1883 Italianate – Madison, OH

Added to OHD on 7/5/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   20 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
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7125 Middle Ridge Rd, Madison, OH 44057

Map: Street

  • $189,900
  • 7 Bed
  • 3 Bath
  • 4922 Sq Ft
  • 5.74 Ac.
Here is a piece of history. Large brick home built in the 1800's. Kitchen, Parlor, Bedroom on main floor and 4/5 others on the second level. The solid woodwork throughout is original, as well as the grand staircase upon entry of the home, All wood floors, Pantry off kitchen and a little breakfast nook. Balcony off 2nd floor bedroom. Dining room and living room fixtures were originally gas converted to electric. New roof, This home still has original feel, the plaster curved walls, push button light switches, so much character. Maids quarters with bath and closet on second floor with private access from kitchen. Full walkout basement. Third story is accessible and rooftop for exceptional views. Too much here to list, Must see. Five + acres with 2 story barn, and 2 bedroom cottage on the property for the caretaker.
Contact Information
Elizabeth Sill, RE/MAX Innovations
(440) 428-8803
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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20 Comments on 1883 Italianate – Madison, OH

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  1. DJZDJZ says: 211 comments
    1947 cape cod
    Glen Burnie, MD

    OH this house is CUTE! Aside from some paint colors and wallpaper removal, and a kitchen reconfiguration, this house is perfect!

    7
  2. MichaelMichael says: 2639 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    Some of the pictures not so well taken but the house looks to be a nice house with some great original details.

    I love some of the light fixtures, particularly the one over the stairs!

    5
    • MJGMJG says: 2023 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Cool house. Do you think the newels and or whole staircase was updated after the turn of the century? Doens’t look anything like you’d see in 1880s. As well as the front door. The front door was on a house I rented from 1930.

      7
      • MichaelMichael says: 2639 comments
        1979 That 70's show
        Otis Orchards, WA

        I can see your point. It doesn’t look like the typical staircase you would expect to see in an italianate victorianof that time period. That said, people of this time period were known for coloring outside the lines, as it were. The stairs look like something I would see just after the turn of the century, as you stated. The front door, even after that. It has a craftsman look to it. If it was my house, I would try to find an appropriate front door, more period correct. The stairs, not so much as the cost would be prohibitive!

        2
        • MJGMJG says: 2023 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          Hi Michael. Coloring outside the lines? Are you referring to the paint job outside?

          1
          • MichaelMichael says: 2639 comments
            1979 That 70's show
            Otis Orchards, WA

            I was referring to the fact that while owners of these fine homes of this time period usually followed typical details you would expect to see on the style of house they were building, some strayed outside the norm and mixed details seen in different styles. We have all seen that odd house that is difficult to categorize as a result of this, although it isn’t common!

            • MJGMJG says: 2023 comments
              OHD Supporter

              CT

              I see what you mean now. I totally agree. I’ve see homes where that is the case. But in the case if the age and time if this house I don’t think personally they selected this stairway and door because that style wasn’t even invented yet. Unless someone there did. 🙂
              I saw a floor plan where the back stairs came into the formal dining room. Now that’s something I don’t see in the plans. I usually see them come into the kitchen, a hall or even butlers pantry.

            • sae43351sae43351 says: 23 comments
              1875 Converted Italianate
              Upper Sandusky, OH

              Our house is like that, mix of Victorian, Craftsman, and classical/Colonial Revival details. When they redid the house in 1902 seems anything went, and they spent a ton of money doing it, more than they could have built a new house for. They put on the longest veranda in town to boot!

              Scott

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5454 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        MJG, I’m in agreement with your comments and observations. Not surprising to see later updates as people were as style conscious then as they are today. I appreciate the photo showing what appear to be sliding/pocket doors with rounded tops. These predate the mass produced factory catalog versions that became so popular in the 1890’s. I’ve seen rounded doors of this kind in houses built in the 1860’s, usually in higher end homes. Did you notice the old rotary wall switch? That predates the later push button (often with a mother of pearl inlay) switches that were so popular in the 1920’s to 1940’s. If the house were mine, I think I would choose an 1880’s color palette for the exterior but otherwise, would live with any later updates throughout the house.

