April 4, 2019: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You!)

Added to OHD on 4/5/19 - Last OHD Update: 4/12/19 - 188 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat. How to share… Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below. Format rule! Make it easier for those browsing shares by including the city, state and price (international listings excluded.) A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful. Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.) Not all shares will be added to OHD as it's own post.
Special thanks to this month's OHD Supporters!
Anne M.
Bethany
Colleen J
DRC
Erol
JimH
CharlestonJohn
Laurie W
Leigh
Oklahoma Houses by Mail
Roger Cook
Ross
ALLALASKAN
Annabelle
Matt Ziehnert
stevenf
David Dyke
Jan Matson
FlaOHDJunkie
Laura Lewis
Guinan
Sharon B.
J.A.
Well Done! Realty (Lancaster John)
Sue Patrick
67drake
clawhammerist
Libby
Evelyn Walker
Nance
Architectural Observer
Lori A
KarenZ
Jenny Wiebler
Grant
Mary C.
Sandy B.
Wendy A.
David Backer (ddbacker)
Victorian Joy
NonaK
DianeEG
Jennifer HT
Our Philly Row
MaggieMay
Les Houston Ontario Canada
Robinjn
Shelley from Canada
Sadie
Aardvark Rare Books
Gregory Hubbard
Anne H.
Abby
Sarah Fox-Balts
Abevy
Friends of the Old West End
Son of Syosset
Bethster
Ryan
Teri W.
John Shiflet
linzyloo
kimmers
Marcia Ames
Kelli
Tonimar
Harley's Mom
Tommy Quinn
P. Buckingham
SandyF
Southwestlovesmomma
Shawn Cripe
Lucinda Howard
PreservationMatters
Fairmount
Terri Carlson, Red Brick Road Farm
QuiltingWitch
Candy
Pete R.
indygreta
Braeden Fitch
SusieQ605
Brigid
Kevin O'Neill
Lord Mannyng
Karen Baker
Karen Rundle
James Michalowski, Howard Hanna Real Estate Services
Paul
Donna Reynolds
CeylaClaire
catlover
Derek Walvoord
JRC
C.J.R.
Boilerguy1720
Laura
Caethe
Hope Douglas
Jim Smith
Marshel Cunningham
Kim Carter
Kimberly62
Sonja
Michael McNamara
Karen S.
Joseph Griffin
David Rainey
Stephen S. Griffin
Lois Buck
Janette Manley
Joyce Rindt
Kathryn Bell
In memory of John Foreman
Polly
Tom Cutler
Becky Martin
Randy C.
Dixie Tait Kirton
luluchicago
Nancy C.
TXJewel
Tom Isenberg
Karen K.
Rita L. from Lansing, MI
jumbojimbo
Julie Cowan
Cate
Alan
Toni Moya
Sandra Lee
Mitchell Bailey
MattD
Polyanthus
Brett & Martha

And those who have chosen not to be named. Thanks to all!


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184 Comments on April 4, 2019: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You!)

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Super thanks to the generous OHD Supporters. Without you it would be tough going lately. So many thanks, you have no idea how much you are saving OHD from continuing. Even days when I’d like to crawl under the blanket I think of you all and realize that people are counting on me. Maybe not saving bees or transplanting hearts but I think what I’m doing is something good for somebody. Even if not looking to buy a house just dreaming can make someones day, I know it did mine for many years.

    I usually black/white the photos but left it the tone that many of my old photos are. Also sure that’s not blood…almost certain…pretty sure. There was writing on the back of the photo but it’s so faded I cannot make it out.

    28
    • BethanyBethany says: 3471 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      Not only are you providing joy to us old house dreamers, but you’re also educating us about old houses through your knowledge and that of many of the regular commenters, and fostering an online community of like-minded people.

      30
    • Amerikiwi says: 320 comments

      Kelly,

      Your almost daily old homes for sale arrives in my in box at noon NZT and I genuinely look forward to and enjoy it.

      Thank you so much for taking the time to find and list all of these treasures that remind me of home and how much I love old American houses. It’s kind of a bittersweet experience for me because I see so many homes I would love to buy in places I would love to live but I can’t return to the U.S. because of my health (no insurance company would cover me). But it is still something I look forward to seeing.

      I have and am still learning so much about the different styles, periods and features from you and other followers and supporters.

      Keep up the good work because it is greatly appreciated!

      14
    • TGrantTGrant says: 815 comments
      OHD Supporter

      New Orleans, LA

      OHD is so often the bright spot in an otherwise charmless day. Keeping dreams alive is no small thing and I, for one, am grateful for all the work you do to bring it to us!

      16
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Thank you! 🙂

        3
      • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1745 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
        NC

        My feelings precisely! I read only a very few blogs and 2 have recently faded away. It is sad, but I understand how one can burn out; it’s a lot of work. Much appreciated in Kelly’s case, as well as that of the learned folks who comment. Big friendly hugs from here!

        7
        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Burn out has been a battle for me. I’m having a pretty good day today but usually I’d rather go play outside with the dogs. 😀 Burn out is why the OHDO site hasn’t had many posts and why I’ve not been doing things I said I’d do. Not sure what the fix is other than just getting through it.

          7
          • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1127 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1947 Ranch
            OR

            Don’t let yourself get to the point of burn out Kelly. I think I speak for us all who love this site, we appreciate your efforts and if it needs to be less often or less quantity, then so be it. I’m so happy I found OHD, it makes my breaks from work so relaxing and happy!

            9
    • JimHJimH says: 5006 comments
      OHD Supporter

      You’re welcome, Kelly!

      At its best, OHD is an exhibition of older homes in America as they should be, reflective of the times that created them and the family life inside. The posted photo of the woman and her home is richer than a million online shots of white and beige real estate with shiny new kitchens.

      14
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 792 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      This is an indirect comment on Kelly’s book recommendation on kitchens. So many of us bemoan the dated/ugly or “fake backdated” kitchens we often see in older homes. I wish more people (including those of us who restore older homes) would remember that the traditional “non-fitted” kitchen (with freestanding cabinetry, work tables, etc. can be as functional or more functional than modern “everything built in” kitchens. The most useful piece in my current kitchen is a $5 table that I bought at a charity shop. I removed the beat-up wood top and loose-laid a soapstone top on the frame. Voila, a practical work table for very little cost. I don’t have one but Hoosier Cabinets are amazing for people who bake regularly. So I guess all I’m really saying is that if you are restoring a home, it’s well worth thinking about cobbling together a non-fitted kitchen that very well may blend more with the home and avoid looking dated in 10 years.

      16
      • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1127 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1947 Ranch
        OR

        Lancaster John, since you brought it up — 😉 –what would you suggest we do with our 1947 rancher kitchen. It still retains its ‘linoleum’ sheet goods on its walls (made to look like 4″ sq tiles). It’s not in good enough condition to save, two layers of wallpaper and a coat of paint. I’d be curious to know how you’d handle it.

