c. 1870 Italianate/Gothic Revival – Paris, KY

Added to OHD on 6/24/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   41 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
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National Register

151 Duncan Ave, Paris, KY 40361

Map: Street

  • $248,000
  • 5 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 3860 Sq Ft
  • 0.6 Ac.
1877 was the last time this home was offered on the market & now is your chance to be apart of the next chapter. This beautiful Italianate home w/ Gothic Revival characteristics was built prior to 1870. This home belonged to U.S. Senator Virgil Chapman & visitors to this home include U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson while a Senator & Vice President Alben Barkley. Upon entry, you are welcomed by a 29 ft. entry hall allowing great flow. Tall ceilings & hardwood flooring throughout. Main level boast living room, master suite, formal dining & kitchen w/ separate utility/mud room. 2nd level features 4 large bedrooms & study w/ built ins. Extensive trim, hand carved moldings & arched entry ways. The grounds are equally impressive w/ mature trees & room to entertain or soak up the shade. Garden Club of KY is short walk/bike/car ride one street over and home is located 2 blocks from downtown shops/restaurants. Duncan Ave. is on the National Historic Register. Estate Selling as-is. Call today!
Contact Information
Kim Soper, Better Homes & Gardens
859-509-8008
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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41 Comments on c. 1870 Italianate/Gothic Revival – Paris, KY

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  1. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5535 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Good to see this extraordinary house as a regular post. I’ve already almost exhausted my vocabulary of superlatives commenting on the house so I can only hope it ends up in the hands of a preservation minded buyer. Modernizing this house would be a tragedy. With some minor work, it could be a museum house because its so intact inside and out. The mansion is also in a neighborhood of fine period homes so from a perservationist’s standpoint, it doesn’t get much better than this. The icing on the cake is the modest asking price. Listing says it was last on the market in 1877 which is itself almost unbelievable. My best wishes to the next owner(s).

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  2. JimHJimH says: 5380 comments
    OHD Supporter

    I remember this wonderful house on Streetview when Kelly posted one of the neighbors. Looks great in the old photo with the iron fence and without the overgrown shrubs.

    Down the street to the right are 4 matching homes built as a parsonage and homes for 3 sisters, all thought to have also been designed by the unknown architect of this house.
    https://goo.gl/maps/RrZx4Ze3rZAnzSrt5

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    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Thanks for pointing this out–It’s always nice to see one house and get a bunch of others for free!

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  3. ScottScott says: 349 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    Thanks for putting this on the main page, Kelly! Each time I look at this listing I feel like Homer Simpson when he gets too excited for words.

    Like John, I hope that this home ends up in the hands of an owner who will do sensitive changes without Chip and Joanna-ing the place. I’ve been trying to convince my wife to relocate to Kentucky so I can take on this house but so far I’ve been unsuccessful. Something about the kids and family and school and work and money. . .

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  4. AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1850 Italianate, classical
    New Haven, CT

