c. 1880 Italianate – Earlington, KY

Added to OHD on 11/22/17   -   Last OHD Update: 3/26/19   -   56 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
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110 E Main St, Earlington, KY 42410

Map: Street

  • $19,900
  • 6 Bed
  • 4 full, 2 half Bath
  • 4455 Sq Ft
Historic home needs to be remodeled. 22 rooms total with 6 bedrooms, 4 full bathrooms and 2 half baths. With a remodel this home could be used for many different possibilities. Bed and Breakfast, hotel, business use and many more. 112 E Main is a lot next door that can be purchased as well for $10,000. Lot size is .44 acre.
Contact Information
Staci Skinner, Coldwell Banker Terry and Associate
(270) 821-3131
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc: ,

56 Comments on c. 1880 Italianate – Earlington, KY

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  1. Andrewjc2 says: 18 comments

    I’m in love! This is the creepy/fabulous Italianate mansion of my dreams!

    13
  2. Michael Mackin says: 2283 comments

    Obviously the porch isn’t original but the rest of the house is so………dreamy! Such a tease to offer only two pictures. The house next door appears to be in the same condition as well.

    8
  3. Jessie says: 8 comments

    I need to see pictures of the interior

    8
  4. Jen says: 74 comments

    I’m in Love I’m in Love with a Wonderful House. I live in Ky and love living here. I wish, I wish to be young and healthy to take this home on as a project. Love the exterior; would have been fun seeing the inside. Think I’ll take a ride to Earlington and see it for myself and dream…

    5
  5. Stephen Pike says: 11 comments

    Another fantastic opportunity for someone who can work from home and can make a trip a month to get groceries…I see so many wonderful buildings in so many ghost towns across this country…breaks my heart.

    6
  6. Barbara V says: 826 comments

    Here is some information about Earlington history, along with another photo of this house, a former “high class hotel for [coal company] executives”:

    http://wkms.org/post/boom-bust-history-earlington-kentucky

    Real Estate agent, if you are reading, PLEASE ADD MORE PHOTOS – including interior.

    This is a fascinating property, although the area seems sadly depressed.

    4
    • Lottie says: 393 comments

      At the end of the boom-bust article above, the 4th photo in the article, there is a picture of where the railroad station in town once was located and on the upper left you can see the hotel. Wow! What a large building!

  7. JimHJimH says: 4990 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This is the kind of old building that is important to save because of the history it represents to a small town, in this case a history of farming, coal mining, and the railroad.
    Thomas Jefferson McEuen (1827-1885) was a middle child in the large family of a small farmer of Scottish heritage from Pennsylvania. After working on the farm as a young man, T.J. worked in a general store and opened his own at Earlington, at times serving as postmaster there. In 1857, he married the tailor’s daughter Amelia Rash; he was 29 and she was 17. Sadly, Amelia McEuen died at 23, perhaps during childbirth, as 2 of her infants had died before. One surviving daughter died at age 5, and the last, Mollie, was gone at 15. The monuments are touching:
    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/67171493/Mary-E.-McEuen
    As an agent of the St. Bernard Coal Company, McEuen did well, and built his hotel to serve the company and community as well as travelers on the railroad. He remarried but had no more children, and died just a few years later at age 57, leaving coal company stock to his extended family. His widow, known in Earlington as Aunt Bess, ran the hotel for many years before it was taken over by St. Bernard Coal.

    4
  8. robinjn says: 257 comments

    I grew up in Madisonville, just North of Earlington. I spent my childhood driving through Earlington to get to the shortcut to the Pennyrile Parkway. My mother still lives in Madisonville.

    I wish I could say different but Earlington and Madisonville are both towns past their prime. Earlington never had much prime in the first place. Growing up in the 1960s and 1970s, it was always depressed, always poor. Western Kentucky in general has always depended on coal. There just… isn’t a lot there. The area is stagnant at best. It’s fine to say this should be a B&B but realistically I don’t know who would stay for what reason, unless it could be advertised to coal executives perhaps.

