c. 1860 Italianate/1890 Queen Anne – New Carlisle, IN

Details below are from May 2019, sold status has not been verified.
To verify, check the listing links below.

Added to OHD on 5/30/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   30 Comments
Off Market / Archived

31869 Chicago Trail, New Carlisle, IN 46552

Maps: Street | Aerial

  • $35,000
  • 4500 Sq Ft
Nestled in the countryside outside New Carlisle, Hubbard House is an eye-catching historic house with breathtaking original details inside and out. Constructed around 1860 in the Italianate style, the property received a Queen Anne makeover in the 1890s with the addition of a porch, altered roof shape, and solarium. After serving as a home for the Hubbard family for many years, the property became part of a home for the aged in the 1920s. Indiana Landmarks is working with owner Greencroft Communities to find a buyer who will restore and reuse the house.

The house offers approximately 2,300 square feet with highly ornate woodwork, fireplaces, and exquisite parquet floors. A two-story addition built in the mid-twentieth century adds another 2,200 square feet with a floor plan flexible for many reuses. The house will need a complete renovation including new heating, plumbing, exterior restoration work, and roof. Two fairly new high velocity air conditioning systems have been installed. The electric has been upgraded with new wiring and panels. A full basement is under the entire house.

Located about 20 minutes from South Bend and 90 minutes from Chicago, the site would make an excellent inn, office, or destination restaurant. Protective covenants will be included as part of the sale requiring review of exterior changes. The successful buyer will demonstrate financial capacity to undertake the project and experience with rehabilitation of historic properties. The site will be rezoned by Greencroft once a buyer with these qualifications is identified. Floor plans and additional photos are available.

Indiana Landmarks and its affiliate Historic New Carlisle will host an open house for interested parties on June 8, 2019, from 9 a.m.-Noon EST. For more information about the property, contact Todd Zeiger, tzeiger@indianalandmarks.org, 574-232-4534.
Contact Information
Todd Zeiger, Indiana Landmarks
OHD Notes
Indiana Landmarks and its affiliate Historic New Carlisle will host an open house for interested parties on June 8, 2019, from 9 a.m.-Noon EST. For more information about the property, contact Todd Zeiger, tzeiger@indianalandmarks.org, 574-232-4534.
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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30 Comments on c. 1860 Italianate/1890 Queen Anne – New Carlisle, IN

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11887 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I emailed for more info on the land size, floor plan and additional photos so stay tuned. ๐Ÿ™‚

    117
  2. JimHJimH says: 4943 comments
    OHD Supporter

    It’s an interesting place with a family history that ties it all together:
    Jonathan Hubbard (1787-1861) brought his family here from Oneida County NY in 1836 and purchased a 320 acre tract. His son Ransom Hubbard expanded the farm to 700 acres and built the house, later building another fine house in town:
    https://goo.gl/maps/mFL1ajmS7mWW3ioLA

    Ransom’s son Haven Hubbard remodeled the house about 1890 and married his mother’s young caretaker Armine Hoffman. Haven talked of building a retirement home before his death in 1916, and Armine followed through, giving the entire farm to a church group to build an “Old People’s Home.” It was completed a few years later and Armine lived in the house under their care until 1946.

    National Register info, nomination photos etc:
    https://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/13000091.htm

    32
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6037 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      How wonderful. What a happy story for this house.

      Ransome, Haven, and Armine Hubbard. What fabulous names! Ty Jim.

      22
  3. GearGirlGearGirl says: 142 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Second Empire, Gothic, Tudor... Scottsdale, AZ

    The address resolves to a group of buildings behind the house (Hamilton Communities) so absolutely any information you can get on property lines would be wonderful! Fingers crossed it is on a couple of acres. ?

    The land across the street is just farmland. I wonder if trees would be allowed in the ROW between the street and the acreage? Would certainly help the view!

    Across the smaller intersecting street is an interesting little building with mansard roof.

