October 5, 2018: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You)

Added to OHD on 10/5/18 - Last OHD Update: 10/12/18 - 156 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

How to share…Format rule!
Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below. Make it easier for those browsing shares by including the city, state and price (international shares, just the country and a hint about what the home you are sharing is.) A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful. Example: 1890 Victorian in Baxter, Georgia. Unpainted wood, two story on 9 acres.

Keep email notifications from being marked as spam by sharing no more than 10 links per comment (you can make as many comments as you want just no more than 10 per comment.) Not all shares will be added to OHD as it’s own post.

Special thanks to this month's OHD Supporters!
Anne M.- Bethany- Colleen J- DRC- Erol- JimH- CharlestonJohn- Laurie W- Leigh- Oklahoma Houses by Mail- Roger Cook- Ross- ALLALASKAN- Annabelle- Matt Ziehnert- stevenf- David Dyke- Jan Matson- FlaOHDJunkie- Laura Lewis- Guinan- Sharon Brause- Well Done! Realty (Lancaster John)- J.A.- Sue Patrick- 67drake- clawhammerist- Libby- Evelyn Walker- Nance- Architectural Observer- Lori A- KarenZ- Jenny Wiebler- Grant- Mary C.- Sandy B.- Wendy A.- David Backer (ddbacker)- Victorian Joy- NonaK- DianeEG- Jennifer HT- Our Philly Row- MaggieMay- Robinjn- Les Houston Ontario Canada- Shelley from Canada- Sadie- Aardvark Rare Books- Gregory Hubbard- Anne H.- Abby- Sarah Fox-Balts - Friends of the Old West End - Abevy- Son of Syosset- Bethster- Ryan- Teri W.- John Shiflet- linzyloo- kimmers- Marcia Ames- Kelli- Tonimar- Harley's Mom- Tommy Quinn- P. Buckingham- SandyF- Southwestlovesmomma- Shawn Cripe- Lucinda Howard- PreservationMatters- Terri Carlson, Red Brick Road Farm- Fairmount- QuiltingWitch- Candy- Pete R.- indygreta- Braeden Fitch- SusieQ605- Brigid- Kevin O'Neill- Lord Mannyng- Karen Baker- James Michalowski, Howard Hanna Real Estate Services- Karen Rundle- Paul- Donna Reynolds- CeylaClaire- catlover- Derek Walvoord- JRC- C.J.R.- Boilerguy1720- Laura- Caethe- Hope Douglas- Jim Smith- Marshel Cunningham- Kim Carter- Kimberly62-
And the anonymous!

A Field Guide to American Houses by Virginia Savage McAlester
“Here at last: the fully expanded, updated, and freshly designed second edition of the most comprehensive and widely acclaimed guide to domestic architecture—in print since its publication in 1984, and acknowledged everywhere as the unmatched, essential reference to American houses. Focusing on dwellings in urban and suburban neighborhoods and rural locations all across the continental United States—houses built over the past three hundred years reflecting every social and economic background—this guide provides in-depth information on the essentials of domestic architecture with facts and frames of reference that will enable you to look in a fresh way at the houses around you. With more than 1,600 detailed photographs and line illustrations, and a lucid, vastly informative text, it will teach you not only to recognize distinct architectural styles but also to understand their historical significance. What does that cornice signify? Or that porch? The shape of that door? The window treatment? When was this house built? What does the style say about its builders and their eras? You’ll find the answers to these and myriad other questions in this encyclopedic and eminently practical book. Here are more than fifty styles and their variants, spanning seven distinct historical periods. Each style is illustrated with a large schematic drawing that highlights its most important identifying features. Additional drawings and photographs provide, at a glance, common alternative shapes, principal subtypes, and close-up views of typical small details—windows, doors, cornices, etc.—that can be difficult to see in full-house illustrations. The accompanying text explains the identifying features of each style, describing where and in what quantity they can be found, discussing all of its notable variants, and tracing their origin and history. The book’s introductory chapters provide invaluable general discussions of construction materials and techniques, house shapes, and the various traditions of architectural fashion that have influenced American house design through the past three centuries. A pictorial key and glossary simplifies identification, connecting easily recognized architectural features—the presence of a tile roof, for example—to the styles in which that feature is likely to be found. Among the new material included in this edition are chapters on styles that have emerged in the thirty years since the previous edition; a groundbreaking chapter on the development and evolution of American neighborhoods; an appendix on approaches to construction in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; an expanded bibliography; and 600 new photographs and line drawings throughout. Here is an indispensable resource—both easy and pleasurable to use—for the house lover and the curious tourist, for the house buyer and the weekend stroller, for neighborhood preservation groups, architecture buffs, and everyone who wants to know more about their own homes and communities. It is an invaluable book of American architecture, culture, and history.”


157 Comments on October 5, 2018: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You)

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8928 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks to the OHD Supporters! They are helping me not freak out so much over OHD bills. 🙂 THANK YOU!

    A reminder about the share format, PLEASE include the price, city and state if not shown in your link. This makes it easier on me as well as others browsing the shares. Don’t make me call you out on it. 🙂

    “Where are the cheap houses?” is a question I’ve been getting for the last two weeks. I do have a separate search for homes priced below $100,000 so it’s not from neglect of looking on my part. The last few weeks I’ve been catching up on $300+ homes on my list in addition to just enjoying posting homes regardless of the price. There are many cheap houses for sale but most of them are either bland as hell in addition to not so great neighborhoods. I’m not going to waste my time on homes I don’t care for. I’ve about 400 homes rattling around on my to-post list that are more interesting, in decent to awesome neighborhoods and mid to high ranking schools. Those are the homes that I’m going to post the heck out of the most in the coming weeks. Yes, there will be cheap homes posted as well but only if they are worthy of my time. 🙂

    Clarification Edit

    Guess I have to clarify, maybe I used too many words for some folks…I’m not going to stop posting cheap houses. I’m going to stop posting “meh” houses JUST because they are cheap especially if they are in not-so-great neighborhoods.

    12
    • mtzgirl says: 39 comments

      amen to that, I hate to see a stunning home for cheap and find out its in the hood! thanks Kelly for all of your posts and time it takes you!

      1
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8928 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        If the house is interesting enough despite being in a bad neighborhood, I may still post those. How original or interesting the home will out weight what the area is like. For instance: link, if you were to look up the address on a crime map you’d see that it’s not in the best area for those looking for no crime neighborhoods. But the home itself was too awesome to not share.

        3
        • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1900 Prairie
          Washington Court House, OH

          I enjoy them even if the neighborhood appears questionable based on statistics and maps. To think positively, sometimes it’s hard to tell by looking at that kind of data the changes that may be occurring in the neighborhood non-residents are unaware of, for example new businesses and neighboring home/street improvements. Sometimes it’s worth checking out just in case you can get lucky by finding it at the right time.

          2
    • TGrantTGrant says: 393 comments
      OHD Supporter

      New Orleans, LA

      Not to put too fine a point on it, but as it’s your website and labor so you should be posting what appeals to you. That said I find that you post something for everyone. In addition I love that you show such a wide range of styles, ages, prices, conditions and locations. Thanks for the effort you put into it!

      13
    • KarenZ says: 726 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’m so excited that I’m FINALLY caught up on the daily listings and I can check out the shared houses here! It takes me forever to go through each house and check out the comments (I have learned SO MUCH from the comments)! I had listings that I hadn’t seen since the end of August! I was good and didn’t comment on the older listings,Kelly, so watch out! I’m probably going to type my fingers off now!!!

  2. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8928 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Book recommendations are back! I’m starting over since I did not keep track before of what I was recommending. A Field Guide is the book I tell everyone they must buy if interested in learning about historic architecture. I’ve got the hard back and Kindle editions, they are both easy to read.

    Today’s old photo isn’t in the header but one I have stored. What the heck is going on in this photo?

    6
    • CoraCora says: 1745 comments
      OHD Supporter & Moderator

      Clinton, TN

      I totally haven’t been putting the price! Sorry, will do better. 😯👼

      Also I just realized this is Friday…lol…was posting my shares on last night weeks link. I’ll move them. Long week, obviously!

      2
    • Karen says: 369 comments

      Yeah… it looks like a bunch of torn open bags of some kind on the ground. Weird. I wonder if this is what n the plains. It looks so plain.

