1856 Octagon – Horicon, WI – $144,500

For Sale
Status, price and other details may not be current and must be independently verified.
OHD does not represent this home, contact the agent as listed below.
Added to OHD on 10/8/18   -   Last OHD Update: 12/21/18   -   37 Comments
219 Valley St, Horicon, WI 53032

Map: Aerial

Price

$144,500

Beds

3

Baths

1.5

SqFt

2079

Acres

2.5

This historic octagon home may be one of only a few left in the state. In addition to the home - that is awaiting a full remodel - there is also a detached 2-story garage/barn, 5 boat houses at the river's edge & another 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath home at water's edge - also awaiting a complete remodel. Beautiful 2.5+ acres, mature trees, all on the Rock River! If you are looking for a historic remodel, building location on the river or just a getaway, look no further - the potential is unlimited! Private, serene location & the Rock River runs into the Horicon Marsh. The river is monitored by the dam, so worry free. Property is being sold ''AS-IS'' and is priced accordingly. Home is not on the Historic Registry, so improvements are not regulated.
Contact Information
Carol Euringer, First Weber Group
(262) 646-6800
Links, Photos & Additional Info

37 Comments on 1856 Octagon – Horicon, WI – $144,500

OHD does not represent homes on this site. Contact the agent listed for details including current price and status.
  1. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 473 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1918 Bunkhouse
    WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

    Well, at least the original staircase balustrade survives! Despite the heavy panelization and numerous updates, this house offers a ton of potential for the right buyer. The width of the masonry opening around the front door suggests that there was originally a pair of narrow doors here. Because the interior has already been so altered, the place is really a blank slate for the next owner… one could go historic or modern in approach and end up with a great house either way.

    The real estate agent’s listing description – “Home is not on the Historic Registry, so improvements are not regulated.” -only helps to perpetuate the myth that National Register status prevents property owners from making alterations. Such status is purely honorary and has no impact whatsoever on a building; listed buildings are routinely torn down without consequence.

    22
    • TGrantTGrant says: 525 comments
      OHD Supporter

      New Orleans, LA

      It’s always surprising to see just how many realtors are unaware of the basic facts behind a National Register listing.

      6
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9787 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        National Register listings are complicated by the fact that SOME NR are in historic districts and do require approval from a local board on exterior updates.

        13
        • TGrantTGrant says: 525 comments
          OHD Supporter

          New Orleans, LA

          True, I lived in Eureka Springs for 10 years and the original Victorian core is a NR Historic District. Our old warehouse building even had a facade easement and that does complicate things greatly. When I moved outside of the district it was a bit of a shock that I no longer had to get paint color permission.

          6
        • AvatarKaren says: 577 comments

          I looked at a wonderful house that had been flipped, in Ft Wayne. It was not on the Register, but was in a city designated historic district. The guys who flipped it (and they did a wonderful job), had a long list of things you could and couldn’t do. A lot had to do with exterior paint colors, and roof shingle colors and types. I loved this house, but unfortunately, there was no driveway! On street parking only-and it was a very narrow street. I kept imagining my car getting bashed in by another car driving down the street, in the winter, when the plows had created snowbanks that narrowed the street further.

          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9787 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            Then it sounds like the sellers were giving restrictions not a local NR board, which sellers are able to do with historic homes if they so choose to have it written in the contract. I’ve never understood how they enforce it down the line, like if the new buyer sells it to someone else.

            • TGrantTGrant says: 525 comments
              OHD Supporter

              New Orleans, LA

              My understanding is that unless the buyer includes the same restrictions in the contract when they sell, it’s basically unenforceable down the line. At least, that’s what my attorney told me. It’s probably different from state to state as well.

  2. AvatarBethany otto says: 2510 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Escondido, CA

    And zoom into fantasy mode . . . my favorite state, an incredibly cool house which needs plenty of restoration, a big old barn, a river . . . “sigh” it doesn’t get much better.

    7
  3. RossRoss says: 2370 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    The best ever octagon house:

    http://www.josephpelllombardi.com/?homes_page=octagon-house

    15
  4. TGrantTGrant says: 525 comments
    OHD Supporter

    New Orleans, LA

    Looking at the aerial photo that’s a good bit of property with several ancillary buildings. Plus it’s right on the river bordering a train line. That would bother some folks, not me. I grew up with the sound of the train whistles so it would put me right to sleep.

    8
  5. AvatarJKleeb says: 145 comments

    In the life of my dreams I would be Joseph Pell Lombardi. His collection of houses is is incredible. Chateau du Sailhant is my favorite for it’s amazing site alone. Check out the links on the site Ross shared.

    4
  6. AvatarTom A says: 16 comments

    Sometimes that paneling can hide unhappy surprises. I’ve seen more than one case where the wiring in a house was not inside the walls, but rather in the 3/4″ gap between the paneling and the original walls. Pull the paneling off of the furring strips, and all the wiring flops out into the room.

