1898 Queen Anne – Dunkirk, IN

Added to OHD on 12/17/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   100 Comments
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412 S Main St Dunkirk, IN 47336

Map: Street

  • $62,500
  • 4 Bed
  • 2.5 Bath
  • 3160 Sq Ft
  • 0.38 Ac.
This home is a must see! The dwelling has a lot of the original features that makes this particular property so unique. The inner beauty and woodworking that this Victorian home offers is amazing and you have to see it in person to truly appreciate it. The Weaver House was built in 1898 and was brought in on the railway as a kit house. This was the first home in Dunkirk with interior plumbing. You will also really appreciate the main stairway and the Queen Victorian traditional light in the main entry that was imported from Spain. Each of the rooms downstairs have different types of hardwood flooring throughout the main level. There are four gas fireplaces located on the main level. The home has four spacious bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms. The dwelling sits on a large iron fenced lot in downtown Dunkirk. Don't miss your chance to restore this amazing property and buy a piece of local history.
Contact Information
Jerrett Flesher, United Country Real Estate / Wagner Auctioneering and Real Estate
(765) 716-8418
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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100 Comments on 1898 Queen Anne – Dunkirk, IN

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12208 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I’m not so sure about the kit aspect of this one. Some people get confused with catalog (or planbook) homes being like Sears Kit when the only thing catalog homes provided were usually just the plans and sometimes recommendations on where to get the parts if not local.

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    • Dan says: 28 comments

      I agree, doesn’t have the feel of a kit house and there are definitely a bunch of higher end details.

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    • JimHJimH says: 5379 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I agree with you that this looks like a catalog home, and a nice one. There actually wasn’t that much of a difference between catalog and kit homes. The catalog plans included detailed specifications and lists for ordering materials, either locally or shipped by rail from a large supplier. Besides the design, that was a big selling point for contractors who didn’t have to do all the paperwork. Sears and others took it a step further with fully supplied kit homes, which included pre-cut lumber marked for assembly by amateur builders. That made construction a lot easier in the days before portable power tools, but it still required basic building skills.

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      We owned and lived in this house for many years (1970s-1990s). We talked to every members of every family who lived in it. There used to be a magnificent two story Carriage House with living quarters above for the men servants.There was also a room full of leftovers from the house. We worked hard to bring it back to it glory days it is so sad to see it now. John Weavers son told us the house came as a kit on the railroad. The track is just down the street. There were many extras of everything. We had extra doors, woodwork, tiles, light fixtures, wainscotting, wood flooring, etc. etc. The son said the extra stuff was in case anything was damaged in transport. Most people would dispose of the extra building materials, but his dad kept it in case any of it was needed in the future. He was not positive which catalog it was ordered from, but thought it was Sears or Montgomery Wards as there were lots of other things in the catalog. His dad ordered every possible feature available. He was afraid of indoor plumbing, so the three bathrooms (two on the second floor) had 6 inches of concrete under it. He used the outhouse out back as he just didn’t trust indoor plumbing. The out house finally fell apart just before we bought the housse. We used the area for our trash can and yes the out house sat on a concrete pad. The house has a 16 foot deep foundation made out of stone as he hated rats. It has never settled, so all the sliding doors slide like they are new. We did a lot of entertaining when we lived in the house and it was perfect for it. Ball State University did a study on it and it is in the Smithsonian along with the origional blueprints. I dont recall any brand or catalog name on the blueprints, but we gave them to the next owners, so I cant look at them for clues.

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      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12208 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Do you have an photos of the home from when you owned it that you’d share? We’d love to see what it looked like.

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        • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

          I even have the study Ball State University in Muncie did on it, that was put in the Smithsonion. We have a bit of the blueprints, but we gave them to the next owners. I hope they kept. Our kids loved the drinking fountain built in by their bedrooms, the old style intercom that you speak into and hold the other part to your ear. It connect servants to kitchen. The doorbell can only be heard in the kitchen, so we added a door knocker and a sign saying use both. They doors and most windows are 8 foot high. With close to 60 windows they ech only got cleaned once per year. I understand why previous owners had servants. I sure needed some. the landscaping was all knind of things tht usually don’t grow in Indian. They have all been removed by the current owners, but it was fun having wonderful things to pick for vases.

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        • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

          People would just stand their with their jaw dropped when they entered our foyer. The red light was Mr Weaver’s pride and joy. At the time it was very stylissh to have something morrocan or spanish and the light was it. It is not a modern light although some people think it is. I am so glad the current owners left it in.

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      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7266 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Thank you SO much for indulging us Mrs. Lucas. Your insights make the place come alive! It is my sincerest wish that the next owner shares your respect for the place, and does right by it.

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      • SERGE1SERGE1 says: 1 comments

        I remember this beautiful house, as I stayed as a foreign student with your family during the summer of 1983 or 84. I was trying to look about Dunkirk on the internet, when I found pictures of the house. And when I saw the picture of the stairway, I knew it was your house, and then I saw your name.
        I don t know if you will read this message, and I know it is an unusual way to contact someone.
        Best regards
        Serge Morelot

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      How do I post pictures?

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    • Cynthia L Butler says: 1 comments

      I am intrested in looking up the history of this house any idea where I could start?

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Since the local Dunkirk library (and glass musuem) is right behind this house, that might be a good place to start. If they don’t know the answers, surely they could point you to someone who would. Their contact information: http://www.dunkirk.lib.in.us/ If you find anything out, it would be very kind if you could share whatever you find. Thanks!