    Totally agree with John. The dark shadows on the walls where pictures once hung certainly suggest that the house was in the possession of just one family for a very long time. I saw a couple of places where it looked liked second floor ceilings had stains from leaks above them but hopefully the necessary repairs have been made to the roof. I was a little less certain about evidence of Gothic detailing, but I know this issue was presented as there being only a suggestion of same. What I saw were overwhelmingly Rococo Revival elements (and hence, by association, Italianate) and details, with possibly the following exceptions: (1) one overmantel mirror which I would classify as more Renaissance Revival than Gothic since the truest Renaissance Revival design elements followed the Rococo Revival/Italianate period stylistically; this mantel was almost undoubtedly brought in by the second owning family and was not original to the house. I would think that all the original overmantel mirrors were likely heavily gilt and curved Rococo Revival examples; (2) the porch, where quatrefoil-like elements can be seen, although the brackets and other stylistic elements are overwhelmingly more Italianate; and, (3) the one bedroom mantel that is less clearly classically Rococo Revival but far from what I’d label as Gothic Revival as it has no truly Gothic Revival elements that I can ascertain. The primary Gothic Revival-looking element to me is the spike over the rounded, central window on the second floor, reminiscent of Gothic Revival spires and spikes on cathedrals. However, virtually all Italianate houses’ belvederes, cupolas or lanterns (or whatever you want to call them) as well as full-blown Italianate towers were capped by such devices originally (almost all were subsequently destroyed by the elements years ago and were not replaced, which is why you very rarely see them today except in very old photographs). This is what I suspect this piece is inspired by in the absence of the house having a belevedere or a tower, as might otherwise haven been expected of so grand a mansion of fundamentally Italianate design.
    But I know we all tend to interpret such stylistic elements differently, so I won’t insist that this house doesn’t have any Gothic Revival elements. I think such rigidity to one’s own personal and subjective interpretation is unfounded and only gets people into senseless arguments that go nowhere and can create more oppositional-defiant thinking amongst some of the parties involved once such debates get started. I’ll certainly include myself in the later category of people, which is why I will concede the point that we all see and interpret potentially ambiguous things differently and that there is no “absolute” or one definitely correct answer in any potentially ambiguous situation. But, if others see Gothic Revival elements that I’ve missed (and I feel quite sure that this is the case), I’d greatly appreciate having them pointed out to me so I’ll be more likely to see them the next time. I know our debates about such matters are all in the sake of good intellectual fun and conversation, but they sometimes seem almost to border on needlessly polarizing. Which I hope i’m not engendering myself with my comments!
    The final thing this house reminded me of has to do with the issue of plumbing that was added to houses such as this one after they were built. My 1852 Italianate has 2 bathrooms, both of which open off relatively “public” room or heavily-trafficked parts of the house–ie, rooms where other people might be expected to be found, particularly in the days when middle class houses often had staff members working in them. In my house, the downstairs bath was added directly off the kitchen (which was originally a large bedroom, but it was converted into the kitchen when the kitchen was moved up to the first floor of the house from the basement c 1880 and additional bedrooms were created upstairs). The second floor bathroom opens directly off the second floor sitting room. Ideally, IMO, bathrooms should be off hallways or in parts of bedroom suites as this creates more privacy than their being off very public or heavily-used rooms. Knowing that the posted house has a master bedroom suite on the first floor, I certainly hope the bathroom seen in the photos (10 and 11) is attached to that bedroom, and not a parlor, dining room, library or other “public” room. I strongly suspect that it is the case and wish that my house was similarly well-thought out. I’d have preferred that the entrance to the first floor bathroom had been put into the back stairwell which is right next door to it in it own contained space as even that would have created more privacy than having to access the bathroom directly through the kitchen. The same thing could have been done for the second floor bathroom since it also is right next door to the contained back stairway and could have been accessed through it as well on the 2nd floor landing. I’ve considered reconfiguring the rooms accordingly, but the expense involved in moving both plumbing and now indoor heating elements around to accommodate it just doesn’t seem to justify the expense until I hit the lottery since I’m the sole occupant of the house. But if and when I hit the lottery, the change will definitely occur!

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    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Sorry–the spike is above the 3rd floor central window, not the second. The comment from “Hi”, which appeared while I was writing my too-long epistle, makes me think of this house as perhaps predominantly Italianate and perhaps secondarily more Second Empire, despite a mansard roof, which it does feel like it should have. I got too focused on the Gothic Revival issue that I think I failed to see that possibility more clearly. On, the costs of obsessive thinking… and missing the woods for the trees!
      Also, just noticed the window hoods over the first floor windows do look Gothic Revival in that they are drip-style rather than rounded as is the coursing around the 2nd floor windows and their hoods.