    2
    • AvatarNancy C says: 123 comments
      OHD Supporter

      abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

      My fantasy house bucket list contains 1) old house, 2) at least one acre, 3) on water, 4) near railroad tracks (I like hearing trains), among many other things. But I never dreamed of an octagon house (I “designed” one when I was pre-teen) or a built-in National/State Wildlife Refuge just up the street.

      But when I look inside the house, I am overwhelmed by my ignorance about how to turn this building into something memorable. What do you do about the potential paneling problems, Tom A? Have the windows been replaced with ones that are totally inappropriate? Is there any way to find restoration clues in such an altered house, Architectural Observer?

      It could be just marvelous — what a property for old house dreaming!

      2
      • AvatarJoe says: 588 comments

        -The trick is to go look at it. One can often tell if the paneling is new or old. It has only been in the relatively recent past that contractors used glue on paneling. If Furring strips were used, the old window trim may be under the paneling.
        -If you assume disaster, then pay accordingly., then there may be pleasant surprises.
        -If you go in assuming that you are not going to save the old walls, if they are intact, what a pleasant surprise! If you plan to rewire everything, what a pleasant surprise!
        -If you find that you don’t need to do all of it! If you assume that there is no hidden detailing remaining……
        – and if there are no pleasant surprises, you can do whatever you d…ned well please and have the house of your dreams…… as long as you don’t overpay.
        -Over-improving is a must if it is going to be your home, but not if it is just a house to you.

        2
    • RossRoss says: 2370 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      I have removed acres of paneling from many, many houses.

      Not once did I discover anything surprising under. Well, except some poor wallpaper choices on occasion.

      2
  7. jeklstudiojeklstudio says: 888 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1947 Ranch
    OR

    The paneling problem could be even worse: It could all be glued down. We restored a Craftsman in CA that had one bedroom covered in cheap paneling. When we pulled it down so came a lot of the original plaster πŸ™
    I worry that’s the case every time I see paneling in an old house.

    2
  8. GypsyGypsy says: 128 comments

    The kitchen reminds me of my grandmother’s. I loved her kitchen. She had a huge Hoosier Cabinet on one side of the room and the other cabinets looked like those.

    If that house could be “un-70’ed”, it would be so neat. The land is appealing as far as the space and what you could plant!

    3
  9. AvatarSusan Holmes says: 3 comments

    Hey, friends! Buck it up! This could be awesome. Yes, paneling hides potential troubles, but look at the price. We bought an 1872 remuddled house 22 years ago. Everyone thought we were nuts. $75,00 for 4500 substandard sq ft. Now appraised at between $600-700k. Get out your carhartts!

    2
  10. AvatarLes F. says: 79 comments

    Horicon is a absolutely wonderful town. It has a John Deere Factory that belonged to my mother’s family 100+ years ago. My great great uncle Willard sold to John Deere because they guaranteed the employees jobs. When Uncle Willard died at the start of the Great Depression, he willed most of his estate to his employees, giving Horicon a support base thru the 1930’s. Will Rogers said there should be more Van Brunts. It is a rich heritage that the new owner of the octagon will share.
    Les F.

    3
  11. AvatarPookha says: 143 comments

    Did I spy some pink in the bathroom? That’s a plus already.

    2
  12. AvatarKim says: 4 comments

    The Genesee Country Village has an octagon house that is restored. It was a disaster when they moved it. You can see what the exterior looks like now at https://www.gcv.org/explore/historic-village/gas-light-district/
    If you look at the museum’s facebook page on 3/2/2017 you can see photos of what it looked like. It shows what you can do.

    1
  13. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4606 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Octagon style houses were never common and they enjoyed a relatively short period of popularity roughly from 1849 when Orson Squire Fowler published The Octagon House until the 1860’s when the style’s popularity waned. I know of one example in Minnesota said to have been built in the early 1880’s with some documentation to support it but few were built after 1870. Fowler espoused using an early form of concrete for economy but most were built of either wood or masonry. They could be embellished with cupolas, wrap around porches, and fancy millwork or kept relatively plain with only a small portico for a porch. I’ve seen very few Octagons with lavish interiors (such as Longwood in Natchez, MS, and the Armor-Stiner House in Irvington, NY) which should come as no surprise because Fowler promoted the Octagon as one of the most economical types of houses that could be built in the mid 1800’s. I did observe a chimney in one of the photos so perhaps there was once a mantel or two but more recently it appears that central heating was installed. My opinion is along the lines of those already shared: keep and clean up the original staircase but the rest of the interior should be up to the next owner to decide. The original brick walls were likely unpainted when the house was built. I hope the next owners choose to take the house more towards its original period.

    2
  14. AvatarLana says: 62 comments

    Oh I see so much potential. Rip out the paneling, paint, wallpaper and imagination. The grounds are just wonderful. What a unique and magical house.

    3

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