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    • RossRoss says: 2412 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      My 1894 house is a custom design but is filled with millwork ordered from catalogs, like all eight mantels, doors, trim, etc. While my staircase appears to be custom, it was common at the time to order staircases from catalogs.

      I am guessing that this is the story with this house: A custom house filled with catalog millwork.

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        I wholeheartedly concur, Ross. Everything ornamental in the house appears to have been ordered and shipped in from the doors to the fancy interior fretwork. I’ve looked through several period planbooks to try to find a match to this distinctive design. Although the house appears to date after 1900, the design itself looks more like from the mid-1890’s. I was most amazed at the few surviving capitals atop the columns on the remaining small back side porch. They are still covered with thick paint but in spots the paint has delaminated revealing what appears to be pine grain. Often such capitals were made of composite material (like a plaster mix) but for an extra amount hand carved versions were available upon request.

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      • Ross…would love to restore a home like this & looking for one ASAP! What needs to be done first to be able to live in this home? Roof? furnace? contractor? Where can I find informative ideas & information about starting a project like this? I’ve been following you & your beautiful home restoration. I will be doing this project as a (crazy) single woman with a passion & love for Victorian homes.

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  2. HarleysmomHarleysmom says: 107 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Windsor, CA

    Wow! I was not expecting such and amazing interior. All that fretwork, those fire places and that wallpaper frieze!

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      The frieze is in the library. It is damaged in one spot and we left it alone and thought a specialist should fix it right.

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  3. CarolynCarolyn says: 303 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    I would love to get my hands on this place! How amazing it would be restored.

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  4. Amy Sue says: 14 comments

    What a beautiful house! I am smitten with the dark tiled and papered bathroom! I have never seen antique dark tile before but perhaps I just haven’t seen any I liked so it wasn’t memorable. I wish I had enough money to save all the lovely beauties like this. Please someone, buy her, fix her, and send pictures to Kelly. This house needs someone who can take great care to restore it. Thanks Kelly.

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      That tile is light blue and remained with it’s origional color until the 1990s. The current owners must have painted. The floor had a beautiful tiled pattern that matched. I don’t know why they painted it. The master bath was geen tile and the bathroom off the wet bar was black, but they were all shiny and had pretty floors to go with them. I was a previous owner.

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      As I look at the pictures gain I see that the tiles are still shaded light blue tiles the picture is just very dark

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  5. John_Alan says: 104 comments

    I gasped when I saw the interior. Absolutely amazing! I agree with Amy Sue about that bathroom. The tile and paper give it such a dramatic, almost Gothic feel. I hope someone only with the interest of preserving what hasn’t been changed and restoring what has buys this home.

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  6. julie A.julie A. says: 146 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1914 foursquare farmhouse
    New Germany, MN

    Wow! Beautiful fireplaces and all intact! amazing. how could you have 4 gas fireplaces and not use them. This place is a steal!

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      They all had gas inserts and as the owners from the 70s to the 90s we always used them every winter. The kids loved standing in front of them and warming up.

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  7. John_Alan says: 104 comments

    I’m not sure, but I think the countertop in the kitchen might be nickel. Or perhaps just stainless steel. It’s cool regardless

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      They were a dream and always looked beautiful. It was great when I was doing canning. Each side of the sink is enourmous! We were the first owners that did not have servants and some wonderful meals were prepared in that kitchen and the Summer kitchen just outside the kitchen door. to help keep the kitchen cooler in the summer.

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  8. RossRoss says: 2412 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    Oh my.

    Oh my!

    OH MY!

    ZOUNDS!

    Just the tower finial got me all excited:

    https://www.google.com/maps/@40.3724898,-85.2118036,3a,15y,302.43h,124.03t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sbROjiEPL7Q_szJ9XR-EYqg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    And look at the tower windows! Imagine them restored and lighted at night from the inside!

    https://www.google.com/maps/@40.3724898,-85.2118036,3a,15y,302.05h,115.24t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sbROjiEPL7Q_szJ9XR-EYqg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    The porch is very sad but….look at the outline revealing the lost columns!!!!!!!!!

    https://www.google.com/maps/@40.3724898,-85.2118036,3a,15y,277.68h,89t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sbROjiEPL7Q_szJ9XR-EYqg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    The porch needs to be reconstructed, STAT!

    And don’t miss the fence!

    https://www.google.com/maps/@40.3724898,-85.2118036,3a,20.6y,335.89h,77.51t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sbROjiEPL7Q_szJ9XR-EYqg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    And the interior? Oh, my heart! My heart!

    And the triple crystal chandeliers in the dining room, and matching crystal sconces? Fabulous!

    I LOVE THIS HOUSE!

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12208 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Gosh, maybe I need to start doing more screen shots from Google. Great eye on the porch column ghostly outline!

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      • PaulPaul says: 112 comments
        Arlington, VA

        The side porch may still retain its original porch columns, maybe they are the same for the front porch. Beautiful house.

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        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          Hope you are right about the columns on the side porch matching the original front porch columns. That would allow for a full accurate restoration. Did you notice in streetview there’s some wood pieces stacked against the side of the front porch? One item is definitely an architectural piece with an ornate pattern. Perhaps when the original columns were taken down one or more was kept somewhere. Since this was once one of the prominent houses in Dunkirk, perhaps the local Library or historical society has a period photo of the house in its heyday. That too would allow an accurate restoration rather than one based on conjecture. I can’t tell in streetview if the two triangular porch pediments (Tympanum) still have ornamental panels or not. Such decorative panels are often picked out in colors to reveal their details and would look good here with the right combinations of color.

