c. 1870 Italianate – Schoharie, NY

Added to OHD on 12/21/15   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   86 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
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229 Main St, Schoharie, NY 12157

Map: Street

  • $115,000
  • Sold for $115,000
  • 4 Bed
  • 3.5 Bath
  • 4200 Sq Ft
  • 1.1 Ac.
The "Grand Dame" of the village. Circa 1870's in need of someone who can see the possibilities. Come see it as it is and imagine how it could be. 4200 sq. ft. of living space, 3.5 baths, kitchen space with butler's pantry, original woodwork, staircase, doors, four marble fireplaces. Pool that could be brought back. Two car newer garage on 1.1 acres. The full attic and "widows" peak are there as well.
Contact Information
Ruth Anne Wilkinson, Century 21
(518) 895-2902
Links, Photos & Additional Info

State: | Region: | Associated Styles or Type:
Period & Associated Styles: , | Misc: ,

86 Comments on c. 1870 Italianate – Schoharie, NY

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12238 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I’m guessing the walls are half way down because of damage from the 2011 hurricane. pics The house is shown in one of the photos.

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  2. Kat-B says: 10 comments

    Or perhaps it was molding. That’s what it looks like to me…it’s so uniformly cut out.

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  3. evers310evers310 says: 109 comments

    Looks more like wainscoting was removed. Notice the pieces of cross bracing right where the plaster ends. Also, none of the floors appear to have any visible water damage, there would be cupping if the boards were submerged. That’s a real shame the wainscoting was removed.

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    • Allan says: 83 comments

      Could that be sub-flooring? If you notice none of the fireplaces have hearths. Shouldn’t they?

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      • John Shiflet says: 5581 comments

        Allan,
        I was wondering the same thing myself. In mansion level homes similar to this one it was common to have fancy inlaid patterned floors especially around the entry/foyer and parlor. The flooring looks very uniform in width and direction throughout the house without any changes from room to room as would be expected in a finish floor. However, I can find no visual evidence of a missing secondary finished floor in looking along the walls for traces of another floor installation. It would not surprise me in the least to learn that the (damaged) top layer of flooring was removed after the flood.

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        • Michael Mackin says: 2980 comments

          John, I normally would agree with you as you are more informed about these things than I am. That said, I noticed that the trim around the windows and the doors go all the way down to the flooring. If this was just a subfloor, wouldn’t we see a gap where the finish flooring was removed? Also, I usually see the subfloor going diagonally across the floor joists, unlike what we see here.

          I also noticed that you can see where the water was in the third picture. The brick and mortar color are clearly different below the windows on the main floor. I have been though a flood twice in my lifetime and that is a sure sign!

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          • John Shiflet says: 5581 comments

            Valid observations, as yes, if a second layer had been removed we should see more evidence of that. It is also correct that where a subfloor existed it was usually nailed at a diagonal to the finish floor for greater strength and stability. I also noted the furnace registers near the entry are sitting directly atop the visible flooring and if a layer had been removed, you’d see a gap unless the registers were dropped 3/4 to 1 inch. Only the previous owners could provide an accurate explanation about what we see here today. Some have suggested there was a wainscoting in the exposed wall areas. But there too without knowing what existed previously the best I could offer is that it might have been merely plaster and baseboards or wainscoting and baseboards. One thing I can say with some certainty is that the removal of the water damaged materials was thorough. It would be best for the new owners to put things back as they were prior to the flood.

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          • JimHJimH says: 5408 comments
            OHD Supporter

            I agree Michael. I think this floor was laid over the existing floor when the building was converted to public use years ago. The hearths look recessed or covered over.

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          • rick2948 says: 1 comments

            We purchased a similar abandoned (46 (years) mansion so it has original interior. Our floors were originally painted in wood graining. This finish was ruined when styles changed and carpeting was glued down.

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  4. Randy says: 5 comments

    Yes, Kelly. It was in the record-setting flood that resulted from Hurricane Irene, and has been the subject of abject neglect ever since. It’s a real shame because it was once a showplace.

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  5. says: 14 comments

    Love this house, its about a 30 minute drive from my current apartment. I may have to go take a look at this, just for fun!

