September 7, 2018: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You!)

Added to OHD on 9/7/18 - Last OHD Update: 9/14/18 - 149 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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Link to real estate and sites that do not require you to register to view. Just paste the link in the comment box below. Format rule! Make it easier for those browsing shares by including the city, state and price (international listings excluded.) A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful.

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149 Comments on September 7, 2018: Link Exchange (Supporter Thank You!)

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8793 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks to this months OHD Supporters! If you only knew how much you were helping with costs, thank you many times more than I can say. 🙂

    Today’s old house photo, says “Johnston, Ohio” on the back.

    2
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      The cottage appears to perhaps be the elderly couple’s retirement residence. I think it dates from post-1900 because of the simplified (likely carpenter built on site) fretwork frieze atop the turned posts on the front porch. I assume the gentleman is the bicycle owner-rider. This eliminated the costs of keeping a horse and going through the hitching ritual to hook up a buggy or wagon. We should remember social security did not exist until the 1930’s and this was still an era when pensions were not universal. There was a real risk for older Americans in those days who did not have children or close relatives to help financially that they would become destitute and forced to go to so called “poor farms” often operated by counties or cities. These proud folks appear to be holding their own. They probably raised a lot of their own food in a garden and were thus self-sufficient. Thanks for sharing.

      5
      • Laurie W. says: 1408 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1988 Fake Greek Revival!
        NC

        It’s possible they built the place & have lived (farmed) there for decades. Looks like a chicken coop to the right of the house and a barn in back. The decoration shows it’s been loved from the beginning, either by this old couple or others — I especially like the, what? shingles? milled panel? on the gable.

        1
      • Karen says: 291 comments

        We had at least two poor houses here in Niagara County, NY. Both had “Potter’s Fields.” One was torn down, perhaps in the early 1900’s (I’m not sure when) and the
        land was left to return to brush. Recently, a path was mowed through the brush, and I walked back there. There is a small memorial for all the people who didn’t get gravestones, a bench, and, one gravestone for a man named Merritt. The Merritt’s were a family of wealthy farmers in nearby Olcott, NY, and apparently they had one member who somehow ended up in the poor house. After his death, they must’ve felt bad enough to get him a gravestone. The other poor house was in the city of Lockport, but then became a nursing home for indigent elderly, run by the county. It was closed down, why, I don’t know, and was empty for years. Now, a local developer has purchased it, and intends to make apartments out of it. The building rather looks like an office building, so it will be interesting what it ends up looking like. Only thing is, it’s been empty for at least 25 years, so I bet a lot of money wil be spent getting rid of mold, etc

        1
        • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1889 Eastlake Cottage
          Fort Worth, TX

          Thanks for the Poor House information, Karen and thanks to Karen Z. for the kind words. Today, we take Medicare health coverage for senior and Social Security or SSI income for seniors for granted as a permanent part of our culture but until the New Deal era of the 1930’s seniors were largely on their own. Families were expected to take in older relatives and parents when they had the resources to do so. Poor farms were an alternative to homelessness but in most cases only provided the barest necessities to their residents. Some communities seeking more dignity for residents called the institutions “Work Houses” suggesting that everyone worked in some capacity for the benefit of all residents. The steep economic decline of the 1930’s Great Depression years as well as the provisions from the Roosevelt New Deal era caused most Poor Houses/Work Houses to permanently close. Given the high number of homeless people these days in larger cities, perhaps the concept has some validity in modern times as well. No senior wishes to spend his or her final years financially destitute and struggling to survive after a lifetime of being productive members of society.

          1
      • KarenZ says: 702 comments
        OHD Supporter

        You have so much knowledge, John, and I am so happy that you share it with all of us!

        4
  2. PaulPaul says: 54 comments
    Arlington, VA

    Would love to know the history of these 2 homes. Both Italianate, VERY similar looking and in the same town. Just reversed. Very nice.

    4 bd, 3 bath, $675,000, 5525 sq. ft., missing front porch
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2106-Fort-Hill-Rd_Phelps_NY_14532_M41119-63546?view=qv

    5 bd, 1 bath, $249,000, 3469 sq. ft.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1278-Gifford-Rd_Phelps_NY_14532_M35929-98030?view=qv

    2
    • JimHJimH says: 3511 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks for sharing these two beauties. Undocumented in the state CRIS files and local documentation is lacking, though most likely by the same architect/builder as you suggest.

      1
  3. Mike says: 45 comments

    This house in the South Shore neighborhood of Chicago belonged to Cyril Pinder, former Chicago Bear. It’s been on the market three days but at this price I’m surprised it’s not under contract yet. Five beds, five baths, three car garage!
    7137 S. Luella, Chicago. Built 1930. $485,000
    https://www.trulia.com/p/il/chicago/7137-s-luella-ave-chicago-il-60649–2207084896

    3
    • CZenos says: 34 comments

      Street view shows that the house sits sideways on the lot ???

      1
      • Mike says: 45 comments

        Yep, there’s a number of houses in that particular neighborhood (and some adjacent) which are situated like that. I’ve heard it’s to maximize the ‘front’ of the house since city lots are generally rectangular.

  4. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
    1980 board & batten modern

    1849 Brick Italianate $359,000 love the tall windows, tall rooms, another beautiful stairway and the Eastlake bedroom furniture

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/767-Pikeview-St,-Dresden,-TN-38225_rb/

    1900 Second Empire, Kingston, NY 740,000 Big house with a love for Christmas lights. I do like the decorating, rather whimsical and light and airy

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/84116502_zpid/41.926628,-73.988907,41.898141,-74.029677_rect/14_zm/1_fr/

    1890 Queen Ann (?) 169,900 lovely woodwork and windows
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/39-Virginia-Ave,-Poughkeepsie,-NY-12601_rb/
    And then we have a few from Ekla Park Club in Hunter, NY, and I would love to explore all of them and wonder why they are all for sale?:

    http://elkaparkclub.com/index.php

    1893 Victorian.. realtor says transition from Queen Ann to Colonial Revival. I would almost add Chalet to the mix 250,000

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/177-Hill-Rd,-Hunter,-NY_rb/

    And, while we are in Hunter, a 1920 Shingled Queen Ann

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/2095760828_zpid/42.171403,-74.141279,42.14468,-74.171792_rect/14_zm/1_fr/

    1897 Victorian, Also in Hunter, they all are part of the Elka Park Club

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/2095738314_zpid/42.171403,-74.141279,42.14468,-74.171792_rect/14_zm/1_fr/

    A while back I also offered this one, also in the same Club:

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/2088819831_zpid/42.170282,-74.167479,42.156921,-74.182735_rect/15_zm/1_fr/

    9
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      http://elkaparkclub.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=49&Itemid=44
      I have attached a history from the Club’s website

      1
      • zoomy says: 353 comments

        I looked into the Elka Park Club. It seems that many of the houses there are too large for the older generation, and the younger generation doesn’t want them, so there are a number (four, recently) for sale. The houses are my dream, and I’d buy one in a second (even though they are a long ride from my home) because they are so perfectly preserved, with lovely views. BUT, there’s always a BUT, the annual club dues are $7K, and the taxes are $7K, which is not affordable for me. Also, these houses are in upstate NY, and will be un-useable during the winter. And you don’t own the land, just the house. If I had more $$, I’d buy one anyway because the houses are time capsules and perfect!! And the 1000 acre park is another dream. The house that was for sale for $250K had foundation issues, and needed $200K of work. That one is under contract now.