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    • JimHJimH says: 5380 comments
      OHD Supporter

      My feeling when looking at the older photo of the front façade was that the overall character of the porch, and also the “spire”, is quite different from the usual Italianate of ~1870, by which date this house was built. It’s at least possible that these elements were added in an update about a decade later by the 2nd owner. Often this type of sawn ornament is referred to as Carpenter Gothic regardless of its actual design and perhaps that’s what they’re referring to in the description.
      It’s interesting that the 4 other houses I mentioned were all built 1880-82 and have the same combination of Italianate architecture and sawn decoration.

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      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        I definitely see what you’re saying about the old exterior photos of the house. I got preoccupied, I think, with all the arches that characterize the exterior of the house, the paired, slim double windows with arched tops, the brackets under the wide, overhanging eaves, and the fact that the interior was so stereotypically Rococo Revival as most 1st generation Italianates were. But you and others are right, this house, for all its Italianate stylistic elements, is clearly not stereotypicaly Italianate when simply looked at as a whole house rather than as disassembled parts. More and more, I see it as an unmansarded Second Empire, but realize I should give up on trying to classify it and just acknowledge it’s too eclectic and unusual to fall neatly into any one stylistic category. And maybe that’s exactly what makes it so surprising and interesting to look at!

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    • DianeEGDianeEG says: 569 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1896 Farmhouse W/Swedish roots
      Rural, IL

      Your plumbing comments apply to my home which had no inside bathrooms when built. The downstairs bathroom opens off the dining room. All good and fine for the family. Totally inappropriate for visitors especially at a party. I finally started tacking a little note to the door asking folks to use the upstairs bathroom. Otherwise as far as sounds and odors, even with the exhaust fan, it’s like inviting everyone to your business and not in a good way.

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      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        Glad to know I’m not the only person who is bothered by this shortcoming in a seemingly “improved upon” house! I’m just surprised by the fact that the people doing the improving did not figure this out beforehand, but I guess the answer is simply that they were not accustomed to indoor sanitation to begin with and could not be expected to be aware of the potential or unintended consequences of where they chose to put the doors to access it.

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    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5535 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      A.J.,
      One reason I keep referring to Samuel Sloan is due to his versatility for combining different styles in the 1850’s. Sloan was slightly ahead of his time when he published the two volume influential MODEL ARCHITECT plan books in 1852, at a time when in many areas of the country the Greek Revival style was still popular. Fortunately, I found Sloan’s two volume set available on the Internet Archive and suggest if you have time, take a look at the designs: Vol. I, https://archive.org/details/modelarchitectse01sloa and Vol II, https://archive.org/details/modelarchitectse02sloa Sloan is best known for his unfinished Moorish Octagon “Longwood” or Nutt’s Folly mansion in Natchez, MS which had its construction interrupted by the outbreak of the Civil War. By some small miracle, it sat for many years abandoned and unfinished with even the tradesmens’ tools left behind because the northern based carpenters fled to the north when hostilities broke out. The design for Moorish Longwood is prominently featured in Volume II of MODEL ARCHITECT.

      The architect for this Italianate (with a few Gothic Revival details) house may very well not be Sloan but I believe that Sloan was a strong influence. Assuming 1865 is accurate, there were a number of other architects at that time with published designs. The mansard Second Empire style was taking off around that time but this design looks older, perhaps from the late 1850’s when formal Italianates were popping up around the country. I enjoyed reading your comments and concur that there’s room for civil discussions about the architectural merits of homes posted on these pages. I learn new things all of the time; hopefully, at a faster pace than I forget them.