        1
        • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 792 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Victorian Farmhouse
          Lancaster, PA, PA

          Hi Jekl, generally I’d say look at books like Kelly’s (or vintage home magazines) for ideas, or websites like https://retrorenovation.com/category/kitchen/. Specifically, on your walls it sounds like you need to tear all that out and start fresh since it sounds worn out. If you like the look of the linoleum 4×4 tiles on your walls, you could just put up real ceramic ones. My parent’s 1949 ranch had sheet (real) linoleum (patterned but smooth) on the countertops and the entire area of backsplash between the counter and wall cabinets. It held up nicely for 60 years, so you could do that and be period correct. Real sheet linoleum (not vinyl) is still available. Since you asked, if I were doing it I would likely choose the popular look of that era, which I like — white metal cabinets (not hard to find on Ebay and elsewhere, and can be resprayed by an auto body shop), a patterned (real) linoleum floor (and perhaps the same lino on the counters and backsplash) and cheerful “kitchen theme” vintage style wallpaper. And a vintage 40 inch or larger range, if you have the space. Answering this makes me feel like Carlton Varney and his newspaper column! LOL

          5
          • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1127 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1947 Ranch
            OR

            Thank you for that LJ. What’s interesting about this kitchen is that it also still retains its original wood cabinets (actual wood!) and formica counters which I think are from a remodel in the 1960s. It also has, believe it or not, it’s original lino floor, which as you can imagine is showing its age, particularly since it was not cared for in the last 35 years at all. Anyway, I like it very much and would save it but for that. It’s the multi/red/yellow swirled color style I’m sure you’ve seen. So I’ve chosen a Marmoleum that resembles it closely. As to the walls, I would love to do the 4.25″ sq tiles from baseboards up about 5′ and then perhaps paint or wall paper, but the cost is so extreme. We’ve just finished our (single) bathroom restoration with tile and even with a small room the cost for tile & installation was $6000. The kitchen would have to be twice that. I think I’m going to look into linoleum, after all, it worked in this kitchen originally. Dang, if they’d only left it alone. Pretty yellow (faux) tile walls. . .

            1
            • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 792 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1875 Victorian Farmhouse
              Lancaster, PA, PA

              Well, I don’t know how handy you consider yourself but putting up 4×4 ceramic tile is something I think you would find very easy…pre-mixed mastic, an inexpensive diamond blade tile cutter, tile nips, pre-mix grout, a grout float, a sponge and a bucket and you’re ready to go. It’s a bit messy but not difficult to do a nice job.

              • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 1127 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1947 Ranch
                OR

                LOL, Oh LJ, your comments brought a smile to my face 🙂 We have done tiling before (subway tile in the bathroom of our previous home) and swore never again. When I watched Chris, the tile setter who recently did our current bathroom, I realized all the mistakes we made. Not bad enough to spoil it completely, but enough to realize where our limit is. We were so lucky with Chris because the job he did was impeccable. And I was surprised at how difficult it was to get someone to take the job in the first place. We were told that “tile setters don’t want to do 4″ tiles much anymore”, too much trouble I guess. I’m not giving up—I may still get tile in my kitchen if I can save up enough!

      • zoomey says: 534 comments

        Thanks for pointing that out, John. I have a half-fitted kitchen because I wanted more flexibility and couldn’t afford all those cabinets. I purchased three antiques (one is an oak dry sink) to use as kitchen cabinets. I use them for storing pots and pans and other kitchen items. It makes my kitchen so much more inviting and homey. A friend of my college-age child commented the other day how much she likes our kitchen. She lives in a brand new house with a huge, sleek, stainless and granite kitchen. Homey-ness is inviting and warm and comfy! It took a while to find my antique cabinets, but it was worth the effort. And cheaper than built-ins!

        3
        • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 792 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Victorian Farmhouse
          Lancaster, PA, PA

          Hi Zoomey, yes a lot of kitchens of this era had a long enamel sink with drainboards on either side and cabinets underneath, and maybe some wall cabinets above but that was about it. Everything else was free standing. And I neglected to mention, if you have or can create a nice walk in pantry, you hardly need any cabinets for storage.

          1
          • natira121natira121 says: 610 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1877 Vernacular
            Columbia River Gorge, WA

            My kitchen is free-standing except for the sink, which is a double drainboard double sink from one of those metal cabinats. The cabinet was shot (and I hated the noise it made) so I built a frame for for the sink with shelves underneath.

            Nearly everything in my kitchen is off craigslist. Table and chairs in the center, 1950 gas stove, big free-standing cabinet, the sink, and my glorious Hoosier. I had the 1952 fridge already.

            There were a couple cabinets built in when I bought the place, the plywood cabinets I took out and burnt! The wall cabinet, which was very old (square nails) I carefully took apart and re-built into an open dish shelf with plate rack. It’s gorgeous, and I love the way it looks on the wall with all my Fiesta dishes in warm colors.

            The best thing about having a free standing kitchen is that it looks great, and is very inexpensive to do. I’ve spent a total of $650 getting everything mentioned above. Easier to change colors, wallpapers, etc too, because you can move everything!

            I love my kitchen.

            4
      • Jeanne Smith says: 71 comments

        Lancaster John, I have been saving unfitted kitchen ideas on my Pinterest board for several years. I have also many suitable pieces stored in my shed and garage. Now all I need is the right historic home.

        1
    • LaDona says: 33 comments

      Thank you for helping us Save these old Houses

      1
    • KarenZKarenZ says: 1213 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I am so thankful for what you do for us, Kelly! I have truly learned so much from you and some of the people on this page. I agree that just looking at some of the quality craftsmanship in these homes is so much fun for me! Before this page, I didn’t realize how much that I love Tudor, Italianate and Spanish Style homes (I had never even seen a Spanish style home). Well, I also love Craftsman, MCM, Second Empire and the Queens! Thank you so much, Kelly, for the hours and hours of enjoyment!

      4
    • SueSue says: 546 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Kelly, burnout is your bodies way of telling you it needs something. I have read all the comments and clearly you are well loved by a group that does not want you to push yourself to burnout. I have been working on remission from Lyme disease for over a year now. I understand that place of “I can’t do this anymore”. I adore this group and it’s collection of amazing and knowledgeable people. I love old homes so much and the souls they seem to have but not at the expense of you. Thank you for all you do for us and for old homes. You are not taken for granted.

      4
    • Keith Sanders says: 130 comments

      Whether or not our dreams of old houses ever pass from anticipation to realization, much of their magic is fostered in the imagination. And whether the bricks of our inspirations build cottages or castles, OHD is the mortar of the mind. God bless you, Kelly, as a mason of memories.

      6
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Thanks Keith! 🙂

        1
      • Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 craftsman farmhouse
        Bainbridge Island, WA

        Beautifully and truthfully said, Keith…..thank-you!