    4
  4. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 898 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    From Todd: “…the parcel will be approximately two acres. There are presently no bathrooms in the main house and common baths in what was the rear wing addition. Our sense is that it would be fairly straight forward to add a full bath in the main house adjacent to what could be the master bedroom. The rear addition could be gutted to accommodate a host of new uses including additional bedrooms, bathrooms etc.

    Please make sure to mention that this house will require all new mechanicals, electrical, plumbing and finishes. The successful buyer will have to demonstrate experience with historic renovations of this scope and the financial capacity to undertake the work.”

    15
  5. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 898 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Also, photos. I’ll add these in the morning to the post: https://photos.app.goo.gl/dz1QPXHx9WTQYZQt9

    10
    • GearGirlGearGirl says: 142 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Second Empire, Gothic, Tudor... Scottsdale, AZ

      Wow so many additional photos! None of a kitchen though? Or the attic?

      I looked at what lot lines I could find online and the parcel this property sits on has several other structures on it, so I assume they are subdividing it. Curious what the final layout will be.

      I wonder why they started wall demo in the addition. And if the new roof is for the addition. Lots of questions…

      3
  6. RosewaterRosewater says: 6037 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Oh outstanding! Thank you agent! Nice shots.

    Sure hope the new owner thinks LONG AND HARD about junking the single pipe steam heating system. Looks fine to me; and even the existing boiler seems to have been spared the ravages of a wet basement by being set nicely on that base. SURE, it will need work; but what I wouldn’t give to do that work myself were it mine! SUCH a huge +++ that dual zoned, high velocity air is in situ! Cripe, that installation would surely cost one MOST of the purchase price! Heheheheh.

    Many of the “finishes” look just fine to me. Out with the tin ceiling though.

    This place seems magical!!

    18
  7. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    A great old house with lots of possibilities. Potential buyers should not focus on the low purchase price but on the scope of work to be completed under the watch of Indiana Landmarks. If a Landmarks-approved architect has to be brought in, (likely) then the rehab costs could escalate quickly. Probably best to go see the house, talk to the agent or Landmarks rep and note the terms and conditions that have to be met. For those who love old houses and cherish the historic details, the burden placed by Indiana Landmarks shouldn’t be too onerous or restrictive. In summary, do your homework carefully on this property. Areas where there’s Streetview show a nice looking community. The proximity to Chicago and South Bend might be a plus as well.

    18
  8. RosewaterRosewater says: 6037 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    $35K can not be right for this FINE, SOLID, INTERESTING, House! What a deal.

    Lucky buyer if all the goodies convey! I love that step above, not quite so old, art glass shade. The place is positively loaded with great pieces!

    Why someone would downsize the windows during the early update is a mystery. I guess the unusual interior trim treatments are the result. The upper hall must U around the chimney mass. Never seen that before. What interesting tile on the fireplace up there.

    This house is choice!

    I for one, sure as shoot, would not touch the RAD solarium! ?

    I’ll be posting another great Indiana Landmarks noted property In the share this week; having hunted down, and edited, as many good to great pix of it as I could find. It’s super groovy so watch for it! ๐Ÿ™‚

    12
  9. RosewaterRosewater says: 6037 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    How amazing would it be to see a somewhat wealthy, senior, single, Chicago-lander buy and restore this home to use, as it was long since intended, as a retirement home; for say four or five single individuals, (of relative means). Possibly set it up as a non-profit trust; which would of course reimburse the initial investor; then operating as a co-op. It could pass on in perpetuity as such to the residents; who would always be in control of who they shared with next. Staff could be hired for basic household, and geriatric care to service the group; (and very reasonably I’d think). There is enough land to have a nice little local cottage moved on-site, and restored, to possibly, nicely, house a couple who would run the day to day bits; and provide capable facilities maintenance. All would still be close to friends and family in the city. Perhaps even chickens, goats, and maybe even a pony could be provided for to entice grand-kids out of the city for some fresh air. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Sounds nice to me. ๐Ÿ™‚ I’ve often had this thought as an adaptive re-use for other places over the years: but what better place than this, for MANY reasons!

