January 11, 2019: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 1/11/19 - Last OHD Update: 1/18/19 - 148 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

How to share…
Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below. This part is important! Make it easier for those browsing shares by including the city, state, build date if available and price (international listings excluded.) A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful.

Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.) Not all shares will be added to OHD as it’s own post.

148 Comments on January 11, 2019: Link Exchange

OHD does not represent homes on this site. Contact the agent listed for details including current price and status.
  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 10360 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Oops, just realized today was Friday! 🙂

    Today’s old house photo, was mailed to “S.A. Miles, Esq. Bethany, Nebr.” The home still stands at 6706 Colby St in Lincoln, Nebraska (Bethany Heights was the areas name) and is on the National Register (many photos!). Wiki link. It was built by the president of Cotner College, sold in 1901 to Samuel A. Miles.

    8
    • AvatarCarolyn says: 259 comments
      Grand Rapids, MI

      I get so excited every week when the featured house is still standing. This one is a beauty, inside and out!

      9
    • JimHJimH says: 4208 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Fantastic house in Lincoln with nice old photos and links. Thanks!
      The owners in 1990 were very interested in restoration and made a good start. They had the original cresting but it never was reinstalled. I see a recent listing for the Beattie House Apartments at the same address – not a good sign for the interior! Let’s hope any alteration was gentle.

      3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Amazing that all of the exterior details seem to have survived so brilliantly; especially the porch skirting! I wonder if it might be redwood?

    • HeidiHeidi says: 137 comments

      So many old houses had cresting and yet today you are hard put to see a home with it in tact. Did it serve a purpose besides decoration and why was it done away with?

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Cresting was only one form of “artistic” decoration for Victorian era rooftops. Towers and turrets had fancy finials and generally speaking, between about 1850 and 1900 was a unique time when art and architecture merged. The residential ideal during this period was an “artistic home” which reflected inside and out an appreciation of art and lavish ornament. By 1900, about two generations had grown up in this artistic/ornamental environment, and there was nowhere else to go except towards simplicity and functionalism. While building suppliers still offered a few ornamental details for roofs in 1910, finials and crestings were no longer part of the new construction landscape. Some newer, mainly high end homes today, feature simple copper finials for rooftops but cresting has yet to make a comeback in new construction. Capital Crestings in Milford, PA, makes reproduction crestings: http://www.architecturaliron.com/roof-cresting/ Fischer Artworks based in New Mexico, hand makes custom finials out of copper: http://www.fischerartworks.com/ Today we barely notice roofs but back then they played an important role in the overall look of a home. To give you an idea of what was available, browse this 1891 E.T. Barnum (Detroit) ironworks catalog: (Internet Archive, free read and download) https://archive.org/details/E.t.BarnumManufacturerOfBuildersWireAndIronWork E.T. Barnum was but one of many regional ornamental ironwork suppliers. A lot of old ornamental ironwork disappeared during the WWI & WWII scrap metal drives and was never replaced. It’s a wonder we have a few surviving original examples today.

  2. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central NY, NY

    Albany, NY…

    1) 1919, $159,900; colonial revival w. light & airy aura
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/863-Myrtle-Ave-Albany-NY-12208/29643787_zpid/

    2) 1900, $184,500; rather unusual Tudor revival which needs some TLC.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/459-Hamilton-St-Albany-NY-12203/29649051_zpid/

    3)1869; $239,900; downtown row house w. lots of original features, looks onto the green space of a church across the street
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2-1st-St-Albany-NY-12210/29650336_zpid/

    5
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 466 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1980 board & batten modern

      Like that kitchen stove on 1st st. Would that be for coal?

    • AvatarKaren says: 626 comments

      I love the row houses in Albany. Every time I go there, I try to make tome to walk down at least one street to look at them. Some are so wonderfully maintained. Others…ugh. There are quite a few foreclosed on row houses, and those that have that square red placard on them; I take that to mean they are condemned or unfit to live in. Sad.

      4
  3. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central NY, NY

    Berkeley, CA…

    1)1938, $725,000; small but charming home
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/60-Latham-Ln-Berkeley-CA-94708/24849119_zpid/

    2) 1931, $1,350,000; nice fp, tons of built-in bookshelves, pretty mint tiled bathroom.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/904-Keeler-Ave-Berkeley-CA-94708/24848455_zpid/

    3) 1909, $4,278,999; a cyber-friend pointed this one out, since she often drives by it; very nice, very pricey!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2967-Avalon-Ave-Berkeley-CA-94705/24831776_zpid/

    7
    • AvatarAngie boldly going nowhere says: 27 comments

      Love the little house in Berkeley. So bright, lovely furnishings, gorgeous exterior. Wish I could have it relocated here, sigh!

      1
    • AvatarDon Richards says: 106 comments

      I know there’s so much to like about number 3, but that attic is awfully enticing!

      4
    • AvatarKarenR says: 37 comments

      What a gorgeous staircase the 1909 house has!

      1
    • AvatarKeith Sanders says: 104 comments

      Wow, the #3 house is quite something. The transition between pics 14 and 15 had me faked out for a minute – well staged.

      1
    • AvatarLaurie W. says: 1609 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      I’m in love with House No. 1. Special place, everything done right to make it feel larger and open. It’s not only the all-white paint and skillful photos; large windows, good traffic patterns without a total-open plan, whew; varied textures contribute to a feeling of space too. At the word “loft” I automatically thought “eeeuw.” Lofts are so often claustrophobic but this one is a happy surprise. Outside is well done as well. I would be right there, jammies & toothbrush in hand, if I could drop almost a thou per square foot. That’s Calif for you, sigh.

      2
    • SueSue says: 303 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      I just am still just shocked at CA prices.

      Love the small home but the last one at the 4 plus million mark is a treasure. I could just live in the attic.

      1
    • AvatarRick Gippner says: 2 comments

      #3 Nice home, more than likely in a “Special Study” zone due to proximity to the Hayward Fault. May even be directly on it. This morning’s 3.4’s epicenter was within one block.

