Delphi, IN – $79,900

Contingent or Pending Sale
Status may not be current or/and may accept additional offers.
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Added to OHD on 3/2/19   -   Last OHD Update: 4/28/19   -   31 Comments
221 E Franklin St, Delphi, IN 46923

Map: Aerial

  • $79,900
  • 3 Bed
  • 3 Bath
  • 2432 Sq Ft
  • 0.16 Ac.
Lots of potential. Character abounds. If you are looking for a home that is not a cookie cutter....here it is!! Some lovely hardwood floors and appliances stay.
Contact Information
Bret Rinehart, Rinehart Realtors Auctioneers
(574) 967-4195
Links, Photos & Additional Info
Status, price and other details may not be current and must be independently verified.
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31 Comments on Delphi, IN – $79,900

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 10360 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Posting for the gable, eave and side porch details. And of course, the windows will hopefully be saved/repaired by the next owner. There’s a home down from us, built around the same time as ours, had 2/2 original windows. Went by this weekend, brand new vinyl 1/1. Always try to save original or the older windows when possible.

    39
    • TGrantTGrant says: 554 comments
      OHD Supporter

      New Orleans, LA

      Truer words!

      11
    • AvatarDavid Sweet says: 237 comments

      Ditto on the windows. My current restoration project house is almost 150 years old, and the original windows are JUST NOW needing some real maintenance. Wonder if vinyl windows will last that long? If they do, hopefully they will be in a landfill and not destroying an old house!

      5
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 346 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      Maybe you could stop by and see if the old ones are available to be saved – I’d hate to think they ended up in a landfill…

      4
  2. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 544 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1918 Bunkhouse
    WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

    Someone went to a lot of effort to turn this former Greek Revival into an Italianate! It’s the best of both worlds! The arched gable ornament is nothing short of mesmerizing… it’s very bold! The side porch is quite nice, too. I’m glad the Greek Revival entry was retained during the transformation. The 2/2 windows look sharp here; replacing them would be so wrong.

    16
  3. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Agreed, Architectural Observer. I visited Delphi a couple of years ago and enjoyed taking a long look of this hybrid house. I regret not posting photos of it and a number of other fine period homes I saw in Delphi. The small town is as unaltered as any Victorian era town as I have ever seen before. Now that I see this house on the market, I must motivate myself to upload the Delphi photos to an album in my Flickr photos collection. (with over 2 million views) For anyone with an opportunity to visit Delphi (sorry, no Oracle there) it truly is a rewarding experience. Homes there range from the Greek Revival/late Federal period to the early 1900’s. Every popular Victorian style is represented as I recall. That distinctive gable brace was featured in an A.J. Bicknell book (also featured in a Wm. T. Comstock book) from 1879: (Google Books page 62) https://books.google.com/books?id=waoaAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA62#v=onepage&q&f=false There must have been a very talented ornamental carpenter in Delphi in the 1870’s/’80’s to construct the highly ornate side porch as well as several others similar to it in the town.

    14
  4. AvatarMary Lou says: 55 comments

    I wish my husband and I were young enough to take this on. What a beautiful home. Going to have to plan a road trip there just to see all the houses.

    4
  5. AvatarCody H says: 150 comments

    The porch used to wrap around the front. I at one time paid for access to the local online photo archives and distinctly remember a photo showing it like that. I grew up in Delphi. You’re right John – this small little town has one of the better selections of 19th c. architecture I’ve ever encountered. My favorite EVER house is here – posted awhile back; the brick, towered Queen Anne on E. Main St. If I can make a career work from such a small locale, I’d love to stay in the area once I graduate from Purdue.

    9
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 544 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1918 Bunkhouse
      WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

      Aha! That explains why the entablature of the entry looks so blunt and abbreviated; it was obviously replaced with something else when the porch was removed from that area. The “ghost” of the removed portion of the porch is somewhat visible in places.

      3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      A PHENOMENAL house for sure. One of the very best, beautifully preserved, top-shelf, Victorians to ever appear on this site. If everything else about it weren’t enough, it is FULL of it’s original, as well as early, antique lighting fixtures. The current owner has provided updated pics, (there are a gabillion pix), and described lots of juicy details!

      DO NOT miss seeing, and reading about it!

      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2013/08/13/1885-queen-anne-delphi-in/

      2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Hi Cody,
      So the University has taken you away lately? That’s great news as Purdue is a highly respected institution of higher learning. During my visit, I did take a couple of photos of the unusual Queen Anne mansion you mentioned. It is a phenomenal house. I vividly recall the owner(s) had concerns about taking on the project because there was some speculation the entire Spanish tile roof would have to be replaced which would have cost a fortune. Fortunately, the roof repairs were manageable so the house is getting the TLC it had long deserved. I don’t know what your major is but historic preservation or architecture seem like a natural choice. Thanks for explaining the missing wrap around porch detail. From my visit to the town, I think there’s enough restoration work remaining to last a lifetime. I really liked the George Barber designed Queen Anne on a corner in the town. Now its almost mandatory that I upload the photos I took in Delphi. Best wishes as you continue your education.