    It should also be noted that Hopkins County is a dry county. Madisonville is wet, but the county is dry, including Earlington. It’s kind of a weird place. You can be driving down a tiny two lane road in the middle of nowhere and hit the county line where there will be several seedy liquor stores along the side of the road.

    I know I seem very negative. I don’t mean to be. There are many very lovely homes in Madisonville and if sleepy town is your thing and you don’t need to depend on local economy for your livelihood, it might be a wonderful place for you. Not sure I can recommend Earlington though.

    3
    • withheld due to being a local says: 5 comments

      Earlington is wet now. Barry Eveland is building ANOTHER new Ideal market/gas station at the corner of Main and Trover Highway, RIGHT next to this house. We walked around it, having missed out on another beautiful Italianate in Henderson, which was also shown on this website (724 Center Street — Henderson, KY). We were aghast at it’s condition. Compare this place with the other place I mentioned, which was finally sold for $72,000 and change. That one was WAY more better kept, and didn’t require ANY stabilization AT ALL.

      1
      • robinjn says: 257 comments

        I’m sorry to hear of the gas station. I wish I had more cheerful news about Earlington. And Henderson is a lovely community with a lot to recommend it, including a large number of historic homes. I would buy in Henderson in a heartbeat.

  9. Cindy B says: 262 comments

    I agree with JimH, historic buildings in small towns need to be saved. It seems no one has the money to fix them up and let them deteriorate until they are just torn down. My town of Brunswick, Mo had an old hotel that as built in the 1870’s which was torn down recently.It was originally the residence of the town’s founder. The hotel fell into disrepair and drug dealers moved in and it got to the point that it couldn’t be repaired or so they say. I’m sure for the price of razing the building it could have been restored. A lot of people in small towns are stuck in the 1960’s and think all old buildings are beyond repair and need to be torn down. They don’t value their heritage. Anyway, the iron fence on the Earlington Hotel is fantastic, hope someone cares enough to restore it.

    4
  10. John Shiflet says: 5656 comments

    Thanks to those who sought out information about this house and the community. A quick informal streetview tour indicates this town is indeed slowly fading. Almost countless small towns across the U.S. have been moved into the endangered category through structural changes in the local or regional economy. Many of these towns were established primarily for workers of one major industrial sector (in this case, Coal mining) and when that sector declined, so did the town in tandem with it. A few smaller towns retained so much of their architectural past that their architectural heritage has become a draw in itself. Russellville and Carlisle, KY come to mind. But Earlington just doesn’t have enough historic structures remaining to make it a tourist draw. For a buyer with ample funds and not caring much about recouping their investment, taking on this old hotel might be worthwhile as a “labor of love”. But how many other small towns also have such worthy candidates? There’s a Queen Anne style home (seen in Streetview) on the corner next to this former hotel that if included in the restoration could provide a focal point of historical interest in this part of E. Main. But then again, Earlington is not unique in having a small number of worthy historic buildings worthy of restoration but because of their small community size and anemic economic activity there’s no one available to save them. If there were some type of broad tax incentives that would promote investment in saving buildings like this one then fewer would be lost. However, the national trend of many remote rural towns marching towards ghost town status continues. It’s a sad phenomenon but not limited even to the United States. The big cities with their robust economic activity thrive and grow while small towns are disadvantaged. As often as not- no matter what size the community is-at least one or more impressive period homes remain. The solution to this nationwide problem is not evident because the economic strengths that gave rise to these towns are often gone forever. In summary, I see this former hotel as restorable but not necessarily profitable. Interior photos, no matter what the condition is, would help any prospective buyer to assess the feasibility of taking on this project.

    8
  11. Lottie says: 393 comments

    Very sad. Once the house is lost, it is forever. I also hope someone cares enough to restore it, even to make it into a commercial building.