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  6. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12238 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    2:57 in, you can see the water line on the house. video link

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    • Paul says: 1 comments

      With the water line from the flood that high the 1st was partially underwater and the basement would have been completely filled with muck.
      I love Italiante style homes. This one is a beauty. I would love to have seen the upper levels and basement. Probably needs all new wiring, hvac, etc. in order to do a complete renovation.

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    • Robt. B. Falls says: 15 comments

      still think that that is a moisture line and not a flooding level.

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      • Deamea says: 8 comments

        No, the water filled the basement and to just below where the sheet rock is cut. It was a devastating flood, the worst one in the life time of that house.I was housekeeper there for years when the guys that restored it had it.

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  7. Cora says: 2077 comments

    LOVE the exterior details.

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    • Deamea says: 8 comments

      Previous owners had all the saw blades made to redo the Gingerbread woodwork all round the entire place. It was very costly, I hope the blades are still in the attic where they were stored.

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  8. Laurie W. says: 1700 comments

    Its present state is so sad. This house would (will!!) be stunning once restored. The outside is superb, the inside full of graceful elements. Thanks for the link, Kelly — horrible as the damage is to see.

    In the street view the house looks forlorn but still dignified — somebody help it!

    P.S. Widow’s peak? Do they mean the cupola? A “widow’s peak” refers to the way someone’s hair grows. I think they’re confusing it with a widow’s walk, which this house does not have.

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  9. Robt. W.Robt. W. says: 351 comments

    Wonderful house. Evidence of the ‘500 year flood’ will scare off most potential buyers, but depending on the real state of damage (not just signs of past disaster) it might not be so daunting a project as some of the places bought on the thinking that “it just needs a bit of TLC”. Hope the right buyer finds it; it’s a beautiful house.

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  10. RossRoss says: 2419 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    Wow.

    Fabulous house.

    LOVE the cupola.

    It is evident that a lot of post-flood work has already been done.

    The house sold in 2010 for $325K.

    Just after the flood it sold for $100K.

    And obviously work has since been done.

    This may be a very good deal for the right person/couple.

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  11. terri says: 16 comments

    was surprised to see this on here! i go to schoharie several times a year. this was one of the many homes caught in the flood a few years back. really a shame. the guys that owned it had it looking so great on the outside. but, it sits in the floodplain of the schohairie creek, unfortunately. not that it floods every year…this happened because of a hurricane and a ton of rain that just had nowhere to go. they are still tearing down houses there. it is a great little town, though. very quaint and quiet. and a beautiful area in the foothills of the catskill mountains. i hope it finds someone to love it.

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  12. SueSue says: 1109 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1802 Cape
    ME

    Spectacular beauty. I wonder what it would cost to bring this back to it’s former glory?

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  13. John Shiflet says: 5581 comments

    Mansion grade Italianate house here. While the interior shows some probably water damage, mantels and the staircase remain intact. I don’t see the damage as being that severe and thanks are due to the folks for cleaning it up to this point. Far better to have it opened up and convenient for inspection rather than show mold on the walls or other signs of hidden water damage. For a moderate investment, I think this house could be transformed back to its former elegance. Of course, any house that has been damaged by water infiltration should be thoroughly inspected. I like the tall windows that go to the floor. The statuary outside appears that it could be original; if so, a very rare find. In summary, this is a textbook high-end Italianate with all the exterior details intact. The mansion probably has an illustrious local history as well. Note the surviving shutters, another rarely found detail.

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  14. JimHJimH says: 5408 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Great house, good town, fair price, weekend-able from NYC. It may not sell by New Year’s but it should go fairly quickly unless there’s serious structural or foundation damage. Looks like a blog waiting to happen.

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  15. JimHJimH says: 5408 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This was the home of James Olaf Williams, a local son of a merchant who followed his father into retail business, invested in mills and railroads, held local offices and founded the Schoharie County National Bank. The exact construction date is unknown but after 1866 when the site was vacant.
    The house was noted in the county history book of 1882 in its description of Main Street:
    “The observing can plainly note by the different style of buildings, at what period they were erected, and mark the improvement in architecture as well as convenience and comfort in their construction. But in strolling up the street, observing the modern additions placed upon some of the buildings of equal age, and especially in viewing the spacious residence of James O. Williams, we can but be struck with the development of architectural art.”