  4. Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
    1920 Colonial Revival
    Upstate/Central NY, NY

    Philly, PA:
    1)1930, $1,895,00; stone colonial revival, pricey & pretty! Curb appeal galore, lovely interior, beautiful grounds! (I’d gladly take it, esp. if it came with at least some of its furnishings! “Take it” – if given to me – being the operative words, since it’s way, way, way above my budget!)
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/716-W-Mount-Airy-Ave-726-Philadelphia-PA-19119/2087892597_zpid/

    2)1926, $499,900; another stone colonial & perfectly nice – unless you’ve already seen house #1. 😉 On the other hand, way less expensive!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/500-Arbutus-St-Philadelphia-PA-19119/10284128_zpid/

    Bennington, VT:
    3)1930, $579,000; pretty grounds, nice house.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/33-Monument-Ave-Bennington-VT-05201/75419136_zpid/

    Saratoga Springs, NY:
    4) 1935, 1,119,000 (pricey for upstate – location, location,location); Colonial revival w. original tiled bathrooms: 2 yellow, 1 mint green, 1 tan
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/55-5th-Ave-Saratoga-Springs-NY-12866/32404101_zpid/

    6
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 10360 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Just wanted to say, I love the way you’ve posted your shares. Your way is the ideal way to do it! City, state, price, build date, comment and clean URL’s.

      14
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      Just realized… that last house’s last bath mentioned… it’s pink tiled, not tan. The pic of its adjacent bedroom looks into the bath, and different lighting shows it to be pink.

      1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 466 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1980 board & batten modern

      The saratoga house is blocks away from the main race track. The houses across the street from it have the training track just past their backyard fences. Very beautiful setting really.
      The street view is actually the left side of the house looking from East ave.

      2
  5. natira121natira121 says: 322 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    Hello everyone!

    I’m looking for ideas, and not having much luck, so I thought I’d see what awesomeness you guys can come up with.

    I smashed my fingers badly this morning in a double-hung window. Honestly thought I’d have to stay stuck there until my daughter-in-law would arrive (in about an hour!) to get unstuck! Luckily I got myself free, nothing is busted, but my fingers are black and swollen. Weeee

    Anyway, the offending window WILL be replaced, and it’s going to be inside the box/cupboard/alcove bed we are building. I plan to remove the window sashes, which gives me an opening about 26×50 to work with.

    I don’t want to hang curtains, but I want to block the light completely for sleeping. And I want to be able to have lots of air as well… currently the window is open at all times, even in winter.

    So, some combination of screen, windows, shutters…. I don’t know!

    As for style, think gramma’s folksy farmy cabin. And my husband and I can build nearly anything from scratch.

    2
    • AvatarKaren says: 626 comments

      How about a roller shade? It would roll up against the very top of the window, and be practically unnoticeable. Or, you could put up a pretty valance that would hide the rolled up shade completely, while accenting the woodwork around the window. They have shades now that have pretty stencils and other art work on them ( which you could probably do yourself).

      • natira121natira121 says: 322 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1877 Vernacular
        Columbia River Gorge, WA

        I hadn’t thought of a roll-up shade, which is odd because the window had one when I bought the place…. back in 2001, so I suppose I can understand why I forgot.

        In my researching I came across a couple of interesting options:

        I really like this!

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fortochka

        And do a search for “demerara window” to see another awesome idea. I like this one a lot. I think it would work well for my very high wind area.

        • AvatarKaren says: 626 comments

          I like the Demerara window. I’ve also seen windows that use that louvre idea in Moorish architecture. The louvres shade the inside from direct sunlight, while also creating a stronger breeze from any little breeze that comes through them. I bet they also put bowls of ice/cool water inside them too. That’s too good an idea for the Moors not to have used!

      • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
        1920 Colonial Revival
        Upstate/Central NY, NY

        Same thought here – a roller shade. Or maybe wooden blinds. Either possibly combined with lower shutters.

        1
    • AvatarZoomey says: 501 comments

      Plantation shutters plus room darkening Roman blind? That way you could keep the window open, but room dark for sleeping. During the day you could adjust the light and privacy, but still keep the window open. Plus plantation shutters are pretty!

      • natira121natira121 says: 322 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1877 Vernacular
        Columbia River Gorge, WA

        Plantation shutters are another option I’ve considered in my quest for the perfect window. Because we have high winds, I’m not crazy about outside shutters, though I LOVE the look.

        I’ll probably end up with a combination of several ideas, and I’m getting quite the education on windows!

    • SueSue says: 303 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Goodness you poor thing. That is so incredibly painful.

      I thought about replacing the window with a vintage stained glass one.

    • Ed FerrisEd Ferris says: 311 comments

      Here’s the Victorian way of excluding light without outside shutters:

      https://archive.org/details/WillersPatentSlidingBlind/page/n9

      The sections slide up and down and are held in the tracks by a leaf spring at one side. I had a project house in Edinburgh, Indiana, where these blinds were still working after 120 years.

      The 1970’s “counterculture” way would be to put two insulated vent doors above and below a fixed glass panel, perhaps painted, vinyl-appliqued, or stained glass. If you don’t want light, of course, the panel can be solid wood.

      1
      • natira121natira121 says: 322 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1877 Vernacular
        Columbia River Gorge, WA

        Ed,

        Oh! I like that! That would be perfect, and I could do some version of a Fortochka window for ventilation.

        Problem solved! Thank you so much Ed, and everyone else!

  6. JimHJimH says: 4208 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Woodstock NY – 1918 stone Craftsman, $896k with 42 protected acres.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2091-Glasco-Tpke-Woodstock-NY-12498/32885305_zpid

    I don’t remember if this has been shared before. Likely it was built by one of the artists associated with the Byrdcliffe Art Colony. Owned since 1940 by illustrator Anton Otto Fischer and his family. The area has gotten crazy expensive but my Woodstock roots are calling me.

