c. 1838 Federal/Greek Revival – Milledgeville, GA – $350,000

Contingent or Pending Sale
National Register
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Contact the agent if interested.
Added to OHD on 10/26/18   -   Last OHD Update: 12/3/18   -   70 Comments
402 Allen Memorial Dr SW, Milledgeville, GA 31061

Map: Street

Price

$350,000

Beds

6

Baths

3

SqFt

5776

Acres

12

A piece of Georgia History awaits you... Some renovations have been made including roof, some interior work, and all windows replaced with energy efficient, double paned gas filled windows throughout. Property needs cosmetic TLC to restore this beautiful southern belle back to her former glory. This property is lavish with potential. Located just minutes from Historic Downtown Milledgeville Georgia and adjacent to the Historical Estate, Lockerly Arboretum. Property Boasts 12 acres and a spring fed private pond. Property showings by appointment only.
Links, Photos & Additional Info

70 Comments on c. 1838 Federal/Greek Revival – Milledgeville, GA – $350,000

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9369 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I linked to the National Register form up top, has a few photos from the 1970’s and history of this amazing place. Note, when I was creating the post the build date on record was 1812 which is why the title says that on FB and Twitter. I’ve updated it to the date from the National Register, 1838. Some of the 1970 photos show fire damage which happened in the late 1960’s, the then owners were restoring the home when the NR report was written.

    9
    • JimHJimH says: 3808 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Yes, well documented from 1838. Much of the design comes from the pattern books of Minard Lafever, published in the 1830’s.

      The exquisite woodwork in the dining room has been meticulously preserved. Unfortunately, the Winterthur Museum in Delaware acquired it in 1969 and it’s installed as the Georgia Dining Room there.

      13
      • Mark Phillips says: 12 comments

        Yes JimH at Winterthut it’s interpreted, or rather staged, as Georgia Dining Room. However, it was originally one of the twin parlors

        1
        • Mark Phillips says: 12 comments

          I am vexed about the re-interpretation at Winterthur c.1999, I agree with simplification of walls and furniture – more correct for GA, however, the curtain valances now cover the wonderful surround w/ elongated Anthemion motif. What’s the use in tearing-out the window surrounds- then covering them? Lol

          1
          • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

            MP –
            I’m completely sympathetic with your vexation. I attempted responding to your dismay under another of your comments relevant to swathing the window surrounds beneath excessive fabric. One would believe that with all their research material available Winterthur would have pursued a more respectful avenue.

            1
  2. miatalvrmiatalvr says: 3 comments
    1888 Victorian
    Pikesville, MD

    12 acres next to an arboretum and a wrought iron fence, with no apparent horrible modernization? Beautiful. I’m hoping the old garden outbuildings are still there. Wish there were more pictures!

    34
  3. Mary Halako Dunton says: 26 comments

    What a gorgeous house! I love that stairway, the wrought iron, and beautiful big, fat floorboards! I adore this place!! She is a beauty!

    18
  4. HeidiHeidi says: 131 comments

    Anything with a wrought iron fence captures my love—everything else after that is icing on the beautiful Federal cake.

    9
    • Bethany otto says: 2374 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Escondido, CA

      I love that OHDers know how to correctly spell “wrought iron.”

      16
  5. RJ says: 2 comments

    Isn’t this the house used in Robin William’s “Jumanji” movie?

  6. Rhea Kamendat says: 20 comments

    Oh if only, would move right in! Love the intricate iron fence and the entrance inviting you in to explore more. Awesome spiral staircase, love shot from above it. View from balcony is absolutely priceless. Would like to see more shots of interior; such as bedrooms, baths, kitchen (hopefully original). This is truly a time capsule of a gentler, more graceful place in time. Love this one!

    14
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9369 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      The original kitchen is not what you’d want. It would be a building detached from the main home or in the basement with a wood stove.

      18
      • Jojobee says: 3 comments

        I would LOVE a basement kitchen. I’d also love the old wood stove…but I would have it converted to run on gas.

        4
  7. Careen says: 16 comments

    Stunning

    4
  8. Ashley Parlier says: 7 comments

    The location leaves something to be desired. A good investment?

    3
    • Stick Miller says: 3 comments

      Great location. Milledgville is an ideal college town with mild winter climates. What else could you want.