        1
    • Sarah Erwin says: 49 comments

      Interesting to see a house that grand in Dresden. It’s the county seat of Weakley County — Ancestors moved from North Carolina in an ox cart after the Civil War headed to the west, but the Mississippi River was in flood and they couldn’t cross,, and so they stayed in Tennessee. My Grandfather’s family was born and raised in Dresden. Speaking as an outsider, it’s a sweet little town — but it’s hard to imagine this house there — even without the addition. I really like it, and we’d love to move there, but it’s out of our price range. Thanks for sharing!!

      2
    • SueSue says: 125 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      How could you possibly choose? They are just all so beautiful. In my fantasy world if someone asked me to choose then I would choose the Bavarian cottage. It makes me little sad to see all these family gems up for sale. Think of the summers spent there. Thanks for posting them.

      1
    • Laurie W. says: 1408 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      So many marvelous old houses in NJ and this is a great example. Good job even on the kitchen; it fits in well, a rarity.

      2
  5. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
    1980 board & batten modern

    Beautiful and very nicely decorated. It reminds me of the Sherwood House (1740), which belongs to the Yonkers Historical Society in NY. My Grandparents were both members and we used to visit there when I was young.

    http://www.yonkershistoricalsociety.org/sherwood-house.html

    2
  6. CharlesB says: 340 comments

    1830 Brick Federal with 1840 Greek Revival addition priced at $64,900–Brownsville, PA was a town of immense importance at the time this house was built–it was the place where the National Road met the Monongahela/Ohio/Mississippi river system, and pioneers could build their flatboats here and sail away downstream to their new homes. Later the town became a shipbuilding center, and the majority of Mississippi River steamboats were constructed here. Today Brownsville, no longer busier and more important than Pittsburgh, is a quiet backwater of 2270 inhabitants.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/600-Front-St_Brownsville_PA_15417_M40143-96783

    A video of the town’s architectural treasures:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3lIVSKDveU&t=22s

    7
    • RitaB says: 117 comments

      I lived in downtown Brownsville above an Italian restaurant for a couple of years while I finished school. Didn’t know boats were built there. There are, however houses along Route 40 of this era still standing. They’re almost always rightontop of the road. Lots of Italian immigration to this area late 1800’s through early 1900’s. Worked mainly in the coal mines.

      3
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      CharlesB, this is a wonderful history you have provided, and I love the blk and wht video of the architecture and the town. After which, the next 2 videos streaming (linked by subject matter or org author) were of the old railway and numerous coke ovens now abandoned in Brownsville. The bridgework and also ovens are beautiful with the many brick archways. Many a brick layer must have been employed in this town, judging also by the numerous brick homes. We have had quite an education here. The past significance of the town is amazing as major steamboat builder alone.

      4
  7. tess says: 228 comments

    Frank Lloyd Wright 1952 fix’er upper, in As Is condition. Located in Arizona for 12.9 million. The photos are worth looking at and dreaming about. I’m sure someone on OHD can tell us the history.

    https://www.sothebysrealty.com/eng/sales/detail/180-l-1698-v6nqlp/frank-lloyd-wright-original-phoenix-az-85018

    1
  8. ddbacker says: 298 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1971 Uninspired split-level
    Prairie Village, KS

    1680! Old Lyme, CT. $1.2 Mil
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1-Sill-Ln_Old-Lyme_CT_06371_M42100-88594?view=qv

    7
    • MW says: 647 comments

      1680, now that is getting a ways back.

      2
    • Laurie W. says: 1408 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      Stunning. It’s beautiful inside and outside, including property. On the cusp of over-restored but stops before going too far. The door & wall on the bedroom ceiling — ahem, amusing, but why?

      1
      • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 543 comments
        1875 Limestone house
        Loire Valley, France,

        On the realtor’s website: “The 25×13 Master bedroom with an original fireplace has an unusual center wall hinged at the ceiling which historically was used to create two separate rooms.”

        What an amazing and unusual feature!!

        2
        • RosewaterRosewater says: 3811 comments

          That’s a first for me! Far out.

          1
        • Laurie W. says: 1408 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1988 Fake Greek Revival!
          NC

          Very cool. I can imagine them having finished making one room of two, wondering what to do with extra door and wall….Can’t throw great antiques like that out; somebody may want to use them in the future. Where to store them?……I know!…..

        • Marshel CunninghamMarshel Cunningham says: 25 comments

          We have a house somewhere down here in the South someone told me about that has a wall that lifts straight up into the attic. There is a giant pulley wheel system in the attic that turns to lift the wall to form two rooms. I think pocket doors are nicer and work just as well.

          1
    • tracy concha says: 11 comments

      Has anyone noticed the door in the ceiling in pic 27? What is that?

      • CandyCandy says: 105 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Carpentersville, IL

        The Agent explains the door on the ceiling in his narrative on realtor.com

    • Karen says: 291 comments

      This house has been added onto over the centuries, right? How does one tell what has been added on, and when? I really like this one!

  9. Julie C. says: 82 comments

    Kia Ora from New Zealand

    I couldn’t sleep so got up and perused real estate listings.

    This truly exceptional home is enormous so unless you have a Walton size family I guess it would be best used as a bed and breakfast/accomodation.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3394166

    We saw this little charmer in Whangarei when we were up there last month. We are actually going up there shortly to spend the day in the area. I love this little place and Regent is a good suburb.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3343593

    I know this house in Auckland’s trendy Devonport is run down but what I like about it is that it has been kept pretty original. Those Kauri wood walls, ceilings and Matai wood floors were the way houses were built but eventually people plastered over the walls and modernised everything. I see a lot of potential but I suspect it will get demolished and a new build will be put in

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3378529

    A home full of character in the very desirable Auckland suburb of Mt. Eden. Unfortunately, I suspect that someone will buy it and subdivide the land. Hopefully, they will not mess with this home.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3309054

    Here is an Art Deco style home located in Hawera, Taranaki which is on the central west coast of the North Island.

    https://www.realestate.co.nz/3348514

    5
    • Randy C says: 352 comments

      I want the Burnside Estate and everything in it! Such a unique and beautiful place. Thanks for sharing.