        2
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5429 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          Well said, Keith. I’ve been accused of building “air castles” for many years but one has to have the “vision thing” to be able to look past the wear and tear old houses have suffered and see the potential in them. OHD is indeed the mortar of the mind for old house lovers. We all know that for Kelly, this site is a labor of love, not an enterprise created to maximize profits.

          4
  2. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Do not forget to add the city, state, build date, price and a small comment about what you are sharing.

    If you happen to buy any home posted on OHD, let me know! I’m having to private/remove certain homes due to the photography (certain photographers allow use but only until the end of the listing period.) But that doesn’t mean I don’t want to know that you found a home here and bought it, please let me or us know. 🙂

    5
  3. SharonSharon says: 649 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 Contemporary
    Sedalia, MO

    Old House Dreams is more than old houses and more than dreams: “It was a mistake to think of houses, old houses, as being empty. They were filled with memories, with the faded echoes of voices. Drops of tears, drops of blood, the ring of laughter, the edge of tempers that had ebbed and flowed between the walls, into the walls, over the years.
    Wasn’t it, after all, a kind of life?
    And there were houses, he knew it, that breathed. They carried in their wood and stone, their brick and mortar a kind of ego that was nearly, very nearly, human.”
    ― Nora Roberts, Key of Knowledge

    Thank you, Kelly, for OHD and for all the time and thought that you put into enriching our lives.

    28
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thank you Sharon, I really appreciate that. 🙂

      6
    • john feuchtenberger says: 60 comments

      Lovely quotation! The incomparable Shirley Jackson’s first paragraph in The Haunting of Hill House is the best “old house alive” description: “No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream. Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against the hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for eighty years and might stand for eighty more. Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”

      10
      • SharonSharon says: 649 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 Contemporary
        Sedalia, MO

        Oh, so wonderful, John. I’ve always loved Shirley Jackson, ever since as a junior in high school (1975) I played the “stoned” Tessie Hutchinson in “The Lottery.” Yes, such mystery and depth in her words, as you have found: “Silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.” And such mystery and depth in old houses.

        6
  4. Amerikiwi says: 320 comments

    Kia Ora from New Zealand,

    Here are two delightful character cottages in the tiny settlement of Kohukohu in the far north region of The Hokianga in the North Island. Kohukohu is a real favourite of mine – you take a short ferry ride from the town of Rawene and when you disembark you find yourself somewhat bedazzled. It isn’t just the pretty location, the many old character homes, the harbour, the quiet or the artistic vibe – it’s the sense that you have arrived via a Tardis and entered another world or dimension. I know that sounds cliche and a bit OTT but it really does have this special magic for a place that has about five short streets, a small pub, one cafe and a little library. Most of the homes are on the cottage size scale, but there is one very grand one with an interior full of remarkable antiques and decor as well as an old Masonic Lodge that was for sale the last time we were there (great potential).

    3 bedroom “pre-1914” cottage, stained glass, beautiful views, tropical gardens and very eclectic decor. It is priced at $US314,235.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3504738

    Pre 1914/1929 cottage with more traditonal colonial style decor, wooden floors and fireplaces. This will be more appealing to Old House Dreamers because they have not painted the woodwork. It is also more spacious and is priced at $US304,000.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3468561

    Attractive “pre-1914” single bay villa in the very desirable Auckland suburb of Herne Bay. Polished wooden floors, beautiful wood kitchen and original fireplaces. It is for auction but has a council valuation of $US1,419,000.00

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3468561

    Two story “pre-1914” concrete home with dormer windows and an interior straight out of a home and garden magazine. It’s located in the Auckand suburb of Freemans Bay. I do not know what the deal is with the sale options as none are listed but it has a council valuation of $US1,775,000.00.

    https://nz.raywhite.com/auckland-city/freemans-bay/2074965/

    Two-storey “pre-1914” Victorian villa in the Auckland seaside village of Devonport. French doors opening onto verandahs on both levels, wood floors, wallpapered rooms and the owner is English and decorated it with a bit of English flair. It is for Auction and has a council valuation of $US2,095,000.00.

    https://www.bayleys.co.nz/1451044

    6
  5. GardenStater says: 220 comments

    I loved the home in Dayton, OH today, so started looking around the city.

    Here’s a gorgeous 1927 Tudor Revival in the nearby town of Oakwood, OH. Price is $479,000. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Dayton_OH/age-75+

    2
  6. NonaKNonaK says: 254 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Austin, TX

    1911 Bungalow – Galveston, TX – $140,000 – 909sf – This one would be fun to bring back. Lots of original charm in this little one. If it wasn’t pending, I’d probably be going to Galveston this weekend to look at it. I hope the new owner uses a gentle hand.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2407-37th-St_Galveston_TX_77550_M81696-32423#photo0

    1
  7. Evelyn Johnson says: 2 comments

    $55,000 4 bd 3.5 ba 3,653 sqft
    512 2nd St, Towanda, PA 18848
    Year built: 1891

    Huge Stately 3653 sq. ft. “fixer upper” house has many options. 4 BR +. Formerly a 3 unit and could be made into that again for income potential. Now a single residence. Nice size lot with view of river from 2nd floor. Many historical accents. Public Water and Sewer. Rooms could be used many different ways. Room sizes are estimates, buyer to verify facts. Woodstove and electric space heaters only, there is natural gas hook up and the electric is on. Home Sold As Is Where is.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/512-2nd-St-Towanda-PA-18848

    I looked at this house when visiting my sister. It needs work, most of the “stuff” in the pictures has been removed. It could be gorgeous with the right person cleaning and repairing it. There is a beautiful view of the river from the 2nd floor. Towanda is a pretty little town in the Endless Mountains of PA. Beautiful area.

  8. Kathryn says: 12 comments

    I just wanted to say that this website is the most fascinating and informative place to come when I want to learn something new – or just simply enjoy the beautiful old houses. This site has made me appreciate older homes significantly – I have a whole new outlook for history within these homes.

    I became fascinated with old homes when I was a teenager when I visited Philbrick Museum in Tulsa, OK. It’s a Spanish style, 1928 mansion that was turned into a museum in the 1970s, I believe.
    The next year I stepped inside my first Victorian home for a cousin’s wedding. It was called the Lauren Danielle B&B in Guthrie, OK. Built in 1890 in an East Lake Stick style – it’s the oldest known home in Guthrie.
    Those experiences introduced me to the love of old homes and their history. My bucket list would include living in an old Victorian. Closest I’ve gotten is a 1956 ranch style house! Currently live in a 2001 house raising young kids.
    Anyway, bottom line is: I love this site and thank you for your very hard work, Kelly, and to all the knowledgeable commenters!

