c. 1880 – Nevada City, CA

SOLD / Archived From 2018
National Register
Added to OHD on 4/23/18   -   Last OHD Update: 11/13/18   -   27 Comments
Address Withheld

Map: Street

Price

$250,000

Beds

3

Baths

1

SqFt

1000

Location, location, location! Major project in the heart of downtown Nevada City, located in General Business Historical District. On the National Register. Single level frame residence has been home to three generations of one family, since 1934. Small home on small lot. Lot - approx. 22 x 125 - extends from Broad to Commercial - with garage on Commercial. Opportunity abounds for buyer with creativity and energy. Property needs extensive renovation before use as home or business. See Fact Sheet in Addendum for potential alternate to Uniform Building Code & potential tax credit.
Sold By
Lee Good, Good & Company
530-265-5872
Links, Photos & Additional Info

27 Comments on c. 1880 – Nevada City, CA

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    This is a reader share.

    • RossRoss says: 2313 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      So, I am looking at the first number of images and thinking: WHY did Kelly post this?

      Then came the interior images.

      Oh. Oh my!

      How utterly fascinating.

      The place looks unused since, maybe, the 1930s.

      Extraordinary.

      7
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Yeah, the exterior is not so tempting. I checked out the street view, Nevada City looks awesome!

        1
        • RossRoss says: 2313 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
          Emporia, KS

          Awesome, indeed!

        • Harleysmom says: 75 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Windsor, CA

          It is awesome! I Love Nevada City, highly recommend visiting if you have the chance. I would love to live there.

          2
          • prettypaddle says: 49 comments

            Agreed, the area is wonderful. Many of the little towns in the foothills retain so much character. I sincerely hope this home finds a buyer who recognizes the charm underneath all that needs fixing.

            2
  2. ddbacker says: 349 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1971 Uninspired split-level
    Prairie Village, KS

    I bet this place has some stories to tell.

    6
  3. natira121natira121 says: 233 comments
    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    Wow. This is one of VERY few houses I have agreed with being ‘unlivable’. I sure hope it gets rescued, and I hope they keep the tree growing out of the front foundation, it’s cool!

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4081 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Even I wouldn’t live in this one: well, maybe in the celler. 😉

      Thanks’ for sharing Mary S.

      3
  4. Tommy QTommy Q says: 454 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1912 Craftsman
    Fort Bragg, CA

    If it was mortgage-able, I’d be on it. That’s a great place to live. I prefer Fort Bragg here on the coast but the salt air is murder on anything made of steel — like my truck…

    2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4081 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Picturing the look on the mortgage broker’s face looking at the inspection pix. Heheheh. 😉

      5
  5. Woeisme says: 86 comments

    The church at the top of the hill is in all the postcard pictures of the city. This part of California is beautiful at all times of the year. Nevada city has a real old west feel just like Virginia City Nevada. If I could afford it I would love to live there.

    3
  6. Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 380 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1918 Bunkhouse
    WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

    A rare and fascinating time capsule! Usually the first thing that happens to an historic town – once it becomes a tourist destination – is that all the historic authenticity is removed! Commercial establishments become caricatures of themselves and houses become charmingly quaint beyond credulity. This house (which appears to have been last updated in the late 1960’s) has remained relatively unchanged for the past half century which only adds to its appeal. It might be older than the estimated date of 1880. The kitchen is an especially interesting piece of authentic history and is worthy of preservation – NOT remodeling. The brick vault – rumored to have stored dynamite for the Empire Mine – is especially fascinating. I do fear for the future of this house in an age where people look to HGTV for inspiration regarding historic houses.

    9
  7. Patrick Walker says: 11 comments

    I think it’s time to pull this down and build some thing similar or a copy , it is far too gone an was not interesting to begin with.

    2
    • RossRoss says: 2313 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      One cannot tell from images if a house is “far too gone”. Should a house be condemned for failing wallpaper?

      Also, properly restored, the house would have character and soul not possible with a facsimilie.

      7
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 380 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1918 Bunkhouse
      WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

      A copy or a reproduction of this house could never yield information about the past as this one does and can continue to do. Houses like these have value beyond aesthetics or what is interesting to mass tastes. Its true value is that it is a rare, surviving, example of early housing in this particular mining town. The brick vault is likewise interesting from both an architectural and an historical point of view. Similar houses in this town have torn down or remodeled so extensively that very little historic material is left. We can’t learn from the past if we don’t save any of it, and this house is worth saving. It’s not as “gone” as it may appear; people who are not familiar with historic structures are often intimidated by signs of neglect. Sadly, its National Register status is not enough to protect it, and ultimately the values of the buyer will determine its fate.