    1
  12. Austin Storm says: 3 comments

    22 ROOMS?!?

    1
  13. Ray Unseitig says: 202 comments

    the porch may go way way back, but the problem I have with it is how it obsures the exterior windows on the first floor. So not orig. to the design, but there for quite a while.

  14. says: 2 comments

    I love the exterior of this house hotel!! And the coal mining history!! And I plan on finding all I can about it. If my health was better right now or I had dedicated help with passion and love for history I would love to take on this challenge after a thorough inspection of the foundation, outside structure and load bearing walls. It looks like a low key area perhaps uneventful but sometimes what is nothing to one is everything to someone else. I believe that passion is everything. I so hope someone saves this amazing piece of history.

    2
  15. Mary Lou says: 54 comments

    I really appreciate your comment on this hotel. It breaks my heart to see so many of these towns going down due as you say to no real economy. I do so wish I could take it on and I hope someone can save it. We see so many beautiful old home and building torn down here in Missouri and it just hurts. In places like Kentucky where the coal mining is no longer a huge employer, I imagine there are even more. In a perfect world there would be some sort of incentive for those who would put their time and energy into saving one of these old buildings but we are not a perfect world. And yes, I would love some more photos. Enough to convince my carpenter husband that he wants to spend what should be retirement years, if such were a reality, rebuilding an old hotel 🙂

  16. withheld due to being a local says: 5 comments

    I have pictures that were taken on Friday if anyone is interested. How do I upload them to this site? Waiting on word from an admin.

    2
  17. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11984 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks “withheld…” for sharing these photos with us.

    House next door being restored:

    1
  18. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11984 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    And a few more. “withheld…” did not go inside the home, these were taken from
    the windows.

    1
  19. says: 21 comments

    I doubt I am the only one not discouraged seeing the interior.

    I doubt I am the only one whose husband would choose adjectives other than ‘discouraged.’

    OHD has taught me to carefully choose the listings I share with him, lol.

    Thank you to the photographer.

    Kelly, I imagine OHD may be the only site able to save this home by publishing these new interior pics. They may be the most extreme I remember on OHD. As always, thank you for serving this community of dreamers. You do important work serving as matchmaker!

    3
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11984 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks Nick. I think you have more hope than I do about this one. I do see what it could be, looked like a fine place back in the day, but finding that right person to save it, will be tough.

      1
    • John Shiflet says: 5656 comments

      Hope no one minds my sharing thoughts about a way to approach and save this former hotel. I agree its a mess…literally, in this case.

      First order of business would be to go in and do a thorough clean up. Don’t do as they do on the HGTV shows where the uninformed clean up crew members just grab whatever they can reach and then toss it without thought into a big dumpster. Sort through the trash (wear gloves and a good dust mask or respirator) looking for and setting aside anything that might have been an architectural element from the house. Carefully stack doors, (use a marker to write on them which room they came from-of course, that also necessitates having a floorplan with rooms identified. Staircase parts, (I see the handrail and parts of the balustrade strewn about the foyer) should be similarly collected and carefully gathered. Once a semblance of order is again visible through the chaos, a restoration plan can be created beginning with the roof, foundation, structural issues, then systems (HVAC, plumbing, electrical) and last cosmetic work which will be substantial here. The premises should be secured with a chainlink construction fence with appropriate signage. The property’s lot should be cleaned up and any found architectural elements carefully collected.

      It makes sense before getting into the thick of the project to meet with the city folks responsible for building permits and present your restoration plan as well as a realistic timeline for project completion. If all of this sounds like a boring approach to bringing this former hotel back, it is.

      If nothing else among my suggestions is worth noting, a deliberate methodical approach is always best to yield the desired results in a badly deteriorated structure like this one. Check beforehand with the State Historic Preservation office to see if any grants or tax credits might be available. Above all, bring to the table almost infinite patience as well as a good sense of humor so that the inevitable setbacks or surprises do not abruptly end the project before completion.