    7
    • AvatarDon Richards says: 106 comments

      Jim, right down the fence, it’s perfection!

      1
    • AvatarMatt Z says: 87 comments

      That Fence!! The house is lovely too, beautifully rustic. Thanks for sharing Jim

      2
    • AvatarAngie boldly going nowhere says: 27 comments

      Have no Woodstock roots to call me, but the beauty of the house and grounds has me transfixed. Haven’t been able to stop scrolling since I first saw it. Every time I look at it I see something I missed first time. Have added it to my bookmarks page and will certainly be revisiting it and wishing — wishing …

      2
    • AvatarJoe says: 636 comments

      Hi Jim,
      -I, as an aficionado of things which are nineteenth century or older, enjoyed this house tremendously. My comment is on the pressure treated fence that has been created so artfully for this house. I often bemoan the use of standard pressure treated lumber for decks, porch floors, railings, and other exterior elements. My hope is that the fence was built using techniques that will weather the years and is properly maintained as is so rarely the case with pressure treated elements. People often don’t understand the difference between won’t rot and the need for protection from weather damage and maintenance.
      -It made me wonder what new materials will come into common use in the future, which will cause traditionalists like myself to look back nostalgically and bemoan the loss of lumber, pressure treated in particular, as a building material. I can just see OHD link and exchange postings in the year 3000 praising and admiring the pressure treated decks.

      1
    • AvatarLaurie W. says: 1609 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      Wonderful house that I think has contained much life. I’d clean & fix up where necessary but do as little as possible to it. Its personality is perfect as is.

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Rad rusticator in a great spot! Don’t know how it’s under a million. Thx Jim.

  7. AvatarDon Richards says: 106 comments

    I have two houses to share today, at very different price points.

    The first is an 1885 Shingle Style mansion in Washington Ct, priced at a heart attack inducing $6.2 million. It was designed by Ehrick Rossiter, a NYC architect who first went to boarding school in town, and later had his own house there. He built a number of other summer cottages in Washington and in surrounding towns for wealthy NY families. This is one of his best. it doesn’t appear on the open market, just a pocket listing at this realty firm.

    http://klemmrealestate.com/pages/rPropertyDetails.php?2091

    Second up is a 1905 stucco Colonial Revival in New Britain, Ct listed at $279,900. It has amazing woodwork throughout, and I can only imagine that it was probably originally unpainted, like it shows in the foyer. It definitely feels like it has a Craftsman bent.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/330-Hart-St_New-Britain_CT_06052_M49445-85490?view=qv

    7
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      Wow! I’d be happy with the second house *if* I hadn’t already seen the first one. Which is really something! Gorgeous. Too many niceties to start listing them.

    • AvatarZoomey says: 501 comments

      Sigh. I want riches so I can buy that Washington house! It is perfect. I hate pools, but love that one. Hmmm. Where can I scare up six million?

      1
    • JimHJimH says: 4208 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks for the Rossiter! Fantastic, and the owners won an award for the restoration. It’s nice to see OHDreamers at the estate level, Americans or for’ners.

      http://www.townvibe.com/Litchfield/November-December-2013/Rock-of-Ages/

      1
      • AvatarZoomey says: 501 comments

        Interesting article. Looks like they want a nearly three million profit on a house they’ve owned for only 10 years. The renovation is fabulous as is the furnishing and the decorating of the house. If it came furnished, well, maybe…. i’m Going out to buy a lottery ticket today.

  8. AvatarRy says: 29 comments

    I feel like Cathy’s posts are the right way to go about it too so I’ll try and stick to that format as well!

    1. Creston, NC: 1930, $85,000; A cute brick home with few frills (though I like the shiplap walls) and in need of TLC. The windows have been replaced but you can still see original ones on the inside of the closed-in porch.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1396-Ben-Bolen-Rd-Creston-NC-28615/250753620_zpid/

    2. Cove Creek, NC: 1925 (?), $295,000; Working farm with several outbuildings including old storefront. Not 100% vintage but utterly charming and a fine example of a well-loved and lived-in home.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/131-Dale-Adams-Rd-Sugar-Grove-NC-28679/102329925_zpid/

    3. Linville, NC: 1904, $279,000; Rustic cottage with chestnut bark siding in a great location. Linville was planned as a resort town for Northeasterners and all of the homes were designed to look old-fashioned – it’s still surrounded by country clubs to this day. I like the beadboard ceilings and I think the kitchen is cute! The front windows are original blown glass, but the rest are new.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/109-W-Third-St-Linville-NC-28646/2110051248_zpid/

    4. Banner Elk, NC: 1902, $237,500; Six-bedroom farmhouse with some lovely woodwork despite the questionable decision to remove a wall in the living area. The kitchen is fairly untouched, thankfully, and the stairwell is quite breathtaking as well!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/317-Old-Turnpike-Rd-Banner-Elk-NC-28604/114797431_zpid/

    4
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      I’ve never seen a house like #3 with its bark siding. Interesting.

      5
      • AvatarRy says: 29 comments

        It was meant to be a second home for someone wealthy, so it’s unsurprising that they wanted it to have a homey, rustic, “Appalachian” feel. The trend is still alive and well, too. Touches like the natural wooden posts are still super popular and I’ve seen trellises like the one in the front yard being sold at roadside stands.

        The tourist boom in the early 1900’s meant that a lot of resorts like Linville sprang up in western North Carolina. A little way north is a place called Tynecastle, which was built in the 1960’s and 70’s by the owner of Grandfather Mountain. It’s particularly memorable because all of the buildings are designed to evoke stone Scottish castles – I think I may have shared one on a previous link exchange. They tend to be very expensive, but you get what you pay for, and the view of Grandfather Mountain is pretty priceless in my opinion. 😀

        4
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 346 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      Great picks – especially the Linville cottage. I have always wondered – and maybe someone can tell me – how is the bark siding installed and maintained?