    Unfortunately, Williams’ career in Schoharie didn’t end well:
    TROY DAILY TIMES – Jan. 22 1886
    Bank Officers Indicted
    United States Court at Albany today, Franklin Krum and James O. Williams, president and cashier, respectively, of the defunct Schoharie County National Bank, were indicted for embezzlement, there being nine counts in the indictment. Krum is believed to be in Canada and Williams in New Mexico.

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    • John Shiflet says: 5581 comments

      Thanks for researching the history, Jim. The immediate post-Civil War period in the north was the era of industrial titans and bank barons. This house undoubtedly was built to impress and even in its degraded state remains a landmark. Although old house properties away from NYC are often under-priced, (for a variety of reasons often discussed here) this house is in my opinion still an exceptional bargain. With perhaps another $100k investment, the owner will have a landmark Italianate mansion with an incredibly intact exterior. The interior has not been excessively modernized either so for the Preservation minded period purist, this is an ideal candidate. I would be very disappointed if the next owners opted for obliterating the period details for a modern interior. There are suitable old houses where any work done inside would be an improvement but to change this one to a modern looking house inside would amount to desecration.

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      • JimHJimH says: 5408 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Thanks John. Schoharie is a conservative place that reveres its history and likes its old buildings, so I don’t think this house will get an urban style designer makeover or a Property Brothers hack job. The more likely scenario is someone who loves it for what it is but doesn’t have the money to properly preserve it. Yes, for $100k or so maybe someone can get the place up and running with working mechanicals, serviceable baths, a basic kitchen, and some new paint. There’s only so much someone can do for that amount of money in the Northeast, unless a lot of skilled labor is added to the effort without compensation.
        This house deserves a lot better than a life-support rehab. The 100 year flood presents an opportunity for a 100 year restoration, and this is a big landmark house that needs bigger than usual money. I’m hoping that someone bringing substantial resources and expertise, with community support and public grants, can make this jewel shine again.
        Unfortunately most of the money in New York lives elsewhere, but perhaps there’s someone who might like to garner some attention with a good deed here. Someone could also get their name on a National Register nomination, and New York State recognition as well, apparently not pursued to date.

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    • Paul says: 113 comments

      http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nyschoha/mainandbridge.html

      An old postcard of the house in its original glory days.

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    • josechan1 says: 1 comments

      Hi Jim, I am trying to find out more about the history of this house, in particular descriptions of the house interiors and grounds. I was wondering if you had any information that may help me in this search?
      Thank you.
      Jose

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      • JimHJimH says: 5408 comments
        OHD Supporter

        josechan1, I checked the old maps, histories and deeds online and posted what I could find, but that’s it. You might want to contact the Town of Schoharie, since the house was used for their offices for years. The folks at the Old Stone Fort may have something too. Good luck!
        http://theoldstonefort.org/

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  16. MW says: 924 comments

    Very nice looking house. Looks easily savable to me. Good time to upgrade some stuff too before it al gets put back together and refinished out. Of course it would have been better without the damage to begin with. But also a perfect point to get it actually on the relatively cheap in a position to fix it up even better than before in some ways.

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  17. Robinjn says: 242 comments

    Oh, the light. And the front doors. Wow.

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  18. SandraGMcNichol says: 72 comments

    I really LOVE this house. Thanks, as always, for everyone’s comments – I enjoy reading them all. JimH – I chuckled out loud when reading that the original owner, James O. Williams, took off to New Mexico after being indicted for embezzlement from the bank that he founded; interesting guy! He was a crook with good taste in architecture. Wonder how eh lived out the rest of his days.
    I also like the fact that the walls are open and you can see what’s going on inside, after flood damage. I wonder if the remaining part of the walls are original plaster…? I’d be tempted to rewire everything and then have spray foam insulation sprayed on every exterior wall after rewiring. I know that everything isn’t shown in these pics, but if the foundation is strong & true, to me this doesn’t look like an overwhelming restoration project with a GORGEOUS end result possible. Wish we could see the upstairs.

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    • Paul W says: 464 comments

      Spray foam insulating is not recommended in historic buildings, as it can hinder air flow and lead to the rotting of timber frame members.