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    • JimHJimH says: 5379 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks Ross!

      The Share button on the Street View – 3 little dots – makes a clean link. ?
      https://goo.gl/maps/R52AHGPrrNt

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  9. Ms. Anthrope says: 21 comments

    Just….wow!!! This lady is a stunner!!! I’d give my right arm to restore this beauty!

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  10. Looks like it smells of old books.
    In a good way.

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  11. Randy C says: 429 comments

    I agree with everyone. Rebuild that porch with appropriate columns and railings, and add little nice exterior paint. Interior is amazing and to me at least, doesn’t show much in the way of structural damage. Beautiful millwork and fireplaces. What an incredible deal!

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  12. tess says: 296 comments

    Take a Google trip down Main St. to the corner of (101) Jay St. There is another one of these old gals.. She’s in much sadder shape, vine covered, windows broken out. Sad to think how much has been lost when you compare the two. Someone please restore this house before it’s also ruined.

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  13. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    I had to pause after viewing the photos just to wipe the drool off my keyboard. This house has just about everything I’d want in a Victorian and thank heavens, it hasn’t been messed with much by privious owners. In fact, this is the best unrestored Queen Anne in Indiana I’ve seen in a number of years. We would be packing for an Indiana trip right now except that we haven’t been able to sell our Fort Worth, TX Victorian yet. What makes it even more frustrating is that we have two contingency full price offers contingent on our entire block (small, only 6 lots) being available and one of the three owners on our block is a stubborn holdout. He doesn’t even live on our block but has three rent houses here. Sorry to rant, but we’ve waited and wanted to sell and relocate to the Midwest since the end of 2007 and now this wonderful house comes on the market and once again, I’ll have no choice but to pass on it. Makes me wish sometimes I were totally into Sports or outdoor camping instead of old houses.

    As for this being a kit house; not exactly, but maybe there’s a grain of truth in the claim. I do believe it very well could be a published plan design from any one of a number of house plan sources. The dates on the official listing sites are confusing…one says 1916 (completely wrong) and another, 1898, which seems about right. As for parts being shipped to the town in boxcars, I agree, but instead of being shipped in kit form, a big millwork supply order was sent in after the house parts were chosen from a factory catalog (or catalogs) and then shipped in by rail from places like Chicago or Indianapolis. Thus, the likely truth is not that far from the kit house claim but it wasn’t from Sears or Aladdin which came out with house kits a few years later.

    I won’t allow myself to think about this house much because I know someone here is probably planning a trip to Dunkirk, IN right now. My only real concern is about someone with little understanding of old houses who will buy the place and want to follow the HGTV Property Bros. approach (everything in shades of white, grey, and black) and finish it off (literally and figuratively) with IKEA Modern inside. I shouldn’t have written that because now I’ll have nightmares about it! Fantastic house here for the money, overall, I’m already envious of its next owners and hope they will restore it faithfully to its original glory.

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    • Teri says: 72 comments

      John I don’t think you have to worry about someone snatching it up…Dunkirk is a small little town not far from Muncie…..but far enough. It’s probably going to take awhile to sell. It IS fabulous on the inside…..

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Teri, You’re probably right. The Sumner House in tiny Earl Park reminded me a lot of the Dunkirk Queen Anne. (it had more great architectural details and was priced even less) I was sure it would sell in a month or two but it took over a year before someone bought it. While I love this house, I also think there’s a serious risk of dying from boredom in such a small place. However, I see that the Elm Street Brewing Co. has a “Jazz Night” coming up this Thursday so maybe its less lethargic than one might assume. To the reader (Jane) who asked about tornadoes, they do happen occasionally in the Midwestern States (like the infamous F5 that hit Xenia, Ohio) but compared to states like Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas, the occurrences are fewer. Nowadays, tornadoes even pop up in New England which formerly was pretty rare. In any case, if we had the opportunity, I’d still want to go take a look at the Dunkirk house but I hope someone who is a fan of Old House Dreams does check it out. In some places, a faded house like this which still retained so many original features would be on the market well up into the six figures. As mentioned by others, Indiana taxes tend to be the lowest among Midwestern States.I would expect winters there to be similar to Chicago’s but perhaps a little milder. I can just see this house nicely restored and again as a local landmark.

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        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1897 Queen Anne Colonial
          Cadiz, OH

          Correction: the Elm Street Brewing Company is actually in Muncie, close to Dunkirk but a much larger community with Ball State University.

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    • Zann says: 517 comments

      John, I am sorry to hear about your plans being thwarted, especially since it sounds like it’s because of someone who has a love of money, not a love of his home. I’m going to keep my fingers crossed for you and pray everything works out so that you can move on to your next dream house. After all the great information and comments you’ve left on this page, that is the least I can do. I’m sure I’m not alone in that sentiment, too.