      3
    • SandyF says: 97 comments

      8.5 M?? Am I reading this correctly? And I thought CA was expensive!

      2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      A wonderful collection! I hope the orig intact homes will be preserved.

      1
    • Laurie W. says: 1408 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1988 Fake Greek Revival!
      NC

      I love the derelict cottage! The wood is SO attractive & even in its unfortunate condition, the house feels cozy. Gosh, I wish somebody would bring it back, but the price is obviously for land & location (translates to US$842,379). Heartbreaking.

      1
      • Julie C. says: 82 comments

        I really do hope someone with vision (and money) does fix it up. Devonport is less than an hour away from me and is full of beautiful old homes (albeit most of them have interiors that are very modern). My husband identified some problems he sees in this house which he said would concern him. If I lived near there I would consider buying it and doing it up. I would ignore the paint it all white trend and furnish it would Scandinavian or retro style furniture too. And the exterior would be bright and colourful – none of the white on white stuff.

    • SueSue says: 125 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      I have dreamed of living in NZ but now I don’t think I can afford to. Wow, what wonderful houses. Of course the first one is just breathtaking.

      • Julie C. says: 82 comments

        It was easy for me to move here because I am married to a New Zealander. But yes, it is expensive here, especially housing although there are places where it is relatively quite cheap. I live in the most expensive area of the country (the Auckland region) so when the husband retires we will sell up and move to the far South where it is quite cheap, buy or build a nice place and have plenty left to live on.

  10. Anne M. says: 478 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Hopkinton, MA

    Kelly, this site is one of my all-time favs, proud to be a supporter!
    1904 in Southbridge, MA for $173,000 – pretty fabulous inglenook & price for the size
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/56-Everett-St-Southbridge-MA-01550/57642461_zpid/?fullpage=true
    1910 Craftsman in Worcester, MA $358,000 wowza!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/15-Haviland-St-Worcester-MA-01602/56735784_zpid/?fullpage=true
    1916 Colonial in Springfield, MA $175,000
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/101-Kimberly-Ave_Springfield_MA_01108_M49766-68259?view=qv
    Have a nice weekend, everyone!

    7
    • Eileen M says: 207 comments

      I am No expert on architectural styles,, but the Worcester, MA house seems mre tudor than craftsman to me.

      3
      • Anne M. says: 478 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Hopkinton, MA

        I was also puzzled by the description from the realtor – I am thinking more Arts & Crafts style

        3
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      All really great, thank you.

      I was rather amused by the Craftsman. Musically inclined home. From the record collection, nice to see, in the living room, to the basement bedroom with, I thought Gibson, and husband guessed Paul Reed Smith guitar, and sound equipment, to George hanging in the bath. Smile

      2
    • Anne M. says: 478 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Hopkinton, MA

      Very charming! Love the kitchen especially.

      2
    • cheryl plato says: 165 comments

      too much in that kitchen to love!! and the street view- many antique homes nearby! Lovely

      1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      Rupert is a lovely hamlet on the way, for us, to the Merck Forest and Farm Center (educational, sustainable farm and forest preserve with hiking and cabin rentals). OHD featured the old store, now home for sale in Rupert a while back. Christopher Kimble had a home there where he filmed his cooking show Cooks Country. He is now on to Boston w/ an interesting cooking show, Milk Street.(I digress…)
      This is a great house. I too love the kitchen! Lovely woodwork too.love how original the interior is. The outside seems to be a slight mix of decades.

      2
    • Southwestlovesmomma says: 105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1958 Ranch
      Bartlett, IL

      It makes me so happy to know there are these un-touched/unmuddled homes out there still! I hate to watch flipand move TV, where all individuality and history is completely removed. This Rupert beauty is a treasure.

      1
  11. cheryl plato says: 165 comments

    Howdy all! Have a few to share before I check yours out:
    First an 66K 1870 farmhouse in Magnolia NC a sweet sleepy little town, simple original beauty inside, original outbuildings, nice old Victorian cottages and farmhouses near
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/219-Carroll-St_Magnolia_NC_28453_M58661-62065#photo0
    check out street view
    https://www.google.com/maps/@34.8958712,-78.0524145,3a,75y,324.67h,89.99t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1skNg4Bg0LVdqLTvk9QPwdAA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    1869 Victorian(?) 69K Whitehall NY 9 acres, beautiful fireplaces, coffered ceilings, a tower?
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/123-Poultney-St_Whitehall_NY_12887_M46418-60088#photo13

    Sweetest 1900 Victorian cottage Neodesha KS 49K,adorable home beneath little granny’s decorations, garden paths, lovely architectural details
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/202-Indiana-St_Neodesha_KS_66757_M89304-35010#photo0

    1940 Charleston WV brick and stone (semiTudor?) 64K love Hobbit light in picture 3
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1129-Bridge-Rd_Charleston_WV_25314_M38221-21456#photo0
    love the matching stone wall and reverse twin house beside it, street view
    https://www.google.com/maps/@38.338356,-81.6455563,3a,75y,258.76h,90.63t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sLAxpm6JLT4UNLQkkWu2ksw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    Got 2 super bargains this week, first 1900 21K Peabody KS says Colonial,charming
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/211-N-Elm-St_Peabody_KS_66866_M85542-64975#photo0
    What I really love is the cute neighborhood with brick streets, nice curb appeal, street view
    https://www.google.com/maps/@38.1671355,-97.1025638,3a,75y,243.84h,81.83t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sIC3P9A4LYlJbtp__zQOrHQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
    my other bargain 16K Victorian Burlington IA much originalness still inside,
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/901-S-8th-St_Burlington_IA_52601_M79214-94837#photo15
    street view
    https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7987382,-91.1077188,3a,44.1y,282.35h,93.5t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sbpb-9OQbKo1DdjyF_VBcdg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    First home I ever ‘pinned” on Pinterest 10 years ago, for sale again, 1850 Federal Harrisburg PA 209K, plank floors, built-ins, servant stairs, summer house….
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/5530-Old-Locust-Ln_Harrisburg_PA_17109_M44446-40281#photo0

    Finally this eye-popping 1899 Victorian mansion in Jackson MI 179K, ornate woodwork, cool antique stove, beautiful old sinks,coach house, original light fixtures…
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1401-Greenwood-Ave_Jackson_MI_49203_M35210-98788#photo0

    Have a great weekend everyone! Now to sit back and enjoy your finds….. love OHD!