      1
    • TGrantTGrant says: 393 comments
      OHD Supporter

      New Orleans, LA

      I was wondering that myself. Looks like a brown bag convention!

      3
  3. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 332 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1918 Bunkhouse
    WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

    Great photo! Very odd… not only is there a lot of debris on the ground but there is also a parlor stove sitting on the porch. Surely there is a reasonable explanation of this scene! Post-construction crew? Excellent book pick, as well – EVERYONE who loves old houses needs this book. Three houses today:

    Whimsical 1927 Tudor, $95K in Winfield, KS:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1321-E-11th-Ave-Winfield-KS-67156/77166468_zpid/

    Fantastic 1962 MCM Contemporary, $750K in Omaha, NE:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6617-Cuming-St-Omaha-NE-68132/75811493_zpid/

    Huggable 1894 Queen Anne, $180K in Omaha, NE:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1309-S-31st-St-Omaha-NE-68105/75843472_zpid/

    7
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8928 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      I wondered if they were making alcohol. Could those be sugar bags?

      6
      • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 332 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1918 Bunkhouse
        WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

        I like the way you think! Not sure if they would need such a crowd or want to document such an activity; this scene is quite perplexing. I thought maybe it’s a farm auction, but that still doesn’t explain all the bags. Unless some entrepreneur was selling bags of peanuts or something. I sure hope somebody can figure this out!

        1
      • Laurie W. says: 1458 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Fake Greek Revival!
        NC

        Doubt it. You needed wood for alchohol & doesn’t look like there’s a tree within miles, which indicates this is a plains state, possibly. How about a union meeting? Something of that sort? There’s enough action among them, as if they’re milling about — I get a feeling of agitation among them. Maybe some genius here has an idea?

        6
        • Ron G says: 103 comments

          The photos are perplexing. Lack of trees may point to the plains states most west of the Missouri River. They’re all dressed in coats and wearing gloves which could indicate a cool fall day. Maybe they are there to start the fall harvest. Yet the pictures hasn’t captured a hint of machinery just a small portion of what might be an old model T in the background in one picture No idea what the reason is for all the debris scattered about.

          2
        • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Laurie, I thought about the same – a work related gathering of some kind. Not a woman or child in sight. Possibly there’s a railroad track just behind the camera.

          5
          • Laurie W. says: 1458 comments

            It’s interesting, Jim and Ron. It looks like too many people for a harvest. The lack of women &/or children made me think of work. The stuff on the ground looks like paper sacks, which could indicate that they brought their lunches or coffee (did they do takeout coffee in those days?). They do look chilled as if they were waiting there. No answers but I love puzzles like this. Hope someone has more ideas.

            2
            • tracy concha says: 12 comments

              They look like they’re up to something!

              2
              • Nancy C says: 93 comments
                abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

                Maybe they are voting and brought their “refreshments” in brown bags? {giggle}

                3
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            Jim, I can’t tell much about the date based on the clothing. I’ll share a guess and emphasize its only a guess. When the Great Depression hit in the winter of 1929, soon millions of men were out of work. By FDR’s (Franklin Delano Roosevelt) election in 1932 desperate measures were called for so a series of make work programs were created to help pick up the economy and they had names like WPA (Works Project Administration) and CCC (or Civilian Conservation Corps) I think its possible the gathering was for able bodied men to go to work so they could earn a minimum income. The CCC was mainly for younger men just entering the work force. They were organized along military lines and were required to send money home when paid to their families. Both organizations were disbanded upon the outbreak of WWII with many of the CCC alumni going straight into military service.
            My second guess would be “Coxey’s Army” which followed the Depression of 1893 and also consisted of unemployed men but the attire looks later than the 1890’s so I think it unlikely to be correct. Again, only guesses since the men are gathered in this spot and it appears to be temporary as there are no knapsacks or bedrolls.

            4
            • CoraCora says: 1745 comments
              OHD Supporter & Moderator

              Clinton, TN

              Teamsters on strike maybe? They just don’t appear to be in work attire to me, but who knows what work attire truly looked like 100 years ago? The landscape certainly resembles a plains state. So interesting yet completely baffling.

              3
            • ddbacker says: 312 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1971 Uninspired split-level
              Prairie Village, KS

              Good guess. The Model T only tells us that it’s post- 1910 or so. Could be anywhere from the teens through the 30’s. The setting is definitely the West, or as far east as Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska or the Dakotas. There, I narrowed it down, lol.
              There are no women, only men. Are they gathered for a nefarious purpose? There are no guns or dogs pictured (except maybe one drinking from a bucket in photo no. 2?), otherwise I would guess a rattlesnake, jackrabbit or coyote roundup. There is no barn pictured, so maybe a barn-raising, but this seems like too much help for that.
              Why did the photographer take two close-ups of the debris on the ground? Good photos – it’s fun to speculate!

    • JKleeb says: 98 comments

      The MCM is magnificent. There seems to be a slight Brutalist feeling that would be later than 1962 but it all works very well—

      2
    • MW says: 655 comments

      Here is my theory, although I could be wrong. I think that is the search party getting ready to head out to go look for some kind of trees or other plants somewhere. They just got done eating breakfast and threw all their trash down on the ground. Seems like kind of a rather rude bunch. You never see trash laying around like that back in old photos. These guys though clearly don’t care about any of that.

      1
  4. Laurie W. says: 1458 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1988 Fake Greek Revival!
    NC

    Made a virtual visit to the UK this week, pretending I could buy one of these.

    WOODWORK HEAVEN! 17th century (with later additions) Morningthorpe Manor in Norwich, Norfolk, is stuffed with some of the most beautiful Jacobean carving I’ve ever seen. Nothing else about this entirely excellent house matters next to that, even its startling colors. $2.4 million for perfection. https://search.savills.com/property-detail/gbnorsnrs170095

    If Tudor times attract you more, Grade II-listed Chesworth House near Horsham in West Sussex is ideal. Though renovated in the 1920s from a derelict state, it remains authentically Tudor yet comfortable for present times. A lot of history happened here during Henry VIII’s and Elizabeth’s reigns as well as those of the Stuarts. The River Arun has been fundamental to Chesworth’s magnificent gardens and park. $7.9 million U.S. clams! https://search.savills.com/property-detail/gbpwrspsg180079

    In lovely Henley-on-Thames, Oxon, is Holmwood, listed Grade II, built in the early 18th century of mellow brick and local stone. Grabs me as the quintessential Georgian country house (with 11 bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, gulp), though I’m not sure how quintessential is its price of $14.6 million. https://search.savills.com/property-detail/gbhershes150107

    The remaining tower of a medieval Irish castle in County Mayo, beds in the alcoves where archers shot their arrows, a stone spiral staircase, crenelations above, and views of the Irish countryside to take your breath away. $1.93 million. http://www.periodproperty.co.uk/property/listings/House-sale-in-Kilmaine-id-679/overview

    9
    • Nancy C says: 93 comments
      abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

      I like the tower remains of the Irish castle the best — always the romantic. . .

      3
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1592 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central , NY

      My fave of this batch is the second house. A lot because of its setting – just lovely!

    • jenny wiebler says: 150 comments

      All of these places are glorious and if I were a billionaire, I would buy each one. Thank you for finding these and sharing them,Laurie W!

    • Karen says: 369 comments

      I love Chesworth! Love the gardens and that little creek falling over the steps some wonderfully smart landscape artist of the past put in!

    • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1900 Prairie
      Washington Court House, OH

      Absolutely in love with the castle. Great post!

    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 600 comments
      1875 Limestone house
      Loire Valley, France,

      stunning!!

  5. Mike says: 49 comments

    Happy Friday!

    This beauty in the North Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. The neighborhood is improving because people are starting to realize that it’s close to downtown, has excellent access to public transit and Ogden Ave. (part of old Route 66). Built 1903, can be yours for $269,900.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1858-S-Millard-Ave-Chicago-IL-60623/3824995_zpid/

    Also an update to the Pink and White House that I posted last week. Our local NPR station did a story about it this week and spoke with the owner!

    https://www.wbez.org/shows/wbez-news/a-giant-pink-house-is-up-for-sale-in-chicagos-austin-neighborhood/af35cad5-c31a-46c4-af21-0ace85cc5f96

    Oh and, the potential GW Maher house in Blue Island had a price drop and is now $299K.