        4
        • MJGMJG says: 2023 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          Yeah it’s fun to date the updates. I’d replace the front door. Id live with the stairs. Unless I came into enough money or a great find to replace it with a more fitting style. I do love, LOVE!, 1880s stair balustrade so much. Especially substantial designs.
          I agree about that door. I loved seeing that.
          I sure did notice that switch. The light switch is like one that still worked in my basement of the house I sold. I’ve also seen early gas light electrical switches that resemble the push button switches but were installed sideways. https://archive.org/details/IllustratedCatalogueAndPriceListOfEverythingElectrical/page/n97 or
          https://archive.org/details/IllustratedCatalogueAndPriceListOfEverythingElectrical/page/n107

          I agree that you see the vertical mother of pearl topped switches abundantly in the 20s and 30s.
          https://archive.org/details/EdisonCoCCA20310/page/n99 Have you seen these early electric chandeliers from 1883? Amazing! A bouquet of lightbulbs ? How cool is that. And the aesthetic movement influence on these early lights is beautiful. Love this idea, a chandelier mocking a flower basket of lit bulbs. https://archive.org/details/EdisonCoCCA20310/page/n132

          3
          • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1850 Italianate, classical
            New Haven, CT

            You found some great illustrations there!
            I can see how logical it was for inventors like Edison or others to simply think about replacing electricity lines for gas and using the gas turn-on key to turn the electricity on or off on pre-existing gasoliers that had electric bulbs and their necessary sockets added to them. This actually made much more sense than trying to create whole new mechanisms for accommodating electricity and light bulbs if the old gasoliers could do the job. And certainly it encouraged retrofitting gasoliers for electricity, which saved a lot of resources and was probably most amenable to most people’s preferences. But eventually styles changed, just as they had with gasoliers over times, and inventors and designers undoubtedly decided not to limit their new ideas about electrical lighting devices to conform to a prior technology. The same thing happened when you think about the development of the automobile. First, cars were literally “horseless carriages” in that they were simply retrofitted buggies with an engine to propel the vehicle and the steering wheel (originally, just a curved stick attached to the axle of the buggy) replacing the implements needed to attach horses to the buggies and the reins attached to the horses. Trunks, which on early cars, were the trunks that people had attached to their buggies and which were held in place by leather straps (just as the folding hoods of some early cars were initially secured in place by leather straps when the car was being driven) were ultimately replaced by trunks that were structurally incorporated into automobiles as we know them today, which protected their contents from the elements.

        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          The light fixtures are an interesting menagerie reflecting different periods. Many appear to be from the early 20th Century and were solely electrical from the beginning, including the one over the stairs, whereas the gasolier that was converted to electricity shown in front of the double pocket doors appears to be the only light fixture that I could detect in the photos that appears original to the house.

          1
        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          John–Thanks for identifying what the lightswitch was–I wouldn’t have known otherwise. I also agree with you regarding the colors of the paints on the exterior of the house. The almost turquoise blue seems particularly inconsistent with the period of the house, tho none present seems particularly on target to the period of the house. It sort of looked to me like maybe the house was painted this way as an act of patriotism, but that the blue was just a bit off. Then I noticed the colors seemed to entirely match the small sign (intentionally or not) in front of the house, which decidedly looks like it’s utilizing the colors of the American flag in its design (that particular crest-like emblem derives from George Waswhington’s ancestors’ crest or coat of arms in England). Looks to me like that sign may possibly be from the security company utilized to protect the house and is there to announce that any would-be burglars should pass this one by and go on to a house that is not as well defended.

          1
  3. BethanyBethany says: 3511 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1983 White elephant
    Escondido, CA

    I love the signature Italianate window style so much. What is the dial/switch in the close-up photo? It doesn’t look like a light switch or a call bell.

    1
    • MJGMJG says: 2023 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      That’s an early electric light switch.

      1
    • sae43351sae43351 says: 23 comments
      1875 Converted Italianate
      Upper Sandusky, OH

      Rotary light switch. Our house had probably half a dozen when I bought it in the 1990s. I removed them as they were all surface mount (naturally) and some did not look too safe. I kept them all, just ran across a couple of them a few days ago.

      Scott

  4. AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 386 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1850 Italianate, classical
    New Haven, CT

    I was a bit surprised by the architect or builder’s decision to put a rectangular-shaped door on each level of the two-story verandah to the right side of the main entrance of the house. These are the only non-curved bays in the whole front facade of the original house and tend to throw off the symmetry of the house a bit, at least IMO. While I can see that a door would have been an easier way to access the verandahs than going through a floor-to-ceiling window, most architects of houses like this would have tried to have the windows slide higher up into the wall above or would have utilized doors with rounded tops that matched the appearance of the windows (rounded French doors in both windows would have solved the problem completely, but perhaps they were too expensive). Interesting that someone decided to surrender aesthetics to convenience in this way, particularly on the primary facade of the house, but I guess every generations has those who prefer functionality to appearances, tho this is certainly not what the Victorians were known for…

    1
  5. Barbara VBarbara V says: 1007 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    How I love a period house that isn’t afraid to show it’s age! The lighting fixtures are just beautiful, and the later, albeit pre-war, modifications merely add to the charm…

    2

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