      1
  6. AvatarDouglas Rice says: 35 comments

    the downtown commercial buildings are also really great as well. most of them from the 19th Century. and most of them are recently restored/renovated. or are in the process of being. i have been there a dozen times in the last year. a horrible crime occurred just outside the city limits near an old abandoned bridge…the Monon High Bridge. two girls 13 and 14 were brutally murdered in Feb 2017. and to date, no arrest has been made. very tragic.

  7. AvatarAquila says: 27 comments

    If anyone does visit Delphi, don’t miss taking a look inside the courthouse. There are colored porcelain tile floors in lovely patterns, and a stained glass dome, also some stained glass skylights in one of the courtrooms. I didn’t get a chance to see this house while I was there, but the one street I did see was great.

    2
  8. JimHJimH says: 4208 comments
    OHD Supporter

    The home of John H. Gould (1837-1916), an attorney and judge who was a colonel in the Civil War. The local history and survey info dates this house from his arrival in Delphi in 1857. I’m not seeing anything clearly from that date – the Greek Revival house seems older, and the porch, cornice and gable detail are from a couple of decades later. Of course, there are no stair photos to help sort it out!

  9. AvatarJoe says: 636 comments

    -The others have said it so well and knowledgeably that, although I want to express my admiration, I have little to add. I sure hope that this post helps to motivate John Shiflet to post his Delphi photos to an album in his Flicker account. How about it John?
    -I am sure many others would like to see them while this house is fresh in our minds. Afterwards, a link here on this page and/ or sending your pics of this house to Kelly to post here would be great.
    -I can add that no one has mentioned the little carriage house in the back. I love those!

    4
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Hi Joe,
      We’re in the midst of a late winter Polar Vortex type cold front here so I have no excuse for not uploading the Delphi photos. I’ll post a link as soon as I have the task completed. I appreciate the “nudge”…Google really needs to cover the entire beautiful historic town of Delphi in streetview.

      2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Joe,
      I’ve now got the 22 photos I took in Delphi uploaded on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157707316883784/with/46549416974/ I still need to add narratives and should mentioned without the high winds and sporadic rains encountered, I could have taken dozens more photos in this town with its large collection of period homes. There’s still one photo that has me scratching my head; photo No. 19 is of a Greek Revival/Italianate constructed of stone and brick and more recently covered in VINYL siding! That’s a first for me. This house’s photos are No. 6 & 7-in the largest photo size you can count the paint chips. Thanks for encouraging me to put these online. Next to upload photos from Frankfort, Indiana, and yet more towns later. (Wabash and Peru)

      4
      • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 544 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1918 Bunkhouse
        WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

        I’ve encountered vinyl-clad brick houses before… it is sometimes done when the house is built of locally-made brick which is soft and porous. This soft brick was often painted when new, so keeping it painted is essential to keeping the interior of the house dry. Sometimes homeowners get tired of the constant battle to keep paint from flaking and resort to measures like this. Maintenance-intensive soft brick is just one of the reasons techniques like Formstone were popular in places like Baltimore… it was a quick fix to an ongoing problem. I appreciate the irony of the installers leaving the heavy limestone lintels visible… it looks incongruous on a house which appears to be wood, but reveals that it is actually masonry! Thanks for sharing these photos… they are all fascinating.

        1
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          Your comments and observations echo mine. Brick homes built before the Civil War era (and sometimes afterwards) were constructed of soft fired bricks which inherently have the weaknesses you described. If local clay deposits were available, the bricks were even made and fired on-site. Add the soft lime/sand mortar mixes and weathering problems become progressively worse over time.

          There are, of course, non-vinyl solutions like parging over the damaged bricks with harder cement mixes or tuck pointing if mainly the mortar is deteriorated, but that is expensive and takes a lot of work. Brick replacement for large areas is even more expensive and time consuming. I fault no one for covering the house with vinyl as it protects the bricks from additional deterioration although furring strips of wood embedded in the bricks are necessary to attach the siding.

          By the 1880’s improved kiln technology allowed for more uniform and harder mass produced bricks. Still later, so called Vitrified bricks fired at high temperatures allowed bricks to replace the earlier cobblestones for paving purposes.

          BTW, I’ve added 15 more photos of period homes in nearby Frankfort, IN to the album with the Delphi photos. Additional photos from other towns to be added in the days ahead, time permitting.

          1
  10. AvatarJoe says: 636 comments

    No, thank you. The pics are a great treat for me!

  11. AvatarSeymour says: 1 comments
    1892 Queen Anne

    Just thought all you commenters might like to know, a proper restoration is in the cards for this house. We have family in Delphi & my wife’s been admiring this house since she was a child. We walked by & saw the ‘for sale’ sign on Easter Sunday; we had a purchase agreement before the week was out. Work will begin this summer.
    First order of business: excluding the weather that’s begun to find its way in. Replace the roof then restore & paint the cornices & barge board. The windows will be repaired & reglazed, random newer float glass replacement panes will be replaced with salvaged cylinder glass. The shutters will be restored along with their hardware to keep their functionality intact.

    1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 10360 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      That’s great news! Please keep us updated, we’d love to see your progress.

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Congratulations! It’s sounds like this house has found the perfect next owners. I hope your journey into restoring this house is memorable and enjoyable.

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