    12
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thank you! 🙂

      1
      • SharonSharon says: 649 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 Contemporary
        Sedalia, MO

        Kathryn, I went to the Philbrook in Tulsa when they were fortunate to host the traveling exhibit of Alphonse Mucha’s “Spirit of Art Nouveau” in 1999. In addition to that experience, I was also taken by the many works of William-Adolphe Bouguereau. Add to that the museum itself: former Italian Renaissance villa of oil pioneer Waite and Genevieve Philbrook. Seeing the Philbrook home and its contents was one of the most memorable experiences of my life.

        https://www.philbrook.org/
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philbrook_Museum_of_Art

    • Karen says: 1033 comments

      If you-or anyone else here-loves old houses, if you are ever in the Rochester, NY area, visit Genesee Country Museum. Its in the town of Mumford, NY, south of Rochester. A lot of old homes, from colonial to around 1860, were taken apart, and reassembled in a village format. You can go inside most, and they are decorated and furnished according to the period. Tour guides are in most homes, to tell you about everything from how they were often rescued from demolition, taken apart and reassembled, and where the furnishings, often as old as the homes, and not repos, were found. They also have a tinsmith’s shop, a printer’s shop, a fishing fly tying shop, and other things like that. There is also an art museum. the last time I was here, the art museum was full of primitive American art, including a lot of portraits. Every weekend in the summer, there is something going on. Bluegrass music, a bagpipe competition, an old time baseball weekend, and more. There’s also a few winter activities. Google Genesee Country Village for more details.

      1
  9. Barbara VBarbara V says: 892 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    First, thank you to Kelly for all the effort involved in bringing these beautiful old places to all of us, for taking the time to ensure that comments are reasonable and appropriate, and for educating everyone who visits Old House Dreams through your postings and the many faithful, experienced and dedicated contributors who have become such an important part of what you have created…

    Now, here is an interesting 1897 Romanesque ( ? ), although the realtor is calling it French Provincial, so help me out here… on 2 acres in Charles Town, WV, for $719,500. I’m surprised it hasn’t been shared already, however I may have missed it, but the setting alone is worth a repeat: https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/house_type/22565627_zpid/0-1940_built/39.576056,-77.794876,38.895308,-78.783646_rect/9_zm/7_p/

    4
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks.

      Could be called French Eclectic, just at a glance didn’t really dissect it.

      3
      • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 792 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Victorian Farmhouse
        Lancaster, PA, PA

        I’m thinking it was a turreted Victorian that lost its big porch. We have a curious one near me in Lancaster — a nice Victorian that surely once had a wrap porch but someone decided to try to turn into a Colonial Revival. Street view: https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0429239,-76.3281383,3a,75y,251.34h,96.61t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1ssVEr4gsdzKZ32G02VQalCw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192 If you click through be sure to rotate the image as the Romanesque Watt Mansion (named “Roslyn”) is directly across the street. It was built by our local department store magnate (Watt and Shand).

        4
      • Hoyt Clagwell says: 249 comments

        Agreed. Going by interior details–four panel doors, slate fireplace mantels–it looks a good decade or more older than 1897. It would originally have been solidly Queen Anne originally, but with porches and any other exterior details removed, someone has decided to play up the vaguely French Chateauesque feel of what’s left of the exterior, in a very Architectural Digest-informed decorator kind of way.

    • JimHJimH says: 5006 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The NRHP info says it was originally a chateauesque Queen Anne that was altered in the 1940’s to give it a Norman look. I guess French Provincial sounds better than Remuddled.

      5
      • CharlestonJohn says: 1117 comments

        Thanks Jim. That clears up the odd combination of elements that I couldn’t quite make sense of. Whatever the style is, it’s not French Provincial, as that style typically features relatively simple massing with a symmetrical front elevation and centered front entrance. I imagine the roof was something to see prior to the hipped Norman-inspired replacement.

    • Nancygirl says: 174 comments

      Absolutely beautiful! Love the house, love West Virginia!

  10. Joe says: 753 comments

    While looking at yesterday’s OHD post in Dayton OH,
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/04/04/1904-dayton-oh/
    the comments made me want to see what is available there. I did this search on Zillow of houses under $100,000, with 4+ bedrooms.
    (admin edit out link)

    124 houses came up. That’s lot of houses to look through, and I don’t have the time to do it. But…….
    This one is a block away from the OHD posted house, and it’s a beauty. $85,500,
    with 6 bedrooms, 4 baths, and 4674 square feet. It appears to me to be a Queen Anne Free Classic. It has a many great features including a lot of quarter-sawn oak woodwork and some beautiful stained glass windows.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/915-W-Grand-Ave-Dayton-OH-45402/2091220453_zpid/

    2
  11. StevenFStevenF says: 848 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    Happy Friday !

    Below are a few 20th century South Carolina Colonial Revivals that seem to have a little more “oomph” than the standard. Alas, not many original bathrooms or kitchens, but nice millwork and room designs.

    1. A 1925 blond brick beauty in Greenwood, SC for $390K. I included this one mostly for the front door/transom, the entry hall and public rooms which are pretty gracious. The new kitchen, while not my favorite style, is OK.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/127-Cambridge-Ave-E-Greenwood-SC-29646/121819259_zpid/

    2. A lovely 1956 red-brick colonial in Anderson, SC with imposing columns flanking the front door for $325K. A paneled family room and den as well as a lovely curved bay leading to a French door in the dining room make this a standout. There are some original bathrooms and a meh kitchen.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/406-Shannon-Way-Anderson-SC-29621/10783246_zpid/

    3. Lastly, in the “do-not-judge-a-book-by-its-cover” category, is this wonderful example in Waterboro, SC for $289K. The unprepossessing exterior masks a lovely interior which has been nicely cared for over the years. There’s nothing jaw-dropping, but I’m drawn to solid, quiet homes like this one.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/810-Hampton-St-Walterboro-SC-29488/75225232_zpid/

    Enjoy!

    4
    • natira121natira121 says: 610 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      “meh kitchen” *giggle* I like that most of us don’t like today’s kitchens!

      Sometimes I swear I’m gonna run foaming at the mouth if I see one more white-cabinet-black-granite-stainless-appliances-blasphemous-abomination of a kitchen!

      12
      • BethanyBethany says: 3471 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1983 White elephant
        Escondido, CA

        Me too! My very very least favorite is oak cabinets, granite counters, stainless appliances.

        8
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5429 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        “Sometimes I swear I’m gonna run foaming at the mouth if I see one more white-cabinet-black-granite-stainless-appliances-blasphemous-abomination of a kitchen!” You’ll have to stand in a long line, Natira. Surely such formulaic kitchens are nearing the end of their popularity if we can collectively just hold on a little longer…at least I hope so!

        6
        • Laurie W.Laurie W. says: 1745 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1988 Greek Revival Wannabe in beautiful countryside
          NC

          Let’s hope you’re right! I speed past kitchens unless they’re rare period-appropriate ones, because even in well kept antique houses, modern kitchens are all the same the same the same.

          2
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 792 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      Steven, I too appreciate simpler homes which are well crafted that don’t scream “look at me.” This (last) one is from 1938, which at least in my imagination if not in fact was a time when the doctors drove sensible Buicks, and if you were fortunate enough to get through the depression with enough money to build a home, you didn’t flaunt your wealth in the face of your neighbors.

