c. 1840 Greek Revival – Norfolk, CT

Added to OHD on 1/26/18   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   21 Comments
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47 Greenwoods Rd E, Norfolk, CT 06058

Map: Street

  • $349,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 full, 2 half Bath
  • 3132 Sq Ft
  • 0.51 Ac.
"THE PARSONAGE" circa 1840 The exterior reveals a detailed pristine Greek Revival presentation, with 2 large open porches. The grounds present specimen plantings, open space, mature trees, stone wall and private in ground pool. There is a historic carriage barn with charming studio and a single bay. This side loading Greek Revival has the original door and sidelights, period open staircase and parlor to the left with wood floors, fireplace and double french doors leading to the living room which has a fireplace, wood floors and opens to a spacious side porch. To the rear of the living room is a sweet "snuggery" with fireplace and 1/2 bath. To the right of the living room is a spacious dining room with wood floors and doors that lead to the back and front yards. The kitchen has stone floors, marble tile counters, sweet eat in area and quaint back staircase. The second floor offers 4 bedrooms a large open porch, two full baths and a stairway leading to a commodious floored attic. This Greek Revival is one block away from Norfolk's famous library, restaurants, shops, Yale Summer School of Art and Music. There are miles of trails for hiking and Toby Pond for swimming in Norfolk.
Contact Information
Thomas McGowan, Elyse Harney Real Estate
860-542-5080
Links, Photos & Additional Info

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21 Comments on c. 1840 Greek Revival – Norfolk, CT

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12204 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks to Thomas for sharing his listing with us!

    We are planning our garden for spring, what an inspiration this home is!

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    • FergusFergus says: 229 comments
      1705 Queen Anne

      My first thought was how nice the garden of this place is! My second was how unsafe/unsubstatial that second balustrade/handrail looks…

      I’m so envious! Planning the garden would definitely be one of my favourite aspects of restoring a house, it means you get to go on a shopping spree at your local garden centre! Obviously it’s best to research which plants would be suited to your garden first, before you go and break the bank. πŸ˜‰
      I hope we get to see what you come up with. πŸ™‚

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      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12204 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        They are thin, aren’t they? But it’s typical of the period for some homes to have super skinny rails like that.

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        • SueSue says: 1109 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1802 Cape
          ME

          I am an avid gardener and have very mature perennial gardens. One of the great ways to acquire plants is from friends like me. Things always need thinning out and moving. I have shared many a perennial with friends over the years.

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          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 1109 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            Thanks but…I don’t have any friends! lol…at least not local.

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            • Joe says: 755 comments

              Dear Kelly, You are such a giver. Local gardeners will love you. Take walks in neighborhoods where you admire the gardens. Talk with members of your local garden club(s). Anyone who is an avid gardener can appreciate old houses, and will love what you do. The people who are in your area who have gardened for years are dying to advise you as to what grows well in your area, and they will give you divisions, seedlings, cutting, etc. that are the offspring of their pride and joy, which is their successful plants.
              There are also people, like myself, who are not garden club members,(my mother was) but love to garden. If someone like you stopped and admired my garden, or plants in it, I would be likely to tell you what the plants are, how to reproduce them, and, if I had taken cuttings or grown a batch from seed, would foist them on you whether you wanted them or not. If I didn’t have any extra, I might make twenty or thirty cuttings and stick them in my cutting beds to see if I could reproduce some for you. I might also tell you to come back in the fall and I would give you seeds to spread in your garden.
              You can tell which houses have such people by looking at their gardens when you take a walk. Walk through the more prosperous neighborhoods and the gardeners, as opposed to those who hire landscapers, are out in their yards working. All that you have to do to get them going is to tell them how much you admire their garden, they will carry the rest of the conversation. If they don’t, it means that they are the wrong people and you can move on.
              The reason that I suggest the more prosperous areas is that those are the places where the gardeners have the money to buy the newest varieties. The ones that they bought three or more years ago are in need of dividing.
              Every gardener hates to divide their beloved varieties and then have to throw away the plants that they can’t use. They do because people fail to show interest and they have no extra place to put the plants. You can even say to them, “If you ever have any divisions that you can’t use, please let me know.”
              The only problem is, if you are not really interested in their plants, you may have to be a little rude to get away. I love everything that I know about you, Kelly, and, if you were in my area, you would have to tell me to stop bringing you my extras. Gardeners can be like pet owners, their favorites are their children. They don’t want to throw their grandchildren away if a loving person like you is willing to try to nurture them. They will also tell you how to produce another generation for others.

