1901 Queen Anne – Ashland, OH

Added to OHD on 10/3/17   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   24 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
Are you the new owner? Comment below, we'd love to say hi!

532 Pleasant St, Ashland, OH 44805

Map: Street

  • $60,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 2 Bath
  • 2572 Sq Ft
  • 0.34 Ac.
This historic home needs a new owner with a lot of elbow grease and a vision to bring it back to it's glory. This is a TRUE "THIS OLD HOUSE" project. Many costly updates have been accomplish which include new roof on main structure with remainder of asphalt fiberglass shingle in the old style design included, new wiring throughout the home, new copper plumbing installed, woodwork in dining room all sanded and ready for varnish. Must see mansion to appreciate.
Contact Information
Hugh Britton Troth, Rosen & Co.,
(216) 990-1831
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc:

24 Comments on 1901 Queen Anne – Ashland, OH

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. BugLadyBugLady says: 69 comments

    Add this to my list of places to check out this weekend.

    1
    • Katherine Mohr says: 1 comments

      Center street historic district in Ashland is having a home tour this Saturday. Don’t know the times but you can look it up on Facebook. Thought you might like to know if you’re going to be in the area.

      1
  2. StevenFStevenF says: 826 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 Regency
    Nashville, TN

    I wonder if that’s the original banister?

    • BugLadyBugLady says: 69 comments

      Yeah, it doesn’t seem right does it?

      And do I see two kitchens?

      • StevenFStevenF says: 826 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1969 Regency
        Nashville, TN

        Don’t get me wrong; I’ll take a simple colonial banister with a nice curled end over an OTT victorian one any day. Good catch on the two kitchens – must have been multi-family at one point?

        1
      • CharlesB says: 481 comments

        I see that as a Queen Anne/Eastlake style house from the period between 1875 and 1885. Round about that year of 1901 somebody spent some money and replaced the original veranda with the Colonial Revival job you see here with those telltale modified Aeolian columns; installed that front entryway with the leaded-glass sidelights; put in those French doors and simple woodwork you see in the entry hall; and, yes, installed that Colonialesque stair, probably straight out of a lumberyard’s catalogue. Then they probably proceeded to paint the whole exterior white or ‘Colonial yellow’ with white trim.

        1
        • John Shiflet says: 5470 comments

          Charles B., I concur; I think you are spot-on about the changes this house has seen over the years. Whatever ornateness it once had inside was greatly toned down after 1900. One could recreate something resembling the original interior at considerable cost but given the location and market values in the area, a full blown restoration might not be recoverable if put back on the market. Wish I could have seen this house in its heyday. Despite the suggestion in the listing to take a “This Old House” project approach, I shudder to think what the results would be afterwards. Almost for certain, a top to bottom renovation with all the TOH bells and whistles would be way over-priced for the local market.

          1
  3. Unheard Uv says: 31 comments

    Chock full of curb appeal and character on the exterior, i do hope this house gets in the hands of someone with a vision, imagination, refinement, and a healthy bank account. The interior certainly leaves a lot to be desired but it can also be looked at as a black canvas for someone to create a marvel. The home does have Tons of potential, it will really come down to future owners knowledge and financial ability. On another note, I wish realtors would stop applying the term “mansion” to almost every old 2 story home. 2,500 square feet doesn’t scare “mansion” status, its more like the size of an adequate servants wing.

    1
  4. says: 32 comments

    I agree with you Charles about the date of the changes. The staircase could be later. I find it odd that they probably replaced some of the nicest parts of the original house at such an early stage in it’s life, being the staircase and front door. I wonder if there was a fire? I also think the entrance probably was originally on the right side where the tower is located. Staircase may have been relocated as well. Then again, the place have been converted to a duplex in the early 1900s and that may be the reasons for the changes.

  5. John says: 77 comments

    The outside held such promise as to what to expect inside, but the only things left of the original fittings look to be the parquet floor and a mantle. I don’t mind a colonial stair, in a colonial. I’d have loved to see the original newal and other ‘standard’ equipment the exterior had me hoping for in one of my favorite house styles.

  6. Elwen says: 22 comments

    I’m not quite sure why but this house seems sad to me. I hope it finds a respectful owner.

    1
  7. Lauren says: 20 comments

    Absolutely gorgeous

  8. Lamont says: 9 comments

    Have made similar comment some years ago, but feel its worth repeating. I LOVE this site. And a good portion of why I do, is the education and insight I get regularly from the experts who share their knowlege generously in their comments I am a total amateur as far as arcitecture and style goes, and I hungrily lap up the comments from folks who know what they are spaeaking of. No, despite how this may sound like a snide comment, I genuinely mean exactly what I am saying. Its great to not only know what I like, but to have a basic understanding of why and what it is I am liking. Please, all you folks who have a background, whether gotten from formal studies or experience, continue to share as you have in the past. You make my day!! Grateful to you all.