      4
      • lisa anne says: 14 comments

        original windows!

        3
        • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

          No….they boogered the original windows by replacing them with modern idioms under the purported guise of energy efficiency; which has been proven a fallacy by even the NPS guidelines. Rather than interior storms, note how in some exterior photos you’ll see a solid sheet of glare from exterior mounting which affects the frame/sash depth reveal. Doing this relegates shutters to a purely ‘decorative’ role as they then can’t be closed on a regular basis to mitigate climatic conditions.

          14
          • More says: 3 comments

            My heart sank when I read about the windows.

            2
            • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

              More –
              If you’ll scroll down to the bottom comments (as of today) we found out that possibly all the original windows were put into storage. If true, and more importantly a sensitive & sensible buyer comes along, then the windows could be reinstalled. Should they subscribe to this modern day near paranoia about windows being ‘energy efficient’, any of the various interior storms easily available on the market could be installed without harming the house’s historical integrity.

              1
              • Mark Phillips says: 12 comments

                Only some windows were saved- not enough to do even the facade- including wings.

                • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

                  MP –
                  If I wrote erroneously it was in relaying information ‘third hand’…always a danger. However, if enough original windows survive to allow their complete replication, then surely that is better than contemporary vinyl clad aluminum or such.

                  1
  9. CharlestonJohnCharlestonJohn says: 722 comments

    Very interesting transitional house in the former capital of Georgia. The 1838 build date seems a little late for the strong Federal details found in the front entrance and staircase, but there’s a big Greek Revival influence as well. This one deserves a responsible restoration.

    14
  10. CoraCora says: 1803 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    Egads, this is incredible. 😯 What a beauty!

    2
  11. StevenF says: 629 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    I looked online for pictures of the panelling that was harvested form this house and installed in Winterthur, but can’t find one. On one hand, I’m glad they saved the panelling, but it bums me out that they stripped it from a still standing home.

    15
    • TGrantTGrant says: 467 comments
      OHD Supporter

      New Orleans, LA

      It’s currently called the Georgia Dining Room. Winterthur has multiple dining rooms from many different states and time periods. Most are referred to by their state name.

      7
        • TGrantTGrant says: 467 comments
          OHD Supporter

          New Orleans, LA

          My understanding is that it’s this one.
          https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dining_room_-_Winterthur_Museum_-_DSC01722.JPG

          4
          • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

            Apologies tendered TGrant – but RebnFlames was right in their visual search.

            2
        • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

          YES – that is the correct room! First overdone with the gold window treatments, and not greatly improved the second time around. Unfortunately the paneling details rarely are shown in official photos. I’m intimately aware of the space and furnishings.

          3
          • Mark Phillips says: 12 comments

            I agree! Hate they covered the corner anthemions of window surrounds with the valances!

            1
            • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

              MP –
              The question to be asked is ‘why’ anyone would initially expend funds on elaborated framing only to hide it behind reams of fabric. Federal Era window treatments were relatively simple & graceful (inside the frame); even down to just Venetian Blinds behind articulated or stencil decorated cornices. The rise of C19 Rococo Revival style, with its near upholstered exuberant window coverings ushered in the masking of framework.
              It has to be remembered that “Winterthur” was and is the expression of Mr. DuPont’s personal taste and sense of collecting. It should in no way be assumed as an ‘authentic’ house museum in room settings; hence the often ‘decorative’ approach taken in presentations. The Georgia Room’s present curtains & valances were copied from a period engraving; nothing wrong in and of that. BUT…the said engraving illustrated a glass set of double exit doors; the mistake was in transposing the design to a singular narrow window opening without literate compensation for proportional scaling down.

              2
  12. Rick H. Veal says: 51 comments

    Oh goodness – you had me at wrought iron fence and flying staircase …

    5
  13. Julie Severson says: 7 comments

    Oh my-the staircase! Pick Ross up off the floor-this will give him vapors for sure.

    2
  14. Eric says: 245 comments

    Put the shutters back on after giving her a fresh paint job along with a little landscaping and this would be a stunning beauty. The interior is incredible and that staircase is artwork, absolute perfection. Milledgeville has a number of beautiful old homes including the Governor’s Mansion when this was once the capital of Georgia. I always thought the name of the town so appropriate for the capital, milledge referring to tax assessments.