      I think I see an exterior door with a broken pane sitting off to the side of the foyer. As for how to put the staircase railing back, see if any unbroken balusters remain. Alternately, if pieces remain that can be reglued into a whole (to make a template for replacement balusters) then you’ll know how many balusters will be needed. From what I see, I’m somewhat doubtful the broken balusters were original. The least expensive approach might be to find a salvage source that has the correct number of balusters (and hopefully a suitable Italianate newel post as well) for an 1870’s or 1880’s staircase of this type rather than going down the expensive and laborious path of replicating the balusters and newel post. For an idea of what could be suited look through photos here of fairly intact homes from the period. This somewhat old fashioned for the time 1891 Roberts Millwork catalog (New Orleans) has some great examples of original details suitable for the period: https://archive.org/stream/IllustratedCatalogOfMouldingsArchitecturalOrnamentalWoodWork/MouldingsDesigns0001#page/n85/mode/2up
      Last, and perhaps this should have been first, make sure you have a good understanding of the scope of this labor of love project as well as at least a ballpark figure as to what it may cost. By breaking down the enormity of this project into smaller steps in chronological order (all written down, of course) it will remain manageable rather than overwhelming. If contractors are brought in, make sure they understand your vision and realize total modernization is not your goal. Avoid the gut rehab types as you want to save as much of the original materials and fabric of this former hotel, not create a replica with all new materials. The plaster does not look too bad so save plaster in the rooms where that is possible and if necessary, use drywall sparingly. This hotel could also become a nice single family home and I’m sure the buyer would have lots of input and perhaps help from locals. If it were mine, I would skip trying to remove paint from the bricks and would choose a color as close as I could determine to the original brick color.
      In summary, I think this would be a fun project but not for the faint of heart nor shallow of pocket. For what its worth, I would be willing to share advice or guidance as a friend of preservation and if I did not have the answer I would help find someone who did. Imagine what the “before and after” photos would be for this place. Locals would respect you for saving a local landmark and often this leads to additional restoration in the community. That Queen Anne house next door seen in the photo could help create a historical focal point. A tall privacy fence on the gas station side would minimize any visual impact on this former hotel. Ok, that’s more or less my 2 cents worth and anyone is free and welcome to agree or disagree.

      14
      • gordon r says: 76 comments

        your comments are very professional and very appreciated. it is great to read comments that are NOT about painted woodwork, wallpaper or bathroom tile color. this is a beautiful house and i hope it can be saved for the community.

        4
        • John Shiflet says: 5656 comments

          Thanks for the kind words, Gordon. Cosmetic and decor choices are a personal matter but here its truly a matter of survival for a community landmark with deep roots reaching back into to the early history of this place. As historic preservationists often say, “this place matters.” I’ve seen too many community landmarks needlessly destroyed because there was no one there to save them. Here the location is pretty good; a next door period home (said to be under restoration) reinforces the historical flavor and if the former hotel were brought back from the brink it would be a cherished community landmark for many more generations…or, it may be quietly demolished for a fill-in-the-blank replacement with the former hotel’s loss being forever.

          3
          • Theresa zacco says: 2 comments

            I would be greatful for any ideas that would help in obtaining funds and services to do a restore. I have put much thought into the end less opportunities this Beautiful hotel has to offer. And my knowledge and passion of working with wood. Would be a wonderful asset to project of this significance. As well as for the love of historical building and Era. I’m in the process of putting together a plan as well as a financial plan. So any help would be greatly appreciated please feel free to email it to me at mrsdmechanic@yahoo.com please put dream home in subject thank you ?