      • AvatarRy says: 29 comments

        There are apparently several companies in Western NC alone that sell bark siding as an eco-friendly alternative to regular vinyl siding. From what I read, the bark is kiln-dried and installed properly it is waterproof just like regular siding is. I can’t vouch for the claims that it will last for 50 years or more but it sounds as if it’s at least comparable to plastic vinyl in terms of maintenence and durability.

        Due to the chestnut blight that decimated the species in the Appalachians in the 1940s, though, I can imagine you would have a difficult and expensive time if you wanted to replace the siding on this specific house with the same material. Poplar bark is the go-to these days.

  9. Avatarannemaeve says: 23 comments

    Boonville, MO: c.1883 $188,000: Eye-popping on the outside AND inside – inlaid floors for days… and the staircase! Life as a funeral home didn’t seem do anything much weirder than losing a wall to make an unplanned double-fireplace double-parlor. Live upstairs and tea-shop down? Does “Deed restricts the use of funeral home.” mean you CAN’T keep it as a funeral home… or… it HAS to be one? 😛 Boonville is a sweet little town on the Missouri River, commute to Columbia or Jefferson City or just… stare at your staircase all day…

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fsbo_lt/house,condo,apartment_duplex,townhouse_type/2086418472_zpid/120000-200000_price/473-789_mp/mostrecentchange_sort/39.052651,-92.642556,38.828876,-93.011628_rect/11_zm/X1.dash.SS.dash.tk6542370r1x_5w3uy_sse/0_mmm/

    11
  10. AvatarMatt Z says: 87 comments

    Johnstown, NY
    100 S. William Street
    $214,900

    Interesting Shingle Style/Queen Anne home with beautiful woodwork and plenty of stained glass
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/100-S-William-St-Johnstown-NY-12095/30459194_zpid/?fullpage=true

    Schenectady, NY
    205 Union Street
    $135,000

    Lovely Second Empire townhouse /possibly an earlier home, remodeled with a mansard in the 1860-70’s
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/205-Union-St-Schenectady-NY-12305/2086417965_zpid/?fullpage=true

    Falls Village, CT
    105 Main Street
    $329,000
    Beautiful Bank Building waiting for a new use.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/105-Main-St-Falls-Village-CT-06031/2086440977_zpid/?fullpage=true

    5
  11. AvatarAdam Wachter says: 1 comments

    New York, NY; 1941; $379,000. Really well-priced and gorgeously furnished co-op apartment!
    https://www.corcoran.com/nyc-real-estate/for-sale/washington-heights/30-bogardus-place-apt-4g/5638900

    1
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      Ooh, I like it! Small, but plenty of charm and for the City, a very decent price – being way uptown.

  12. AvatarRobinjn says: 220 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1978 Split level
    Columbia, MO

    I’m not sure if this one has been found yet, it’s been listed for a few months.

    Kansas City, MO: 1939, 1.6 Mill, Frank Lloyd Wright on 1.6 acres. The listing doesn’t show any bathrooms, wish I could see those.

    https://franklloydwright.org/frank-lloyd-wrights-sondern-adler-house-for-sale/?fbclid=IwAR36h_Flehxp8hJlE6IiktMq2OpFFxgbrkgDc1VVRFkCRH_434TYUURC1Xs

    7
  13. AvatarJennifer HT says: 796 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Anthem, AZ

    This pace is retro glam. Lincoln, IL. $439k, listing doesn’t have a date, but description says late 1800’s.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/700-N-Union-St-Lincoln-IL-62656/113798235_zpid/?fullpage=true

    1
    • AvatarStevenF says: 770 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      What an interesting find. It’s like they took two houses and mashed them together at their corners. Odd but cool.

      1
  14. MichaelMichael says: 1309 comments

    Madison, Ga.
    1883 Italianate, $449,000
    Restored in 1986, Fire damaged in 2001. The house has some amazing interiors!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/498-S-Main-St-Madison-GA-30650/2088695978_zpid/

    8
  15. CoraCora says: 1893 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1920. This is a beautiful farmhouse. It almost looks too polished to be a farmhouse…but they’ve done such a fantastic job of preserving it. The beautiful built-ins, the kitchen cabinets, the bathroom fixtures, the incredible amount of gorgeous, unpainted wood, leaded glass doors…and the light fixtures are amazing. Comes with a few acres. The snowy rural view out all those windows is something. $325K

    Iron Ridge, WI:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/N4779-State-Road-67-Iron-Ridge-WI-53035/40244965_zpid/

    3
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      I agree with all of your comments about this house! That sconce is adorable, the leaded glass is pretty, the built-ins are lovely, the kitchen is nice, the original ceiling lights are still in place, etc, etc. And it doesn’t make me think “farmhouse” either.

      2
  16. AvatarJoseph says: 314 comments

    Not a specific listing, but if you find yourself wondering “do people really live in those houses I see in the decorating magazines?” do a Trulia or Zillow search on Washington CT. Apparently some people really do have a lot of money and taste at the same time. There are modern recreations that look like the sets for Gosford Park, and contemporary designs that are essentially private resorts (one with 5 bedrooms and 11 baths did make me wonder). Just don’t do this if you have any work to get done as you will spend at least an hour.

    1
  17. AvatarPeg says: 61 comments

    Punxsutawney, Pa 1927 colonial revival (?) 169,000
    Check out this home at Realtor.com
    $169,000
    6beds · 2baths
    216 Dinsmore Ave, Punxsutawney
    https://b1iw.app.link/xp28XzJ3pT

    Carbondale, Pa incredible 1915 Victorian built by the owner of a lumber company. Tiger oak wainscoting, built ins, marble fireplace, wood and tile fireplace, parquet floors, tin ceilings and beautiful stained glass. Stunning for just $129,900!