    5
    • Nancy C says: 93 comments
      abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

      I appreciate the Millard Ave. house, Mike — thanks for posting. . .

      5
    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1592 comments
      1920 Colonial Revival
      Upstate/Central , NY

      That’s cool that your local NPR station did a story on the Pink & White house!

      3
  6. Nancy Hanle says: 23 comments

    Does anyone recall in the last week of a property with a store – very old – had a neat front – unfortunately I did not take down the address.

    Thanks

  7. KathySE says: 17 comments

    Two favorite homes this week.

    1)Over the top 1885 Italianate at 659 1st St., Woodland, CA 95695
    6 beds 6 baths 11,202 sq ft. I love the many stained glass windows and especially the one in the ceiling above the spiral staircase. Lots of detail.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/659-1st-St-Woodland-CA-95695/16511291_zpid/

    2)1890 Victorian at 910 N Montgomery Ave Sheffield, AL 35660, 5 beds 4 baths 3,748 sq ft. I love the carved newel post and the fantastic carved bedroom set.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/910-N-Montgomery-Ave-Sheffield-AL-35660/111986486_zpid/

    5
    • prettypaddle says: 44 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Wow! That house in Woodland is amazing! Used to go by there fairly frequently when I lived in the area and always was curious what it looked like inside. Wonder how much is original and how much was salvaged from other homes and integrated into this one. Certainly stunning.

      2
      • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Good question, though it looks like they spent way more on fancy updates and doodads than on actual preservation.

        It’s always interesting to see how people spend their money, especially if they have a lot. I was reading about a California company that takes rusty old cars and mounts them on racing chassis and sells them, with rust intact, for like $200,000. Lots of them!

        1
    • Evelyn WalkerEvelyn Walker says: 39 comments

      The state of California should buy the Woodland house (and all its furnishings) and turn it into a museum!

      4
  8. Julie C. says: 98 comments

    Kia Ora from New Zealand.

    Here are some charming, characterful homes in Geraldine, a town in the South Canterbury region of the South Island. I lived about an hour north of there for a year and drove through there once 23 years ago and it was a very nice town at the time.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/2904206

    Check out the English style garden. I have never seen ivy trained to grow between steps like they have done with the stairs to the front entrance.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/2958927

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3399385

    This home is in the small seaside city of Timaru which is not far from Geraldine.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3404002

    Looks like the hubby and I will also have to look at this area as a potential place to retire.

  9. tess says: 243 comments

    Your photo is intriguing. Given the era I wonder if they were lining up for WWI service. Most of the men are young. The packages could be for something they were given for traveling. Here’s a similar vintage photo. Sorry the address is so long, only way I could retrieve it.

    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https://media.iwm.org.uk/ciim5/8/262/super_000000.jpg&imgrefurl=https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/from-civilian-to-first-world-war-soldier-in-8-steps&h=597&w=800&tbnid=jPcMNHXzQdC14M&tbnh=194&tbnw=260&usg=AI4_-kQz–u4hQN2VL3vUH3FkWAiZK-nOA&vet=1&docid=i76QgxavB1ILwM

  10. Jkleeb says: 98 comments
    Seattle, WA

    I’ve been fantasizing about moving to Vermont for years and found a few this week to obsess over

    1900 Colonial Revival/Free Classic blend, $69,900, Rutland VT
    Lots of period features intact including unpainted wood work in principal rooms
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/92-Church-St-Rutland-VT-05701/92020862_zpid/?fullpage=true

    1820 Federal with later updates, 500,500, Middlebury VT
    My favorite house listing today–I wish there were more listing photos–they are done in a sort of sepia tone that lend a feeling of history.
    Listing says the land the house is on will need to be sub-divided–first time I have seen a house listed before that occurs but it may be more common than I am aware of

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/51-Seminary-Street-Ext-Middlebury-VT-05753/2095135771_zpid/?fullpage=true

    1880 with later Colonial Revival changes, $380,000, Montpelier VT
    I have a feeling that that the house may older than 1880 unless it was a very conservative style when built. Great pantry/kitchen sink. Only needs a good cleaning and some touch up paint IMHO

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/11-Baldwin-St-Montpelier-VT-05602/75466926_zpid/?fullpage=true

    1850 Gothic Revival $25,000, Randolph VT
    What a bargain even though it is described as uninhabitable. Exterior is wonderful, interior needs some help.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/14-Pleasant-St-Randolph-VT-05060/2108670560_zpid/?fullpage=true

    1910 “Prairie style”, 2.950mm
    Lastly, a prairie style house in Seattle, which is rare. A great example by the same architectural firm was torn down a few years ago (after owners had spent years preserving it). Current owners did a lot of restoration work on this example- including replacing the aluminum replacement windows and other “improvements” and changes. It is in a prime location in an expensive neighborhood, hence the price.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/320-W-Kinnear-Pl-Seattle-WA-98119/48901559_zpid/?fullpage=true

    4
    • HeidiHeidi says: 129 comments

      I am not a fan of the exterior on the Prairie—-but once inside it is a complete showstopper. Every single inch is drool worthy.
      The views from all those amazing (original!) windows—just an added bonus.

  11. Caroline says: 3 comments
    1905 Shingle
    OR

    Total newbie here. This site is one of the few places I’ve seen Herbert Chivers mentioned, and I’m really hoping one of the experts is around because I’m super excited to ask a couple of questions, I hope it’s appropriate! I’m about as sure as it is possible to be that this house is a Herbert Chivers Marleboro 4 cottage (missing the kitchen extension) with a largely intact floorplan.

    https://imgur.com/a/PZeufi8

    The elevation illustration is of the smaller version (floorplan on page 203). I believe this house to be the larger version (No 4 of floorplan on 204) and therefore the illustration is not an exact representation of the house. I say plan 4 missing kitchen extension for several reasons. I cut out my explanation, but it was long, it involves a mystery outbuilding on Sanborn maps, and not believing the kitchen porch was original to the house due to joist configurations, a historical expert questioning the neoclassical column, and the fact that it was the only ostensibly original feature that was worsened by structural/seismic work that releveled the house.

    I find very little information about him available online other than the planbooks, although he has a fairly distinctive style. This house is very unusual for the city in which it is located in the sense that it is often referred to as Shingle style and there are only a tiny number of Shingle style houses in the city (it’s not a big city for Victorians in general). Does anyone know if much of his work is actually considered to be Shingle style? I have so many questions, I would love to talk to anyone who might have more knowledge on the subject.

    3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Herbert Caleb Chivers was a St. Louis based architect who aimed for the middle and lower end house market at the turn of the last century although when called for, he could design a respectable mansion as well. Some of his designs in the voluminous Artistic Homes are almost identical to designs by George F. Barber as well as David S. Hopkins so the question of plagiarism arises. But who originated the design is a question yet to be answered.
      No such ambiguity about the Marlboro 4 cottage…the photo example is too close to the published design to be a coincidence. Imbricated or fishscale shingles were a mainstay of Queen Anne style homes and the Marlboro belongs to that stylistic family. Shingle Style homes originated on the Eastern seaboard and were popular from the late 1870’s until the early 1890’s. They typically are covered from eaves to foundations with shingles of random widths unlike the symmetry of imbricated shingles which usually do not cover the entire house but perhaps gables or belt courses of shingles. This is not a Shingle style house and I think I could make a fairly convincing argument to support that view. Thank you very much for sharing. Just curious, what state is this house in? Compared to other turn of the last century architect who published house designs, houses by Herbert Chivers are seen with less frequency than some others. But the house plan field was very crowded during the first decade of the 20th century and many of the designs from Artistic Homes are fairly simple and plain which makes their identification more challenging. Please feel free to follow up if you have additional questions. I hasten to add that my knowledge of Chivers’ work is limited compared to some other architects of his period.

