c. 1905 Craftsman – Denison, TX – $89,900

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Added to OHD on 12/13/18   -   Last OHD Update: 12/18/18   -   32 Comments
2031 W Bond St, Denison, TX 75020

Map: Street

Price

$89,900

Beds

3

Baths

2

SqFt

2144

Acres

0.22

Built in the early 1900's, an older home full of character maintained from its beginning. Its a must see and doesn't come around often in this state. Original kitchen, beautiful stained wood built-ins in dining and fireplace living area. Ship-lap walls and ceilings throughout. Original hardwood floors. Classic craftsman style exterior that one can only improve on. So much potential in this home!
Contact Details
Brandy Landon, Milestone Premier Properties
(903) 821-4958
Links, Photos & Additional Info

32 Comments on c. 1905 Craftsman – Denison, TX – $89,900

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Other than the missing plaster, love how untouched the interior is.

    22
  2. jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 865 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1947 Ranch
    OR

    My exact words: Wow, this is different! Has the original plaster just been taken off—It was directly on the shiplap? Or perhaps there was lath over the wood?

    2
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      It could have been something else other than plaster, just an assumption. When I look closer plaster may have not been the covering but something was there.

      1
      • Matt D says: 21 comments

        In many cases of the shiplap interior walls, they were covered with a cheese cloth or canvass that was painted or wallpapered. It provided some insulation and covered the joint gaps of the wood.

        7
        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          I know that part but what would have been on the ceiling between the beams? Surely not canvas.

          1
          • SharonSharon says: 277 comments
            OHD Supporter

            Sedalia, MO

            A little shiplap goes a long way here—–too long. It really detracts from the beauty of the beams, woodwork, built-ins, and fireplace that we have come to expect (and love) in a craftsman. Although, I’m still delirious over the kitchen and built-ins.

            16
          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            I’m trying to remember what house it was that had a partial exposed wall. There was the boarding (people know as shiplap), and a thin board over that then the plaster. That’s what I thought may have been done here. I don’t know what the name of the thin board is.

            1
            • Boxwood says: 42 comments

              LATH. The thin little boards that get covered in plaster is called lath. If you look closely at the interior wall in the lr, you will see the vertical darker marks for the studs on the wall. I kinda think there were studs over the shiplap with some kinda paneling or something similar. I agree with Sharon that the shiplap really distracts from the beauty of the trim and builtins that Craftsman Style houses are know for.

              3
              • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
                Admin

                1901 Folk Victorian
                Chestatee, GA

                No, that’s not what I’m talking about, I know that name. I’m talking about something else that’s like super duper thin dry wall nailed over the boards we see here.

                2
                • Jenny says: 3 comments

                  Plasterboard?

                  2
                  • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 658 comments
                    Admin

                    1901 Folk Victorian
                    Chestatee, GA

                    Maybe that’s what it is I’m thinking of. I just looked it up and gypsum is another one, or maybe it’s the same?

                    1
                    • Jmat3922 says: 34 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      My last house was built around the same time period. It had a covering over ‘ship lap’ identical to what is in this house. I removed the covering, which was like a thick cereal box. I don’t know what it’s called, but it was nailed directly onto the wooden boards. The seams were covered with a piece of wooden lath and it was all painted. After I removed the paper-board covering, I painted the walls….it turned out very nice. I think that would be an inexpensive way to showcase the lovely woodwork in this house.

                      5
                • William Walkington says: 62 comments

                  There was something called “beaver board” the old folks talked about when I was a kid. It was like a thin pressed paper panel that was used over studs under plaster. It had a surface layer that looked like thick paint of some sort. My great grandfather’s house, which had its construction halted by the depression, had this in the upstairs. It had to be installed with a large washer-like pressed metal disc around the nail to prevent the nail pulling through the soft and easily torn wall board. This may have been a regional construction material. My family was from the Ozarks, in the far southwestern corner where Oklahoma and Arkansas abut the state of Missouri.

                  3
                  • Racheal E Carter says: 41 comments

                    That’s what I was thinking if. It is AWFUL to take off of a wall! We redid an old farmhouse with beaverboard walls in the bath. I’m in Missouri.

                • Judy Ashley says: 2 comments

                  beadboard?

                • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 865 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1947 Ranch
                  OR

                  In working with our current house, we’ve run across something I find odd. Instead of lath & plaster, the walls are a thin dry wall like material like what you’re describing Kelly. Probably not more than a quarter inch thick, nailed directly to the studs. It’s got holes in it that create keys to secure the plaster. I’ve never seen anything like it.

                  I just looked it up (duh) and it’s referred to as ‘Button Board’. Wikipedia says it came into use after lath but doesn’t give a time frame. Our house is 1947 so obviously sometime before then 😉

                  • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
                    Admin

                    1901 Folk Victorian
                    Chestatee, GA

                    Yup, that’s exactly what I figured with this one. Either the boarding or board with plaster over it. Or possibly canvas over board, I just don’t believe it was all canvas everywhere without some kind of backing (I know they did that too.) I love wood plank walls (my entire home is like that) but too much of it is overwhelming. With the unpainted wood already there I’d do a backing (I’m not sure dry wall is the answer but that or something similar) and then paint or wallpaper over that. As much as I love plaster walls I think it would be too expensive considering the rest of the work that needs done, I’d rather spend my money elsewhere. I know others would do it differently, just as long as no one paints the important parts and keeps the kitchen as well as they can. As original as this home is, one could have a stunner that appears absolutely original IF done right.

                    1
          • William Walkington says: 62 comments

            I remember reading that a similar Craftsman home had gold painted burlap in the panels between the beams in a dining room. Sounds like it might have rather pretty.

    • JimHJimH says: 3816 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I think this is exactly what you would want to restore the original finish. A close look would tell you what was there – probably muslin and paper, even on the ceiling – and you can go from there. There are different modern products, but adding thickness to the walls with lath, board or sheetrock can ruin the original reveals. The woodwork just needs cleaning and light polish – no shiny Minwax please!

      A nicely preserved early bungalow, though after the form evolved, closer to 1920 I’d guess.

      4
      • Marc says: 171 comments

        Jim, do you think the board installation is original? I was wondering if someone pried them off, flipped them over, and then reinstalled, because there appears to be “ghost” lines from the wall studs. If they weren’t flipped, could that happen on the inside surface over time when covered with some kind of textile? I’m also wondering why only a few boards appear to have old paint/stain on them, and there appears to be newer caulking around the hutch. Maybe the boards were reused from somewhere else? I’m fascinated by the boards because otherwise this house appears so completely original.

        • JimHJimH says: 3816 comments
          OHD Supporter

          There’s some water staining too, but it’s hard to tell from afar exactly what happened. That ghosting can happen over time through the boards. If not completely original, it’s very close, and I think I’m seeing wallpaper residue.
          It might be fun to finish it in different ways: muslin and wallpaper, liner and wallpaper, liner and paint (with stenciling?), primer and paint, as-is.

          3
      • jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 865 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1947 Ranch
        OR

        I agree JimH about the possible coverings for walls/ceilings. If they had used anything thicker than fabric or paper, the profile of door/windoow mouldings, box beams, everything would’ve been lost. And, I’m curious too about the shadowing as mentioned by Marc and others.

  3. MichaelMichael says: 1173 comments

    Interesting the lack of finish on the walls. It’s a beautiful house with great potential. I doubt the walls ever saw plaster, especially with the shiplap on the walls. I’ll bet it had some kind of fabric over the walls.

    1
  4. DeniseLynn says: 174 comments

    The interior looks like it should be a cabin in the woods.

    3
  5. Shirley says: 5 comments

    Nice house and my style for sure but noo shiplap! Id put plaster back on the walls for sure!

  6. Deb says: 18 comments

    I would love to make this my cabin in the woods! Please find me one in rural Michigan. The fact that the walls are stripped back to the shiplap is a benefit to my mind. A wonderful blank slate. Such a charming little place with so much character! Love it!

    2
  7. Karrie says: 220 comments

    Boy this is so neat, hoping someone will RESTORE her to her former glory days.

    1
  8. MazamaGrammy says: 348 comments

    I’d keep the original kitchen cabinets and sink, also the bathroom fixture. This home could be fabulous with very little work. I live about 15 miles south of Denison. It’s a nice place to live – city conveniences but still a small town, rural atmosphere.

    1
  9. Margie GS says: 16 comments

    I love this house so unspoiled. I agree with a previous post that a little ship lap goes a long way. The kitchen and bath are the best, unpainted wood work. This home is a diamond.

  10. pamibach says: 93 comments

    I’m in love with this house

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