    20
  10. ScottScott says: 326 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    I don’t think that 2-story “addition” is an addition at all. I think that’s the original 1860s Italianate home and the large queen Anne was added to the front in the 1880s.

    10
    • JimHJimH says: 4943 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Occasionally, the professional architectural historians that put together National Register nominations and preservation documents make mistakes, but rarely are they obvious from a few photographs in a sales listing. The nomination I linked above and Indiana Landmarks both state clearly, with substantial evidence, that the rear addition is from the 20th Century and the original home in front was altered and remodeled in the 1890’s. These folks have spent time with access to the property and we should respect their conclusions until we have the opportunity to study the house at close range. I’ve found in reading many of the nominations that those prepared by owners and local historians, especially those written a few decades ago, are sometimes incorrect in their conclusions. These findings are both recent and professional.

      8
    • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1097 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Charleston, SC

      The Italianate (or maybe Second Empire) style original section was built of the lighter colored brick. The best visual clue as to how this house evolved can be found in the sections where the darker red brick appear. Specifically, the c.1920 rear addition, the front entrance, and the first floor left elevation. The original form was likely squared with lower slope or mansard roof. The most apparent later modifications are the extended front entrance bay allowing the front Palladian gable, dormer windows, the two cross gables, that really interesting solarium, and the Free Classic style porch. This, along with the interior modifications essentially covered up the earlier style. The rear addition was likely done right before the 1922 original section of the Epp Hall structure called the “Haven Hubbard Memorial Old People’s Home”
      https://www.google.com/maps/@41.7295559,-86.4835975,3a,25.6y,330.94h,92.64t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sMjWvdiMjiHQMiEyd9o6m8w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

      4
  11. Anne M.Anne M. says: 781 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 not a dream.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Thanks for those additional photos. Those floors are gorgeous!

    2
  12. DaveDave says: 285 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Queen Ann/Stick
    Des Moines, IA

    If I were not currently doing a large-scale renovation in Iowa, I would DROP EVERYTHING in order to BUY THIS HOUSE! If I just wasn’t so darn old and slow, I WOULD be able to start something new….maybe.

    4
  13. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11887 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Added additional photos.

    3
  14. stacyjstacyj says: 13 comments
    1984 ick....tract home
    ROSEVILLE, CA

    I have not been able to pick my jaw up off of the floor since seeing this house! Wow….those floors are amazing.The older part of the home has been kept very nicely, from the photographs. Sigh

    1
  15. ZerberbabyZerberbaby says: 39 comments
    1967 cape cod
    VALPARAISO, IN

    I would buy this house and love it for the rest of my life. While the historical societies save some homes they stop people like me, who do not have a trust fund to do everything at once, from getting this beautiful home and slowly bringing it back to it’s former glory. It is a shame because since it is in Indiana, and not NEAR as close to Chicago as they say, it will make this house much tougher to sell even without all of the restrictions that will be put on it. It is sad because I fear that because of these type of issues that a few years from now we could easily see nothing more than a shell of this gorgeous home on this site still for sale. It breaks my heart when I see these incredible homes just falling into ruin because of excessive restrictions when there are so many people like myself who would LOVE to be able to bring these beauties back to life.

    8
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11887 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Excessive restrictions? They are there because people buy these and don’t respect the house enough to keep it as original as they can while updating it. If not for restrictions than we would have lost many more homes or at least they would have received such horrid makeovers that it shouldn’t be considered old anymore, we know this because it happens frequently on nonrestrictive homes. There are also restrictions on houses because people actually want to protect them from buyers that get in over their heads without a clear plan and it ends up worse than before or people that don’t understand what it means to restore an old house. There are some properties that shouldn’t be turned over to just anyone, that is what ruins many actual historic places that could have been saved but because of lack of accountability aren’t. Indiana Landmarks has saved so many homes that would have otherwise been left to rot or remodeled into an HGTV nightmare, good on them for their restrictions.