      The problem is that in ‘sealing” the brick off from the interior with foam insulation you are trapping moisture inside, and more importantly, moisture which may enter from the outside can not effectively evaporated which can develop a freeze thaw cycle within the Brick Wall and cause its failure.

      DO NOT use Foam insulation on a brick house. Let me say this one more time DO NOT use foam insulation on a brick house!

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      • says: 72 comments

        Thanks for educating me about this reality, Paul. I’ve never lived in a brick building. After reading your response to my out loud thoughts, I did some research, and, right you are – no foam insulation on a brick house!!

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      • lara janelara jane says: 468 comments
        OHD Supporter

        But… what do you think about foam insulation in a brick house, Paul? 😉

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  19. Lori says: 106 comments

    Favorite style and this one is gorgeous!Looks like someone has been working on it…hope someone brings it back to original splendor!

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  20. Paul W says: 464 comments

    I wouldn’t let that fact this house was flooded deter me from a restoration. However there are certain things you have to deal with that. Largely damage is dependent on just how long the basement was water filled. Water will deteriorate mortar and the critical thing is once water sits in the soft brick (usually the inner layers of a masonry wall it can deteriorate). The other critical issue will be any wood that sat in the water (porch details). As for the interior that is pretty straight forward.

    If any pre flood photos are out there it could serve as gridline for restoration of the wainscot. These patterns are usually simple and within the ability of most people to duplicate. However if they were a high grade species of wood you will have to settle for something less expensive. You could faux grain a lesser wood to match. Another issue will be the mantles. The marble or marble painted slate mantles are attached to the wall with wires (which will have rusted) and with plaster (which will be deteriorated and compromised). You need to budget the cost of having those re-set. Everything else is pretty standard. New mechanicals and wiring.

    You would also want to check the flood plain restrictions. Hardest part may be getting a loan and you have to see what flood insurance cost will be.

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    • terri says: 16 comments

      according to my friend that lives in schohairie, it took about 4 hours for the flood waters to recede. that doesn’t mean, of course, that the basement waters went out in 4 hours time. i would imagine it had to be pumped out. but it may give someone a good idea of how long it may have been filled with the flood water.

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  21. Janna says: 7 comments

    Can someone tell me what the very bottom picture is?

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    • John Shiflet says: 5581 comments

      Looks like an elevator as far as I can tell. It’s not mentioned in the listing so it may be non-functional. I could see where it would be very handy (note handicapped ramp at the back) for older people or the disabled.

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      • Goldie1 says: 4 comments

        It is an elevator. Unfortunately the motor mechanism is in the basement and ruined from water, it doesnt work and would need to be replaced.

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  22. Diane says: 575 comments

    Is the reason we don’t see more significant first floor wood water damage because the water didn’t actually stand on the first floor but damage to the walls was from moisture in the basement leaching up the outside walls? The front door and the stairs look relatively unscathed which would be hard to restore if water had stood over either any length of time. Did the owners at that time have the means to immediately remove the water from the basement which kept the wood from damage? A lot of questions that would need answers. It does look like the current owners have been implementing a flood restoration plan and are being careful to not damage historical elements where then can. They’ve also removed damaged building materials which credits their renovation work. Plus, it looks, from the outside grounds, they are attempting to restore the yard which speaks to their desire to return the entire property to livable. It would be fun to have follow-up on every single house Kelly lists. So many wonderful old homes.

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  23. Laurie W. says: 1700 comments

    I’ll bet there are photos of the inside: weddings or other functions that show the wainscotting. In any case the woodwork under the windows in the parlor with a clock above the fireplace looks original & could serve as a reliable guide. The light in this house is marvelous due to those lovely windows. I forgot to say how much I LOVE the outside of the front doors!

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  24. Amanda says: 46 comments

    gasp!!!! just the looking at the first picture had me ready to pack! but mother nature, cant stop her. living in Florida and going through Hurricane Andrew in 1992 (with a new born) might put me off from dashing up and putting down a deposit.

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  25. Randy says: 5 comments

    What about all the deteriorating (and missing) millwork on the front of the house? Wouldn’t that cost a small fortune to replicate?