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      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        Thanks for the reference to Samuel Sloan. I’m not at home in CT where I think I have copies of his 2 books, so its nice to know where I can access them on the internet. It has been a long time since I have looked at either volume so I’ll have another look shortly since you’ve provided the link I need.
        Just FYI and assuming I remember it correctly, which is a big “if”: Longwood was never completed, as you noted, because of the Civil War. However, Haller Nutt, the owner, was able to get the basement level finished enough so that he and his family were able to occupy it. I believe the kitchen (predictably for that time and place) was in a completely separate building nearby. Nutt died during the war, and after the war was over, his widow (Julia, I think her name was) attempted to get bids on several occasions from builders to complete the house, but apparently none were ever offered in reply or they were too high for her by then greatly reduced financial resources. So, she lived out her life in the basement, and possibly one or more of her children did as well. I’m not sure if the house was ever completely unoccupied, although it may very well have been. You see the furnished basement if you tour the house today. It is as elegant as a basement could possibly have been. Its primary drawback aesthetically was its relative height, which was grossly out of scale with the relative massivneness of the furniture that the family used inside it and the other dimensions of the basement rooms they occupied. One feels almost claustrophobic when one is actually inside the basement because the ceiling feels so incredibly low in such large rooms, and some people might even be given the false sense the ceiling is about to fall in completely. It’s very disquieting in light of the scale that the house was intended to create.

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        • MJGMJG says: 2387 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          Where in Connecticut are you from or around ? Do you live in an antique home ?

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          • MJGMJG says: 2387 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            Yeah you’re right that it has improved. It’s just too much for me now. I prefer a little less people.
            I LOVE prospect. As you probably know what I’m saying below, Loaded and littered with the remains of my favorite mid to late 19th century architecture. It’s horrible how many homes were lost on that street. The home that Sarah Winchester and husbands family lived in for years with her husband until he died was amazing. Sadly was demolished by Yale. But the Davies house next door still survives. Though a little different in style with its second empire look. Even though it was the home of Oliver and his wife Winchester (founder of Winchester rifle business not the inventor of the rifle like some think) William and Sarah apparently were the ones that designed and built the house. Sarah’s father was a woodworker and she loved architecture. When she moved to California after William died, her mansion in San Jose was like her workshop. Among her other fruit farms and 12 other properties she managed. (Ghost stories were added conjecture and changes later to her life sadly which there is zero factual evidence of. The house had many alterations by the fun house people who bought it in 1923 after she died). She and all of her family are buried In Evergreen Walk new haven.

            The Egyptian gate cemetery is a fun walk. Lots of history. How about all the random gravestones along the back that were removed from the green when the green was a cemetery. But they LEFT THE BODIES in the green!!!! A tree fell over and there was a skeleton in the roots a few years back.

            Sorry. Got off topic but it’s nice to speak to fellow obsessors of this time. My favorite period for interior and exterior decoration and designs etc is 1870-1890s. Though I like 1850s and 1860s. Mostly the aesthetic movement. Once colonial revival starts creeping in I lose interest.

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            • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1850 Italianate, classical
              New Haven, CT