    Check out this home at Realtor.com
    $129,900
    5beds · 2baths
    50 Washington St, Carbondale
    https://b1iw.app.link/DuYdJBA5pT

    Carbondale, Pa a nice 1920 Victorian a block away from the previous home I posted. A beautiful home for $69,500!

    Check out this home at Realtor.com
    $69,500
    4beds · 2baths
    103 Washington St, Carbondale
    https://b1iw.app.link/blixyk85pT

  18. RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Hold onto your seat Kelly, John Shifflet, Chris DiMattei, and other G.F.Barber fans; a very special example of his earlier design work has just hit the market in Muncie. The interior is a well preserved knockout; and the listing is extensive, very well shot, and includes some super groovy antique photos.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/21949420086

    Muncie, IN / $158K!!!! / Exuberant high Victorian stunner
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/202-S-Monroe-St-Muncie-IN-47305/85188864_zpid/?fullpage=true

    Also –
    Great little Vic. farmhouse near Bedford. Listing has a great antique shot.

    Bedford, IN / 1891 / Victorian farm house
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3801-Fort-Ritner-Rd-Bedford-IN-47421/221143935_zpid/?fullpage=true

    7
    • Ed FerrisEd Ferris says: 311 comments

      I spent ten years in the neighborhood of Fort Ritner, Indiana. Seeing the “Devils Backbone Rd.” and “Jasper McKeagg Rd.” on the map brought memories, mostly of evading the potholes. Driving to the grocery once a week because it was eighteen miles away. Waking up early and seeing whitetail deer looking in the living-room windows. Hoping the propane truck driver can get in the snow-and-ice-covered driveway so I won’t have to drain the pipes before they freeze and take refuge in the nearest motel. Country living is NOT for everyone.
      Isn’t it amazing how much better the original colors were?
      If you follow the Tunnelton road you’ll come out at the locally famous whorehouse. Not officially still in business.

      2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Now see Ed, if you’d have heated with wood or coal you wouldn’t have had to worry about that delivery being made; not to mention saving a HUGE % on the cost vs. propane which is notorious for being very high indeed.

        I don’t know about whore houses in Tunnelton 😉 , but this one has been a fave since I’ve known about it: https://c1.staticflickr.com/6/5139/5540537189_a0e23e3a7e_b.jpg

        3
    • JimHJimH says: 4208 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Great house in Muncie, but No Way it’s a Barber. Impossible! jk

      The Bedford house with vintage photo shows how aluminum siding can obscure the character of a Victorian house. Don’t believe them when they say “It was always just white.”

      5
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Heheheh! Shuuuuddup. What do I know about plan book houses.

      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        As far as the Barber design attribution for the Ryan house at 202 Monroe in Muncie, the explanation I’ve read is that correspondence between Barber and John Ryan occurred (from Chris DiMattei?) but it was never established that the design was by Barber. It isn’t even close to any of his published plan book designs yet has a finished look in the period photos suggesting it was architect designed. Barber did suggest if potential clients had a specific design in mind that was not similar to any of his published designs, the client could send in a sketch of the proposed house and Barber’s firm would work from that sketch to come up with a final product satisfactory to the customer. I do not know if this house design originated in that manner but I’ve yet to see another example exactly like it. Rooms built in the round present decor challenges but as far as making a stylistic “statement” the Ryan house certainly does that nicely. From the period photos, it also appears to have been well documented. One photo shows Mr. Ryan and next to him on a table shelf are what appear to be dueling pistols. He must have been a colorful character and perhaps that was intentionally reflected in his house. The house next to the Ryan house at the corner with E. Jackson is the John Rollins Marsh house (c. 1885) still standing but just barely. It has a rare Moorish Revival interior and is crying out for a restoration. The Ryan house was used as a Law Office but would still make for an outstanding private residence. More research is needed for the Barber design attribution. The interior elements are fairly common but its the multiple turrets and towers that set this house apart.

        2
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          I myself don’t know from Barber; but remembered clearly that you had posted multiple good shots of that sweet house John, and was excited for you that you’d have a chance to peek inside; especially since it was WELL worth seeing, (if maybe not exactly super fancy). I wasn’t aware there was an issue with the attribution. Glad you popped in here and spotted it – Barber or no. 🙂

          1
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            Regrettably, at the time of my visit the Ryan house was still occupied so I wasn’t able to get a peek inside. Same for the Marsh house on the corner although Muncie’s preservation officer did allow a friend of mine to see the interior and the friend shared photos of the Moorish arches in the foyer. I have another friend who is going to visit Muncie in the coming weeks and he said he will take more photos to share. I won’t be going to visit the Midwest anytime before late Spring and even that depends on a number of factors mostly outside of my control. The only issue I see with the Ryan house is location. Although it is technically inside the boundaries of the Emily Kimbrough Historic District, it is largely detached from a residential context and is next to parking lots with a commercial context. The Grace Episcopal Church had a for sale sign in the streetview image and they owned the parking lot behind the Ryan house. A preservation friendly developer could do a lot to enhance this location with infill housing sympathetic to the historic character of the district. In such a reconstructed context, the Ryan house would again look residential in its surroundings. But this is in plucky Muncie which is making slow progress towards a better tomorrow although currently there is not a lot going on with new development.