      3
      • Caroline says: 3 comments
        1905 Shingle
        OR

        Wow, thanks for replying! I had no idea about the plagiarism concerns, but it’s very funny you mention it because the house, from the front, has so many features of William Waters designs, that I bothered the William Waters expert about it. He agreed that it had a lot of Waters features, but (obviously since Waters didn’t work outside of Wisconsin) it wasn’t his work. It’s in Oregon, it sticks out a bit, but the original owners moved directly here from Wisconsin and broke ground right away, and it seems a bit more typical of their home town, Ashland. I do find the publishing dates confusing. I assume that the 1910 date on the Artistic Homes book is not the first time this plan would be available since I see a lot of old-timey 5 star reviews (he was quite a character) dating back to the late 1890s. This particular house was started in 1905, I assumed this was a later compilation of previously released plans. Is that likely a fair assumption?

        That’s interesting about the style. I also thought it was really odd when I was told Shingle Style, and it’s on the historic record as Queen Anne, so I’ve been on the fence about it. However, I do see the point that it fits in with what is considered Shingle Style in modest residences in other parts of the country (particularly Wisconsin and Buffalo). Links are below to examples designated for Wisconsin. Also, the possible copying of Waters features helped reinforce the Shingle Style association for me. It’s all very interesting to me, and the original owners lived relatively public lives so there’s quite a bit of info to be had. I also added a front elevation photo to the original link so you can see what I mean by the Waters features. Apologies for the snowy picture, but I’ve never thought to take a picture except at Halloween and Christmas, so it’s that or 8ft spider and 9ft T-Rex.

        Thanks for all the info.!

        https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records?&facets=ArchitecturalStyle%3a%22Shingle+Style%22%2cHistoricUse%3a%22house%22&nodes=Preserve–Sites&more=County,ArchitecturalStyle,HistoricUse

        1
        • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Caroline, Chivers’ books are full of the work of other architects, but with his name attached. It’s comical that his office was in Louis Sullivan’s famous Wainwright Building, with an illustration, as though Chivers himself designed the building.

          Chivers published the Marleboro design in 1903, and possibly earlier. Because of the sketchy origin of his designs, it might be safer to say the house is “similar to” Chivers’ Marleboro #4 than to specifically attribute the design to him.

          https://books.google.com/books?id=oLYaAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA203

          Note that Shingle Style is a modern term coined by Vincent Scully in 1949, and that Shingle and Queen Anne designs often share forms and features. In McAlester’s guide, Shingle Style homes with elements similar to the Oregon house are illustrated, and the term is being used for an increasing number of homes that might have been called Queen Anne a few years ago – the Wisconsin Historical Society link is evidence of that.

          I don’t know if a simplified late Queen Anne with some shingles is a Shingle Style house, but some folks think it is. Although Queen Anne seems correct for this one, Shingle Style isn’t completely wrong either, in current usage.

          1
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            Therein lies the problem. “Shingle Style” did not exist in common usage as a term for homes before Vincent Scully’s The Shingle Style and the Stick Style book was published in 1955. I personally would not consider all of the examples in the Wisconsin Historical Society to be clear examples of the Shingle Style. I try to be accurate in my use of architectural terminology but there are a number of terms where some ambiguity exists as to their exact definition. Second Empire generally refers to mansard roofed houses built roughly from the 1850’s to around 1880. However, lets say you have an Italianate with a central tower and only the tower has a small mansard roof. Must it be called a Second Empire or an Italianate? The Old House Journal suggests even the smallest mansard roof qualifies a house to be considered Second Empire. I’ve always associated Shingle Style houses with leading Eastern architects like Standford White, (as well as Mckim, Mead, Bigelow, & White) H.H. Richardson, (William Watts Sherman House) and especially William Ralph Emerson (“Father of the Shingle Style” https://www.historicnewengland.org/william-ralph-emerson-father-of-the-shingle-style/ ) Another useful Shingle style link: https://christinefranck.wordpress.com/2012/02/28/the-shingle-style/ I think even Richard Morris Hunt tried a Shingle design among his eclectic designs.

            Getting back to Herbert C. Chivers, Caroline’s mention of him jogged my memory and I remembered seeing a several page biography and portfolio of his work I believe in Keith’s Magazine but unfortunately, I did not bookmark it. M.L. Keith of Minneapolis Published several plan book editions (at least 8 based on the eighth edition: https://archive.org/stream/MLKeithKiethsarchitecturalstudies0001#page/n0/mode/1up ) He also published a periodical magazine, Keith’s Magazine: (over 800 pages) https://archive.org/details/keithsmagazineon31minnuoft/page/n3 and https://archive.org/details/keithsmagazineon13minnuoft/page/n3 A search on the Internet Archive showed several H.C. Chivers plan books including Artistic City Homes # 43 and two different editions of Artistic Homes: https://archive.org/search.php?query=Herbert%20Chivers from 1903 and 1905. Research about Chivers’ architectural legacy is probably fertile ground but the time required to delve into it I just don’t have, Besides, how many folks even in this group of old house enthusiasts would wish to read an extensive biography and inventory of his works? That said, if you decide to expand your research about Chivers’ architectural legacy I’d be keen to read whatever you find. As I recall, he was very well known in St. Louis where he had designed mansions for several prominent citizens and their families. (shared in the aforementioned biographical Keith’s magazine article)

            1
          • Caroline says: 3 comments
            1905 Shingle
            OR

            Wow, it’s amazing that there are two experts in what I’m kind of gathering is a semi obscure, slightly dodgy, hybrid of an architect and marketing guy!

            I’m kind of fascinated by pinning down the style primarily because it is a pretty big house that is clearly largely untouched and well built, but (and I admit I’m a non expert) I think it’s kind of a hybrid. If I had to describe the style (particularly the interior) I’d call it some kind of missing link between Queen Anne and Craftsman/Foursquare. Defining a style 70 years after it began makes for tricky identification. When I was told it was Shingle, I think the actual shingles were the least important reason I was given (it’s the West Coast, everything has shingles). The front facing, very steeply pitched overhanging roof, intersecting gable, piercing dormer, arch details, encircling porch with cone roof, multiple porches, sets of huge windows, uncharacteristically large (for a Victorian ) rooms and bedrooms, and unfussy ornamentation focusing on strong woodwork. However, frankly, about half of that was why I thought it was some sort of transition to Craftsman (also the original owner was an industrial architect for sawmills, so he likely had access to spectacular wood).

            I’m guessing the floor plan with oversized rooms was never changed because it’s just so functional. Inside, it looks more like an oversized, elaborate, Craftsman (to a non expert like me) than a Victorian. It just doesn’t look like anything else in the city. To be fair, it’s not a city with a lot of Victorians.

    • Nancy C says: 93 comments
      abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

      Thank you for posting this beautiful building, Michele. Of course, I would want it returned to a single residence — anybody want to live downtown? I do, and I love it. . .

      4
  12. cheryl plato says: 171 comments

    Howdy all! Have a few to share before enjoying yours:

    1890 Sutton WV farmhouse with 4.7 acres, 139K big ol’ porch, beadboard ceilings, original farm kitchen, untouched by time!
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/121-Haymond-Ave_Sutton_WV_26601_M39089-68831#photo0

    1780 Capon Bridge WV 295K 20 acres,original log with very tasteful additions, what a cool old kitchen, beautiful setting :
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3-Slanes-Knob-Rd_Capon-Bridge_WV_26711_M30996-30577#photo0

    1890 Dunmore WV farmhouse 2.5 acre 69K I love the tin roof, polished wood ceilings and walls, old fastened window in bathroom, old timey kitchen:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3-Slanes-Knob-Rd_Capon-Bridge_WV_26711_M30996-30577#photo0

    1863 described as Italianate AND Victorian?239K 1 acre waterfront, Dellroy Ohio. Love
    the paint choices, carved woodwork
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1240-Magnolia-Rd-SW_Dellroy_OH_44620_M40207-43580#photo0

    1876 Victorian(looks Italianate?) Port Washington OH 168K. Wow those door frames doors and fireplaces are unique.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/206-W-Main-St_Port-Washington_OH_43837_M34452-58070#photo0

    1838 Sherrodsville OH Colonial 15 acres 169K. Beautifully kept interior, are those hitching posts out front? Beautiful old barn. Slate roof!
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/8969-Cutler-Rd-NE_Sherrodsville_OH_44675_M33189-86474#photo0

    1900 Greenville OH 169K Victorian? Take a look at the old copper sink and original wood toilet, antique stove:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/500-Washington-Ave_Greenville_OH_45331_M37563-88857?ex=OH611421425#photo0

    1890 Piedmont AL Victorian farmhouse 167K Love the woodwork, inviting interior, brick floor in kitchen, sweet front porch:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/507-S-Main-St_Piedmont_AL_36272_M85459-90285#photo0

    1889 Standish MI 89K 3 acres farmhouse. Love the ancient outbuildings, the simple interior and the 60s time capsule decor.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3335-Arenac-State-Rd_Standish_MI_48658_M49686-87109#photo0

    Finally my super bargain,Ridgeway PA 27K 1900, still lots of vintage charm left:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/22-Lincoln-St_Ridgway_PA_15853_M46651-39040#photo0
    Have a great weekend!