      9
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 2216 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central, NY

      All three are nice, but… I love the first house – so very lovely! And I seriously like the last one. The middle house… it’s its bathrooms I like a lot.

  12. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 792 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    Hi Kelly, I just want to say I like your new display format. It makes it much easier to see the details before clicking through. Lancaster John

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Super! Countless have said they like the new change, only one hated it and wondered when I was going to turn it back but it’s staying. I’m thinking of doing something else with the rest of the site, make it less 2008 looking, easier to find the info you need without actually looking for it. 😀

      6
  13. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Fun fact, nearly 9,000 people viewed last week’s link exchange. I know of at least two people that have bought a home they found in a share since we started (I’m betting there’s more) so y’all should be proud of your time spent finding and sharing homes here. 🙂

    16
  14. Ozark Dave says: 55 comments

    This is my first comment for the forum so forgive me if the Forum Rules aren’t exact. I search a lot properties in Southwest Virginia and came across this jewel near Castlewood, VA. It says it’s an 1800s farmhouse. I agree with this but I can’t place an exact build date or building style because the construction is so primitive! It’s completely off grid! No running water or electricity (There’s electricity run to the property)! It uses a well for water and there’s a very ornate out house! There’s no kitchen evident. The house looks lived in but honestly it could be a museum too! It’s located in a valley on 33 acres for $85,000! That’s a real bargain! The land alone is worth that much. Enjoy!

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/Moccasin-Ridge-Rd_Castlewood_VA_24224_M54207-90548

    3
  15. SecondEmpireLoverSecondEmpireLover says: 5 comments
    OHD Supporter

    YOUNGSTOWN, OH

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6509-Olentangy-River-Rd-Delaware-OH-43015/89704600_zpid/

    Here is an old house that I’ve driven by many times. Would love to one day own this and restore it to its former glory!

    2
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 892 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      Well, the exterior ticks all the boxes – what a beauty! Have you ever peeked in a window? Must be quite a desirable area, if the price is any indication…

      • SecondEmpireLoverSecondEmpireLover says: 5 comments
        OHD Supporter

        YOUNGSTOWN, OH

        It is a very beautiful house. I have always wanted to go inside and take pictures but I’m always afraid of going on someone else’s property. The area is very good and has a lot of higher end modern homes. This property also comes with a decent amount of land which I think really adds to the price. If it were just the house, the price would be a fair amount less I think. Still a real beauty!

  16. SueSue says: 546 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    Hello from Maine. Spring is here. The robins have come home, my horses are shedding like crazy, bulbs are sprouting up and we are expecting snow tonight.

    Speaking of Maine I have some homes from here to share.

    This is a gem from way up in Machais. An Italianate built in 1886. “The Historic Clark Perry House is a showboat home, with extensive exterior wood detailing, designed and constructed for a local lumber baron and horseman during the heyday of log drives down the nearby Machias river.” It looks to have not been changed much at all. They say “priced to sell” but I think it could be gotten for less. I really love this house. What a wonderful summer home it would make or if you like romantic Maine solitude not far from the ocean, a year round home. 225,000

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/101-Court-St_Machias_ME_04654_M49030-42679?ex=ME61138771

    I know this is over a million dollars but I had to share. This stunning 1769 center chimney beauty is in Boothbay on the water with a charming cottage, 14 acres, two ponds(one with an island),huge carriage house,barn,all the fireplaces one could want and a quiet elegance that is the trademark of the historic New England home. For me it just doesn’t get much better than this.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/29-Murray-Hill-Rd_Boothbay_ME_04537_M31967-18140?ex=ME609657981

    From CT, as the search continues, a 1750 cape in Brookfield. Check out how wide the floor boards are. They have done a great job updating the house without ruining it. Some fireplaces have been removed a long the way, which is a shame but it’s till pretty amazing with it’s gorgeous floors and Hand hewn beams in almost every room. Bonus is the gorgeous apartment in the barn. I think I could just live there.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/29-Ironworks-Hill-Rd_Brookfield_CT_06804_M35190-72703#photo28

    4
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 892 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      That Machias Italianate is surely an eye-catcher, with a very unique roof line – and a wonderful old photo…

      2
    • natira121natira121 says: 610 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      Sue, Nice homes all! I wanna put the third house on the land of the second listing.*grin*

      My horses are shedding like crazy too. I was laughing a couple days ago….. I went out to see the horses, and the fences were covered in white hair, with PILES under each rubbing place! I have four horses, two are rollers, two are rubbers, so there is hair everywhere!

      But I love watching the birds carry the hair off, and I have a wonderful collection of bird nests with horse hair in them. I even have an Oriel nest with horse hair and hay string in three colors, a nifty little woven bag hanging from a branch.

      2
      • Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 craftsman farmhouse
        Bainbridge Island, WA

        Natira, isn’t God wonderful to have programed the timing of shedding in this way? I used to love to see the birds pick up my dog’s shed fur in spring and then find an empty nest in the fall, that has bits of string, hair/fur, etc. from many different sources. Amazing…!!

        5
        • natira121natira121 says: 610 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1877 Vernacular
          Columbia River Gorge, WA

          It’s awesome, and I love sharing stuff like that with my grandkids. My grandson just spent three days/two nights here. He’s nearly 12. And at one point he said “I love spending time here, in Construction Gramma’s House!”

          I’ll be glad when construction is complete, but sharing the work with grandkids does make it more fun!

          2
        • Karen says: 1033 comments

          When my sister brushes her Newfoundland, she does it at the back of the yard, where there are some trees. She swears the birds all gather there, and watch for a chance to swoop down and get some of that hair! I got a golden doodle a few years ago, and since he rarely sheds (once in a while, I find a hairball floating about), there’s really nothing for the birds to get!

          1
      • SueSue says: 546 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1802 Cape
        ME

        Oh how nice Natira. I have a grey, now white and he is a slob. My mare is never as bad as he is. My mini is so tiny that no matter what he does he is easy to clean. I have a collection of bird nests too and only one is made with horse hair. It’s tiny and I love it.

        2
  17. Amerikiwi says: 320 comments

    I accidentally used the same listing for two different houses (thanks to Natira for letting me know).