            2
        • JimHJimH says: 4208 comments
          OHD Supporter

          John, I was kidding about the Barber attribution, which is undoubtedly true.
          Ryan wrote a thank you note to Barber after the house was completed, “The finished structure is as picturesque as anything in the whole region.” Read the caption here:
          https://www.newspapers.com/clip/16400980/star_press_lidas_house/

          The story is more interesting than the architect. If I were in Muncie I could research an article about the Ryans and their houses, the outline as follows:

          1. John W. Ryan (1837-1919), the eldest child of a prominent pioneer doctor, was an attorney at Muncie from 1869, practiced corporate and patent law, served as prosecutor, and in the Indiana Assembly.
          Ryan acquired a large property on East Jackson Street in Muncie prior to 1880, which encompassed the homes now at 611 and 603 E. Jackson and 202 S. Monroe. City directories and Sanborn maps confirm this, and a Ryan family archive at Ball State contains a memoir, a daily diary from the period, letters, photos, etc.
          Subject to more research, I think 611 was the first Ryan home, and he later built 603 and 202.
          https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/603-E-Jackson-St_Muncie_IN_47305_M34451-67795
          https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/611-E-Jackson-St-Muncie-IN-47305/210952549_zpid/

          2. Ryan had married Lida Alden in 1863, a talented lady who conducted an arts salon at their home at 603 E. Jackson Street, and gave private lessons in both music and art in her 2nd floor studio there (with the “Moorish” windows). Son Thomas’ diary mentions art and club-related activities at the Ryan home on a daily basis for many years.
          Ryan had 202 S. Monroe built specifically for Lida – their initials J&LR are above the “Juliet balcony”. The photo shows the couple before Lida’s death in 1893:
          https://photos.zillowstatic.com/p_f/IS62lnnjt3k3750000000000.jpg

          3. John and Lida Ryan’s 4 surviving children were all involved in the artistic activities of the household.
          Susan was a trained and award-winning artist, painted miniatures, and was commissioned as the decorator of the public spaces at Muncie’s largest hotel. She married local bridge builder John Rollin Marsh and they lived at 603 after 202 was completed. Marsh also opened a photography studio and left many family photos.
          Mildred was a talented harpist who married industrialist Ross J. Beatty and lived at 611 for a time. That’s her in the turret bedroom before her marriage.
          https://photos.zillowstatic.com/p_f/ISqldygxhlzm850000000000.jpg
          Thomas kept a diary, worked as a draftsman for Marsh’s company as a young man, and made architectural sketches. He went on to study law and specialized in patents as a partner with his father.
          Walter was one of the first electrical engineers in the state of Indiana.

          Thanks to both you and Jeff for posting the house. Perhaps it is a bit oddball as you say, but beautiful just the same and there’s a lovely family story behind it.

          2
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            Wow! Thanks Jim for all of the information you found about the Ryan and Marsh houses. I did not know that the Ryans had once lived in the Marsh house fronting E. Jackson in Muncie, IN. The old newspaper clipping about the George Barber design provenance seems factual although I’m glad there was the part about the custom design aspect of the Ryan house. The multiform confection of towers and turrets still stands out today. It starkly contrasts with modern architecture but back in the 1890’s wasn’t considered outside the architectural norm. Some of the Victorian house designs in the 1880’s came very close to pure architectural fantasy. Because they stood out so prominently, they were also often among the first targets of urban renewal after everything Victorian fell out of favor. The Victorian concept of merging art with architecture was not so popular in the 20th century when such whimsical designs went against the architectural conformity of the time. I see the more avant garde Mid-Century Modern architect designed examples as the last major wave of architectural experimentation in residential architecture. But like Wright’s Usonian homes originally intended for the masses, not many could afford such quality designs. I believe the dominant architectural theme of the 21st century has yet to be determined; at least in upscale neighborhoods, historicism, or designs derived from the past, again appear to be popular.

            1
          • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            So cool Jim. You rock.

  19. AvatarJennifer HT says: 796 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Anthem, AZ

    This is a cool deco/moderne type building. I would love to see someone take it back to full 30’s. Hartford MI 1936 $350k
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/63680-60th-Ave-Hartford-MI-49057/2137743485_zpid/?fullpage=true

    5
  20. AvatarJennifer HT says: 796 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Anthem, AZ

    1913 in New Richmond IN for $399k. I love the stairs nd fireplace tiles 🙂
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10508-N-350-W-New-Richmond-IN-47967/94533403_zpid/?fullpage=true

    3
  21. AvatarPeg says: 61 comments

    I just have to share this 1896 beauty for its history. It was originally constructed as A Saranac Lake cure cottage. It was a private residence and a monastery. It is now a 14 bedroom B&B.

    Check out this home at Realtor.com
    $650,000
    14beds · 10baths
    8 Franklin Ave, Saranac Lake
    https://b1iw.app.link/d0VZY2LzqT

  22. AvatarAnthony Bianchini says: 61 comments

    Some from Texas:

    Denton, asking $1.75M, over 6,600 sq ft:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1035-W-Oak-St_Denton_TX_76201_M73537-60003?view=qv

    Waxahachie, Victorian stone farmhouse, over 3,000 q ft, asking $499K (I looked at this house this afternoon, has a tremendous presence, but needs quite a bit of TLC). Yes, I shared previously, but thought a re-boot worthwhile since the price has been reduced from $599K and I looked at it in person:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/617-Solon-Rd_Waxahachie_TX_75165_M82565-87991?view=qv

    Here’s what it looked like prior to the gable’s detailed mill-work and finials going MIA:

    https://www.cardcow.com/686025/waxahachie-texas-old-solon-home/

    4
  23. AvatarKeith Sanders says: 104 comments

    Houston, Texas / $2,280,000 / 1900

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/27759865_zpid/29.846376,-95.335321,29.757895,-95.457373_rect/12_zm/1_fr/

    A marvelous George F. Barber designed house in beautiful shape. A staggering price, but you get lots of nooks and crannies, a coach house, a guest house and a koi pond.

    Video tour at:
    https://hookedonhouses.net/2018/09/04/victorian-house-houston-heights/

    (I’m sorry – I don’t know how to put active links into the text. (moderator, please help, thanks) This place was too good not to submit a comment.)

    1
  24. AvatarPeg says: 61 comments

    This home is listed in the write up by the realtor as an italianate villa from the late 1800’s. The build date is listed as 1925 and it doesn’t look like any italianate I’ve ever seen. (I’ve always loved old homes but still learning!) That being said, there is a lot of preserved detail in this beautiful home. The oak and mahogany woodwork, at least one original bath and the best part is the original butlers pantry. This home is in one of my favorite neighborhoods in Philadelphia, West Mount Airy. It’s about 7 miles from Boathouse Row, a neighborhood of beautiful old homes.
    8 bedrooms, 3 baths, $599,900.