            • John Shiflet says: 5656 comments

              Hi Theresa,
              Kentucky is one of the states that does have some State tax incentives for restoration: http://heritage.ky.gov/incentives/ (up to $60,000 if I read it correctly) I must caution though, outright restoration grants are far and few between and nothing is more frustrating than buying a place like this former hotel and trying to restore it on a shoestring budget. Sooner than expected, the limited funds are often exhausted leaving the restorer wondering what to do next. I could suggest a “go fund me” page but successful funding seldom comes for old house projects. If you could get the community behind the project, perhaps a bake sale, or some other special event could be planned that would bring in some funds. First priority would be to meet with the City and share your passion for saving this landmark. If you should acquire the property, make sure the City understands you will immediately begin cleaning up the place and do anything else to make the property less of a visual “nuisance” so community funds aren’t needlessly spent for a demolition. I admire your willingness to take on a project of this size but cannot over-emphasize the importance of having a sound restoration plan as well as adequate funding. If you anticipate more funds being available down the road you may buy the place some time by at least repairing or replacing the roof, cleaning up the premises, cleaning up and carefully sorting the architectural parts remaining with a carefully thought out priority list as funds become available. Paint doesn’t cost that much compared to other expenses so carefully prepping and putting paint to protect the wood elements will preserve them for a while. Document everything and discuss your project’s goals with the State Preservation officials as well as asking for their suggestions. If I may be of additional help, please let me know. Good Luck, and here’s wishing you and your family Happy Holidays.

  20. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11984 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Dropped to $19,900!

  21. John Shiflet says: 5656 comments

    If the price drop were for a different property, that might be very encouraging news. However, in this case, the obstacle to saving the old hotel is not necessarily the listing price but the condition and amount of work ahead for the next owner. The lower price probably puts the old hotel at greater risk because there’s commercial development right next door and now this lot can be acquired for very little with the old hotel likely becoming the target of demolition. I can only hope that this lower price instead brings forth a preservation friendly buyer and perhaps a future as a bed & breakfast or a single family home instead of a fast food joint or something similar.

  22. Cora says: 2051 comments

    I keep looking through these photos and re-reading all the comments. It does appear that if someone were to consider saving this hotel, first steps need to be taken very, very soon to avoid more severe deterioration. But as John Shiflet noted in his comments above, just a major clean-up (carefully done) would reveal not only the immediate issues that need to be addressed, but also what remains of the original structure. Under the rubble and trash, there could be a great deal.

    I sure wish I could have seen that staircase when it was new. Even in its current state, I can envision the graceful curve and the detailed banister. Any guess on the decade that wallpaper came from (on the staircase wall)?

  23. Dreamer says: 1 comments

    I wish I had the money to restore this place. I know just what I’d use it for too! I think that it would make a fine event space if it was restored to its former glory. It could host intimate receptions and with the purchase of the lot next door, garden weddings. (Think putting up a tall white picket fence with lots of climbing ivy or wisteria to block your view of the gas station and road.) I think that architecture lovers such as yourselves would love to visit such a place, even in the middle of W. KY. I don’t have the 300,000 it would probably take to fix up this place, but if someone else does, and wants to steal my idea…have at it!

  24. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11984 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks Christina, first floor floorplan from the National Register report.

  25. Bpotatoe says: 5 comments

    This poor house has a demo order, but my husband and I are actually going to try and save it today. We remodel old homes in Kentucky and plan to restore it to its former glory. The state it’s in does not scare us, In fact the house diagnol from it my in-laws just bought and are remodeling that one as well to bring it back to its former glory too. I am excited to not only bring back its lost beauty but to call this old hotel home!

    1
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11984 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Please, please, please keep us updated! I hope you are able to grab it away from the bulldozer.

      • bpotatoe says: 5 comments

        I will keep everyone posted. Were contacting the city right now to try and remove the demo order. we will do everything we can to make sure this beauty does not get torn down! My husband just walked through it (tyvex suit and all) and from the outside it does not look it, but there is three stories in this gem. The staircase is absolutely breath taking, I want to start working on it now!