    4
    • clawhammerist says: 13 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1879 Italianate
      Danville, VA

      Thanks for reminding me of the Port Washington gem, Cheryl! I just love the shape of the openings for the bay window and the pocket doors: more interesting than either a true curved or square opening would have been. While not as unusual, I always love to see that stairstep windowframe and doorframe design in Italianates and Greek Revivals, too.

      1
    • Laurie W. says: 1458 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      Love the WV house — the kitchen is the most inviting I’ve ever seen, makes me want to plop down & have a long chat. The rest of the house is nicely antique and very welcoming also — and the property, yummy!

      1
    • Karen says: 369 comments

      I love the kitchen island in the Dunmore house. What a charming idea!

      1
    • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1900 Prairie
      Washington Court House, OH

      I love the kitchen in the first home. I’d probably never leave or stop baking cookies. It’s so warm and cozy!

      1
  13. Anne M. says: 486 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Hopkinton, MA

    I agree, the clothing in the photos is 1920’s and I would guess that these are working men, perhaps this is a union meeting? The man with the pipe appears to be wearing overalls under his coat, as do several others. In the last photo, it looks like there is a table or a box of some kind in the center of the group of men. Maybe they are voting? Very intriguing!!
    The first house I wanted to share is an 1825 stone Cape in Dudley, MA for $299,000. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/32-Tanyard-Rd-Dudley-MA-01571/57580796_zpid/?fullpage=true
    This description on this house in Fitchburg, MA says it was built in 1920, but it looks about 50 years older than that to me $329,00
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/106-Mount-Vernon-St-Fitchburg-MA-01420/56692186_zpid/?fullpage=true
    Also in Fitchburg, 1898, for $149,000 – check out the kitchen!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/65-Brigham-Park-Fitchburg-MA-01420/56693183_zpid/?fullpage=true
    Last but not least is this Queen Anne in Springfield, MA 3400 square feet for $165,000. It says it is pending but I thought you all might want to see it:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/14-Fairfield-St-Springfield-MA-01108/56211172_zpid/?fullpage=true

    3
    • StevenF says: 514 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      I love that first one in Dudley which is a surprise to me, as I generally go for them 100 years younger and without open concept. But this house is a gem. Thanks for sharing!

      1
  14. CharlesB says: 351 comments

    Haddam, CT–1770 Cape that’s compact, manageable, and artistic, priced at $219,000:

    https://www.historichomesinct.com/details.php?mls=170121183

    8
    • Nancy C says: 93 comments
      abuts historic village Old Salem, NC

      What a charming historical building — love it! (but who is going to sculpt the shrubbery?)

      1
    • Karen says: 369 comments

      I love the floors! I’d hit every antique shop and flea market in the state to furnish this great little house.

      1
  15. cheryl plato says: 171 comments

    Oops! Something went wrong. THIS is the 69K 1890 Dunmore WV farm:

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/15085-Browns-Creek-Rd_Dunmore_WV_24934_M31086-86232#photo0

    1
    • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thank Cheryl! Cora posted this one a few months back and I was taken by the nice mix of the simple vernacular farmhouse and the 1950’s updates. The veneer paneling is attractive in a humble country house, much better than the cheap stuff that came later. Can’t beat the price!

      2
  16. linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1900 Prairie
    Washington Court House, OH

    1925 Piqua, OH $159,000

    I chose to post this one alone so I wouldn’t lose it before I arrange the rest. It’s a very unique home with many original features but I posted mainly because it’s vintage interior decorating is very unique and it’s unusual to see an entire home still like this. Although it doesn’t fit with the era of the home, I still think it’s incredibly fantastic.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/317-W-North-St_Piqua_OH_45356_M41606-24491?ex=OH612986421#photo0

    3
    • Eric says: 182 comments

      I would have never expected the interior to be totally in tact from 1968, unusual and kind of fun.

      2
    • JKleeb says: 98 comments

      The earlier decorating is such a great time capsule and appears in good condition it would be a shame not to save it.

      4
    • StevenF says: 514 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      Wow I love that time capsule decor. She splurged in the late sixties or early seventies and, knowing what she liked, stuck with it. I admire that.

      2
    • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1900 Prairie
      Washington Court House, OH

      I’m so glad I decided to post it. I was a little nervous I’d be the only one here who appreciates the 60’s/70’s style decor. I just can’t help but be drawn to the eras colors and patterns.

  17. linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1900 Prairie
    Washington Court House, OH

    These two homes don’t have any interior pictures, but I figured this was still a great place to post for those who would love a project. They’re both incredibly interesting homes. The first I drive by every day and just couldn’t wait to post. The street it’s on is probably my favorite in town. It’s filled with old houses.

    1860 Gothic Washington Court House, OH $28,000

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/411-E-East-St_Wshngtn-Ct-HS_OH_43160_M45423-91752#photo1

    I always loved this home and it looks like it has a wonderful outbuilding too.

    1842 Italianate Circleville,OH $189,900

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/410-S-Court-St_Circleville_OH_43113_M36168-19007?ex=OH606509597#photo0

    5
    • prettypaddle says: 44 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Oh my, those are both beauties! And only $28,000 for the first one!

      2
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        The $28,000 Gothic Revival house is intriguing. Did you notice it differs from most Gothic Revivals in its Italianate arched top windows? If the 1860’s date is accurate, by that time Italianates with their arches and curves, were extremely popular so the steep Gothic form was kept with the scroll-sawn verge/barge boards in the gable while Italianate windows instead of pointed arch versions were chosen to keep up with then current fashions. I am concerned about the spalling/disintegration of the soft bricks near the entry. I’m personally puzzled about how the damage could best be repaired? One thought would be to create a brick colored mortar and carefully apply (parge) the mix and then texture it to look like bricks, then selectively paint the faux bricks in subtle colors to make them look like the original bricks. Another approach might be to shore up the floors and ceilings inside near the damaged wall and then disassemble the wall down to the damaged area and replace the damaged bricks with good ones. That kind of brick disintegration is usually associated with “rising damp” or efflorescence where the minerals (salt sometimes) form a powder in and on the bricks. It’s also possible some long damaged gutters allowed water to soak and saturate the lower bricks and the freeze-thaw cycle destroyed the soft fired bricks of the period. Without interior photos, difficult to say whether a project house like this would be worthwhile. Mid-19th century brick Gothic Revival houses were often relatively plain inside unlike the lavish Victorian homes that came several decades later.
        As for the Circleville Italianate, at that price point, interior photos are usually featured. The 1842 date is suspect because the earliest examples of the Italianate style appeared on the East coast only a few years earlier. 1842 would make it one of the earliest if not the earliest Italanate style house in Ohio but to me it looks to be a decade or two later. Nice example, no matter when it was built.

        1
        • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1900 Prairie
          Washington Court House, OH

          I did notice the windows. They’re what really draws me to love this home so much. I believe this is only the second home of this style I’ve seen in town. The brick damage is even more apparent up close but according to others in the neighborhood, it’s been vacant for quite some time. I’m not good at assessing damage or have any knowledge on costs for repairs, but I thought it was worth a post hoping someone who wants to preserve it will find it. I’ve found the costs of services like that here can often vary favorably from city prices. This particular area of town seems to be quite nice and has a lot to offer potential buyers. It’s a block away from the library and the downtown area, close to the park and bike path, and only about a five minute drive to all of the schools. The added bonus is an upcoming street/beautification project (that intersects with this street) that will have new city sidewalks, improved traffic patterns, upgraded sewer/rainwater drainage and added curbs. The neighborhood is hopeful this will have a positive impact on close by home values when it’s over.