    8
  12. CoraCora says: 1698 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1888. Well-cared for beauty. This is only a block away from my Gramma Ree’s old house. My mother was born and raised in Perry.

    Perry, IA:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/61661084_zpid/

    2
  13. Kristi E says: 39 comments

    This beautiful 3 story 1870’s townhouse in Frederick, MD is technically not for sale anymore because I have a contract on it! I wanted this house when it last sold in 2007, but missed it because it sold so quickly. It’s currently 3 apartments which is the only way we could afford this. We will live in part and keep renting one apartment. I am so excited.
    https://www.weichert.com/78999410/

    16
    • MW says: 647 comments

      Congratulations. I’ve only visited there once a couple Summers back while looking at an old house in Hagerstown, but Frederick seems like a great town. Good luck with finalizing the sale and making it yours.

      2
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 543 comments
      1875 Limestone house
      Loire Valley, France,

      congratulations! what a beautiful building! I would love to see inside!

      1
  14. Jessica says: 32 comments

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/900-NW-19th-St-Oklahoma-City-OK-73106/21847022_zpid/

    Very classy remodel above.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/614-E-Warner-Ave-Guthrie-OK-73044/21800691_zpid/

    I think I enjoy the house above so much because when I was young my mother let me paint Egyptian hieroglyphs in my bedroom! Interior decor spoiler alert!

    4
  15. BeanbagBeanbag says: 43 comments

    ALL Maryland today! I love the Baltimore area! I plan on moving there…. So i thought id share some 🙂

    Historic meets Modern in this Gorgeous Bolton Hill Masterpiece. Baltimore, MD $589,900: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/237-W-Lafayette-Ave_Baltimore_MD_21217_M54205-31247#photo3

    Great opportunity in desirable Madison Park/ Bolton Hill area. Baltimore, MD $239,900: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1902-Madison-Ave_Baltimore_MD_21217_M66021-49298#photo2

    Massive 3 Unit Townhouse with Garage in the heart of Bolton Hill. Baltimore, MD $595,000: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1403-Park-Ave_Baltimore_MD_21217_M61545-21250?ex=MD644525210#photo7

    Beautiful Crown Moldings, hardwood floors and many other architectural delights with very modern amenities. Baltimore, MD $385,000: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/820-Hollins-St_Baltimore_MD_21201_M50340-12959?cid=soc_shares_ldp_pt#photo1

    Fabulous condo with high ceilings and spacious rooms! Unit 1B, Baltimore, MD $329,000:https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3902-Canterbury-Rd-Apt-B1_Baltimore_MD_21218_M59037-04398#photo8

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  16. AbMellyAbMelly says: 39 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1900 (not sure if accurate), Mount Olive, MS (hometown of Steve McNair), I’m unsure as to what style to call this so maybe y’all could help! $27,500.

    I love the hardwood floors, high ceilings, front porch, French doors and the random stained glass on the kitchen cabinets.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/108-S-Main-St_Mount-Olive_MS_39119_M82357-57061?view=qv

    2
    • s says: 49 comments

      Hubby and I call that “water bed stained glass”. LOL I’d bet it’s a 1970’s addition.

      2
  17. APhid says: 15 comments

    Not a house, but Kate Wagner, the author of the blog McMansion Hell, had a nice piece on Curbed on the philosophy of renovating antique houses.
    https://www.curbed.com/2018/9/5/17820648/what-to-renovate-home-mcmansion-hell-wagner

    And the blog itself, which is HILARIOUS: http://mcmansionhell.com

    5
  18. JRC says: 63 comments

    The one in Madison Park left me feeling cold.

    2
    • Jkleeb says: 82 comments

      That just hurts to look at!

      1
    • Karen I says: 178 comments

      What does that mean “available for refi cash out?” Thank you.
      (Assuming there was a crime committed in photo #3.)

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Thanks for sharing, Cody. Assuming the 1892 date is accurate, this must have been a growing prosperous Toledo neighborhood in those days. But in more recent decades the neighborhood appears to have in decline along with the City. (streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/iCJFRuBcmnp ) There are numerous small businesses in this ethnically diverse and economically diverse neighborhood. Toledo and Ohio’s efforts to clean up cities and towns of vacant and abandoned structures is also evident with empty lots dotting the landscape. Most of the housing in the neighborhood appears to be of the (lower end) rental variety and this house is said to be divided into a multi-family although some interior integrity remains.
        My advice to anyone considering buying it is to please buy the next door property as well because that would give you some control over the locale and insure that the criminal element doesn’t live right next door. A school is in back of the house across the alley. There also appears to be what was originally a carriage house of brick, now in use as a rental unit.
        We don’t hear the term “urban pioneer” too often these days but a fair number of formerly marginal neighborhoods have been brought back by individuals willing to stake out a claim in the neighborhood and then make the effort to rehab the house and turn it into a neighborhood asset. (in this case maybe rehab two houses) Once there’s evidence of investment coming into a neighborhood it sometimes has a domino effect. Soon others notice the positive changes as well as local realtors and then a trend of improvement begins to take hold. Carried to extremes, a classic case of urban gentrification ensues but that is less likely to happen in plucky Toledo. The payoff for the original “pioneers” is that they can usually sell and make a profit over what they invested in the rehab. But this process depends on a lot of factors so I would not recommend anyone to buy this or any other nearby property with firm expectations of a financial reward down the road. From a preservation perspective, this was once a fine home, obviously architect designed that was close to mansion grade when first built. Restoring it to period again would make you a local preservation hero, I would think. I know very little about Toledo’s Southside so potential buyers would want to get as much information as possible from local resources before buying. I definitely see potential in this house but the low asking price should not be the primary factor in deciding to buy it.