    8
  15. 67drake67drake says: 163 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Racine County, WI

    I be happy owning that fence

    7
  16. Daughter of GeorgeDaughter of George says: 758 comments

    That staircase takes my breath away. What a glorious house!

    4
  17. sir douglas rice says: 20 comments

    did they buy the dining room from a former owner? it bothers me to think they robbed that from this still-standing gem. and when they took it, i imagine the house was in much better shape as well.

    3
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9369 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      The house had a fire about when it was taken but the owners were restoring it back then. Maybe it was suppose to be a temporary loan that turned into forever? I don’t understand why either.

      4
      • Mark Phillips says: 12 comments

        I think it may have been sold to defray costs after fire in late 60’s. I still think it was a sacrilege-esp. Since it was one of twin adjoining parlors- And they took pocket doors between the parlors.

        2
        • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

          MP –
          And didn’t they trim/alter the woodwork to fit their allowable space? Hopefully the pocket doors are labeled and in protective storage.

          1
    • Carolyn says: 220 comments
      Grand Rapids, MI

      I agree, whether they purchased the dining room or not they robbed this house of part of it’s history. Who wants a giant gutted room. I can’t imagine what it would cost the new owner to replicate it. It’s such a shame. I love this house. And yes I winced when I read the line about the new windows. I kept wishing I’d won the billion dollar lottery because I’d use it to save every old house on this site!

      3
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9369 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        There is no indication the dining room is a “giant gutted room.”

        2
        • Carolyn says: 220 comments
          Grand Rapids, MI

          I meant gutted of woodwork. I was going by what was said in the comments. “The woodwork in question consists of wainscoting, door and window surrounds, base boards and doors.” And maybe the mantle. Doesn’t sound like much was left but the plaster walls.

          1
  18. William Walkington says: 58 comments

    That stairway is poetry in wood. I can’t imagine a more elegant and lyrical design.

    3
  19. Johntique says: 26 comments

    The missing dining room woodwork was purchased for Winterthur; Mr. DuPont did not steal anything to add to his museum. The woodwork in question consists of wainscoting, door and window surrounds, base boards and doors. I am not sure whether or not the mantel was part of the room. The room is much prettier in person; the photo doesn’t capture the warmth or period feel of the room. If you have never been to Winterthur …. you are missing the finest collection of American furnished period rooms in the world! It takes WEEKS to see the entire museum – and there are many different tours available – to satisfy every taste.

    6
  20. JimVal says: 2 comments

    I wonder if they saved the original windows. I would put them right back where they belong.

    2
  21. SueSue says: 193 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    Oh my, now this is a dream. I can hear my husband now though. “Susan, that one looks like there will be a ghostly face staring at me from upstairs as I am moving in.”
    I wonder if it is zoned for horses etc.?

    3
  22. HoyteJ says: 2 comments
    1830 Federal Greek Revival
    Milledgeville, GA

    Local Milledgeville lore has it that the dining room was reproduced and an exact copy now fills the walls at the house. It was said that Mr. DuPont wanted an “authentic” Georgia room and when they got it to Delaware, discovered that it was made of northern white pine that the builder had shipped down from Maine. The house is in great disrepair and has been robbed of several beautiful mantles and a fine marble one lies broken where thieves tried unsuccessfully to pry it from the wall. The area around this house (known as Hardwick) is a struggling part of the community with the closing of the State Hospital that now is surrounded by hundreds of abandoned homes and neglected properties, and acre after acre of uncared for trailer parks. Lockerly Hall is the referenced “arboretum” and is indeed a fabulous Greek Revival of note. Also within gunshot of the Willis House and one of the finest ladies in the area. Both are worth a google. Tragedy about the windows.

    The RebnFlames picture reference is the correct Dining Room image. I was recently at Winterthur and took a few photos that I would be glad to share. I’m new to the site: Is there anyway to download? Also have a few more shots of the interior of this house (Rockwell House) that I can post

    4
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 656 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      If you’d like to share pics, you can email to me and I’ll add. Kelly@oldhousedreams.com

      • HoyteJ says: 2 comments
        1830 Federal Greek Revival
        Milledgeville, GA

        Thanks Kelly…am sending now

        1
        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9369 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Thanks!

          Photos of the Georgia Room at Winterthur:

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9369 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          And of Rockwell Mansion, taken about a month ago by HoyteJ.