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Thanks for the very kind words, Zann. Prayers, good thoughts, and positive energy, are always welcome. Just for clarity, the holdout on our small 6 lot block is an absentee landlord who has been offered $30 a square foot for his two lots by a developer upon which sit these three low end rentals-one of the small cottages is behind the corner house on the same lot (streetview) https://goo.gl/maps/VXuUuu9ksJx Pan around to see the other three rentals owned by the same landlord across the street.(also offered the same amount per square foot for them and declined) Technically, they are old houses, but all have endured a number of remodelings over decades of hard rental use. The irony here is that the holdout is likely to eventually capitulate and sell once property taxes begin (the block is now surrounded by brand new apartments that rent for $2,775 a month) to reflect the new development increased land values. Regrettably, by that time I may be pushing 70 and probably will not have the energy or willpower to make a cross country move. I’ve waited 10 years and counting for a sale to happen but now must wait on someone else to change their mind before we can sell and move. Sorry to delve into something of a personal nature yet it reflects the level of frustration we are feeling.

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      Te earlier date is correct. And yes it was delivered on the railroad which is why we had so many extra parts of everything in the house. Extra doors, woodwork, stained glass, tiles, winscotting. Etc. They sent extras in case anything is damaged The train track is a couple blocks north on Mainstreet. The first owners son to us about it. By the way he had a Stutz bearcat car and a racoon coat and said he usuall didnt use the doors to get in and out of the car. I wish I knew how to post pictures on here. The landscaping was magnificent, but the current owners removed most of what the garden staff had put in. It occupies and entire quarter of a city block and was like a park for my kids to play in.

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Ms. Lucas,
        Thanks for the wealth of information about this remarkable house. It remains one of my all-time favorites on this site and I sincerely wish we were closer to a sale of our Texas Victorian so that we could make a visit to Dunkirk where my spouse and I could check out this house and the town of Dunkirk. It so happens that my spouse is a fan of antique glass and over the years she’s collected many interesting pieces with most coming from the fine American made glassware of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I saw in streetview that Dunkirk has a glass museum and town library just beyond the back of this property. Given that my spouse is also something of a bookworm, the locale might be a great fit for us.

        Because old houses are a passion of mine, like the others have posted I’m curious to see any old photos which might show what is now missing. If we bought the house, I’d personally see to it that it was faithfully restored to its original appearance even to the point of building a replica carriage house/workshop where the original was located. But while we wait, perhaps someone else will be the next owner(s) and can give this fine old home the TLC it deserves. As for the origins, pure “kit” houses were rare before the early 1900’s when companies like Sears and Montgomery Ward not only sold the plans but shipped most of the materials needed to finish out a house. In the later 1890’s the published house plan field was getting crowded so it’s difficult to make an attribution at this time. I seem to recall seeing a similar design from the Scientific American magazine-Builder’s & Architect’s edition and the publisher did sell house plans for many of the homes featured in the magazine. Other trade magazines of the time did the same. I can only hope the next owner(s) will give the house the respect and care it deserves so it can still be standing a century from now. I too look forward to any old photos or additional information you might be able to share with fans of this fine period home.

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  14. Jane Maxwell says: 35 comments

    Omg…. in love with this…. Are there many tornadoes in Indiana?

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  15. Karen Abadie says: 101 comments

    Looks like a great house, tho I’d be a little concerned about water damage that shows up in the one picture. And I agree, all those great fireplaces and never used? wonder why..

    I would like to mention that in Indiana, our property taxes are pretty low compared to the rest of the country, for those of you who are thinking about buying here.

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  16. David Sweet says: 257 comments

    Has anyone else noticed the rectangular patch of dark stain on the stairway paneling?
    There was surely a radiator there. The switch to baseboard heat must be quite recent,or someone would have done something about that.

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  17. Michele says: 90 comments

    Would the original baseboard still be there behind that baseboard heating? I would want to investigate putting other type of heating in the house and get rid of what is there now.

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      The person who owned it before us took out the radiators and put in white baseboard heating over the baseboard. My family and I are going to see it soon. I want to cry as the people we sold it to removed the slate roof, and the porch posts and other things. The side posts are exactly the same at the what the front posts were.

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  18. Paul says: 28 comments

    The price is a steal for someone to swoop in and save this baby. This would be an awesome house once restored. There is so much that is original and untouched. My favorite thing is the three chandeliers in the dining room.

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  19. Beverly says: 11 comments

    There seems to be some water damage in photo 8 – upper wall meeting the ceiling…. and is that a drop ceiling? I’d want to inspect under that and see what’s going on there. I LOVE that dark tile in the bathroom too!

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      It is not dark , it is shaded blue. The picture makes it look dark. At first I thought they had painted it but now realize it is jut poor lighting.

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  20. I wonder if any of the tower rooms are usable as all of the windows seem to be without glass. That is a shame. I love the stained glass and the homeiness of this place.

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    • Linda Lucas says: 15 comments

      My children loved hiding in the tower and making terrible sounds. We had a really hard time keeping baby sitters as the children would run up one staircase and down another one. A baby sitter could be there for hours and never see one of the kids. On the second floor of the the tower we had a four horse Merry-go-round. The kids loved riding around and around with all those windows to look out.

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  21. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    If there are any roof leaks, the absence of windows actually helps to diminish the effects of wood components being saturated with water for long periods of time. That same principle was used under porches to provide ventilation and reduce “dry rot”. Of course, the roof should be dealt with first but then the windows can be repaired and insulation installed where appropriate. The tower windows are classic Queen Anne versions with a large central pane with small stained/colored panes around the sash margins. Many towered Queen Annes had these types of windows.