        2
        • CandyCandy says: 105 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Carpentersville, IL

          John, you pretty much hit the nail on the head about this Toledo neighborhood and Toledo in general. I’m gonna add to what you said because Toledo was my “stomping ground” from 1970 until I left Ohio in 2000. 56 miles from Defiance made it a quick trip and because Defiance was so small and my interests were so big 😉 I would actually drive to Toledo just to buy exotic groceries and wine that I couldn’t get in Defiance. In my younger years, I spent a lot of time in the specific area where this house is located because when my friends left Defiance to move to Toledo, this was a popular area. The mansions that existed as single family homes had been turned in to fairly inexpensive 3 or 4 (ot more) flats. As this happened in these beautiful old neighborhoods, the families moved out and the Toledo University students, the “hippie radicals” and the general “riff-raff” moved in. The point is, the decline of this entire area has been on-going since the mid-sixties (if not longer) and even though I’ve seen some homes bought and returned to single family dwellings, the trend doesn’t seem to be widespread or entirely successful. Toledo is/was so industry-based (rust-belt, etc) that it continues to struggle despite the best efforts of it’s residents. Of course, you can make all the same observations about Detroit, just 60 miles to the NE. And Detroit is experiencing a strong (although slow) resurgence. I loved/love Toledo…I lived there briefly in the 70’s, my son lived there for a few years in early 2000…the majority of excitement I had in Ohio was in Toledo and I still have friends there. I spend lots of time looking at homes in the Toledo area on realtor.com (so many of the older homes/mansions are familiar to me because I’m from a Real Estate background and before we had RE websites, I was driving through the neighborhoods and dreaming 😊… now I get to see inside!!) I would advise anyone considering moving to one of these Toledo neighborhoods to seriously SERIOUSLY do their homework. At the VERY least, park in front of the property at all hours of the day and night and just observe… and keep the doors locked, the windows up and the car running. Just reality…

          1
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            Thanks for sharing a local’s observations about this area. If I were looking for a period home in Toledo, I think the city’s Old West End neighborhood would be a fairly safe locale. (website: http://www.toledooldwestend.com/) I can recall in the years immediately following the 2007/2008 recession that even some landmark homes in the Old West End were selling for bargain prices. It appears that today the housing prices in that neighborhood of 25 blocks have stabilized or perhaps even appreciated in value. As for the Southside house, I did mention the need for an “Urban Pioneer” type next owner who can live with the rough edges as they and others work towards improving the neighborhood. Definitely a tough sell in Toledo but as you mentioned, but even Detroit, formerly the national poster child of urban decline and decay, has seen a renaissance in recent years in former slums like Brush Park which is now rapidly losing its unsavory status to new development. I hope this home’s next owner is a perfect match with a new owner who cares enough to begin a revitalization process with preservation being a part of it.

            • CandyCandy says: 105 comments
              OHD Supporter

              Carpentersville, IL

              Yes John… again you’re right on point. The Old West End (or “The Woods” because nearly all the streets end with “wood”…Glenwood, Kenwood, Ravenswood, etc) is the area where you’re gonna find the best bang for your buck. But you better be ready, willing and able to put in the work! And that pioneer spirit is a necessary qualification! Additionally, patience will most likely be required because you may not see a return on your investment for many years. There are a lot of properties in this area that still need someone to love them back to life so if you choose one in this area you better choose wisely or you may be living next to a real disaster for quite a while. luckily they have a very active and involved community of people trying to love this area back to where it once was (see John’s link) I believe if I were ever to move back to Toledo, I would most likely pick a home in the old orchard district which is just north of Ottawa Hills. There once was a time when you could not even buy a house in Ottawa Hills because everything was sold by word-of-mouth or kept in the family. There are some properties in Ottawa Hills (Almost always “Time capsule properties” where the owner has passed away and the family isn’t interested in keeping the property) that are very affordable considering the area. Just to the south of Ottawa Hills property is VERY affordable!

              Here are 3 examples of what I’m talking about… all similar size, built in the 20’s. The Ottawa Hills home has a bit more land but that is part of the a lore of Ottawa Hills.

              Old Orchard area, north of Ottawa Hills:
              $329,900
              5beds · 3+baths
              2717 Barrington Dr, Toledo
              https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2717-Barrington-Dr_Toledo_OH_43606_M37272-89813?cid=other_shares_core_ldp

              South of Ottawa Hills:
              $184,500
              4beds · 2+baths
              1735 Potomac Dr Unit 43500, Toledo
              https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1735-Potomac-Dr_Toledo_OH_43607_M45672-26891?cid=other_shares_core_ldp

              Ottawa Hills
              $424,900
              4beds · 3+baths
              3706 Edgevale Rd, Ottawa Hills
              https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3706-Edgevale-Rd_Ottawa-Hills_OH_43606_M43552-48275?cid=other_shares_core_ldp

              1
        • Karen says: 291 comments

          In my small city, there are some lots that have been vacant for years. Many were finally purchased by people here from out of town landlords, who were just paying taxes on the lots, and doing nothing but let them collect broken glass. Now, there are community gardens on them, the lots donated for this purpose by the new owners. I’m sure the new owners get some kind of tax credit for doing this. The lots are very well kept up, and people are growing not just the usual tomatoes, beans, and corn, but veggies more representative of various ethnic groups. It seems that where there is a community garden, people are taking more pride in their neighborhoods overall. Not just improving the curb value of their homes, but taking note of who is hanging around, and demanding the police and local government do more to combat crime, drugs, and homelessness in the area. It would be nice to see these two houses fixed up, and that empty corner lot turned into a community garden.

          1
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            All of these steps can lead to a neighborhood renaissance but it takes time, hard work, and people willing to come together to work for a common cause. In marginal neighborhoods that is sometimes a difficult task. Scores of formerly neglected neighborhoods have become desirable again because people cared. We can only hope the Southside house owner(s) follows this path as difficult as it might be.

            1
      • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 436 comments

        “Refi cash out” means buy it (probably with cash), rehab it, and then put a mortgage on it and pull out your cash investment. It’s technically not a “re-fi” (short for re-finance) since you wouldn’t be paying off an old mortgage to put on a new one, but this is how lenders describe loans when people want to take money out of their home with a new loan.

        1
        • Karen I says: 178 comments

          Ok. I guess it’s a way of getting the equity out of your house without selling it. But you would have to then make mortgage payments. Thank you for the info.

          1
  19. CoraCora says: 1698 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1914. Such a charming little house. This may have the cleanest unfinished basement I’ve seen.

    Saginaw, https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/140970526_zpid/

    1
  20. AbMellyAbMelly says: 39 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1870, Wilmington, North Carolina, Italianate. Auction starting at $239,000. 5 beds, 4 1/2 baths, 4854 sq ft. No inside pics, but the exterior on Google street view is AMAZING. If you’ve never checked out Hubzu before, there are some really great old house gems at affordable prices. Some are cash only, others are able to be financed. Hoping an house old enthusiast buys this home, restores it and then invites me over for a house tour! 🙂

    Hubzu auction link:
    https://www.hubzu.com/property/0007191822662-110-Nun-St-Wilmington-NC-28401

    Google Street View:
    https://www.google.com/maps/place/110+Nun+St,+Wilmington,+NC+28401/@34.2303773,-77.947393,3a,75y,216.6h,90.93t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sHPHh-YlQjcoLXi3uLxAiEg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!4m5!3m4!1s0x89aa1fc91d5162df:0x437b5c02d371ca9f!8m2!3d34.2301303!4d-77.9474064