      4
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 4081 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Heresy! 😉

      If it turns out that the place is even half as termite ridden and decrepit as it looks I totally agree with you. Heheheh. Unfortunately what we see is not just droopy wallpaper, but significantly failed structural elements throughout. IMO the best path would be to disassemble it as opposed to just wrecking it; salvage as much original material as possible, (of course including the GREAT cellar; and rebuild on the same footprint and in the same form using salvaged elements, and re-creating at least the exterior appearance for historic neighborhood cohesion. Considering the price, there seems to be a local market which would support such an endeavor.

      If it turns out to be strictly foundation failure, that is another matter; and the overall superstructure could likely be saved and restored without flushing MUCH long term money down the good after bad stool.

      2
  8. OurPhillyRowOurPhillyRow says: 92 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1852 Greek Revival Rowhouse
    Philadelphia, PA

    I always advocate for turning the lights on when shooting real estate photos, but this is a case where I would not want to turn the lights on at all. I find the house to be interesting and would love to poke about and extrapolate it’s history.

    3
  9. fern benson says: 30 comments

    I have noticed this house several times when in Nevada city. Recalled lots and lots of potted plants……….figured someone had lived there for a very long time. With houses like that, suddenly you see them empty and know the person either passed on or had to be moved because they couldn’t live alone. Obviously there wasn’t someone to help keep up with the house. And yet, you look at the wallpaper and such, and know that once it was a cute cozy home with someone who felt happy there.

    12
    • More says: 59 comments

      Thank You for your beautiful comment.

      2
    • JimHJimH says: 3816 comments
      OHD Supporter

      This was Darleen Crowley’s house, before that her mother’s and grandmother’s. She lived here from the time she was 5 until her death last year – 77 years. Miss Darleen sounds like an interesting lady, and she liked the house just how it had always been.
      https://www.theunion.com/news/obituaries/obituary-of-miss-darleen-lee-crowley/

      The NRHP info says the house and surrounding buildings were built about 1880, although the street was developed 30 years before. Photos from 1985 show the house in fine condition. The firehouse 3 doors up was built in 1860 and is still active.
      https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/NRIS/85002520
      https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/NRIS/74000544

      3
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        4
        • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 380 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1918 Bunkhouse
          WestOfMiddleOfNowhere, KS

          Great photo! It’s interesting to see how the front of this house comes right up to the sidewalk while its neighbors are set back a few feet… this may or may not suggest differing construction dates. By the time this photo was taken, the house next door had already received a stylistically inappropriate “ye olde apothecary” window, but still retained the original 6/6 window in the gable (now replaced with a overly-large double window). Photos like this help to show how change creeps in and alters our perception of the past. Thanks for adding!

          1
          • JimHJimH says: 3816 comments
            OHD Supporter

            The 1985 NRHP photoset shows facade changes on many buildings in the district. The town prides itself on its historic preservation but apparently the codes are not very strict. As you say, the tourism business is the priority rather than authenticity per se.

            The house had an overhanging porch before the sidewalk existed, as shown on the 1885 Sanborn. It would be fun to rebuild it, although probably only feasible for a commercial endeavor. Welcome to Miss Darleen’s Gold Nugget B̶r̶o̶t̶h̶e̶l̶ Sports Bar.
            http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/216094/Plate+001/Nevada+City+1885/California/

            2
            • NC Native says: 2 comments

              These changes were done before the Historic District was created. We’ve owned and restored several historic properties in Nevada City, and the NC Planning Commission is very strict on historical accuracy, even down to signage and paint colors, it’s often called the Hysterical District. Historical accuracy keeps this a desirable town not only to visit, but also live. This house is now back on the market. The new owners just removed wallpaper and cleaned up the yard and are now asking $399,000.

  10. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 9414 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I had hopes when this sold but it went back on the market at $399,900…ok.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/414-Broad-St_Nevada-City_CA_95959_M27431-90098

  11. Friederike says: 1 comments

    I used to live in Nevada City about 25 yrs ago now, and you are correct!- it is Awesome! And i know just where this house is, walked by it nearly every day!

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