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  26. Franceslyns says: 109 comments

    Floods, earthquakes, fires, birth, death, scandals (thanks for sharing that JimH), that is what makes old homes so much more interesting! Not that this one needs it, truly amazing.

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  27. judys mum says: 3 comments

    o.m.g. is that a lift?!!!
    such potential.
    hello, I might live here!!

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  28. Frank D. Myers says: 55 comments

    I believe this building housed village offices at one time and that may explain the elevator and accessibility ramp. It’s great house!

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  29. D. Gatch says: 1 comments

    99% sure it was flooded….. Link of picture showing a store just a little northeast of this home on 319 Main Street, this home is at 229 Main Street. http://www.dailygazette.com/photos/galleries/2011/aug/30/sockade-flooding-monday/11047/
    http://www.bizjournals.com/albany/morning_call/2014/05/flooding-scars-remain-in-new-yorks-schoharie.html

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  30. Schoharie Resident says: 5 comments

    As a Schoharie resident, I know for certain that it was well and deeply flooded… as was almost all of Main Street, where some homes remain unoccupied and untended.

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  31. MW says: 924 comments

    The closer I look at this house, the more I think it is in better shape than I had even first thought. I don’t think the missing walls had wainscoting. My guess it is was just plaster and baseboard. I don’t see any obvious evidence of any wainscoting. I think a remediation crew was sent in to just open up the walls to the light switches and it appears the work was done promptly and carefully to minimize damage as much as possible. Given the apparent condition of what can be seen, it looks like what is left is in remarkably good and clean condition.

    Short of upgrading wiring and plumbing and fixing the lower walls and baseboards, it mostly looks like stripping and fixing paint and deteriorated trim work might be the biggest part of the job. I’d also of course try to upgrade the thermal properties of the house, but careful to do so in proper ways as noted by Paul above. The porch looks like it might need a little structural attention. But for a $100-200K, one should be able to return this house back into a mildly updated showcase. But even at $100K, that is already at about the average house price for the area apparently. So one would want to be careful about how best to put in another $100-200K. But obviously this house has the potential for being well above the average, so should be some room to work with.

    Good thing is the schools in the area seem to have decent ratings. So, that will help broaden the possibilities for a buyer that could actually use a house this large, besides a B&B.

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    • MW says: 924 comments

      Further thought, with any luck, maybe they saved the baseboards and they are just stored somewhere. Looks like the remediation work was done pretty carefully. I’m thinking there is a good chance they might have thought to save the baseboards if they were salvageable, which judging by the remaining wood likely was and came off without being ruined in the process. Only question might be if they are still around stored in possibly the basement or garage.

      If nothing else. maybe they saved some samples to go by or the other trim in the house is good to copy off of. Oddly, the listing doesn’t show any photos from the second level rooms. I’m guessing the baseboard is still there and was possibly the same as on the ground floor, or maybe a smaller scale version of it.

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  32. Betsy says: 158 comments

    Believe it or not, I think this is one of my favorite houses ever.

    Outside styling is glorious. I love the light, especially from the floor to ceiling windows. There is enough of the interior remaining to be alluring. Wish I had a reason to move there.

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  33. Angela says: 1 comments

    The last picture shows what is probably a dumbwaiter. That used to be such a chic thing to have in a house but I think they’re dangerous. I’d rather have a laundry chute.

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    • Deamea says: 8 comments

      Nope, it was an elevator. One of the numerous improvements made by the guys who restored it. There was a tremendous amount of work done and luckily they sold it before the flood and didn’t have to go through the loss of all their hard work. At least not as the owners.

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  34. lara janelara jane says: 468 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Mother Nature took care of some demo work, I hope some brave soul seizes the opportunity to restore this beauty.

    Ross, any desire to move back to NY state when you’re finished in Emporia…?

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    • RossRoss says: 2419 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      I should be finished with my house in…um…about…thirty years.

      Luckily, this house stands a good chance a finding a buyer! It is VERY tantalizing!

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  35. Lucinda says: 54 comments

    Perhaps the foundation could be raised, to reduce damage if there’s future flooding? It might not help with moisture wicking up the walls from a flooded basement, but it could keep the house’s “petticoats” largely dry. The Skagit Valley in WA State has had flooding problems (a decade or two ago, a levee went), and some houses have gained foundation height since. These homes aren’t brick, for the most part, though.