    Here is the correct listing for a “pre-1914” single bay villa in the desirable Herne Bay suburb of Auckland. It has a council valuation of $US1,419,000.00.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3524201

    2
  18. QuiltingWitchQuiltingWitch says: 54 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 split level prisoner
    Great Falls, MT

    Divine bathrooms and an overall very fine house. Los Angeles, $5,750,000

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2172-W-Live-Oak-Dr-Los-Angeles-CA-90068/20808523_zpid/

    2
  19. QuiltingWitchQuiltingWitch says: 54 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 split level prisoner
    Great Falls, MT

    More bathroom love, not sure if it’s original. Los Angeles, $11,970,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2600-Aberdeen-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90027/20809403_zpid/

    Batchelder Tile. Pasadena, $849,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/745-E-Rio-Grande-St-Pasadena,-CA,-91104_rb/20919232_zpid/

    5
  20. Don Richards says: 446 comments

    Just one to post this week that caught my attention, a super charmingly renovated 1758 cottage in Washington, Ct listed at 685k. It’s hard to tell what was built when, but overall pretty sensitively done little house. Love the exposed stone wall in the kitchen.The landscaping is also gorgeous.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/New-Preston-Marble-Dale_CT_06777_M47016-30502?view=qv

  21. Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    1670, historic Norwich Town, CT.
    One of my favorites, just reduced to $204,900. May have been posted previously, but at this price, thought it was worth a second look.
    https://www.zillow.com/savedhomes/for_sale/61991871_zpid/1_pnd/55.924585,-67.895508,20.961439,-123.618165_rect/3_zm/2_p/1_rs/1_fr/
    This little old house is a great small size, and what I most appreciate, is that in the restoration, they did not OVERDO it!! The old floor patina remains and little kitchen and baths are just right. Staging perfectly helps too. I am SO tempted…!!!

    4
  22. Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    $750,000, 1894, Louisville, KY.
    Although more elegant than I’m usually drawn to, the owners of this house have used a fabulous color palette and window dressings. And its location across from an Olmstead designed Central Park is a decided plus. I could easily move in and enjoy it all.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1375-S-4th-St-Louisville-KY-40208/73606560_zpid/?utm_source=Yahoo&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=addresssearch

    3
  23. kate cahill says: 51 comments

    just a shout out of “thanks” to you Kelly! I so enjoy all the effort you put in to this site. Bottom line- though– take care of yourself- and take necessary breaks. Everyone (and I mean everyone!!) appreciates you- but can survive if you need time for yourself!
    Thanks-Kate

    3
  24. Virginia Parks Seward says: 53 comments

    Asheville, North Carolina $359,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/88-Elizabeth-St-Asheville-NC-28801/5616767_zpid/
    this house is in the Montford District, surrounded by wonderful old houses, walking to downtown is easy,
    amazing Riverside cemetery is very close by to walk in as well. Thank you Kelly for all of your hard work!

  25. Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    I echo the kudos to you Kelly..! You may not fully realize the wonderful community you have brought together. I would so mourn its loss, so preserve yourself and your sanity…..take time when needed to feed your soul. ?

    • Wm mann says: 7 comments

      W.Brookfield property looks like it could be a bargain.
      Close to Sturbridge and not so far from Boston.
      Barn and lot size make it especially tempting.

      1
  26. Margaret B says: 2 comments

    First time sharing a link!

    $249,000 Gilsum, New Hampshire: Colonial/Federal on 36+ acres.

    https://www.landandfarm.com/property/36_48_Acres_in_Cheshire_County-8789215/

    The interior needs some gentle unpicking and restoration, but for the price I think you get a lot to work with.

    Hoping to find an intact colonial on substantial acreage back east when my husband retires in about 7 years…this site is my absolute favorite place to browse old homes. Thank you so much Kelly and all who make this such a neat community!

    5
  27. JimHJimH says: 5006 comments
    OHD Supporter

    The first true Shingle Style house, the 1879 Morrill Cottage at Bar Harbor, ME by William Ralph Emerson, known as “Redwood” – $5.2 MM. Although structurally intact, the natural wood interiors have been winterized and slathered with paint.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10-Barberry-Ln-Bar-Harbor-ME-04609/91843689_zpid/?fullpage=true

    An Emerson masterpiece, the 1878 Eustis Estate in Milton MA, a wonderful house museum. Linked before, but the website just gets better:
    http://eustis.estate/locations/

    Another Historic New England property, Roseland Cottage, a Gothic Revival gem:
    https://www.historicnewengland.org/property/roseland-cottage/

    4
  28. Don Richards says: 446 comments

    Hey guys, I have a conundrum for you. I have a friend looking for a house with character in Yakima, Wa. She’s found this little 1940 Cape that she’s looking to make an offer on. Loads of red flags, the Realtor has basically doubled the true square footage, but that’s another story.

    In any case, it appears that the kitchen is pretty original. She’s a bit dismayed at how shallow the base and upper cabinets are. Does anyone think it’s possible to alter them to be deeper and therefore more functional? My first thought is that where the stove and refrigerator are now, move in a vintage 36″ range to where it would have been, and flip the refrigerator back to the original spot. The counters don’t seem to be original, so maybe some 40’s tile? Linoleum for the floor? I think it’s cute as hell, and I’d be happy to live with it as is. She likes things to be unique, but as functional as possible. I want to show her that this layout can be still functional. Thanks for any advice.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7-N-36th-Ave-Yakima-WA-98902/23683233_zpid/

    • zoomey says: 534 comments

      I’m not a purist, so I’d tear out the kitchen, saving the doors and anything salvageable from the original cabinets. Those skinny cabinets would be unworkable for me. And the fridge next to the stove, well, I could not live with that, but I’m very into cooking. A good carpenter can rebuild the cabinets. Take out the soffit (I really dislike soffits) and use that space above the sink. Move the stove halfway across the wall where it is now. That will cost $$, but I can’t see how anyone who isn’t using this as a part-time house could manage in that kitchen. It is dismaying, although the house overall is very cute. I love original most things, but if it’s not functional, it has to be altered.

    • Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      Don, it is a sweet little house. As to the kitchen…..less would be more in my view. I agree with moving the fridge to the opposite wall niche and finding a nice 42″ refurbished range for the space the current range & fridge occupy. I absolutely love that the original cabinets are still there and wouldn’t change any of them, simply renew the countertops. I was wondering where the double doors go, or if any of that space could become pantry..?? The soffits could be converted to matching cabinetry. I redesigned a 1945 house in Seattle where the kitchen was closet sized. BUT, it still had a back door, the counters were 18″ deep and it sported a 42″ PINK Fridge. We borrowed space and closed off the back door to make it workable in today’s world. But I think the kitchen in the Yakima house needs very little alteration…..KEEP those cabinets…celebrate an original…!!

    • Hoyt Clagwell says: 249 comments

      As a builder/carpenter/cabinet maker–there’s no really plausible way to alter those existing cabinets to make them deeper. Any attempt to do so would be far more time consuming and expensive than simply purchasing or constructing new cabinets from scratch. Even trying to re-use original doors or hardware…those doors may not be truly square, probably weren’t built to precise standard dimensions, may have warped or been damaged over time, and probably have many layers of paint (and grease/grime), some of which may be lead-based. As for salvaging hardware, well–modern hardware is easier to install (seriously-try installing an entire kitchen’s worth of eighty year old flat head screws by hand because an impact driver will not work), easier to adjust as needed, and you don’t have to worry about stripping old paint or grime off of it, trying to find the right screws, or about trying to find matching pieces when you have less than you need to do the job.

