1763/1840 – Gladstone, VA – $499,900

For Sale
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Added to OHD on 5/14/19   -   Last OHD Update: 5/14/19   -   9 Comments

197 Guest House Rd, Gladstone, VA 24553

Maps: Street, Aerial

  • $499,900
  • 4 Bed
  • 3 Bath
  • 4135 Sq Ft
  • 66 Ac.
Antebellum Farm on the James River. Circa 1763 with an 1840 addition. Peaceful and private. Easy access to the James by Wreck Island creek. Excellent condition and lovingly maintained by current owners. Used occasionally for a vacation rental. A one of a kind property! The recently restored Summer kitchen could have many different uses. $25, 000 restoration of 9 fireplaces $9, 900 stainless fireplace liner $30, 000 double front porch repair with new foundation $5, 500 repair 1st outbuilding floors, doors & loft $3, 500 outbuilding period lean to $86, 000 Summer kitchen restoration
Contact Information
Sharon Donovan, McLean Faulconer Realtors
(855) 210-1077 / (434) 981-7200
Links, Photos & Additional Info


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9 Comments on 1763/1840 – Gladstone, VA – $499,900

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  1. Jmat3922Jmat3922 says: 59 comments
    OHD Supporter

    OH! Looks like heaven! What a perfect place….main thing I’d want to do is bring the kitchen back to a more period look befitting a house of this age.

    19
  2. Leah SLeah S says: 167 comments
    OHD Supporter

    TX

    Perfect! The stairway is my favorite feature. So much to love about this home … including the views.

    This property is listed on Airbnb as Riverview Guesthouse on the James. More photos can be found there.

    12
  3. r myersr myers says: 15 comments
    1967 raised ranch
    Shawnee, KS

    wish I had a summer kitchen. Wonderful home!

    4
  4. KarenZKarenZ says: 1204 comments
    OHD Supporter

    What a gorgeous home! I think that the 3rd floor bedroom space is so sweet!

    5
  5. StacyStacy says: 369 comments
    1900 Maybe Craftsmen
    TX

    Old farmhouses are my faves & I really like this one, I just find myself saying alot that when I see an old farmhouse, I want to see that old farmhouse look, that feeling of it. I would have to bring the homes time back to life. It’s not really too modern I suppose, but too much for me & maybe it’s just me, but… I would totally love being home here!

    8
  6. AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 406 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1850 Italianate, classical
    New Haven, CT

    Although I have done no research on this house whatsoever, I nonetheless strongly suspect that chances are that in its antebellum heydey, this was not a farmhouse but rather a plantation house. A farm where the owner held 20 or more enslaved individuals differentiated a farm from a plantation and a farmer from a planter. “Gone with the Wind” and multiple other movies, coupled with the existence of a small handful of southern cities like Natchez (which only NYC surpassed in terms of millionaires per capita at the time of the Civil War) where the wealthiest of the southern elite congregated and built some of the grandest mansions in the south have created a very false impression of how grand the typical plantation in the antebellum south really was. Even if this place was not a plantation, it almost undoubtedly relied on slave labor, at least to some degree. It’s just a probable part of the place’s history and should not be forgotten from a historical standpoint. No condemnation of the house is intended in my saying this, just an attempt to better contextualize the house and its likely history which may be a bit more complex that its simple appearance might suggest.

    1
  7. AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 406 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1850 Italianate, classical
    New Haven, CT

    Addendum to above–Even the above photo of the silhouetted tree in front of the very romantic sunset reminds me of the scene in the movie “Gone with the Wind” where Scarlett and her father are talking in front of a fairly distant Tara with a dramatic sunset in the background and the wind rustling everything around in a very dramatic fashion, clearly trying to glorify the romance and beauty in the lost antebellum south. However, I attribute no such motive to the person who took the photo, but the image was just so strikingly reminiscent of that early scene from the movie that I couldn’t help but notice it.

    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 406 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Addendum to above–Even the above photo of the silhouetted tree in front of the very romantic sunset reminds me of the scene in the movie “Gone with the Wind” where Scarlett and her father are talking in front of a fairly distant Tara with a dramatic sunset in the background and the wind rustling everything around in a very dramatic fashion, clearly trying to glorify the romance and beauty in the lost antebellum south. However, I attribute no such motive to the person who took the photo, but the image was just so strikingly reminiscent of that early scene from the movie that I couldn’t help but notice it.
      Addendum 2–I couldn’t help but notice that in one of the photos of the sunroom there appeared to be a framed photograph of a portrait of Robert E. Lee on the far right wall. Opposite it in the lower left of the same photo is what appears to be a brass model of a Civil War-era cannon. I won’t try to make anything of these decorative pieces since the only flags I see in all the photos are clearly those of the US and not those of the Confederacy.

  8. CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1065 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Charleston, SC

    The property on which this house sits was part of a 1743 land grant to the Christian family that eventually passed to the Walker family via a marriage of Susan Christian to John Merriwether Walker in 1790. They had three sons, who inherited the property and all owned plantations in this area known as Walker’s Ford. The posted house called Locust Grove was built by one of the sons, Samuel J. Walker, sometime after his father’s passing in 1830. After the War Between the States, the Walker family built and operated two sawmills, one of each side of the river. The house passed out of the family and was eventually became a company guest house for the Greif Brothers company.

    6

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