          I was also a little suspicious of the Circleville homes build date but I recall seeing a farmhouse for sale in the area that had a building the realtor called a summer kitchen that was very similar in style to the building in the background of these pictures. Its build date was close to this. Either way, I couldn’t find any evidence that said differently. I was wondering why the lack of interior pictures, too. The home has also been pending sale for months before this week but that could be for many different reasons. I had been hoping with it’s change of listing status we’d get to finally see inside 🙂 With so many people seeming to be choosing this town to be close to Columbus, it may be the right investment for someone. I think it’s definitely worth saving.

          1
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            Agreed. Good to hear that the house is sited in an improving location. Now, if it can only survive until some caring new owner provides it with the TLC the house deserves. I would think repairing or replacing the damaged bricks would be expensive, but if the rest of the house is fairly stable then it still might be worth it. It seems that realtors who often market modern or modernized older houses sometimes refrain from posting interior photos in the “before” renovation state. While I cannot accurately date it without supporting documentation, I believe it is among the older surviving period homes in Circleville and is part of the community’s history. I hope someone can save it so it remains part of the community’s architectural and historical legacy from the past. Those arched shutters are rare survivors. Streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/7eMDoTothQA2

            1
  18. CharlesB says: 351 comments

    ‘Where are the cheap houses?’ Here’s one in Ripley, NY: an 1890s Grandma-style house authentically decorated in that style throughout priced at $69,900. Ripley is at the heart of the famous Grape Belt (in fact, there is a vineyard to the rear of this property). Sandwiched between Lake Erie and the Allegany Escarpment, Ripley lies in the warmest microclimate in Upstate New York, a place where fig and mimosa trees, camellias and crape myrtles thrive:

    https://www.redfin.com/NY/Ripley/7-Maple-Ave-14775/home/117312843

    2
    • Karen says: 369 comments

      If you look below the property description, there are more houses in Chautauqua county listed. Particularly interesting is one on Schultz Dr in Westfield. Really cute, and on Lake Erie. This whole county is full of great old houses, many built by prosperous farmers in the mid to late 1800’s. If you ever get south of Buffalo, NY (another city to visited, if only for its fantastic architecture, both in homes and downtown buildings), just drive around Chautauqua, get lost, and get your fil of wonderful old houses!

      1
  19. krstout says: 42 comments

    Anyone interested in Italy? Here are to amazing apartments; one in Lucca one in Turin. Both bigger than most houses. Not cheap but full of ornate details.

    https://www.casa.it/immobile-appartamento-piemonte-torino-34211807
    6000 sq ft!!

    https://www.casa.it/immobile-appartamento-toscana-lucca-28602438
    7000 sq ft!!!!!

    2
  20. kstout says: 42 comments

    Anyone interested in Italy? Here are two apartments (both bigger than most houses); one in Lucca and one in Turin. Both not cheap but they’re huge and incredibly ornate.

    https://www.casa.it/immobile-appartamento-toscana-lucca-28602438

    https://www.casa.it/immobile-appartamento-piemonte-torino-34211807

    Enjoy!

    1
  21. prettypaddle says: 44 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Intriguing picture indeed. Maybe the bags were filled with peanuts or popcorn to entice the men to come to whatever was going on? Given that it’s all men a union meeting or voting both seem plausible to me.

    For my contribution this week, I found several listings from northern Minnesota.

    Two beautiful mansions in Duluth, MN (Perhaps shared before? They’re so gorgeous it’s hard to imagine they’ve not shown up already. But just in case):

    Built 1904 asking price $999,000 Among all the other splendors, check out the original bathroom in this one
    https://elymn.bearislandland.com/idx/details/listing/a321/6030152/2316-E-1st-St-Duluth-MN-55812

    Built 1914 asking price $887,5000
    https://elymn.bearislandland.com/idx/details/listing/a321/6033040/2429-Greysolon-Rd-Duluth-MN-55812

    And some lakefront cabins up north:

    Ely, MN, built 1930 asking $75,000 There’s only one photo of the exterior and no interior photos, but this one sure has me curious. Has 1.25 acres with 340 feet of shoreline. Water access only.
    https://elymn.bearislandland.com/idx/details/listing/a321/6028537/XXX-Fall-Lake-Rd-Ely-MN-55731

    Tower, MN, built 1940 asking $673,500 for a log cabin on your own private island!
    https://elymn.bearislandland.com/idx/details/listing/a321/6030861/4772-Little-Timber-Island-Tower-MN-55790

    Finally, a nice house in Virginia, MN, built 1914 asking $167,5000. This one has lots of original features including a cool newel post light. Also cute kitchen and bathroom from… 1940s? Maybe?
    https://elymn.bearislandland.com/idx/details/listing/a321/6027024/809-S-5th-Ave-Virginia-MN-55792

    2
  22. Kelly says: 1 comments

    1900 Victorian $149k Shippensburg, PA

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/235-E-Orange-St,-Shippensburg,-PA-17257_rb/?fromHomePage=true&shouldFireSellPageImplicitClaimGA=false&fromHomePageTab=buy

    I’ve followed OHD for about a year now, and I love being able to look at all the great old homes. This is the first time I’ve shared a link– and it’s to my house! This was the first home that I bought out of college, and I remember being so delighted that I could actually afford something so beautiful. I’ve had it as a rental for several years now after having to relocate for work, but now it is time that I let someone else call her their own (even though it kills me a little to give her up)

    Before anyone throws paint at me for the white trim, it was already painted when I bought it– I’d never paint over wood! Sadly, the Realtor didn’t get some of the cute details like the filigree hinges and the amazing patterned radiators. I’ll see if I can get a few of those gems uploaded. 🙂

    Thanks for letting me share with you!

    Kelly

    4
    • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1900 Prairie
      Washington Court House, OH

      What a bright and cheery home! Someone is going to really feel at home there. The exterior colors are so warm and inviting. Best of luck!

      1
  23. CoraCora says: 1745 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1925. So much to love in this sweet old place. The dining room built-in is beautiful. $73k

    Milwaukee,WI: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/40480072_zpid/

  24. CoraCora says: 1745 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1925. This is gorgeous. I love the toilet with the tank way up high. And that bath tile is my favorite. The attic window seat would be my “spot” in the winter. $135k

    Wichita,KS: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/77343965_zpid/

    1
    • Laurie W. says: 1458 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      We had a toilet like that when we lived in Amsterdam. We bought specially for it a beautiful braided silk rope with a big tassel at the end that you pulled to flush it. Loved that! It was always good for conversation.

      2
  25. clawhammerist says: 13 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1879 Italianate
    Danville, VA

    Here is a large and grand Italianate needing just a bit of love in Petersburg, Virginia, a small city chock-full of interesting nineteenth-century architecture in varying states of repair. As historic real estate in Richmond becomes more and more costly, I have to wonder whether Petersburg, just twenty miles south on I-95, will one day take off. The $349K asking price here is on the high side for Petersburg, even for a house as special as this one, but that kind of money does not go far at all in Richmond anymore.

    The pierce-work plaster molding is so rare, and it seems mostly intact here. It is interesting to see how “finished” some of the formal spaces are compared to the rather “primitive” kitchen and single full bath. Do others agree with me in figuring that the current occupant must be a milliner? Kudos to the realtor for providing so many excellent photos of the kinds of details that we all love seeing!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/204-S-Market-St-Petersburg-VA-23803/79250214_zpid/

    7
    • JKleeb says: 98 comments

      Thanks so much for posting! I love everything about this house—-even the porch addition. The plasterwork is wonderful.
      Must be a milliner or a seriously addicted hat collector

      2
    • jake c says: 2 comments

      The owners are indeed milliners. Ignatius Hats, in business since 1985, shows its business location as 204 s. Market St., St. Petersburg, Va. No wonder the home and its contents are so eye-catching. If I were to purchase I would want the furnishings to convey!

      2
    • SuzyQ says: 48 comments

      The plaster in this house is amazing. However they would have to take the furnishing with them.

      1
    • CTimmCTimm says: 10 comments
      1913 Venacular Rowhouse
      Easton, PA

      Here’s a bit more on the meeting between Lincoln and Grant held in this house. http://www.historicpetersburg.org/the-lincoln-grant-meeting/
      The history combined with the wonderful architecture of this place really appeals to me.