  26. bpotatoe says: 5 comments

    Just wanted to send everyone a refreshing update! This beauty was set to be demolished next week, but my husband just got off the phone with the owner and they are stalling demolition for us to come up with all needed information stating that the house is not a hazard and it is repairable. We have a structural engineer going in there today to write us a report about the stability of the house to bring to city council to remove it from the demolition list completely. We are also setting up a gofundme/article to have everyone back us up on not letting the city demolish this house, the more people behind us the more likely this house will not be demolished!!

    1
  27. bpotatoe says: 5 comments

    Another update! We are officially saving this beauty! We have removed this gem from the demo list and are now underway of restoring it! We have started a GoFundMe for anyone willing to aid us on our historical home restoration!

    2
  28. bpotatoe says: 5 comments

    This will be my last update on here. But the home has been saved! Restoration will be starting as soon as everything is finalized (hopefully in the next week) If anyone would love to follow the restoration process we have a Facebook and Instagram (Facebook:Hotel Earlington and Instagram: hotelearlington) where we will be posting before and afters and our journey on fixing this beautiful historical home/hotel. Were excited to begin this journey!

    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11984 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      That’s exciting news! https://www.facebook.com/HotelEarlington/

      I chuckled at the one comment you had about just tearing it down. Bless you a thousand times over if you are able to prove him and everyone else wrong that no historic home should be a throw away and can be revitalized.

      Because of my rule about GoFundMe’s linked on OHD, I’m going to tell you how to get to theirs. On The Facebook page linked, look on the right hand side for their website. 🙂

      • bricardbricard says: 2 comments
        1880 Late Victorian/Italian
        KY

        Not sure if anyone can help. But we are the ones who bought this beautiful home. We are in the process of restoring it but yesterday we hit roadblocks created by the city. First off when we first bought the home we were given 6 months (dealine of October 31st) to pretty her up, paint, windows, eaves. Just yesterday we talked to the city attorney who now is saying we need the entire home habitable by the same deadline (October 31st). On top of that, at the beginning we asked if we needed permits for anything (painting, garbage, actual construction) the city said no. Well just yesterday we had a “Stop Work” notice on our door. So now we have to have the home habitable by October 31st, with a stop work order for permits which we dont know how long those will take, and we have limited funds. We Started a petition to potentially help with the put off of demo and to give us more time to fix her up to the cities needs.

        https://linktr.ee/hotelearlington

        That has our Petition, any help is appreciated.

        • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11984 comments
          Admin

          1901 Folk Victorian
          Chestatee, GA

          Was your 6 months deadline in writing? Have you talked to a local attorney? That may be the first step in preventing a demo order and extending your deadline.

          • bricardbricard says: 2 comments
            1880 Late Victorian/Italian
            KY

            When we bought the home we agreed that there could be further litigation on the property but they only gave us 6 months (verbal agreement) after purchase. We have only talked to the city attorney who is the one making these unreasonable deadlines for us. Technically the home already had a demo order on it before we stepped in. It was pushed off with our purchase but if we do not meet their new needs by October 31st they can take us back to court to further the demo.

            • JimHJimH says: 4990 comments
              OHD Supporter

              I’ll repeat Kelly’s advice – If you haven’t already, hire a local attorney to buy you time to do what has to be done. Local officials will usually take the path of least resistance and extend permits if you can demonstrate good faith in making real progress on the project.

              Good luck Britney!

    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5656 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      That is indeed good as well as surprising news. It’s not often that local authorities will back off from their declared intentions to see a structure razed. Of course, now, that decision to allow things to move forward puts the rehabbers in the spotlight but I have a feeling this story will have a good ending, if there are no more surprises. Once the house/hotel is totally rehabilitated, invariably locals will then gain perfect hindsight and say it was the right thing to do all along. Badly deteriorated structures can be rehabbed but it does take money and determination to see the project through to the end. I wish the restorers/rehabbers the very best as they continue on their old house journey.

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