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  22. Susan says: 4 comments

    My husband and I had the chance to view this house on Saturday. It is even better in real person. If this house were closer to where we are looking to retire we would make an offer on it. The water damage that is seen inside seems to be from burst pipes from the hot water heating system. So that is not a serious issue. It is missing some of the slate pieces on the roof but they do have containers to collect the drips which is working so far. This house is just glorious inside. So many original details and even the original curtain rods on the ground floor. To answer the bathroom tile questions. They are a very pretty light blue and light green tile. They have not been painted, just looked dark from the photo. The incredible woodwork extends even into the kitchen and pantry. Places not usually graced with ornate trim. I want so much to make her mine and lovingly fix and restore her. I have attached a link that I hope will take you to a google photos album I made of the photos I took while there. Mostly of details. https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipNY87JysgpH9XTQxeRfz1xr5lfP4EyXBkQZxAHR

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    • RossRoss says: 2412 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Thanks, Susan!

      But the link did not work for me.

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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Thanks for the updates, Susan. This house is one of my all-time favorites on Old House Dreams. However, please have no concerns about my spouse and I buying it out from under you (or anyone else) as we’ve pretty much reached the point where I feel it’s impossible to sell our (Ft. Worth TX) home. Without a sale, we’re not going anywhere. We may be nearing the all time record length of having a house continuously on the market without finding a buyer. Our last valid offer was from a developer back in June 2008 and we deemed it inadequate which, in hindsight, it was. In the coming months, I’m going to have to make the difficult decision to take our home permanently off the market and by doing so, terminate our decade long dream of relocating to the Midwest. Not trying to be melodramatic, but some things are just not meant to be and we’ve all had to accept that sometime in our lives. I do sincerely hope this special house gets the caring new owners it deserves. Such well preserved intact homes of this kind are now far and few between.
      I tried to access the Google photos and ended up on a Google page describing problems with cookies with instructions on clearing my cache and other technical details. All I wanted to do was see the photos, not invite Google to data mine my computer hard-drive. Not actually much of an issue anyhow as I’ve long been convinced this is a very special house but the remote Dunkirk location remains challenging.

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  23. Teresa Meagle says: 1 comments

    i hope you will be pleased to know that a loving family is in the process of purchasing this house. we fell in love with the beauty and warmth. we hope to restore it on our own little by little including victorian gardening and repairing some of the things the previous owner was unable to maintain. i am hoping to be able to get the history and blueprints to use as a guide for our work.

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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Congratulations! I just want you to know that this house is really special. It is akin to finding a 1931 Stuz Bearcat sitting for 75 years in a dusty barn that is all original. Of course, it is not all original, but if documentation could be found (photos;plans) the original porch could and should be replicated. The interior is a real time capsule. I’d wager there are fewer than a half-dozen towered Queen Anne style houses as intact and unspoiled like this example in the entire state of Indiana. I’ve wondered why Indiana Landmarks hasn’t jumped in before now to make sure whomever bought it would restore it to the Secretary of the Interior’s standards for historic rehabilitation? I can only hope your idea of restoration doesn’t mean taking a Property Brothers approach. Please, I mean nothing personal towards you, but just a block away on the corner of West Jay Street is another forlorn looking towered Queen Anne (if not already demolished) that would take a quarter of a million dollars or more to return it to its original appearance provided the information existed to do so.
      The local library or Genealogical society may have information on the original family/owners. I agree the house could have been built from published plans but finding the source (dozens of planbooks were published in the 1890’s) may be challenging. I can only wish you the best as you move forward and suggest you take a long view approach; meaning that visitors to this house in 50 or 100 years will appreciate all the work you’ve down. Please pause and carefully consider making any changes that are “trendy” as this 122 year old house is timeless, classic, and an American architectural treasure.

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  24. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12208 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Back as active.

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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      I’m smiling!

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      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12208 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        I take it you mean you are hoping this holds out for you? 😀

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      • CarolynCarolyn says: 303 comments
        Grand Rapids, MI

        John, I don’t know you but I’ve actually been praying you sell your house in Texas. I would love to see someone like you get this house. It deserves you and you deserve it if for no other reason than your love and respect for the history these places represent. This is one of my favorite homes on this site and I’d snatch it up myself if I could. Good luck to you!

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  25. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    I’ve always loved towered Queen Annes. This one has a largely intact interior although the porch reconstruction would be a labor of love. I regret the original carriage house is missing although something suitable could be recreated. I do love the fact that the City library and a glass museum are nearby as my spouse and I are both bibliophiles (bookworms) and she collects antique glassware and has for many years. The slower pace of Dunkirk might be just what is needed.

    However, with all of the potential pluses, we remain stuck here in our Fort Worth Victorian now surrounded by a brand new apartment complex. We just came off a one month realtor listing which seemed very promising at first but the awaited buyer didn’t appear. So, now that I have our half acre lot all nicely mowed and landscaped, the FSBO sign goes back out this week. It’s pouring down rain here today as it is for much of the middle of the country. I bought another “Infobox” information flyer receptacle…this now makes 3 of them since we started trying to sell. Perhaps the third time’s a charm? Prayers are always appreciated no matter when or where we sell and move to. As for this special house, it truly deserves someone who will appreciate it for its historic and architectural merits and not someone who merely wants to “leave their mark” on the late 19th century house. Kelly, yes, that was what I meant although I want more for the house to end up in the hands of someone who takes a curatorial or custodial approach to this well preserved period home. Too bad Indiana Landmarks didn’t acquire this house to insure and protect its future.