          1
          • JimHJimH says: 3808 comments
            OHD Supporter

            Sad condition, but it appears completely restorable or replaceable. The woodwork sold to Mr. duPont can be traced and fabricated, the original windows restored – not as good as the original but reasonable facsimiles.

            Beyond the obvious beauty and authenticity of the place, what astounds me is that this amazing antebellum estate is available, essentially intact with 12 acres of original grounds, for a mere $350,000 (or less). That’s a fair amount of money for a family home and the restoration could be much more, but this is a landmark property whose benefactor will be recorded in the history books for generations to come. Folks buy ordinary McMansions or Ferraris for much more than this will cost!

            5
            • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

              JimH –
              You couldn’t be more correct in your comment! Through a contact made I’ve just learned that the original windows (some if not all) are in storage, along with certain other salvaged materials. The listing agent has proved interested in weeding through calls for the right respectful buyer. A hand has been extended to the owner on having preservation easements created, and possible tax credits available if the property is restored/renovated to NPS standards.

              1
              • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9369 comments
                Admin

                1901 Folk Victorian
                Chestatee, GA

                Thanks for the great news, crossing my fingers hard for the right kind of buyer that will put them back in.

                1
                • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

                  The new owner is indeed having preservation easements created, and pursuing historic tax credits which will ensure at least the exterior is returned as much as possible to its original appearance. Preliminary color analysis is proving the house was not the proverbial ‘snow white with black shutters’, but instead a warm yellowish-tan with limestone-shaded trim work. The foundation was stucco over brick with an ashlar pattern in a deep sandstone tint. The exact shutter green is being examined.
                  Were it not for the open forum provided by your comments section, the successful chain of connective events & individuals leading to protection of this invaluable property may well have faltered. Consequently this restoration victory can be squarely laid at your feet and subsequent OHD listing. Do savor the personal triumph and enjoy this holiday present you’ve given the State of Georgia.

                  • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 656 comments
                    Admin

                    1901 Folk Victorian
                    Chestatee, GA

                    Are you saying the pending owner found the home on OHD? Glad the comments were helpful to them!

                    • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

                      Yes, the pending (no complications expected) owner was alerted to the OHD listing. I passed everything along to a preservation compatriot, the GA Trust reached out to the agent, etcetera & so forth with a lot of to & froe between outside parties interested in saving the house…for restoration. I’m trying to compliment you for your moderated open forum that directly led to the accomplishment.

                      1
                    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 656 comments
                      Admin

                      1901 Folk Victorian
                      Chestatee, GA

                      Ah! Well that is awesome. Good luck pending owner, crossing my fingers everything goes smoothly for them.

                      1
    • Mark Phillips says: 12 comments

      No reproduction of any of the woodwork- severely plain 1×6 or 1×8’s.. The architect/builder was from Portland, ME and also dealt in building supplies. His name was Lane and he maintained a woodworking shop in Milledgeville. His estate inventory taken at his death mentions that he dealt in building furnishings- windows, doors, mantles,etc. He was also responsible for designing/building Thalian Hall on the campus of Oglethorpe College, just a short distance from this house.

      1
      • Reneau de Beauchamp says: 42 comments

        MP –
        “Thank you” for providing this important info on the builder! Off-site manufactured millwork, often even imported, was far more commonplace than ordinarily known. One quick example are the Corinthian column capitals of “Millford” plantation in SC.

  23. Jason says: 14 comments

    The street/aerial view of the property makes it confusing as to what is part of the property and what isn’t. The street view shows a house to the left with a blocked off driveway and it appears the main house’s metal fencing separates the 2 but the aerial shows the driveway for the main house going over to that next door house. Hopefully just where rehabbers lived.

    • Mark Phillips says: 12 comments

      That was the guest house – c.1950’s??- for this property, however not included in sale of House+12 acres.

      1
  24. Georgia Girl says: 53 comments

    The staircase has me longing for a BBQ at Twelve Oaks.

  25. Johntique says: 26 comments

    Kelly ….
    Thank you for posting Hoyte’s photographs – and thank you, Hoyte, for submitting them. The current state of this magnificent house is enough to make you heartsick! I pray that someone well versed in correct restoration acquires this – and does it the justice it truly deserves! I don’t think that I’ve ever loved an old house more than this one.

    1

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