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  21. JimHJimH says: 3511 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Auction of an old TB sanitorium in the Adirondacks, 29 structures on 63 acres, including some nice homes and a stone chapel.
    https://www.williamsauction.com/property-plus/600-AMA-way-saranac-lake-ny-sept-2018-352550
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adirondack_Cottage_Sanitarium

    5
  22. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 543 comments
    1875 Limestone house
    Loire Valley, France,

    A few French properties in Normandy:

    – 256,800€ : mansion with marble fireplaces and wainscoting: http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/68079JDA27/house-for-sale-in-nonancourt-eure-higher-normandy-france

    – 598,900 € : Anglo-Normand mansion with the same features as the one above, parquet floors, and timber-framed thatched-roof outbuildings: http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/36198ASL27/house-for-sale-in-marais-vernier-eure-higher-normandy-france

    – 227,900€ : another stone mansion c.1920 : http://www.reseau-expertimo.fr/30332-Maison-de-style-de-255-m-parc-arbore-de-7300-m-sur-la-commune-de-Plesidy.html (and different pics here: http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/P1809LRF/house-for-sale-in-plesidy-cotes-d-armor-brittany-france )

    – 892,000€ : incredible property consisting of 3 timber-framed/thatched-roof buildings connected as a U overlooking a pond, with indoor pool: http://www.frenchestateagents.com/french-property-for-sale/view/70096PMO27/house-for-sale-in-pont-audemer-eure-higher-normandy-france

    3
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 436 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA,

      I particularly like the 1920’s stone mansion. A bit unusual but easy to see living in it, at a fairly reasonable price.

      1
  23. BugLady says: 68 comments

    Howdy folks! I’ve been busy but peek in here from time to time.

    I had a random question that I thought I would pose to the group. I see a lot of victorian/old world style homes posted from, well, the Old World (Europe specifically). But I have yet to see anything that looks Mid-Century/Modern. Was that ever a thing over there or is it pretty much exclusive to the States?

    1
    • ChrisICU says: 482 comments

      Hey BugLady,
      That’s a great question There are several architectural styles that originated in Europe. Bauhaus, Art Deco, International Modern are to name a few. What we call Mid-Century Modern was a popular style globally. There are examples all over the world and some places they were more popular than others. There’s a site called WowHaus that focuses a lot on the UK and Europe. Occasionally they include other countries, too. https://www.wowhaus.co.uk

      2
      • CandyCandy says: 105 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Carpentersville, IL

        ChrisICU… You’re pure evil! I now have another great site to suck up my time! 😉 Thanks a lot! 😏

        • ChrisICU says: 482 comments

          LOL OHD is the gateway site for lots of people. It all starts with a little Victorian, maybe an Italianate. Then, before you know it, you’re hooked!

          3
          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8793 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            “OHD is the gateway…” I like that! 🙂

            3
            • ChrisICU says: 482 comments

              You know it’s true. LOL Honestly Kelly, you’ve created one of the sweetest, safest, pg13 sites on the internet. A place where everyone shares happiness curiousities, and home-enabling goodness. Can’t ask for anything better than that!

              2
              • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8793 comments
                Admin

                1901 Folk Victorian
                Chestatee, GA

                Thank you! Makes me happy to hear that people do appreciate me keeping the trolls and negativity away (failing at times but I do my best.) I hope people see OHD as a place to get away from the world, day dream about a life they could have and keep minds off off the depressing things in life.

                2
                • ChrisICU says: 482 comments

                  Everyone should think that this is that kind of environment. And the only time I get even partially depressed is when I can’t afford one of my dream homes. But, I’m pretty lucky overall so it’s only a fleeting feeling. You’re and OHD are awesome!

                  1
                • zoomey says: 353 comments

                  Kelly, You have created a dream!! I love your site! I escape the cares of the world here and dream of a life I probably never will have, but it’s fun to dream! And I’ve enjoyed seeing so many of my “dream” houses here! Keep up the great work! Much appreciated!!

                  1
                  • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 573 comments
                    Admin

                    1901 Folk Victorian
                    Chestatee, GA

                    Thank you! 🙂

                    • CandyCandy says: 105 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      Carpentersville, IL

                      ChrisICU, I take back my comment about you being evil (kinda😏😉) because of the nice and sooooo very true comments you made about Kelly and OHD! I don’t drink or do drugs so OHD is my “crack” 😳… and although I have NO interest in living in MN, NJ, VT, NY etc, I look at everything everywhere and dream about the lives that have been lived in these Grand Dames! And no matter what other “stones” I step on, OHD will always be my first love!

    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 543 comments
      1875 Limestone house
      Loire Valley, France,

      MCM as we can see in the USA with sprawling houses was not a thing in Europe (at least Western Europe, French woman speaking here). I read on wikipedia that MCM period is 1945-1975. Keep in mind that 1945 was the end of WWII for us and many countries were left destroyed and poor, and that fancy design was definitely not a thing at that time. And our pieces of land and houses were/are smaller than in the USA in general.

      If you search on Google.fr “maison années 50” (and change the years to 60 and 70) you’ll get an overview of what it looks like in France. Mostly quite ugly houses, with a bit of regional influence, but not that much (compared to older constructions from before the 20th century).

      Peculiar forms of architectural styles were not that widespread. I’ll take an example: Brutalism and Le Corbusier’s work. Only a few buildings (i went to Marseille’s “cité radieuse” this summer) and mainly apartment buildings. Other example: Art Déco : many more because it was in the 1920-30s, post-WWI boom, used mainly on apartment buildings or bourgeois/upper-(middle)-class houses and townhouses.

      2
  24. Nally Steeves says: 1 comments

    http://www.maxspann.com/auctions/detail/78.75-acres-preserved-farmland-with-private-pond-in-columbus-nj
    c. 1720 farmhouse
    $Auction (September 27th)
    Columbus (Mansfield Twp), NJ

    • Karen says: 291 comments

      I wish they’d shown the inside of the house!

    • zoomey says: 353 comments

      The description “sits on a quiet country road” is a little deceiving, considering this lovely property is adjacent to the New Jersey Turnpike!! There are major highways on three sides of this property!

      Other than that important detail, it looks very nice.

  25. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    Not in pristine condition at the low $30K asking price but this eclectic 1895 Victorian in Decatur, Illinois, with over 3,8000 sq. feet does appear to have potential: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/665-W-Prairie-Ave-Decatur-IL-62522/84811699_zpid/?fullpage=true Here’s the streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/vJeuXC7HhFS2 Some period details remain like the staircase and at least one mantel. Might be a good starter old house for some folks who are handy with house renovation repairs. The neighborhood appears stable with significant local landmark homes nearby. There’s a large wooded vacant lot next door.