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              • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12204 comments
                Admin

                1901 Folk Victorian
                Chestatee, GA

                I don’t live in an area that I could walk through neighborhoods and someone not call the cops (I’m referring to another state, NOT the posted home)…and now that I think about it, most around here have a patch of grass that’s maintained by someone else. We don’t have “howdy neighbor” neighborhoods here, most don’t even have sidewalks except in the nicer subdivisions. They are either 1990’s smashed together variety (so no gardens) or mega expensive gated neighborhoods. If I were to walk up to someone and say “nice petunias”, they’d either have their gun ready or on the phone to the sheriff! lol I’m fine with looking online and having to buy new plantings. My goal is our yard to look like it’s been that way for as long as the home has been here. That’s why I love the posted home garden, it looks like it’s been there forever and has that nice “homey” feel to it.

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                • DianeEG says: 569 comments

                  Kelly, there are some really good books and on line sites that have “historic perennials” for certain areas. Since Georgia is so large and it’s climates vary widely, search by county or region first. Also, garden clubs often have publications for historic gardens and plants. The American Hemerocallis Society (daylilies) lists every registered daylily. Most plant species have similar web sites. http://www.oldhousegardens.com has beautiful heirloom plants and bulbs. If you know the date your home was built, it allows you to focus more on that era when looking instead of getting pulled into “OMG that’s beautiful”. When we did our old house, I would take breaks outside and started planting to coordinate with the era. Have fun – it’s as addictive as loving old houses.

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                  • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12204 comments
                    Admin

                    1901 Folk Victorian
                    Chestatee, GA

                    That site is awesome!!! Thanks for suggesting it, never heard of it before now and it didn’t even cross my mind to plant according to my homes age, just by what I thought was pretty! πŸ˜€ Thank you!

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  2. Cathy F. says: 2295 comments

    A pretty house, with pretty outdoor spaces! And I don’t think I’ve ever seen a front door quite like this one – with the two long vertical panels. I rather like it…

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    • Sandy B says: 862 comments

      Cathy, the double vertical door panels are typical Greek Revival elements, which is unlike the stair newel which is not. Taking into consideration this house has been lived in and adapted by multiple generations…..quite a normal continuum in historic houses…..this one could easily and nicely be fine-tuned back into its original design consistency.

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    • Miss-Apple37 says: 1169 comments

      They’re called sidelights i you want to search about them on the internet πŸ˜‰

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  3. dkzody says: 233 comments

    the room with the window seat and vine wallpaper is just divine. I would make that my hideaway.

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  4. Don E says: 1 comments

    A stunning authentic Greek Revival with many period details. The photos speak for themselves. One of the finest examples of this style I’ve seen. Add to this the attractive private grounds and you have one of a kind. Thanks, Thomas, for sharing this beautiful home on Old House Dreams!

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  5. Clay Fulkerson says: 44 comments

    I like the garage and the wooden sash windows throughout.

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  6. ROSALIE says: 6 comments

    Oh those grounds! This has given me a big case of ‘Spring Fever’. The interior is delightful. Thank you.

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  7. Melissa says: 232 comments

    Wonderful home – and Norfolk is just lovely

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  8. Connie Murray says: 112 comments

    Pretty and has an in-ground swimming pool — wow!

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  9. Ben S. says: 2 comments

    Imagine my surprise to see the South Cushing Baptist Church in the 13th photo from the end! (https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/47-Greenwoods-Rd-43.jpg)

    It’s a tidy rural church as the painting (or is a photograph?) suggests: http://cushingmainehistoricalsociety.org/church.html

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