c. 1850 – Pantego, NC

Details below are from August 2019, sold status has not been verified.
To verify, check the listing links below.

Added to OHD on 8/11/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   25 Comments
Off Market / Archived

25915 Us Highway 264 E, Pantego, NC 27860

Map: Street

  • $125,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 2788 Sq Ft
  • 1.73 Ac.
Historical home built in 1850 has tons of charm in every room wooden plank flooring, updated kitchen, thermal windows, and comes with 1.73 acres. The house includes 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths. The inviting wrap around porch perfect for swing and a cool beverage. New downstairs HVAC unit. Minutes away from water access. Has large two car detached car port, gazebo, large workshop/barn, and chicken coop. Yard has established trees and bushes full of colors. This house is a must see!!
Contact Information
Ann Johnson, Keller Williams Realty
(252) 355-6000
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region:
Period & Associated Styles: ,
Features: , | Misc:

25 Comments on c. 1850 – Pantego, NC

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11885 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    c. 1850, if you took away the porch and bay addition, probably added closer to 1900, I’m betting this started as a Greek Revival. I see a few interior details that are left from that date although the photos are a bit hard to see much. If you look on the street view, sits on a pretty fenced lot. I really love this one despite the photos not showing the interior as fully as they could.

    40
  2. GearGirlGearGirl says: 205 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1909 Victorian
    Scottsdale, AZ

    I picture much brighter colors on this one!

    4
  3. Tom says: 21 comments

    I agree that the bay and the mantles really suggest late 1800s.

    After this winter eastern NC is looking pretty good!

    14
  4. MJGMJG says: 2169 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    This is a case where the shutters originally would have been on all of the bay windows and overlapped. Now their functionality doens’t make visual sense.

    6
    • CharlestonJohn says: 1091 comments

      Assuming the bay windows had shutters, they would have been set up something like this:
      https://www.oldhouseguy.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/wide-window-shutters.jpg

      I think the Victorianization that occurred in the late 19th century likely did include overlapping bay window shutters to balance with the left side bay that appears to still feature Greek Revival details. The corner pilasters, wide frieze boards, gable returns, and center stair hall plan all indicate the Greek Revival buried under a Queen Anne makeover that Kelly described.

      7
      • MJGMJG says: 2169 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        Agreed. Thanks for the visual to my comment. 🙂

        I did read several books that advise against shutters on houses. But the practice clearly continues into the turn of the century.

        3
        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 379 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          Why do people advise against shutters? I deliberately put functional shutters on my 1853 Italianate so I could leave the windows open even if there was a forecast for rain while I was away at work so I wouldn’t have to worry about it. I’m not a big fan of air-conditioning and the shutters really block out the sun in summer so you can leave the windows open. Whenever possibly, I avoid potential overlapping by not getting symmetrical shutters. I get variable sizes for any given window (where purely symmetrical shutters won’t work so there are no overlaps but I get maximal coverage for the windows); it actually makes the house look more interesting that way, in my opinion, since nobody else I know does it. I think they are one of the most needlessly discarded inventions in house design and really would like to know why some people object to them because I honestly don’t see them doing any harm and think they add a lot to climate control while saving energy.

          21
          • MJGMJG says: 2169 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            Actually I’m talking late 19th century books that were beginning to advise against shutters and state they are deemed unnecessary with all the interior modern conveniences. I’ll try and look up some of the books and architectural references and get to you

            I love working shutters. I had some in my dining room that were completely usable that I restored in my old house that I have since sold.

            7
          • MJGMJG says: 2169 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            https://archive.org/details/scientificameric00unse/page/91

            Here is one reference I found for you. Its from Scientific America October 1887 edition. Its titled Blinds. (what we call shutters)

            The writer beefs about them stating they are “only dust collectors on the slats” for inside blinds but goes onto say “Outside blinds …preclude the use of a storm sash, and in this northern latitude the storm sash has proved to be an economy as well as a comfort. It is time the blind was banished and certainly is being from all houses of the better class. Only builders of hideous white houses cling to them affectionately and this class is rapidly being narrowed down to country towns and farms.”

            This is only one reference. There are many more. Though again, like any time, you have lovers and haters of things. But you do see some homes being built without outside blinds/shutter in the period. Makes me wonder what their school of thought was when building.

            2
    • FlaOHDJunkieFlaOHDJunkie says: 160 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1902 FL

      Given the location of this house, in a hurricane prone area, there is a possibility that those are actually working shutters I seem to see an indication of hinges, the single ones on the bays could be double fold so would actually cover the window if needed, we have that type here in Florida

      13
      • MJGMJG says: 2169 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        I personally don’t think so. These look like old shutter blinds. They also don’t look like they bifold. There are also hinges where the over lapping shutter was removed as well. So if you close them they won’t fully cover the window. But you are correct. I do see some bifold shutters in photos too from the time. So the possibility for the period but overlapping was very common. Even though some modernists at the time started discouraging them all together.

        5
  5. Denise Lynn says: 202 comments

    What a charming, old-fashioned home!

    12
  6. becky martin says: 102 comments

    These pics aren’t very clear so am I seeing textured ceilings or popcorn? Not liking the wallpaper either, but it’s a cute home overall!

    3
  7. Those floors are wonderful, but that’s a lot of white paint everywhere.

    6
  8. Leslie says: 2 comments

    Many more pics at the realtor’s site. What a gorgeous house!!

    4
  9. DaveZ says: 21 comments

    Yep, there is a Greek house in there. If you (pretend to) take off the front bay, then you have a classic Greek 5 bay. Check out the corner pilasters on the left side. Greek it is!

    5
  10. Brendalisa says: 6 comments

    Very well kept home for its age
    Really Pretty!

    4
  11. Thomas McLean says: 30 comments

    Nice black sashes and shutters. The trim stays white, and I would make the siding and body a really nice light yellow…

    1
  12. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11885 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Lower price and updated listing photos, updated on OHD and moved to the front page. Comments above may be older.

    5
  13. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5356 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    A fairly thorough job was done in the 1890’s to update the house with a wrap around porch and Queen Anne style chamfered cornered front gable. In photo number 3 from the top there’s evidence of an earlier, probably Greek Revival gable with returned ends. The side glass lights at the entry have Gothic style etched glass with stylized crosses. In summary, the late Victorian remodelers did an excellent job of combining a mid-19th century house with the popular 1890’s Queen Anne style.

    5
  14. JoAnnJoAnn says: 119 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1903 Melissa, TX

    I am not a wallpaper fan in general but that peacock wallpaper is gorgeous. Not old but still very nice.

    3
  15. Tn womanTn woman says: 45 comments
    1972 ranch
    TN

    I agree on the peacock wallpaper.I like the shutters and over all the house is great.I would live there and love every minute.

    5
  16. GearGirlGearGirl says: 205 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1909 Victorian
    Scottsdale, AZ

    This is showing as off market now? Did they accept an offer?

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11885 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Just an MLS bump. Sometimes a home will show on market one day, the next off, the next back on. I can’t say if it’s under offer but it’s showing active online.

      1
  17. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 710 comments

    Sweet house! So charming! Would move in tomorrow!

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