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    • tcmchickietcmchickie says: 179 comments
      OHD Supporter

      TX

      As a fellow resident of the DFW area, I feel you completely! I’m sending good house selling vibes your way for the perfect offer to come your way at the perfect time! All the best luck!

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  26. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Thanks for the kind words. Last week, we actually visited this one of a kind house and spent over 2 hours looking at every corner of it. I took many exterior photos but the old Sony camera I took for interior photos (very good for taking photos in low light conditions) malfunctioned, so the almost 300 photos I took recently include very few interior shots. My main camera is a small point and shoot Cannon camera but it works minimally for interior photos. I’m just beginning to process and upload the many photos taken last week (five states in 8 days!) but as soon as the ones taken here are available, I’ll post a link to them. Without a doubt, this is one of the most intact early 1900’s homes I’ve ever been inside-only the kitchen and bathrooms are minimally updated. The original turned wood spiral curtain rods remain and odd items like electrified speaking tubes similar to the old candlestick telephones still remain. (and could still be operable) However, this house needs a ton of work both inside and out. I’ve alerted Indiana Landmarks about the fragile state of the house which I’m hoping they might acquire it, stabilize the house, and put protective preservation covenants on it. Less than 1% of old houses I’ve seen have this level of authenticity and intactness. As for selling our house, the prospects remain elusive.

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    • GearGirlGearGirl says: 202 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1909 Arts and Crafts
      Scottsdale, AZ

      How much work needs to be done on this old gal, in your opinion? Are we talking tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands? Thanks!

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      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12208 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Sorry, not something he can answer publicly although y’all are welcome to message each other and discuss it privately.

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        GearGirl, I have replied privately to your request for information about considering a rehab/restoration of this once grand old home. Should you have any additional questions, I’ll be happy to try to answer them. Good Luck!

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  27. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Hi All,
    I just got the photos taken of the Weaver House, as it is known locally, uploaded to my Flickr album collection: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157710991021596 Please keep in mind, I wasn’t out to photograph all of the “good stuff” but to document noteworthy things that might be of interest to the Indiana Landmarks Foundation-I’ve made a plea for them to rescue this amazingly intact home and to make some emergency repairs to the roof while placing preservation covenants to help preserve its incredibly intact interior. The aforementioned rare electric speaking tube device is seen next to the fusebox upstairs. The Victorians loved finials atop their Queen Anne tower domes but this one is a real knockout: (scroll up to see all of it) https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/48767507772/sizes/o/ Some minor damage is visible to the metal (likely zinc) fluted ball in the middle of the finial but it can be repaired with lead and the damage made invisible. One other extraordinary detail is seen on the back side porch-the capitals atop the wood columns also appear to be made of highly carved wood in intricate patterns. To have a master wood carver makes these out of pine as were the originals would be very expensive although substitutes made of synthetic materials poured in a mold would look the same painted. I’d be strongly tempted to buy this former community landmark myself but Dunkirk is very small and lacks a hospital that my spouse would need due to on-going health issues.

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    • rodeolthrrodeolthr says: 50 comments
      OHD Supporter

      John,
      Thank you so much for taking the time to share these photos with us. Both the house and the small community of Dunkirk seem like a great opportunity for preservation minded individuals. Did the other towered house 2 doors over (with failing vinyl siding) appear to be empty/abandoned? It must have been stunning at one time also and perhaps had a grand porch wrapping the façade?
      Kevin

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      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Sorry for the delay in replying. Dunkirk, a small northeastern Indiana town of 2,314 in a rural farming setting has long been in decline due to changing economic conditions. A century ago, Dunkirk was a thriving town with a number of busy glass factories within a regional Indiana area of glass production turning out a wide variety of glass products. The legacy of this prosperous era survives in the local Glass Museum which is community volunteer operated and charges a modest $2 per person admission. The museum-near the Weaver House-appears to be part of the local City library so the facility serves a dual purpose. Local business family, the Fuquas, own the tiny Dodge-Chrysler-Jeep dealership (the only new car dealership in town) and have recently reopened a downtown family style restaurant which we wanted to patronize but since it was after 2 PM when our tour was finished, we decided not to.

        To answer your other question about the ghostly vinyl sided Queen Anne a block to the south of the Weaver house, it appeared to have been long (years, if not a decade or longer) vacant with any work on the old house occurring a long time ago. In the close up version, you’ll notice near the doorway facing Main street that the vinyl (or aluminum?) siding actually covers over an older layer of cement/asbestos siding and finally, a small section of the original clapboards are revealed. I did not have time to look closely through the windows although there’s some evidence that perhaps some of the original house survives inside. The real estate agent who met us drove out from Muncie which is almost 22 miles away, one way. I’m not aware of any local RE agents based in Dunkirk but a person can search through the Jay County tax assessor records using an address or owner’s name: http://www.jaycounty.net/plugins/content/content.php?content.20 it would not surprise me to learn the current owner of the vacant Queen Anne doesn’t wish to put more money into the property (which was surely tenant occupied the last time it was habitable) so it might be available. Any value for the property would be based on its Main street location and likely nothing else. A newer gas station convenience store is located about another block to the south of the abandoned house-it’s one of the few signs of newer development in Dunkirk. Future prospects for the Weaver House, its vacant neighboring Queen Anne, and Dunkirk itself remain uncertain. Small towns like Dunkirk dot the entire Midwestern U.S. and some are doing better than others but very few are booming these days. Nearby Redkey, about half the population size of Dunkirk, still has an architecturally interesting downtown but a lack of more free time precluded our visit there.