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  36. Spotts NY says: 1 comments

    Nicole Curtis from HGTV Rehab Addict would love this house.

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  37. anon lass says: 10 comments

    does anyone know if any of the fire are wood burning? Or if could be?

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  38. Goldie1 says: 4 comments

    I was at this house several times in the last week as I was going to purchase it. I had a contractor give me estimates and it would cost at least 200,000 to repair the damages. The cut lines on the sheet rock are from water, there is no insulation, the electric boxes need replacing, the elevator doesnt work (system was in basement which was completely flooded) it needs a new furnace, of the 4 fireplaces only 3 could be functionable. One was bricked up behind the facade, the other 3 are gas, and the workings are in there but all need to be repaired. The foundation is in great shape but you wouldnt be able to utilize the basement spaces (which is huge) as it is always wet. They did have the upstairs remodeled before the storm and its in good shape but they seemed to have rearranged the original floor plan up there and the rooms are kind of choppy, and dont make sense. The cupola has never been touched but in ok shape. Outside all the porches would need to come down and be replaced, the wood is all rotted, and all the ornate moldings around the top of the house would need to be replaced. I decided against the purchase only because of the expansive amount of work to repair the main floor, the new furnace alone is going to cost a fortune.

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    • SueSue says: 1109 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1802 Cape
      ME

      Goldie, Thank you for all that information. Such a beauty but it would seem to me with so much needing to be done that the price should be less than it is. How likely is a flood like this to happen again in the area? I cannot see restoring it even if there is a slight chance it could happen again.

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  39. Lewis Wendell says: 1 comments

    I wonder who bought it. always a favorite as we drive through town. I have not noticed much exterior work if any going on in 2017

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    • PK says: 8 comments

      I believe a local professional bought it and will use it as offices and his home. He may be waiting till he has enough funds for all the work that needs to be done. I hope it’s soon.

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  40. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12238 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks to MattZ for sending exterior photos to show what the new owners have been up to. Looking fabulous!

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  41. DianeEGDianeEG says: 575 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1896 Farmhouse W/Swedish roots
    Rural, IL

    Bravo and God Bless to people that take on projects like this! As the towns in NC/SC are battling Hurricane induced flooding, I hope there are many others who can pull on that inner and bodily strength to start again. Any of us who have brought an old home back from the edge of demolition know it takes both and so much more, but, then we are OHLs!

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  42. LizaLou says: 1 comments

    House is fully restored and is fabulous! Congrats to the owner who has rehabbed the building for his dental practice. It is stunning inside and out!

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  43. RosewaterRosewater says: 7276 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Well. I guess since it can’t be mine, a dentist office will suffice. 😉 I’d say they did a pretty fantastic job bringing new life back into this ABSOLUTE GEM. This wondrous house truly is one in a million. Links have some new pictures of the finished product:

    https://schohariedentalny.com/our-practice/our-office/

    https://www.facebook.com/pg/Schoharie-Dental-PLLC-776755922373384/photos/?ref=page_internal

    The new, contemporary light fixtures are insanely rad!

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  44. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5581 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Uh, yeah…”Rad” and then a little heavy on the insane part. I’ll forgive them though because they took a seriously endangered faded mansion and at least on the exterior brought it back to pristine condition. Light fixtures and dental equipment can be later removed as this former mansion is likely to survive another century with continuing maintenance and a bit of luck. I always like good endings.

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7276 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Lolz! John killin me. YES modern themes, (in good taste), in old houses are an acquired, (and admittedly questionable), taste. Me, I like having a bit of today; and some of yesterday; along with past centuries, in old houses. The whole museum ethic in interiors just seems, for me personally, rather inhospitable. If there had been antique fixtures in situ, of course the change would be unacceptable. The important point is that this house has been thoroughly preserved and largely unaltered: I know you’ll agree. Rad light fixtures not withstanding; you can’t tell me you wouldn’t want this dude to be your dentist if you lived in Schoharie: I know I would! I’d be getting cosmetic procedures just to possibly be allowed to wander around upstairs instead of reading mags in the waiting room. Heheheh. 🙂

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