              Started this once before, but it got lost somewhere when I was looking something up in another screen, so I’ll give it a second try.
              Regarding the Winchester house: I think I always heard it was designed by Henry Austin, particularly in light of how much it resembled in overall layout the Davies mansion, which Henry Austin definitely designed in collaboration with someone else, possibly Sidney Mason Stone. I’ve only seen about 4 or 5 very old photos of the Winchester house, but the Italianate tower, mansard-like roof and overall plan and design all looked like it was fundamentally a Franco-Italianate villa, only with “Swiss chalet” ornamental detailing. I got at an auction a mis-attributed (it was said that it was a depiction of a Colt family mansion–right ballpark, but wrong team, which I knew when I bought it), finely detailed, framed, cork sculpture that depicted (these depictions were very popular at one time, but their popularity was short-lived and you may never have seen one) the Winchester mansion from the side that was next to the Davies house. Indeed, I had seen a photo of the view the cork sculpture scene depicted, the photo obviously having been taken from the tower of the Davies mansion. Where did you get your information on Sarah Winchester and the fake news that has surrounded her house in San Jose? I’m always interested in learning the truth about maligned individuals, particularly in so far as their architectural creations is concerned. I’ve never seen the so-called “Winchester Mystery Mansion” when I was in California, nor have I wanted to, given all the hype about it. But I would like to know your sources of information on her and both houses so I’ll be more informed about them, if you can remember where you learned what you recounted above.
              Yale built the Divinity School on the Winchester house site (and had in more recent years made sounds to the effect that it wanted to demolish the Divinity School, which pleased the benefactor family of the School not too much–I think a lawsuit may even have ensued), and tried to use its frequently utilized demolition-by-neglect policy to get rid of the Davies mansion, but it had played that card once too often and local activists were not about to allow Yale to get away with it when the Davies house was severely arsoned 20 or more years ago, as you may remember, after Yale let it sit totally unprotected and abandoned for too many years. So, Yale ultimately restored it and found a use for it, though I know it continues to buy up whole neighborhoods in New Haven and then invokes their demotion-by-neglect policy because they clearly want the land cleared for re-use for new Yale buildings (particularly in the medical school area where I worked) in coming years. Which does nothing but create problems for many poor residents in the city of New Haven who are left with nowhere familiar to live and end up in trailer parks in the surrounding areas instead.
              I don’t know what you know about the Town-Sheffield Mansion that occupied virtually one whole side of the lower block of Hillhouse Avenue, the Dana house being virtually its only neighbor. It was undoubtedly the most extravagant house ever built in New Haven. It had been greatly altered from being the severe Greek Revival home designed and built by architect and engineer Ithiel Town in the 1830’s for himself (he designed 2 of the 3 churches on the Green) into the Italianate extravaganza that Henry Austin created (primarily by additions and not demolition) for Joseph Sheffield. Sheffield made the mistake of leaving it to Yale when he died, which egregiously neglected it for years and then eventually demolished it for a very objectionably bland classroom building many years later, a fate that has befallen all too many architecturally significant buildings that fall into Yale’s generally very unsympathetic, self-canaballizing hands.
              Speaking of the Grove Street cemetery, to which those tombstones on the New Haven Green were removed, but without their underlying human remains accompanying them. The gateway you referred to was designed by Henry Austin in the Egyptian Revival style, reflecting just how stylistically fluid he was. I remember that skeleton that a fallen tree on the New Haven Green managed to pull up in its roots some years ago–I just hope it was no ancestor of mine, since both of my parents are descended from a number of the families that founded New Haven in 1638 and thus have deep roots there, as did the tree that pulled up that skeleton with it. It’s quite interesting when you study the multiple uses to which today’s quaint New England town greens were put in their prior incarnations!
              Anyhow, anything you can tell me about Sarah Winchester and her 2 houses would be greatly appreciated. I’m sure this conversation is to be continued. Adios for now!

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              • MJGMJG says: 2387 comments
                OHD Supporter

                CT

                My research on Sarah Winchester came from many sources. The people at History San Jose and I talk a lot as well a women I’ve become friends with at the San Matteo historical society. She has sent me many things. I’ve read through thousands of pages of Sarah’s letters to and from her attorney Frank Leib. About properties, receipts, land disputes, her will, and other things. Some of them are online for reading at history San Jose’s website. But I went onsite.

                I have copies of some letters from Sarah (really known by her friends and family as Sallie) from CT Historical Society to her sister Jennie Bennett. She talks about adding an addition to her house in San Jose but having trouble with plaster cracking and an addition making a room dark and needing to put in a skylight. She also talks about dismissing workers through the winter to rest and feeling worn out from all the stuff she’s doing. But also attributes it to not drinking coffee anymore.

                Some of this information is also in a biography written called Captive of the Labyrinth. Not a bad biography, filled with a lot of other useless information than I could have done without.

                I also have a large digital collection of newspaper articles written about her and her building from 1890s to 1925. Most articles are silly “yellow journalism” but there is a wonderful biographical article written about her by Merle H Gray written in the 1910s.

                Yes. Henry Austin and David R Brown did their homes. I only have two pictures of this house. I wish I had interior photos but so far no one has any. David R Brown was the architect who built my 1887 home I sold.