      It’s a modestly size kitchen with a straightforward layout–new cabinets shouldn’t be extravagantly expensive for such a kitchen. Plus one would have the advantage of actually specifying the arrangement of components to suit one’s actual requirements and preferences.

    • Don Richards says: 446 comments

      Thanks for the input, everyone. They put an offer in on the house and are waiting back to hear. My friend made her husband a promise to wait a year before they change anything. I think that’s a really smart and practical idea.

      3
  29. Don Richards says: 446 comments

    One more house to share with you. This 1955 mid-century modern is located in Salisbury, Ct and is listed a dollar under 800k. It’s being slyly marketed as a teardown because the land has great views and the house obviously needs some work. The green metal cabinets in the kitchen and that wallpapered bath might be enough to seal the deal.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/136-Belgo-Rd_Lakeville_CT_06039_M34020-17748?view=qv

  30. KimT says: 74 comments

    Copying Facebook post on proposed changes to National Register listings:

    Coalition for American Heritage
    7 hrs ·

    ACT NOW!! Proposed changes to the National Register regulations could limit the input of local communities in the listing process while giving more power to large developers. Use our template to send your comments to the National Park Service.

    https://heritagecoalition.org/call-to-action-2/?fbclid=IwAR1a-_YXTXpEHwrxsYKObVm6Noqn2_9oTAcgki5tvyneaV6gLE1duaFWqbU

    5
    • JKleeb says: 260 comments

      Thanks for the alert on this!

      2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5429 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Kim,
      At any other time in our history such adverse changes to thwart or repeal laws that were enacted to protect our architectural heritage would be almost unthinkable. But in this new political climate where protective laws are being rolled back or ignored entirely in many sectors, nothing appears to be safe anymore. Developers have rediscovered the charm of old often inner-city neighborhoods across the nation but saving the architecture of the past seldom plays a part in their redevelopment equation. Even when a half-hearted effort is made to preserve something, it is often reinterpreted during rehab to introduce a modern sanitized context to the past. The air of authenticity is often lost in the process.

      This issue hits home hard for us because it is very personal and immediate. We bought a historic 1880’s home in 1989 on the fringes of downtown Fort Worth, Texas. with the aim to restore it over time to period perfection. Back then, scores of period homes remained in our neighborhood which had the distinction of being the oldest in our city. Because many of the neighborhood’s old homes were in various states of neglect and deterioration, what was most needed at the time was new investment respectful of the city’s history embodied in the neighborhood.
      But in 2003-4 a developer out of San Antonio arrived and local Preservationists immediately launched an effort to convince the developer to recognize the historic character of the neighborhood. Nationally known preservation economist Donavan Rypkema, https://www.placeeconomics.com/about_us/donovan-rypkema/ was hastily brought in to consult with the developer and advise him that preservation and new development could profitably go hand in hand resulting in the best of both worlds.

      Mr. Rypkema worked intensely with the developer for three days. The developer patiently listened to Mr. Rypkema’s pro-preservation arguments. Those of us living in the neighborhood were excited about the neighborhood’s prospects for the future but almost from the start our expectations started falling short as the expected mixed-use combination of housing and retail in between historic homes was abandoned for unremarkable downtown apartments without the surviving period homes. A few were moved out of the neighborhood or, more commonly, were razed with little fanfare. That set in place a template for future development to the point where our neighborhood now appears destined to soon become “apartmentville” with only a few isolated remnants of the past surviving. It’s reached a point where the changes are irreversible.

      Therefore, like the few others who have lived here for decades, we’re now resigned to leaving this neighborhood forever. Presently, we are literally surrounded by brand new apartments with more nearby still under construction.

      Our listing agent made a video last week beginning where our neighborhood connects to downtown Fort Worth and ends at our 1889 Victorian home which stands out like the proverbial sore thumb against the backdrop of modern luxury apartments (please note the “Industrial look” steel overhangs!) Here’s the Youtube video: (rather long at 8 minutes) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tI2Gb0dS1c0

      Truly sad to realize that numerous other neighborhoods across the nation are going through similar transitions. These proposed adverse changes to the National Register/National Park Service regulations will only encourage more development of this kind. Money is now trumping our history; sad. Don’t forget there were once old houses where the apartments stand.

      6
      • KimT says: 74 comments

        Sorry to hear about the encroachment on your old house dream. Thanks for sharing the story though. I hope you can find a more happily situated place next.

        2
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5429 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          Thanks, Kim,
          We’ll be Indiana bound when and if we ever sell. In the meantime we’ll have the unique experience of being surrounded by apartment dwellers.

          2
  31. 67drake67drake says: 265 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1993, hey I’m still looking! Boring
    Iowa County , WI

    $165,000. 1904 Dutch Colonial-ish ( “Victorian “ in the ad”) close to me in Boscobel Wi. Lots of woodwork still intact.
    https://www.redfin.com/WI/Boscobel/1312-Wisconsin-Ave-53805/home/57571192

    3
  32. Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    I’m partial to storybook shingle style houses of that era….this one is charming and cozy…..thanks 67drake…!

  33. Dr.SnyderDr.Snyder says: 64 comments
    1895 PORTAGE, OH

    Been a while since I’ve posted any interesting finds, so I thought I’d put this one up. I love these sort of working class, blue collar homes (probably because I’ve always seen myself as that). When I called Rochester home, north of Titus was a good place to live; near to Wegmans, and near to Durand Eastman–Lake “O.” I love that none of the gumwood trim has been painted, though my wife doesn’t very much like the kitchen. I agree with her; I don’t very much like the soffit, but the rest of the house is really quite wonderful:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/90-Hardison-Rd-Rochester-NY-14617/30973038_zpid/

    And because video really presents a sense of the space:

    http://www.bayervideotours.com/tour/90-hardison-rd-rochester-ny-14617

    1
  34. CarolynCarolyn says: 295 comments
    Grand Rapids, MI

    $294,900. 1910 ?? in Fort Wayne IN. Inside has Craftsman vibes but I’m not good enough at styles to say. I love how original everything is. Just stunning!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/618-W-Berry-St-Fort-Wayne-IN-46802/180535940_zpid/

    6
  35. Joe says: 753 comments

    Hi All,
    I have a question for any who might know the answer.
    – I have always heard that wood burning fireplaces take more heat out of a home than they generate. I have always found this to be confusing until I moved to my c.1800 Federal townhouse. I opened up the walls and coverings in front of all seven fireplaces to see
    how restorable they might be. I quickly learned that the chimneys would draw the heat from the house at a rapid rate and quickly installed insulation in them.
    – Recently, I thought that it might be that wood burning fireplaces don’t remove heat while fires are in them as much as that heat is constantly drawn out of the house by the nature of their construction, even when their flues are covered with dampers.
    -Before I had thought that it was only when the dampers were opened during the time that the fire was low and going out, yet closing the dampers would introduce toxic fumes into the living space.
    -My original take when I was told that they take more heat than they give was that while the fire was burning, more heat would leave the house than be generated while the fire was in it’s full strength than would enter the house. I love an open fire, and have never understood how such a warming thing could be costing me heat. I haven’t been able to find a reliable source to find out the truth.
    -Does anyone out there know of such a reliable scientifically valid study or source of such information?
    – I myself have been repeating this claim for years without any thing other than hearsay to back it up. Anyone out there know the truth?