      13
      • stacyjstacyj says: 13 comments
        1984 ick....tract home
        ROSEVILLE, CA

        Maybe they could articulate their exact requirements better. How much in funds available do they want to see? How much experience in working on historic homes do they want to see?
        Of course, those questions could be answered by calling the groups listing the property.

        It is a beautiful home. I see great things in its future!

        1
      • ms.anthropems.anthrope says: 10 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1895 queen anne cottage
        OH

        Amen! Took the words right out of my mouth. I applaud communities that actually have respect for their architectural history, and make the effort to preserve it. Unfortunately, I see historical homes absolutely decimated daily, in the city I live in. We are in the process of restoring our current home, and have planned from the beginning to go through the process of placing covenants on it. If we were a bit further along in our current restoration (this is our 4th), I would already be on the phone with my agent.

        Many, many thank you’s to the powers that be, for keeping those restrictions in place, and taking measures to ensure that this wonderful historical home does not get lost to the current “trends”. We should be stewards of these type of homes – I personally think it it selfish to remuddle/ ruin one of these to one’s liking, removing the chance for future generations to admire and learn from; there are plenty of houses built with modern, inferior building materials, that can be completely gutted and remodeled if one chooses.

        1
    • CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1097 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Charleston, SC

      Those restrictions also protect unaware buyers from making huge financial mistakes. Without the qualification requirements, some inexperienced buyer would snatch this up at $35,000 thinking they can handle the work themselves and $100,000 at the big box store ought to do it for materials. A few years later, they’ve bankrupted themselves on a half-done and poorly executed remodel, and the house has lost its character in the process. Then we see it listed again in far worse condition. There are a ton of unrestricted houses out there for people who don’t qualify for this type of project.

      7
    • DJZDJZ says: 196 comments
      1947 cape cod
      Glen Burnie, MD

      Where this house is located, yes it is 90 minutes from Chicago. I grew up in Chesterton which is 45 minutes from Chicago, and new Carlisle is 35 minutes from where I lived so the time frame is correct. But I fully understand where you’re coming from with the restrictions as I am in the same boat with you when It comes to the all up front manner.

      1
  16. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5363 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Contact Indiana landmarks if you are serious. They will explain to you exactly what steps you need to take and they are not famous for added red tape and bureaucracy. Besides, the regional offices are typically staffed by one or two people so complicating the approval process just adds to their workload. Their overarching goal is to see that the property is rehabbed according to the Secretary of the Interior’s standards for rehabilitation which itself seeks to preserve history rather than reinterpret it. Certainly not oriented towards house flippers or the HGTV shows followers but common sense based and flexible enough for most people. As Kelly says, any restrictions are not to place an undue burden on rehabbers but to protect the historical integrity of the house. Good luck if you decide to go forward but please visit the house and meet with the Landmarks folks first.

    11
  17. DJZDJZ says: 196 comments
    1947 cape cod
    Glen Burnie, MD

    I grew up about 25 minutes from this house, Ive always been fascinated with it and wanted to know what it looked like. Now after seeing this, I so want to buy this house and fix it up, but I don’t have the experience that they are looking for. I know if I made the plead I would explain that the woodwork, floors and original layout in the original section of the house would be unchanged, along with the exterior. I would update the exterior to the add on by doing a brick faรงade to tie in with the main house, update to a more even flow to tie in with the rest of the house, and do updated period lighting as well.

    I wonder if the house is being sold with that furniture in it? I would love to keep some furniture in the house that’s from the early time period. But that woodwork and floors speak for themselves. I really do love this house.

    2
  18. Gregory_KGregory_K says: 458 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Chatsworth, CA

    This just shows you that once my family, or a branch of it anyway, had both money and taste. Astounding price, but I am too old to move anywhere without the prospect of creating a job, or finding one. I have tried that, moving without a job, and it can spell disaster.
    Gregory Hubbard

    2

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