    Check out this home at Realtor.com
    $599,900
    8beds · 3baths
    305 W Hortter St, Philadelphia
    https://b1iw.app.link/EuT2uSQNrT

    • AvatarStevenF says: 770 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      That’s an unusual house. There are some Italian or Mediterranean influences happening there but I’m not sure it’s what most people think of as an “Italianate”. Thanks for sharing.

      1
  25. AvatarHeather M says: 20 comments

    Another great home in Breaux Bridge, LA, a favorite town of mine when home (Baton Rouge) for the holidays.
    I’m not sure where the big wood room addition is in the house and thought UH OH when it was the lead picture thinking the house had been remuddled, but it hasn’t and I LOVE the original part of the house!
    Circa 1905, Breaux Bridge, LA $599,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/106159862_zpid/30.281426,-91.897642,30.270826,-91.913821_rect/15_zm/1_fr/?

    I posted another Breaux Bridge house around Christmas, but it was at the end of a two week long thread, so many probably missed it. This house is fabulous and includes the structure that was the original mercantile building of the builder of the home.
    Circa 1898, Beaux Bridge, LA, $749,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Breaux-Bridge-LA/225967169_zpid/3792_rid/30.326064,-91.828966,30.241273,-91.958399_rect/12_zm/1_fr/

    2
  26. AvatarJulianaMoon says: 74 comments

    Grosse Pointe Woods, MI. Built 1954. $349k.
    I came across this house and the outside looked like it was abandoned. When I looked at pictures, it is very art-deco inside. I was so surprised. I would have never guessed it was so nice inside. I love the Grosse Pointes. In the basement, there is a line of copper pipes going up. I have never seen that. Anyone know what that is for?
    Just wanted to share this one.

    https://www.trulia.com/p/mi/grosse-pointe-woods/541-lake-shore-ln-grosse-pointe-woods-mi-48236–2050879386

    https://www.trulia.com/mobile/android/

    3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/541-Lake-Shore-Ln-Grosse-Pointe-Woods-MI-48236/88305953_zpid/?fullpage=true

      Juliana; I couldn’t resist having a look at this house since you mentioned weird mechanicals, despite the (very tedious) Trulia link. Glad I did. What you have found there is a version of one of my favorite house subjects; an extremely well preserved mid-mod inhabited and kitted out by collector enthusiasts. I have no doubt they were sold by those RAD baths and original kitchen!

      The “line of copper pipes going up” you mentioned are lines to what is (I believe) a quad zoned, hot water circulated, under floor, radiant heating system. That boiler shown is likely the originally installed unit, and the lines all look the same to me. The zones are likely upper, lower, garage (as described in the listing), and (I’ll bet a nickel), (probably now defunct) driveway zone for EZ snow and ice removal in wintertime! 🙂 That this system is seemingly the untouched original, displaying no obvious changes, is a MARVEL; and likely owing to the (as described in the listing) engineer who designed and had built the house. These earlier radiant systems are notorious for their failure rate, (F.LL.Wright on > up through the 80’s). The survival of this one is likely owing to VERY thick, and very well engineered concrete slabs; many of which are SPLENDIDLY preserved as the finished floors you see throughout the house today, as they were originally intended! It’s a brilliant way to heat, and has become far more common today with contemporary methods and materials than it ever was in 1954(!). This house is very special for those reasons and more. Well spotted and posted. TY!

      4
      • MaggieMayMaggieMay says: 10 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1945 Craftsman
        Athens, TN

        Wow. From the outside of the house, you would never think they had such a well preserved unique type of floor heating. Thankyou so much for answering my question. I am geeked. I would love to see how they work. I may look around on the web. Thankyou so much!!
        My first thought when I saw those was they were hooked up to tanks of top shelf liquor for a bar upstairs. Lol. I used to be a bartender. The Grosse Pointes are where a lot of car executives and old money families lived and still live since the early 1900’s. Each house is so unique, mostly pricey, but you can find deals in there. Unless you want to live on the Detroit River, most homes are in the 200-400k range. I would love to live there. So close to the city of Detroit, but in a world all its own. I love Detroit and cannot wait to move home!! Thankyou again for the detailed explanation. I am really intrigued by them now. 😁

        1
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 4561 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1875 Italianate cottage
          Noblesville, IN

          I am for sure a geek for rare and unique systems of all sorts. Glad you found this one interesting as well. If I had an old house blog, I’d post houses for their interesting mechanicals alone from time to time. 😉

          • MaggieMayMaggieMay says: 10 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1945 Craftsman
            Athens, TN

            And I would love seeing them. Even small details are interesting to me. Like milk chutes. I adore radiator steam heat. My 4th floor apt overlooking Woodward Ave in Detroit had steam heat. I kept the living room windows open all winter long. It would get so hot and steamy. Had a cage elevator too. If I had a dollar for everytime I dropped my keys down the elevator shaft opening the cage!!

    • AvatarCZenos says: 61 comments

      Juliana,

      If you are talking about photo #39, those aren’t copper pipes, they are steel bar joists. The reddish color is red oxide paint primer. More commonly used in flat roofs in commercial buildings, they are steel trusses, giving a much longer span that wood for equal depth.