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        • rodeolthrrodeolthr says: 50 comments
          OHD Supporter

          I must wonder if the library/museum houses any collections of vintage photos. I did do some research into Dunkirk and it’s fascinating to know that Indiana Glass came from here. Having been in the restaurant industry, their glass products were well known. It’s intriguing to me, when doing “Google tours” of small towns, that some of them seem to be thriving, while others are practically ghost towns. The one common denominator for those “thriving” communities seems to be the embrace/understanding of their historic structures and the draw the they can have. Though perhaps that is merely a chicken/egg scenario. It really doesn’t take a lot though to set a small town on the road to recovery. It’s a shame that the businesses that are lying on the outskirts (even the Family Dollar) weren’t asked to set up shop in some of the extant buildings on main street. A small coffee shop and perhaps a café could also bring some people in. Maybe there’s someone yearning to start up a microbrewery and just looking for the right space.
          Kevin

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          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1897 Queen Anne Colonial
            Cadiz, OH

            Hi Kevin,
            It appears that the glass museum focuses almost exclusively on the glass making legacy of Dunkirk. However, Jay County has a historical and genealogical society in nearby Portland, IN: https://www.jaycountyhistory.org/ There’s a fair chance something about the Weavers and/or their home remains in their archives. The agent showed us a photo of the Weaver daughter that appeared to date from the early years of this house. The source of this old photo might have more showing the house although enough remains for a faithful restoration. I concur with you about Dunkirk’s potential. Dunkirk has an annual glass Days festival every year. The 54th annual festival is slated for May 27-30, 2020 and it has a Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/dunkirkglassdays/ If somehow the Weaver house had been feasible for us, it was my intent to see if I could have also acquired the nearby towered Queen Anne a block to the South and then tried to rehab it to its original appearance. A labor of love, for sure, but when you buy an old house you are buying the community its placed in as well.

            Entertainment for residents in Dunkirk appears to be traveling almost 21 miles to Muncie for suitable entertainment venues. The right individual could indeed create something like a microbrewery and small club/pub/ gathering place for locals and I’m sure it would be very popular. If Dunkirk had a large number of old homes to rehab then it might draw old house enthusiasts to the town, However, there’s only one Weaver House and there’s another well maintained Colonial Revival/Queen Anne isolated on a side street at 207 South Broad: https://goo.gl/maps/ZjdBDWdyLruoPQWRA as well as a small number of noteworthy homes scattered about town like this rare late Gothic Revival style home: https://goo.gl/maps/DrWXPEWktGnPZojb6 It’s certainly not a pure or formal example of the style but the window trim is decidedly Gothic.

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            • rodeolthrrodeolthr says: 50 comments
              OHD Supporter

              John,
              Did you by chance notice this? https://goo.gl/maps/KYmZ5UjVtBFnfexU7 I can only assume that it belonged to the same person.

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              • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1897 Queen Anne Colonial
                Cadiz, OH

                You have a sharp eye, Kevin. The intersection of East/West Commerce street and Main is the center of Dunkirk’s small downtown so when the Weaver Building was constructed, it was at a prestigious location. The extant Weaver building is marred by a lower floor remodeling at some time in the recent past. There may still be some elements of the original facade behind the bricks or, if not, perhaps a period photo survives (likely) that would show what this building originally looked like. Dunkirk appears to be one of those communities that could greatly benefit from joining the National Trust sponsored Main Street program: https://www.mainstreet.org/about-us In the past, I believe outright grants were available to help owners of historic buildings restore the historic facades they once had. However, in the current tight budgetary environment, the historic building owner would need to contact the program’s offices to see what might still available. Historic Preservation has suffered from a lack of adequate funding for decades. The zenith of support for preservation occurred during the late 1970’s (as part of the country’s bicentennial celebration) until the late 1980’s. I feel it’s highly unlikely that any wealthy private individual or organization would come to a sleepy town like Dunkirk and make a large investment towards the town’s revitalization. That said, sometimes miracles do happen.

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  28. EileenMEileenM says: 287 comments
    Camillus, NY

    This is classic “don’t judge a book by its cover”.

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  29. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12208 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    New agent, new listing photos. Updated and moved to the front page. Comments above are older and may reference the old listing photos.

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  30. GearGirlGearGirl says: 202 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1909 Arts and Crafts
    Scottsdale, AZ

    This house is taunting me… I wish they’d included pics of the detached garage.

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  31. RossRoss says: 2412 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    I did a blog post, in part, about the lost porch of this FABULOUS house, and how it could be accurately recreated:

    https://restoringross.com/a-column-milestone/

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  32. CarolynCarolyn says: 303 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    I am so in love with this place. The new pictures just make me want it more. This is the first time I’ve noticed the baseboard heaters. They would have to go. Can you / is it feasible to put radiators back in?

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  33. This house is incredible. Seriously in love with it!! I love that previous owners commented about the kids playing in the attic cause when I got to that last attic photo I immediately thought “what a PERFECT playroom!”.

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  34. RosewaterRosewater says: 7266 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Shame it hasn’t sold: but great new pix! Good job agent.