    1
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5429 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Count Rumford, an early physicist interested in thermal dynamics, studied this issue in the late 1700’s. Here’s more information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumford_fireplace The principles remain the same so modern Rumford fireplaces have been refined and still provide heating advantages over conventional fireplaces. Here’s a firm specializing in Rumfords: http://www.rumford.com/

      1
      • Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
        OHD Supporter

        2001 craftsman farmhouse
        Bainbridge Island, WA

        Joe and John, I designed one for our large handcrafted log house in 1980 using Count Rumford’s specs. Opening was 50″x52″, with full-width 4″deep throat and a shallow 17″D flared firebox with outside air vents and a chimney-top damper. The results of a small fire could be felt across the 17′ room. Filled with rubble, the two-story multi-flue stack performed as a Russian stove when all, including the kitchen wood stove and basement wood/oil fired boiler were all fired up. We loved the way it radiated heat and never once smoke. If I remember I think I bought the little 18th-century book written by Rumford.

        2
    • ChrisICU says: 649 comments

      The kang ‘beds’ of Northern China is another example of solving the too much heat is lost issue. There, they use an elaborate series of flues and tile/clay to create.a thermal mass that can not only heat while lit, but can heat the space overnight when not lit. in the 21st century, Thermal Mass Rocket Stoves (or Earth Stoves) are attempting to solve the same problem. But, the average traditional fireplace in use today doesn’t really warm the room efficiently.

      1
  36. Ted says: 7 comments

    1937, Charles Eames designed house, St. Louis, MO. $2.1 Million.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4-Deacon-Dr-Saint-Louis-MO-63131/2787086_zpid/

    4
  37. CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 1117 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Charleston, SC

    Boonie Doone Plantation is located within the part of the SC Lowcountry called the ACE basin, which is named for the three rivers that form the estuary and define the area (Ashepoo, Combahee, Edisto). Bonnie Doone was initially established in 1722. The original house was a 1865 victim of Sherman’s scorched earth tactics.
    The current house was completed in 1932 by New York stockbroker Alfred H. Caspary in the Georgian Revival style.
    $2.89M

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5878-Bonnie-Doone-Rd-Walterboro-SC-29488/2085253472_zpid/
    https://south-carolina-plantations.com/colleton/bonnie-doone.html

    3
  38. CoraCora says: 2055 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1900. Yes, it’s a mess. But there’s a ton of great parts left. Worth sharing. The one freshly painted room appears as if someone is living in it; I see a small fridge and microwave – maybe trying to renovate while living onsite. $60K

    Moberly, MO:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/521-Union-Ave-Moberly-MO-65270/231529215_zpid/

    1
  39. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11882 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    For sale by owner (which is why I’m sharing it here, I don’t post by owners unless it’s from a reader.) Moved to this location in the 1970’s, built c. 1831. Pink (er, salmon?) Greek Revival with 3 bed, 1900 sq ft on 6.9 acres in Americus, Georgia. Also has a guest house. $299,900

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/141-Briarwood-Cir-Americus-GA-31709/105388463_zpid/?fullpage=true

    2
  40. Kim says: 22 comments

    Kelly,
    Columbus, Ms has a wonderful 1854 home just posted.
    Love your site!

  41. Kelley Townsend says: 1 comments

    https://www.rmlsweb.com/v2/engine/reportgen.asp?MLSID=19126375&PropType=1
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/8873-Days-Creek-Cut-Off-Rd_Canyonville_OR_97417_M18223-33221
    YEAR BUILT 1897 PRICE $395,000 5BR 3BA 3576 Sq ft Every detail in this 1897 home is either original or has been handcrafted for period.12″ base molding, wainscoting, hardwood/fir floors, beautiful country kitchen with both modern and antique features including wood burning cookstove.
    video shows it all: https://vimeo.com/282063748

    1
  42. ChrisICU says: 649 comments

    Frank Lloyd Wright, 1.65M
    Kansas City, MO

    Lovely and highly original. The kitchen doesn’t look like a regular FLW design, but vintage nevertheless. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3600-Belleview-Ave_Kansas-City_MO_64111_M88789-84197

    2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1608 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      While it is nice to see this one again, I believe I have seen it here before. I remember the circular pond with aqua plants and some of the artwork. How nice to have a home with all of those windows.

  43. Sandy BSandy B says: 717 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    1838, $295,000, simple Greek Revival, Harrodsburg, KY
    Just had to post this one near one of my most favorite places…..Shakertown (Pleasant Hill), KY, 1806-1910. I love the house and the area is beautiful. Although I sadly suspect the original windows have been replaced, it still has a very nice Shaker vibe and certainly was built during their time in the neighborhood. Since this community eventually grew to over 4,000 acres, it possibly could have included this site, be interesting to know who built this house.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4236-Lexington-Rd-Harrodsburg-KY-40330/105907543_zpid/?utm_source=Yahoo&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=addresssearch

  44. ChrisICU says: 649 comments

    Ok here’s an unusual find…
    70+ acres, 1890’s farm house…. and your own beautiful cave
    Caves, it turns out, don’t come cheap. $1.3M

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/7126-N-Crystal-Cave-Ln_Springfield_MO_65802_M73036-77692#photo27

  45. Christina Comer says: 3 comments

    https://www.coldwellbanker.com/property/200-Oliver-Ave-Crewe-VA-23930/94545409/detail?src=agent-profile-featured-photo

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/Crewe-VA/200-Oliver-Ave/250876650_zpid/

    200 Oliver Ave. Crewe, Virginia.
    Built in 1914 by T.B. Oliver.
    This house carries a lot of historical significance to the town of Crewe. T.B. Oliver was a huge influence on the development of the town and its local businesses.

  46. Mark H. says: 16 comments

    1943 Modernistic in Marengo, IA – $94,900. Still has many of the original details including a fairly unique stair railing. I was surprised to find this style in the area.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/220-W-Main-St_Marengo_IA_52301_M82254-76798

    1
  47. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1164 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Limestone house
    Langeais, Loire Valley,

    Hi fellow OHDers! Check out this amazing French property in my area, built on the ruins of an ancient Roman fortress, with underground tunnels and rooms and plenty of buildings and outbuildings. Don’t miss the drone video after the pictures! 728,000€, Marigny-Marmande (Indre et Loire) http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/55092CFI37/house-for-sale-in-marigny-marmande-indre-et-loire-centre-france

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