    5
  9. Colleen J says: 1168 comments

    I would love to see this beauty happy again!

    3
  10. Linda R says: 218 comments

    This is like a before and after view in the same house. Half restored and half not yet. Seems there must be some porches or balcony missing on the back side for the 2nd floor door to nowhere. Looks like it comes with roll top desk worth about $500+ as well.

    2
  11. Steve H says: 152 comments

    Not only is the staircase later, but it’s very under-scaled for such a large foyer space. It really looks more like a secondary staircase.

    1
  12. MARK CANNADAY says: 7 comments

    IF YOU LOOK CAREFULLY FROM THE FRONT VIEW, THE ODD SECOND STORY ROOF LINE TO THE RIGHT OF THE TOWER, IS CLEARLY AN ADDED STAIRCASE LEADING TO THE SECOND STORY APARTMENT/DUPLEX, WITH IT’S FRONT DOOR ON THE PORCH ON THE RIGHT OF THE TOWERS BASE.
    DON’T GET THE INTERIOR STAIRCASE, CLEARLY THE ORIGINAL WAS MOVED/ADDED/BUTCHERED IN ORDER TO GET TO A SECTION OF THE UPSTAIRS THAT IS NOT PART OF THE SECOND STORY APARTMENT/DUPLEX UNIT. BY THE TEXTURED CEILING IN THE FOYER, I’M GUESSING THAT NOT MUCH OF THE HOUSES ORIGINAL FOYER LAYOUT IS LEFT INTACT.
    THERE IS ENOUGH REMAINING OF THE OLD HOUSE FOR SOMEBODY TO GET POINTED IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION FOR RESTORATION.
    RIP OFF THE UGLY AWNINGS, STRIP THE PORCH BACK TO BEING OPEN, REMOVE THE ERRANT STAIRCASES AND GO FROM THERE!

    1
  13. Mark Cannaday says: 7 comments

    Sorry for the cap’s lock on the last post…didn’t even notice until I was done typing.
    Anyway, looking back at the pic.’s again. There should have been a fireplace where the piano is in the foyer, and I feel the staircase originally was on the right side of the foyer with a short run, turn 90 deg. with a landing, turn 90 deg. again,then final run to the upstairs.
    The present stairs are too steep & too narrow &etc., etc.
    Mark

    2
  14. Jason B says: 197 comments

    The “stomping” of the ceilings needs avenged. Those wretched awnings, oh boy! There is enough work here to become a full time job for a while. With my wife and I encroaching 50, not up to the task anymore. Hope someone can save her properly.

    1
  15. Sinead Eilis says: 4 comments

    I agree that the spindles look out of place. It looks as though they replaced them with much newer round ones. If you look at the newel post on the landing….it’s square. Every old house I’ve ever been in had the shape of the newel post repeated in the spindles. They look more like exterior spindles as well. Not a very good start to a restoration.?

  16. Sinead Eilis says: 4 comments

    On second look at the spindles in the picture of the handrail taken from the upper part of the staircase they do look original. There is no newel post at the bottom of the stairs in the foyer. The handrail twists to the left and stops. It’s the newel post in the upstairs hallway that doesn’t match. The spindles themselves are quite pretty but someone thought adding garish gold paint to the carved areas of each spindle would be a good idea…..it wasn’t. Lots and lots of work to be done here but what a pretty place it would be if restored. I was also looking at the foyer to see how the staircase would have been originally on the right side…..as described by Mark C. That certainly would have been some undertaking. I’m not an architect but there’s a hallway behind the staircase. If the staircase had originated on the right side the ceiling would have to have been much, much higher to accommodate it. Another huge expense. There would also have to be a load bearing wall to support the landing at the top of the stairs which presently is located near the top of this staircase. I don’t think this was a millionaire’s home originally so floating and sweeping staircases we probably not in the budget. This house was probably built by a man with a couple of bucks more than most people. They concentrated all the bells and whistles ( fancy millworker) downstairs where visitors would see it. I’m fairly certain that’s why the upstairs newel post is made from a scrap beam. It doesn’t even have a finished cap on it just anothe smaller piece of square wood. No offense to Mark who obviously knows his stuff it’s just my observation ??

Comment Here


To keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents, comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved. Keep topics to the home, history, local attractions or general history/house talk.

Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.
Click here to read the comment rules, updated 1/12/20.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified. Do not contact the agent unless you are interested in the property.