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  35. celesteceleste says: 56 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Argh! Where are the photos of the supposedly fabulous bathrooms several people mentioned above, I wonder? I’m desperate, especially after the teasing partial peep of the green one…

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  36. beckybecky says: 102 comments
    OHD Supporter

    bass lake, CA

    John, it is quite clear you are smitten with this house and I don’t blame you as I can’t take my eyes off all that beautiful unscathed fretwork! Just beautiful! I am sorry you are going through issues trying to get your home sold. It sounds like someone very greedy is putting a monkey wrench in the equation! My mother owned a home that was extremely vintage and the forestry service wanted the land so they told her that since a survey from 1909 was “incorrect” that 11″ of the house was actually on government land, so my step father ripped the entire side of the house off (it was two stories) and corrected the issue. Shortly after that, they said they would give her less than half of what she paid and to take it or leave it. She spent more time in court than I can remember but in the end, as ALWAYS the government won. They said they were going to tear down her home as well as the 5 other neighbors’ homes to build a PARKING LOT. She stripped the home of all the vintage pieces and took them with her and moved. They sent her a letter 6 months later and said they wanted the French doors and the front door (which was purchased at a swap meet in San Francisco) was from an old 1908 bank. She never returned them. All the homes have been torn down, and a few years back I revisited the area and to this day there is nothing there… no parking lot, no homes, just overgrowth. Her heart was heavy for a very long time because this was the first home she purchased on her own working 2 jobs and raising 3 children. She was so proud of the hard work she had put into this gem! My mother is no longer with us and it has been so long I don’t know what ever happened to those French doors or the front door. I didn’t mean to rant on but I do feel your pain and sincerely hope that a miracle is in store for you as you deserve it! I have seen this home before just on this site, but fell in love with it too. I did spend one year in that state (Warsaw) and was more than ecstatic leaving! May you find this house someday to be yours or one like it that is as beautiful as this one!

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  37. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Thanks Becky. I suppose its a good thing that we are (our small 6 lot sized block) surrounded by a new privately owned luxury apartment complex so eminent domain action is unlikely by any governmental agency. In fact, we’ve had potential buyers (developers) in more recent years but they need the entire block (still only 60,000 sq. feet in total) for any proposed projects. One of the block’s 3 property owners is asking more than a king’s ransom ($1.2 million each) for his two 10,000 sq. foot lots with shabby rentals. They might sell at that price say, around the year 2129. Not many single family home buyers want an old house right next to new luxury apartments so here we are stuck in our situation. After trying and coming close to a sale several times in the past dozen years, I’m at the point where I put all of this in the Good Lord’s hands as a matter of faith. A couple of formerly low end duplexes across the street have fetched around $400K in recent weeks and are on tiny lots so never say never is probably valid here. As for prospective future homes, as much as I love the Weaver house it would be more than just a labor of love for us. Besides, my spouse has chronic health problems and must live in an area where good healthcare services are available. Dunkirk services are inadequate although for a town its size, its trying hard to stay viable. The Weaver house needs a special kind of buyer, preferably younger who can restore the Weaver house and help the community of Dunkirk to grow. Small towns across the country are struggling these days but some do better than others. We can only hope and pray for the best with the Weaver House and Dunkirk itself. So sad to hear of your Mother’s plight and ordeals with her home.

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  38. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    By the way, that spiral carved rod in photo no. 5 from the top is actually a curtain rod, (it looked period correct and original to me-probably was above the parlor windows) and I mentioned to the agent to please not discard it. I said the same about the deteriorated (but helpful for a restoration) porch pediment that is sitting up on the porch. Wish I could see what the exterior looked like when the house was newer and still had the original porch.

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  39. GearGirlGearGirl says: 202 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1909 Arts and Crafts
    Scottsdale, AZ

    *sigh* spoke with the listing agent, someone gets this beauty. I hope they treat her right.

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  40. GearGirlGearGirl says: 202 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1909 Arts and Crafts
    Scottsdale, AZ

    Sold for $45,500…. wowsers!!

    I hope the new owner finds this posting and gives us pics of what they do with the exterior!

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    • TonykTonyk says: 1 comments

      We have just started renovation starting with roof but will be touching almost every aspect of the home and grounds. Exterior and plumbing/electrical/HVAC are starting soon. Already working with stained glass craftsman. Will provide pics along the way and should have social media and website up within next few months.

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      • Hi,
        Any update on the renovation?

        Beautiful house. Too bad I didn’t see the listing last fall.

        Any chance the intent is to flip and we will see her back on the market again sometime soon, or will this be the buyers long term residence?

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  41. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5533 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    The low selling price does not surprise me. Given the amount of restoration work it requires I don’t consider the under $50K price as much of a bargain. I expect a foundation to attic renovation could run as much at $250K or more. That would make this house post renovation one of the most expensive houses in Dunkirk. I expect any comprehensive restoration/renovation could take a couple of years-a bit less if crews are hired for specific tasks. It’s one of the more challenging old houses I’ve seen in a while. I wish the new owners the best as they go forward and like you, I’d love to see the finished results.

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  42. The builder of the home John Will Weaver, who died in 1912 was married to Mary Jane “Jennie” Maitlen, who was the daughter of James Coleman Maitlen, who died in the Civil War. Jennie was also my great great grandfathers first cousin.

    John Will Weavers name is still on the large brick building down the street where he operated a store.

    Their daughter Charm Weaver, maimed Frank J McKinney of the Atlantic one time world famous McKinney Brothers department store.

    Franks grandmother was also a Maitlen. He and Charm were 2nd cousins. 1x removed. Not uncommon for back then.

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