                I didn’t know about cork statues. A new topic for research!

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              • MJGMJG says: 2387 comments
                OHD Supporter

                CT

                Kelly is sending you my email address so we don’t bore the panel with our long emails lol

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  5. AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1850 Italianate, classical
    New Haven, CT

    To clarify–the window coursing and windows on the 2nd floor with drip style hoods are on the 3 sides of the house other than the front. And all 3 bays on the front first floor actually have drip hoods, not just the 2 windows. I think I’d better stop looking at this house and adding comments or I’m going to end up talking myself into it being fundamentally Gothic Revival with some Italianate stylistic issues!

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  6. MichaelMichael says: 2957 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    I love everything about this house. Simply stunning doesn’t begin to approach how nice this house is!

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  7. MJGMJG says: 2387 comments
    OHD Supporter

    CT

    This house is a masterpiece that’s clearly a mix of style along with its own unique expression that is free of a title in full. It is a picturesque villa. I’m speechless.

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    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Maybe that is the best way to put it!

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      • MJGMJG says: 2387 comments
        OHD Supporter

        CT

        If you look at books from the period the house styles are named for houses the have a predominant style. In the books that are being specific with names, of the style is not “French villa” or “Italian villa” or “Swiss cottage” Or “Queen Anne” or “ English style cottage” then it’s only called a picturesque villa or an elegant cottage or even I’ve scene and artistic cottage.

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        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          Yes, it’s very interesting to consider how people of the period chose to label their architectural styles and how we choose to do it about their architectural styles 150 years later (in this case). As I think about this house more and its relative uniqueness, I see how different even the color of the brick from which it was built is from almost all other houses of its period. The architect certainly was designing something quite unique and distinctive in virtually all regards as he set to work on this house.

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  8. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 897 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    Love at first sight.

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  9. SadieSadie says: 45 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Fascinating that one home can stay in a family so long. Something that doesn’t happen often in our mobile society. Beautiful home that reflects the family that shared their life with her for so long. Now ready for a new family – one I hope cares for her just as long!!

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  10. MichaelSMichaelS says: 9 comments
    1917 Bungalo
    Charlotte, NC

    Did anyone notice that this house is right next to the railroad tracks? The overpass/bridge just to the right of the house goes over the railroad tracks below. Maybe the tracks are not used much.

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    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 897 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      We’re probably a minority, but I actually like living near railroad tracks!

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    • NonaKNonaK says: 265 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Austin, TX

      A few months ago I moved from my house by the tracks. I totally miss the trains!!

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      • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 897 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Victorian Farmhouse
        Lancaster, PA, PA

        For all you fellow RR Buffs, check out this one in North Carolina, where the CSX tracks appear to be 20 feet from the front porch! (Train picture about 5 from the end) https://www.estately.com/listings/info/374-river-view-drive–1

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        • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1850 Italianate, classical
          New Haven, CT

          There is a house here in New Haven called the James Dwight Dana House (it’s in wikipedia, although it was greatly added on to after its initial completion, particularly to the right side of the front). The Farmington Canal was built just behind its garden and the family used to have parties so their friends could come over and watch the canal boats go by. However, within a very short period of time, railroads replaced canal boats as the preferred mode of transportation, and the canal was drained and railroad tracks replaced the water and canal boats. Then the Dana family’s envious friends and neighbors all came over to watch the newly invented trains go by instead. They had quite an active social life as a result of so much new scientific invention being visible from their garden, something few of their neighbors shared given the irregular shape of the canal and subsequent rail line that emanated out from New Haven to Hartford.

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          • MJGMJG says: 2387 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            I know this house very well. I now live in North Haven and spent years hanging around in new haven.

