1835 – Calais, VT

Added to OHD on 4/3/19   -   Last OHD Update: 9/8/20   -   12 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
Are you the new owner? Comment below, we'd love to say hi!

4608 Vt Route 14, East Calais, VT 05650

Map: Street

  • $185,000
  • 3 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 2016 Sq Ft
  • 4.75 Ac.
This historic 3+ bedroom home in East Calais shines with authentic character and charm throughout and is being offered at an outstanding value. The rooms are bright with high ceilings. There is a large covered porch that looks across to the neighboring historic property and a second story porch perfect for cool summer nights. The ample eat-in kitchen features an exposed brick chimney. Off the kitchen is a long pantry walled with built-in cabinetry, and beyond that is a cold storage pantry. There is a full bathroom on the first floor and a 1/4 bath on the second floor. The current owners turned a second floor kitchen into a beautiful craft room with built-ins and a tin sink. A new furnace and water heater were installed last year. The East Calais General Store is just a few doors down. There is a large field on the property (up the hill behind the house) that would be perfect for grazers and gardeners alike. Detached 2 car garage, separate one car garage and a small cabin/outbuilding provide plenty of storage and options for work space, animals and more. Snag this lovely piece of Vermont history for yourself!
Contact Information
Jeanne Felmly, New England Landmark Realty
(866) 324-2427
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region:
Period & Associated Styles:
Features: , , , | Misc:

12 Comments on 1835 – Calais, VT

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. Ryall Dixie says: 24 comments

    I am in LOVE!

    8
  2. Denise Lynn says: 201 comments

    Really cute house! I love the craft room. And that little cabin tucked in the woods is darling!

    8
  3. Zann says: 519 comments

    This house really is like going back in time. I recommend peeking around the surrounding area. It’s a solitary history lover’s dream.

    Other than a few cosmetic things, I wouldn’t change much to this lady. I also love the idea of the bed outside. That has to be a great place to nap in mild weather.

    8
  4. EileenM says: 288 comments

    This is not a criticism. I notice that in this house, as in many others on OHD, furniture is placed against doors. I can’t imagine why anyone would do this. Any thoughts?

    1
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1165 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      ah ah and the French me always finds it weird to see beds (heads) placed in front of windows in American homes. 😀

      3
    • Melody says: 502 comments

      Sometimes I’ve noticed that sometimes there’s a door between a bedroom and a smaller room. Originally a dressing room perhaps?

      I see furniture in front of doors a lot on here. It bugs my curious nature that I don’t know why a door has been blocked. I want to open the door and see!

      • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 379 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1850 Italianate, classical
        New Haven, CT

        Sometimes there is more than one door into a room and the space is simply needed for things other then entering or leaving the room since a second door permits this. Sometimes rooms simply interconnect when we no longer want passage between them to occur, such as if both rooms open onto the hallway but one room houses boys and the other houses girls. In one photo, the door I saw may not have been blocking the door entirely. And, if that door were now a closet door and opened out away from the room, a person might be able to open it and get things from the closet without needing to move the chair. There’s usually practical reasons for such decisions, even if we can’t see what they are.

        Regarding the following question about dressing rooms, that is certainly a possibility. But a lot depends on the age or period of the house and the resources of the family living in it. It might have been a sewing room, a nursery, a sick room,a study, or any place where one wanted or needed more privacy or isolation. In many very old houses, it was also not uncommon to have to go through someon’e bedroom to get to another room (often a bedroom). Privacy was not nearly as much of an issue as it is now in very early times when living was much more communal and a whole extended family might be confined to just one room. The concept of “privacy” has varied dramatically over the ages.

    • AJ DavisAJ Davis says: 379 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1850 Italianate, classical
      New Haven, CT

      Sometimes there is more than one door into a room and the space is simply needed for things other then entering or leaving the room since a second door permits this. Sometimes rooms simply interconnect when we no longer want passage between them to occur, such as if both rooms open onto the hallway but one room houses boys and the other houses girls. In one photo, the door I saw may not have been blocking the door entirely. And, if that door were now a closet door and opened out away from the room, a person might be able to open it and get things from the closet without needing to move the chair. There’s usually practical reasons for such decisions, even if we can’t see what they are.

  5. Mezzodiva54 says: 2 comments

    I’m wondering if that little cabin is a sugar shack?

  6. Lori S says: 58 comments

    I love this home! The first house I ever lived in as a young married woman (girl) was a 1900 4 square farmhouse in Iowa. I had this exact metal sink unit! That was all the counter space I had to work with other than the kitchen table. Was excited to see this. This house just makes me smile and I’m not usually a fan of this aesthetic.. I could so live here.

Comment Here


To keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents, comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved. Keep topics to the home, history, local attractions or general history/house talk.

Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.
Click here to read the comment rules, updated 1/12/20.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified. Do not contact the agent unless you are interested in the property.