    2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      I do like the window arrangement in the front dormers. especially the larger one

      1
    • Sarah Erwin says: 49 comments

      This home is very close to the Millikin Homestead and the 3 Frank Lloyd Wright houses that I spoke of before. Being near to the University has caused many neighborhood houses to be broken up into apartments for student housing, but this one looks to have dodged that bullet — just a bit too far for students to walk home from late classes. The crime in the area is pretty high, but there are lots of homes in the area that have been restored — the trend is slowly creeping westward from downtown.

      Back in the day, Decatur was a real hot spot for engineering and manufacturing — lots of milling of parts and developing of steam then electric engines (not for trains — for manufacturing), and that area west of downtown was where a lot of the early “movers and shakers” lived. Decatur remains the home of Mueller Manufacturing (think manhole covers and fire hydrants), and is the international HQ for Tate and Lyle (formerly A E Staley — think pancake syrup and other corn based products) and Archer-Daniels-Midland (ADM), processors of soy beans into meal, oil, and lecithin. (Worldwide price fixing of lecithin, which is in nearly all processed food, was the subject of a Matt Damon film some years back.) There are lots of areas of urban— neglect, if not blight — nothing on the scale of, say, Detroit or Toledo, but until schools switch from gearing towards the college bound, and start including education for electricians, electronics, machinists and welders, there will continue to be a high level of unemployment here. Decatur isn’t my “hometown”, but I like it here! SO much potential!!

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Thanks Sarah for the town information. I was dumbfounded by the low taxes on this property:
        Year Property Taxes Change Tax Assessment Change
        2017 $264 -1.8% $2,520 -1%
        2016 $269 5.2% $2,545 1.8%
        2015 $256 -88.6% $2,500 -89.2%
        2014 $2,235 -2.5% $23,137 -3.6% (source: Zillow listing under “Tax History”) Even though surely post renovation the property taxes would soar, perhaps they would still be reasonable by Illinois standards. I’m curious as to what is hidden under the exterior siding. It appears the exterior may have been architecturally “fancy” or ornate. Fully restored, this would be an impressive house, in my humble opinion. Correction: the square footage is 3,800 not 38,000 as posted above.

        • Sarah and Matt Erwin says: 49 comments

          John, hubby says that the taxes probably dropped like that because the home had been declared uninhabitable — non-working plumbing or no heat if furnace failed. Hubby checked Tax Assessment records online and says land value = $4,485; building value = $3,075 for a total Market Value of $7,560. Assessed Value is equal to 1/3 of Market Value = $2,520. Taxes are 10.8098 of Assessed Value = $266.27. If you buy the house and increase the value up to, say $150,000, taxes on it would be calculated in this way: $150,000 (Market Value)divided by 3 = $50,000 (Assessed Value) minus $6,000 (Homestead Exemption if you are owner occupier) multiplied by tax rate of .108098 = $4,756.32 per year. The exception would be that for the first 4 years, you would also receive a Homestead Improvement Exemption up to an annual maximum of $75,000 of improvements from the market value. Our taxes on our 1970’s rancher — 1,900 sq ft, 4 bed, 3 bath home — are about $4,450 per year. They would be $5,046.88, with Homestead Exemption reducing it to the $4,450 that we pay. Thus endeth the tax example lesson for the day. (Can you tell that my hubby is the detail oriented guy?? LOL)

  26. CoraCora says: 1698 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1900. This is one of listings that I normally just scroll past. Exterior is non-descript. I don’t know why I looked, but glad I did! The kitchen is so cute! There’s some other neat parts, too. Worth sharing, anyway.

    Globe, AZ:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2088849737_zpid/

    2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      This to me could be a wonderful place to explore and bring back. To research and find what was or what could have been historically correct. Peeling away what came later. Enough present and still alive to conjure intrigue.

      1
  27. Steffany says: 2 comments

    1897 home in a Lakewood, Ohio (a great place to live, having recently lived there for five years and yearning to return). $259,900
    The siding belies the great interior.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1472-Robinwood-Ave-Lakewood-OH-44107/33499885_zpid/

    3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Lakewood became a fashionable western suburb of Cleveland in the last quarter of the 19th century but it really began to take off at the turn of the last century. Lakewood’s appeal as a coveted place to live has never diminished even though some parts have a boring sameness with dense clusters of developer built houses. Vinyl and aluminum siding have had a long history of use in the town with even this beautiful example not escaping its application. Fortunately, the interior here has little changed with beautiful millwork and original hardware remaining. I’m impressed with the abundance of natural light and airy feeling the house presents. The decidedly Colonial Revival themed stained glass stairwell window ties in with the general Colonial Revival feel of this house. That curved millwork arch off the staircase is a bit of architectural drama and I might describe it as Art Nouveau in feel but in the 1890’s the artistic movement was just taking hold in Europe and in the States it only minimally appeared. I’m fairly certain this house was architect designed and with research the designer could probably be discovered. Cleveland at the end of the 19th century had a very high level of architectural quality focused on the “Showplace of America” (a book title) otherwise known as Euclid Avenue. This very high architectural standard filtered down to surrounding areas such as Lakewood which had a number of grand mansions mostly along the Lake Erie shoreline. Thanks for sharing.

      1
      • CandyCandy says: 105 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Carpentersville, IL

        Wow Steffany! Great find!! The kitchen made me a bit dizzy 🤪 But the rest…🤩

        1
    • zoomey says: 353 comments

      Fabulous unpainted woodwork, pocket doors, and so spacious inside. The outside does not match at all! The woodwork is amazing and so well-preserved. Love it!

      1
    • CandyCandy says: 105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Carpentersville, IL

      Wow Steffany! Great find!! The kitchen made me a bit dizzy 🤪 But the rest…🤩

  28. SueSue says: 125 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    Oh my, this is a beauty. I remember when this Victorian was on the market and it needed restoration. The staircase is the star in this gorgeous house. Built in 1854.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/26-Summer-St_Rockport_ME_04856_M35067-18782?view=qv

    1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      Very Nice, and a beautiful collection in the garage too.
      Would have loved to see the house before restoration too.

      1
    • zoomey says: 353 comments

      Stunning staircase. I love the entire house. Lovely restoration. The garage with the old cars is a little jarring, but all else is wonderful.