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            • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1850 Italianate, classical
              New Haven, CT

              Well, maybe you should move to New Haven if you’ve never actually lived here, or return here if you left at some point… With Yale on the loose, New Haven needs all the preservation-minded people it can get! In fact, it was, as you may well know, Yale’s plan to demolish the Dana house back in the 1950’s or 1960’s that resulted in the creation of the New Haven Preservation Trust.

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              • MJGMJG says: 2387 comments
                OHD Supporter

                CT

                No taxes and crime are way too high in New Haven. Traffic isn’t fun either. But new haven is littered with amazing amounts of mid to late 19th century architecture and I often go there to look around on a nice day.

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                • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 375 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1850 Italianate, classical
                  New Haven, CT

                  Oh, we should get together and compare notes sometime! I actually live in what I call a “working man’s” version of the Dana house on one of the older streets in the Fair Haven section of New Haven. My house was built in 1852 but got a significant addition to the initially one story back wing of the house c 1880, which pretty much destroyed the proportions of the house, but added a lot of living space. My favorite architectural interest has always been 19th Century American houses, and all that goes with them. I probably attended the Yale School of Management (SOM) in the days when it occupied several old mansions on Hillhouse Avenue (the last 2 or 3 houses on the street) simply because I liked those buildings so much better than I liked the much newer buildings at any other business school. I stayed on in a couple of doctoral programs afterwards, both of which were housed in various Hillhouse Avenue mansions and the c 1845 house at the corner of Sachem and Whitney (tho I’m not sure what university program or dept. has it today). I became very familiar, obviously, with the architecture of Henry Austin in the process and got involved in a lawsuit trying to stop Yale, by then my employer, from demolishing the 2nd oldest house on Trumbull Street that occupied its original site, which was an early design of AJ Davis, whose name I adopted as my name for this website. For many years, I lived a block off of Prospect Street (which is virtually nothing but old mansions, as I’m sure you know), so it’s been interesting to follow developments, both positive and negative, in New Haven over the years. Crime is way down since I arrived in NH in 1985, and overall, the liveability of the city is way up. I’ve never had any problem with crime during the time since I first arrived in New Haven in 1985–the city has really changed a lot from what its old reputation was. I’m not from New Haven and it really took some getting used to after living in the Boston area for the 5 years the preceded my move to it, but now I really consider it to be home and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else on a permanent basis (tho I am shopping for a second home, which is how I discovered this website, since I’m trying to find a warmer climate in which to spend my winters–preferably in historic southeastern Virginia, which I know well, or North Carolina). Since I have always lived right in New Haven, traffic has never been a problem for me–traffic is really a problem that commuters have to face more than it is a problem for those who actually reside in a city like New Haven.
                  How about you–do you live in an antique house? And what are your primary architectural interests, in New Haven or elsewhere?

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    • ScottScott says: 349 comments
      1951 Grants Pass, OR

      I noticed that, too.

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  11. MikeMike says: 377 comments
    1886 Queen Anne
    IL

    This house captured my attention like few others; it is a tremendous opportunity for someone to preserve a piece of history. The house belonged to Senator Chapman’s in-laws, named Talbott; his daughter was the last resident, and passed away last fall at the age of 97. It always thrills me to see houses like this on this site (thank you, Kelly!) but at the same time, it is always a little sad to see a family part with it’s heritage. My house was “in the family” from 1906 until 1991, and was still very much original when it sold. We bought it in 2001, and I was shocked to see how much it had been remuddled, all in the name of home improvement. I have spent the last 18 years reversing many of the “improvements”, while restoring what remains of the original fabric as best as I can. I say this so often, but I hope that this wonderful home winds up with someone who will preserve it gently, and treasure it’s history.

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  12. MandyMandy says: 88 comments
    Edmonds, WA

    One of my all time favorites. Seriously considered a move, but kids and grandkids trump this beautiful home. A house like this where I live would be in the millions.

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  13. NeverhadanewhomeNeverhadanewhome says: 6 comments
    1893 Greek Georgian revival
    Camden, ME

    Simply stunning!

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