  26. nic says: 45 comments

    Critics call it “the most perfect example of Jacobean architecture in America”.
    Now for sale…$48 million…75 rooms….50,000 sq ft
    Marketed as New York City metro area, but actually across the Hudson in Mahwah, NJ where it was built as a country house on 1,000 acres.
    Renowned for its carved woodwork done by the imported team of Italian woodcarvers who also did the Italian Parliament building. They spent two years carving all the wood interiors of this mansion.
    Listed by Christies International, but best pictures and videos and most information at the mansion’s own website.. http://www.darlingtonmansion.com
    More great info about the recent 7 year restoration at this link… http://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/real-estate/g19061232/darlington-estate-for-sale/

    5
    • Eric says: 182 comments

      Absolutely stunning and fun to look at. Seems like this should be a tour home. It was built for the “filthy rich” with 28 bathrooms. I wonder how much the yearly property tax is?
      Thanks for posting!

    • StevenF says: 514 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1969 Regency
      Nashville, TN

      Amazing house! Thanks for posting. One has to wonder, though, why they felt the need to add 12,000 square feet of modern living space to this beauty? Is a modern poker room really necessary?

  27. CoraCora says: 1745 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1915. Home is empty except for a stunning, antique grand piano that I am seriously coveting right now. Lovely staircase and woodwork, kitchen hasn’t been modernized which is wonderful. $325K

    Oklahoma City,OK:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/80914041_zpid/

    1
  28. CoraCora says: 1745 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1900. This is the beach view I want when I retire. I love the unpainted everything in this cottage. $895K

    Oak Bluffs, MA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/56894380_zpid/

    3
  29. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Circleville, Ohio. Says Italianate but seems to have a little mansard roof DNA as well. Claimed date is 1900 but looks more c. 1875-1885 to me. Priced at $299,000: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/125-S-Pickaway-St-Circleville-OH-43113/86595283_zpid/?fullpage=true Seems vaguely familiar, so I hope it hasn’t been posted in the past. Nice interior details

    1
    • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1900 Prairie
      Washington Court House, OH

      I posted it this week too. I went back and checked the site to be sure it wasn’t posted before. I could’ve sworn we’ve seen it here before too. It sure is a beautiful home!

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Oops! My apologies, hope you don’t mind my re-posting. I really liked the interior details so perhaps others will too and the fine home will soon have new appreciative owners.

        1
        • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1900 Prairie
          Washington Court House, OH

          I don’t mind at all! I always think of a repost as another chance for someone who really appreciates those details to find it 🙂

      • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
        OHD Supporter

        I figured it had to be good if posted twice, and it certainly is. Some fine woodwork and an excellent collection of marbleized slate mantels!

        Thanks to both of you!

        2
  30. housenutalank says: 13 comments
    1948 Cape Cod?
    Davisville, WV

    Ca. 1920’s 4 bedrooms, 3 baths two-story Farmhouse (Dutch Colonial?) in Bethlehem, PA. Beautiful wood trim, interesting ceiling designs, fireplaces, and a hot-tub room. $414,500.00. click the link below

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/fsba,fsbo_lt/10165888_zpid/globalrelevanceex_sort/40.643982,-75.312567,40.578303,-75.458823_rect/12_zm/2_p/0_mmm/

  31. Victoria says: 137 comments

    Photo: The car off to the far left looks like a Model T, which would date the photo from 1908 to 1927, when Ford produced them. I first thought of the CCC too, but the car and attire look earlier. The caps look dated to the 1920s. Maybe part of the Great Plains Laborers’ District Council or some such early unionized worker meeting? Discarded lunch bags is a good guess.

  32. Neness says: 35 comments

    Nic,
    “Darlington” sadly made me think of “Inisfada”, also on the list of America’s largest houses , but at least twice the size and much more elaborate and sophisticated. A Catholic order kept it in mint condition. John Forman did one of his pieces on it on his “Big Old Houses” site which see. Unfortunately “Inisfada” was demolished in 2013 ?

  33. Shaunta says: 1 comments

    The ad says 1927, but I found newspaper mentions of the address dating back to 1918 (maybe a different house?) and a different listing for the house that said 1875. Would love to know if anyone knows anything about this house or the neighborhood.

    1927 Neoclassical in Warren, PA. 4,044 square feet, 4 bedroom. $125,000. Stained glass windows, butler’s pantry, FIVE fireplaces, amazing floors, full walk-up attic and finished basement.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/510-Pennsylvania-Ave-E_Warren_PA_16365_M39087-40834?ex=PA608904285&view=qv

  34. CoraCora says: 1745 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1845. Fabulous old girl. Nice vintage bathroom fixtures. No history is given on the home or outbuildings, but this looks plantation-ish to me. $215k.

    Sandersville, GA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/76615998_zpid/

    5
    • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Nice! The Smith-Cummings House, part of the NRHP historic district there. The report says antebellum construction and notes original cook house and barn.

      https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/NRIS/87001268

      • JRC says: 65 comments

        I get a church when I click the link.

        • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
          OHD Supporter

          It’s the correct link for the Church-Smith-Harris Street Historic District, where the house is located. It’s just a reference – the info is limited and the photos aren’t great.

    • Laurie W. says: 1458 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      I like this house a lot. The outbuildings add something special. Rather hefty taxes, though, for the price of the house.

  35. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8928 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Started to post this 1920 home but it’s a bit more updated than I usually post. Love the rural location on 3.4 acres. Interior wood work is painted and no longer has the original baths or kitchen but the large rooms and layout I’m loving.

    Leighton, Alabama for $289,900.

    https://www.realestate.com/5655-old-highway-20-leighton-al-35646–222885198

    2
  36. CoraCora says: 1745 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    I occasionally use Google Earth to look around the country, it’s such a fun tool and you can go all over the world with it.

    There’s a place I came across that I go back to often (via Google Earth); I’m so intrigued by it. It’s a ghost town in North Dakota called Arena. There is nothing left of Arena per se, but there is an old church sitting out on the prairie; somehow surviving the harsh prairie elements for all these years. You can “stroll” right up to it via technology.
    I would pay a chunk of $ to be able to see the interior of this old church:

    Arena, ND:
    https://goo.gl/maps/eNo18Fd46AG2

    Any OHD-ers live near there?? From the looks of it, NO ONE lives near.

    4
    • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Here’s the inside:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRk_T8hQdF0

      3
      • CoraCora says: 1745 comments
        OHD Supporter & Moderator

        Clinton, TN

        Ah! What? So I’ve watched that about 4 times since you posted it. Seriously, I’m obsessed. What year was this built? Why is it out “there?” Is that a choir loft I glimpse above the front door, interior view? How long has it been abandoned? The room with all the coat hooks on the wall…was this a school? I don’t think it was a school, as there is an equally abandoned one-room about a mile away. Where’s the cemetery? Why doesn’t someone save this? Augh!
        Surely there are other weirdos out there like me who find places like this fascinating?!?

        Was that a bird or a bat?

        (thank you for finding the video, and feeding my obsession JimH, btw 😁)

        3
        • JimHJimH says: 3593 comments
          OHD Supporter

          St. John’s Lutheran Church, not on the map in 1912 so built right around then I’d guess. There was a small farm community with a school and a few businesses. The cemetery is just up the road; at least 72 burials, earliest in 1908. The most recent was in August – Rose Eide was 97 and ran the Arena store and post office until they burned the place down.

          https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/192249700/rose-olive-eide

          https://goo.gl/maps/spAwtY6huV52

          http://www.ghostsofnorthdakota.com/category/arena-nd/
          http://www.ghostsofnorthdakota.com/2004/05/15/arena-nd/

          You’re welcome, Cora – you can pay me later.

          2
          • CoraCora says: 1745 comments
            OHD Supporter & Moderator

            Clinton, TN

            I used to follow Ghosts of North Dakota, but haven’t in awhile. So interesting, and those guys take incredible photos.

            Find-a-Grave is such a great resource, too.

            If those church walls could talk. Man.

            Thanks again, JimH! Checks in the mail. 😉

            1
        • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1900 Prairie
          Washington Court House, OH

          This was a super awesome little tour! Thank you both for sharing these links. I never get tired of seeing North Dakota. I believe that was a bat…

          1
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            I doubt the church will be standing much longer. With supporting walls of the basement knocked in it looks like the only thing holding this structure up is faith. Always sad to see communities that have reached total ghost town status. Sometimes an overgrown cemetery is all that is left to show where the towns once were. I’m afraid in the decades ahead many more smaller communities across the land now in the going, going, almost gone category will join Arena in becoming full fledged ghost towns.

        • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1592 comments

          It was probably a bird, since bats fly at night. Plus I heard birdsong while the filming was outside.
          Yep, definitely on the desolate side these days!

  37. JftrendsJftrends says: 18 comments

    https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=6Ee8XqnxotQ

    Here is an old one room school house late 1820’s that has been added on to and become a Bed and Breakfast. Listed for $335,000 it has 9+ acres and free natural gas(no heating bill) located in the rolling hills of Chautauqua County NY.

    2
  38. linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1900 Prairie
    Washington Court House, OH

    Thank you for sharing this! I absolutely loved the way the site had the 360 view. I could see every detail down to the patterns of the wallpaper, the texture of the wood and stone, to the empty scotch decanter (sadly just like my house 😊). It’s a very unique property.

    1
  39. natira121natira121 says: 212 comments
    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    My curiosity begs me to find out what this is. (Kelly will be posting the pics)

    Four inches in diameter, hinged little door? window? It’s got glass in it, and it’s cast iron.

    Thanks everyone!

  40. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    My apologies if I’ve shared this one before (at least the photos seem different) but here’s a very eclectic late 1920’s house in the town of Connersville, Indiana, priced at $110,000: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1810-Indiana-Ave-Connersville-IN-47331/85224944_zpid/?fullpage=true Connerville is not too far from Richmond, IN near the Ohio border and east of Indianapolis. There seems to be an almost storybook fantasy flavor to this house with the variety of royal crests, stained glass, and light fixtures. Interesting to see the top of the newel post at the base of the stairs opens up for a hidden compartment. The house listing says it also has an in-ground pool and 4 car detached garage. I won’t even hazard a guess as to the intended style here. (“Olde English”, Tudor?)

    1
    • linzyloolinzyloo says: 136 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1900 Prairie
      Washington Court House, OH

      This is just wonderful! I’m in love with all of the little details, but I especially enjoyed that secret newel post hiding space. I had read before those may have been used to store the house plans. I’m not sure if that’s true but I’m sure over the years many interesting items have been found.

  41. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Although almost literally out in the middle of nowhere in northwest Indiana between Indianapolis and Lafayette, this Queen Anne style farmhouse with 4.3 acres is said to have been built in 1904 and priced at $129,900. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6289-N-State-Road-47-Darlington-IN-47940/94528128_zpid/?fullpage=true
    Some of its details remind me of George Barber’s design work but I cannot match it to a published design. It comes with two large outbuildings including one equipped with horse stalls, according to the listing. The interior is surprisingly elegant but overall the property needs a little TLC. Immediate possession, according to the listing so sounds like it has a motivated seller. I wouldn’t be surprised if this farm and house belonged to several generations of the same family. I think the house exterior could be enhanced with a couple of period colors from the early 1900’s. For the next owners, welcome to the country life! Here’s the streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/UoXGjLE1Ty62

    • Cathy F.Cathy F. says: 1592 comments

      Neat staircase (<— although I find that one off-center window placement to be odd), nice to-the-floor windows, and cool views from the cupola!

  42. Oklahoma Houses By MailOklahoma Houses By Mail says: 67 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Tulsa, OK

    Here’s an example of a JH Daverman & Son no 58. This was likely a popular home since it appeared in many advertisements. I only know of a handful, at this time.
    I can’t tell if this has been sided, street view from 2008 is of no help. I think this was a flip. I thought I had before photos but I can’t find them now. The interior has been remuddled, lost it’s character, but the exterior retains aome of the archetectural detail from that era.
    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/401-E-Mcpherson-St-Knob-Noster-MO-65336/106868799_zpid/
    Compare: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ffshoe/38393271171/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ffshoe/31474156525/

    Watch listings for that model.

    Here’s an example, off market, lots of photos.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/307-Spruce-St_Boonton_NJ_07005_M51071-32620

    2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4284 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Those arched gable braces appear to be a signature Daverman detail. Years ago, I ran across a Daverman design in Carthage, Missouri (Design No. 52) which also has these distinctive gable braces/brackets. Understandably, I like the more intact Boonton, NJ, example better. I’m amazed by the number of vintage homes constructed using published mail order plans. Thanks for sharing.

  43. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 214 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1980 board & batten modern

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/114-Sugar-Hill-Rd-Williamsburg-MA-01096/57005679_zpid/

    1785 Cape on 46 acres, quite a few fireplaces. Williamsburg is a lovely small hamlet near Northampton/Amherst area. How nice to have that land and old house for what might be a decent price and so close to the 5 college system and all that brings to delight and educate. Northampton was my home during my college education. I still go back when I can, traveling thru Wmburg back to the family home for the night.

    1
  44. CoraCora says: 1745 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1890. I think…I’m never gonna sleep again until I can see the interior of this church. Auggh! $10K

    Monon, IN:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2087679107_zpid/

    1
    • CoraCora says: 1745 comments
      OHD Supporter & Moderator

      Clinton, TN

      I could not find any history on this old church. I contacted the White County Historical Society and they were so sweet: they gave me the lowdown. It was a Methodist Church, built in 1902. Closed in the early 80s. An attempt was made to add it to the NRHP, but it never happened.

      I’m sending them $2 for copies of it’s history and some photos. 🙂

      2
  45. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8928 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    If you like before/afters, check out the comment section on this Gothic Revival. The owner sent pics today, such a great job:
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2015/07/07/c-1834-gothic-revival-buckfield-me/

    4
  46. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 600 comments
    1875 Limestone house
    Loire Valley, France,

    1797 stone house in West Portsmouth, OH, for $78,000: Amazing primitive house! Check out the floors made of beams! https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/413-State-Route-239-West-Portsmouth-OH-45663/220146392_zpid/?fullpage=true

    Ans a 1940 time capsule in Saint Cloud, MN, $219,900 with MCM vibe: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/630-Riverside-Dr-SE-Saint-Cloud-MN-56304/2207800_zpid/?fullpage=true

    1
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 460 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA,

      Greetings, Miss Apple! I (and I’m sure others) have missed your France posts lately. (Perhaps you are no longer bored at work, as you once said?)

      AND, that primitive in Ohio is absolutely amazing. Think about sharing it again in tomorrow’s thread so more people get to see it!

      AND the other one, what a find! French eclectic meets moderne? What a gem.

  47. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 600 comments
    1875 Limestone house
    Loire Valley, France,

    Hi Lancaster John! You guessed it right, i’m less bored at work! I work in a company (Corolle, if you want to search) creating baby dolls and accessories for kids, so the last quarter is busier with Xmas in sight (and i asked a colleague to officially take over some of her job), so i’m kinda busy lately! I barely have time to see all of the daily posts on OHD ahah!

    I’ll repost the 2 listings tomorrow in the next exchange post as you advised. Living in a stone house myself, i just love the primitive one from Ohio. And the other ones looks a decader later, more around 50s, right? It’s so cool, i wish there were more pictures!

    And promise, as soon as i have some spare time i’ll propose other French listings 🙂

    1
  48. RonnieH says: 67 comments

    Sacramento, California. $1,899,000, built in 1911.
    Neo-Morrish style according to posting.
    Not my thing, but interesting non-the-less!

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Sacramento-CA/25786534_zpid/20288_rid/1700-1930_built/38.803329,-121.059723,38.34004,-121.797867_rect/10_zm/?

  49. Rondi says: 15 comments

    Moon Cottage; Traditional Irish Thatch Cottage For Sale in Co. Galway €265,000
    http://www.formerglory.ie/period-property-for-sale-in-ireland/moon-cottage-ballyveane-clonbur-galway/

    A friend in Ireland sent me the link to this site. Not as many pics or details as OHD folks like, but some pretty cool places all the same.

  50. CoraCora says: 1745 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1957. This looks like a house no one has lived in for a VERY long time. Posting mainly for the really great kitchen, the OVENS in particular. Also a nice fireplace/bookshelf feature in the living room. Bathrooms appear to be original. $74,900

    Wichita, KS: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/77341738_zpid/

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