      Steve

  27. AvatarJulianaMoon says: 74 comments

    Grosse Pointe Farms, MI Built in 1892.
    795k
    This is a gorgeous Albert Kahn Farmhouse. He was a very famous architect in the Greater Detroit area, and this home is a stunning example of one of his homes. The owners took very good care of this house. The woodwork is gorgeous.

    https://www.trulia.com/p/mi/grosse-pointe-farms/59-lake-shore-rd-grosse-pointe-farms-mi-48236–1088949403

    3
  28. AvatarJulianaMoon says: 74 comments

    Grosse Pointe, MI. Built in 1924. 725K
    Gorgeous Mediterranean that has has some beautiful renovations, keeping the original architecture in mind. A room for the Au Pair? Can I be the Au Pair’s lonely old aunt? I love this house.

    https://www.trulia.com/p/mi/grosse-pointe/455-lakeland-st-grosse-pointe-mi-48230–2050833556

    1
  29. AvatarJulianaMoon says: 74 comments

    I hope you don’t mind this share. Oh, I can’t post the photos. I had before and after pictures of the family home we had from 1925 thru 2003. Thats OK. Never mind.

  30. CoraCora says: 1893 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1910. The listing says “needs TLC,” but I don’t see that it needs that much. Nice vintage bathrooms; generally just a nice, comfortable feel to the house. I like the garden porch. $319K

    Clifton, NJ:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/99-E-6th-St-Clifton-NJ-07011/39715692_zpid/

    1
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      Beyond some cosmetic stuff, nor do I see much to be done. Nothing obvious, at any rate. Rather cute house.

  31. CoraCora says: 1893 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1873. This is converted dairy barn that appears to possibly be used as an Inn, with a couple of little cabins included. Just very, very unique, and worth sharing. $749K

    Hankins, NY:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/204-William-Brown-Rd-Hankins-NY-12741/208780598_zpid/

    2
  32. AvatarQuiltingWitch says: 29 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 split level prisoner
    Great Falls, MT

    Beautiful woodwork, early Arts & Crafts -$2,395,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1272-Caroline-St-Alameda-CA-94501/24869447_zpid/?fullpage=true

  33. AvatarRick R. says: 44 comments

    Here’s a great colonial in Camden,SC for $349,000. Built in 1970, it has beautiful moldings, heart pine floors, real shutters, etc. Pretty lot in a nice neighborhood. Lots of character without the “real” old house problems. You’ll love the interior.

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fsbo_lt/house,apartment_duplex_type/72445816_zpid/7750-_price/31-_mp/0-1970_built/priced_sort/34.426735,-80.400696,33.616334,-81.618805_rect/9_zm/6_p/

  34. AvatarDiane2 says: 68 comments

    24 Clarke St, Binghamton, NY 13905 $89,000 Things have been done here. Any idea as to its original exterior appearance? I don’t seem to locate old photos as well as others here do. Thank you.

    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1883 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central NY, NY

      Here’s the zillow link:
      https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/24-Clarke-St-Binghamton-NY-13905/29720100_zpid/

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        As Diane writes, this c. 1890’s home has seen many changes since it was built. It is in the towered Queen Anne style and still features some classic Queen Anne style windows with a larger central pane bordered with smaller colored glass panes. Almost for certain there was once a front porch, now missing. Since liberties were taken with the exterior, I would not expect the interior to be period perfect either. For someone looking for a project house or merely a period home to live in, this could be worthwhile, depending on what remains inside.

  35. CoraCora says: 1893 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1914. This is a gorgeous old mansion in Wichita. It’s had some updates, but there’s still a good bit of eye candy there to see. Especially the exterior. $975K

    Wichita, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/401-N-Belmont-Ave-Wichita-KS-67208/77344677_zpid/?

    1
  36. AvatarDiane2 says: 68 comments

    205 Union St, Schenectady, NY 12305 $135,000
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/205-Union-St_Schenectady_NY_12305_M39919-03346?view=qv This looks like a newer house (this is the Stockade area, so I anticipate 17th and 18th century Dutch or English buildings) but I found it interesting. Please correct me if I am incirrect as to its age.

    • JimHJimH says: 4208 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The Sanders-Ellice House in Schenectady has a documented pre-Revolutionary history, built in the 1760’s for merchant John Sanders and rented before the war to fur trader James Ellice. The historical society description sums it up:
      A considerable part of the house at 205 Union Street predates the 1779 will of John Sanders, though later modifications conceal the age of the house from passersby. Heavy, hand-hewn beams and extremely wide floorboards are visible inside the house. An interesting feature is a cast iron fireback ornamented with the royal arms of Great Britain, a device that would certainly not have been used after 1776.

      https://dailygazette.com/article/2012/11/25/1125_landmarks

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        As a purist, I would be frustrated with such a house. When it was “Victorianized” the remodelers went at it with a vengeance leaving it with a mid-19th century look. I’m not sure what restoration approach would bring out the best in this house but since its in a neighborhood of real Colonial era homes, bringing back some of the 18th century flavor might work best. Perhaps some period maps or published old illustrations would show the Colonial configuration. Then again, it’s been as it appears today since the mid-1800’s so its a tough call except that it should not be gutted and made thoroughly modern inside.

  37. AvatarJennifer HT says: 796 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Anthem, AZ

    1812 Bath ME with an interesting staircase and hallway to it. $245k
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/84-South-St-Bath-ME-04530/85013189_zpid/?fullpage=true

    1
  38. AvatarKeith Sanders says: 104 comments

    Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania / $888,000 / 1901

    https://circaoldhouses.com/property/king-of-silk-house-for-sale-by-owner/

    $888,000 buys you a 24,000 sq ft, neoclassical fixer-upper with a distinct en déshabillé vibe. Comes fully equipped with spooky narrow basement hallway a la big pipes and water on the floor. Deep pockets required for restoration… but it must have been quite something in its day… and could be again. (Ahh… if I was a wealthy man.)

    1
  39. AvatarWm mann says: 9 comments

    Where’s the link to the Binghamtin n.y.listng?

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4718 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      The setting looks far more pastoral in streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/U7FMGxq36sE2 the house is a stylistic blend of the late Queen Anne style with added Colonial Revival details like the oval “Cameo” Colonial window, the leaded sidelights with Colonial designs and other popular design motifs of the time. Best, the house is in what appears to be a well established and well maintained neighborhood of older homes so it should retain its value for a long time. Thanks for sharing.

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