believe it,” said Fedoff, shaking beads of sweat from his forehead.
    Fedoff, also of Soviet descent, said that when he was first offered the job as restoration manager he didn’t want to take it. Fedoff said he saw pictures of the house taken years ago. “Whatever they do (to the house) it couldn’t match what I saw in the pictures.” When Fedoff saw the house in October he changed his mind. “It had suffered 30 to 40 years of benign neglect,” he said, adding he felt it could be restored.
    The restoration foreman said he was not at the site when fire broke out. “I was coming back from Hudson. When we got to the intersection of 9H and 23B we heard the fire siren. At first I didn’t think anything about it – we hear the siren all the time. In my wildest dreams, I never connected it to the house. We drove up the driveway and I saw one of the guys who was working as a paint stripper go running past down to the firehouse. Even then I didn’t connect it.”
    Fedoff said when he got to the top of the driveway, he saw smoke. “In 15 minutes, the fire went from the west facade to the east facade. “I can’t believe it, I just can’t believe. The fire was relentless, relentless.”
    Fedoff said the mansion was a reproduction of a house in France. Architectural details included 13-foot ceilings, a marble floor in the foyer and a parquet floor in the parlor, black walnut shelving, fireplaces, retractable shutters and chestnut doors. Walls of the brick and stone structure are 1 1/2 feet thick. The ceilings were of molded plaster and windows had carved valences. The structure also boasted an Otis elevator, which Fedoff and his crew intended to restore to use.
    Claverack resident Leon Cook said the house was at one time the home of the president of Claverack College. Then it was owned by Lulu Thorley Lyons who ran it as a school for crippled children.
    In the 1950s, it was an open community school for kids from New York City and owned by Robert McCormack, now a Michigan resident, who sold the property to Chemiakin, Cook said.
    “The house had its own life, a spirit – a domovoi.” In Russian, domovoi means spirit of the house, Fedoff said.
    Chemiakin had restored the auditorium, located several hundred feet from the main house, for use as his studio.
    “He was anxious to move up and wanted work completed by the spring. Now I don’t know what will happen,” said Fedoff, who could not estimate damage, calling the mansion irreplaceable.
    The building was insured but Fedoff did not know for what amount.
    No arrest had been made as a result of the fire, according to Columbia County Sheriff Paul Proper, who said the fire was still being investigated but was believed to be accidental.
    “It (the fire) has to be an accident,” said Fedoff. “No one could burn down a house like this.”

    Caption: PHOTO
    Copyright, 1987, (c) Times Union.
    All Rights Reserved.

    3
  34. some extra interior photos have been added of the main house’s current state. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/20-Route-9h-Claverack-NY-12513/121363634_zpid/?

    They’ve definitely done some work to shore up the house but it has a long way to go. The plaster seems to be pretty much gone, hopefully the plywood they have down is protecting the floor in some areas but hard to know. At least a lot of the moldings and casings are still there! Would still love to see this house brought back to life.

    2
  35. RosewaterRosewater says: 7183 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Looks like the fire really did a number on it. Worse than I thought. Seeing that wonderful banister winding its way up and then turning to a cinder – is heartbreaking. The substantial stabilization is encouraging.

    3
  36. MJGMJG says: 2282 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    yeah according to the article, the fire started on the second floor. With the picture added above like Rosewater said, you can see the char and attachment of the new railing. Sad. Looks like other parts of the house have also been totally stripped of their plaster walls for some reason too. I saw fragments of conversations above but I’ve not re-read through them all. Tragedy.

    3

Comment Here


To keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents, comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved. Keep topics to the home, history, local attractions or general history/house talk.

Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.
Click here to read the comment rules, updated 1/12/20.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified. Do not contact the agent unless you are interested in the property.