      1
  29. chloe says: 2 comments
    1744 Colonial
    Springfield, NJ

    https://youtu.be/yoFAkgL9RSk
    Build date 1744
    $767,000.00
    Swaim Homestead, South Springfield Avenue … – Library of Congress
    https://www.loc.gov/item/nj0849/
    … Swaim Homestead, South Springfield Avenue, Springfield, Union County, NJ … creator: Swaim, Anthony; Created / Published: Documentation compiled after …

    • chloe says: 2 comments
      1744 Colonial
      Springfield, NJ

      Spouse(s): Abigail Sanford
      Family tree: Anthony Swaim 1719-1758
      About This Item Obtaining Copies Access to Original
      Title: Swaim Homestead, South Springfield Avenue, Springfield, Union County, NJ
      Creator(s): Historic American Buildings Survey, creator
      Related Names:
      Swaim, Anthony

  30. Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 543 comments
    1875 Limestone house
    Loire Valley, France,

    1877 Brick Italianate, $259,000, Peoria IL : I love the stately front with gable ornementation and high-pitched roofs and the super gorgeous staircase:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/331-NE-Perry-Ave-Peoria-IL-61603/198232601_zpid/?fullpage=true

    6
    • SueSue says: 125 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      This house is just amazing. I am partial to houses with drama and this one has it in spades. What fun it would be to decorate it. I’d love to see the floor in the entrance way.

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        I’d like to see an old Sanborn Fire insurance map of this neighborhood in the late 1800’s. I suspect this was but one of a string of mansion grade homes clustered there but now all gone except for this lone survivor. Although Peoria still has a sampling of late Victorian and early 20th century housing, the city has tried over the years to present a modern look because until the past couple of years, it was the world headquarters of Caterpillar, Inc.. (they have since relocated the corporate offices to a Chicago suburb) Steps were taken to adapt this house for a more commercial use, it could still be converted back to a residence. A good compromise would be to use it as a bed & breakfast as it is centrally located. We can only wish that its original neighbors were still around.

      • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 543 comments
        1875 Limestone house
        Loire Valley, France,

        Dramatic, that’s the word for it!! I’ve looked at the listing pics several times, i just love it!!

  31. Barnard says: 1 comments
    Amelia Court House, VA

    https://www.callintegrityrealestate.com/property/va/23002/amelia-courthouse/59—amelia–none/16605-amelia/5b8ee1527ddfe362daad1b6f/

    Built: 1913
    Price: $299,900
    Location: Amelia Court House, Virginia

    1
    • zoomy says: 353 comments

      Beautiful house, but it’s next to a highway, which would make it impossible to use as a B&B or a single family house, IMHO. But it would be a lovely location for a business.

  32. clawhammerist says: 9 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1879 Italianate
    Danville, VA

    One of the most architecturally significant houses in Cincinnati–a city full of significant architecture!–has gone on the market: an 1892 (dated in the gable) Swiss Chalet-style mega-cottage. Not exactly cheap at $549K, but it is large, seemingly in decent shape, and aesthetically special. The neighborhood is convenient and boasts lots of nicely kept nineteenth- and early twentieth-century architecture as well as a quite beautiful and large city park with spectacular views of the Ohio River.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2214-Upland-Pl-Cincinnati-OH-45206/34219681_zpid/

    Old House Dreams continues to make my day whenever I peruse it!

    4
    • SueSue says: 125 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      This is amazing. No not cheap but I wouldn’t expect it to be. Goodness knows it would cost a fortune to replicate. One of the most charming and unusual of homes I have seen in a long time. Love it.

      1
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 178 comments
      1980 board & batten modern

      The ceiling in pics 13 and 15 is wild, and I love the staircase.
      Thank you

    • CandyCandy says: 105 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Carpentersville, IL

      I have no words… could someone please explain this house to me? It’s interesting but confusing. I’ve certainly never seen anything like it! Have there been significant modifications throughout, or is this what it’s intended to be?

      1
      • JimHJimH says: 3511 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Here’s a good photo from the 1930’s with some history. Swiss Chalet is one of the Exotic Revival styles that appeared occasionally in the 1800’s. The architect Lucian Plympton designed 2 Tudor homes on that street as well, including one for his mother. Besides some paneling and paint, the house appears fairly intact, an interesting combo of vernacular European architecture and late Victorian millwork.
        http://www.ohiomemory.org/cdm/ref/collection/p267401coll34/id/2023

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 8793 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          I’m always nervous when a home like that goes on the market and goes into pending status so fast, worry that a flipper is catching it with a cash offer. PLEASE let it be an owner that will love it with care.

          1
          • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 4196 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1889 Eastlake Cottage
            Fort Worth, TX

            The gentrified pocket neighborhood of Upland Place (part of Walnut Hills) where this house is located, still features a parade of fine late 19th century homes designed by some of Cincinnati’s best Victorian era architects. Here’s a streetview and I recommend armchair touring Upland Place: https://goo.gl/maps/GHGTHXMEyV82 While a flip is possible, (I too hope not!) this well known house is unlikely to be bought and summarily made totally modern inside. Architect Lucien/Lucian Plympton, as Jim noted, liked the Swiss Chalet style and designed a number of homes in this exotic Victorian variant. When I was considering relocation to Cincinnati about a decade ago, as I recall, I found eight examples of surviving Swiss Chalet style homes from the 19th and early 20th centuries in various neighborhoods. On one Cincinnati visit, I photographed this fine Chalet example in the western Cincinnati streetcar suburb of Sayler Park: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/7423821696/in/album-72157630245353562/

            1
    • MW says: 647 comments

      Definitely a very nice and interesting house with a seemingly odd mix of design cues. I’d love to have this house if I had a good reason to live in Cincinnati. Seems kind of cheap to me, very cheap actually, but blame that on my warped CA perspective.

    • Karen I says: 178 comments

      Love the staircase. One of my favorites.

  33. Charlotte Zang says: 1 comments

    Check out this estate in Cecil County, Maryland. Built in 1735. https://tinyurl.com/yd5fsyb2

    1
  34. Eric S. H. Jenkins says: 1 comments

    I tried emailing in this submission but Im not sure if it went through. (Home / Castle) is located here on the edge of the Shenandoah Valley of WV in Berkeley Springs formerly Bath, a favorite spot for George and Martha Washington .
    https://www.redfin.com/WV/Berkeley-Springs/276-Cacapon-Rd-25411/home/15954135

  35. CoraCora says: 1698 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1912. Lots of nice unpainted woodwork; a well-kept old house with a sleeping porch and attic space that has been finished. A lot of house for $85k.

    Wichita, KS: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/77321531_zpid/

  36. CoraCora says: 1698 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1957. A delicious MCM. Fabulous! Check out the big built-in wall clock in photo #8, with the hidden radio cabinet below.

    Memphis, TN:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/42208553_zpid/

    1
  37. CoraCora says: 1698 comments
    OHD Supporter & Moderator

    Clinton, TN

    1954. The first 8 photos are nothing special.

    Photo #9 changed my life. So. Awesome.

    Memphis, TN:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/42170475_zpid/

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