c. 1840/1897 – Logansport, IN

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Added to OHD on 9/25/15   -   Last OHD Update: 4/12/20   -   78 Comments

2018 North St, Logansport, IN 46947

  • $73,900
  • 4 Bed
  • 1 Bath
  • 3948 Sq Ft
  • 0.47 Ac.
One of a kind home! Ideal for the person who values historic homes and the integrity and character they offer. We have hardwood floors, lots of woodwork, some stained glass windows, tall ceilings, built in cabinet in DR, 2 fireplaces, open stairway plus a 2nd stairway, wrap around porch and a carriage barn that needs restored. Tons of history with this property. Lots of work finished...lots of work needing finished. Home selling as is.
Contact Information
Memi Rennewanz, MPR Realty
574-992-8011

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78 Comments on c. 1840/1897 – Logansport, IN

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12620 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks to John for taking some of the photos seen above. Also thanks to the owners for allowing John to visit the home.

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  2. Travis says: 12 comments

    This could be a KNOCK-OUT in just a few short weeks!

    That huge “porch” on the side looks added on to me…

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12620 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      I think John said it was original but he’ll be along to tell us more about it.

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 7562 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      – “a few short weeks”. Riiiiight. Heh heh heh. ๐Ÿ™‚ You’d probably spend a few short weeks just ripping out all the rot from the failed gutter boxes. Since I’ve sworn to keep my mouth shut except for positive comments, – with this house – sigh – moving on..

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      • Pete says: 1 comments

        As a general contractor for 30 years and have done restoration on historical homes, this is a couple year restoration for the entire home

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        • John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

          Hi Pete, a two year restoration plan seems plausible but of course it also depends on the size of the work crew. If the restoration budget is ample, a skilled general contractor could bring in subs and specialty tradespeople and probably get it all done in a year or less. Of course, Logansport is in the northern tier of Indiana so it does have some winter weather that will impede any exterior work for several months. But good planning would take that into account and move the work indoors during the coldest weather. I’ve seen far larger and more challenging projects taken on and finished to completion and on time. I appreciate your input.

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    • gemma says: 12 comments

      That is an 18-24 month project

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    • Michelle A says: 1 comments

      The porch is not an add on. This home is a town icon. It’s been around forever. My 68 year old mother took piano lessons here at this house and I’ve seen pictures of it. It’s always been awesome and had those wrap around Porches. In is day it was a fantastic house!! Makes me wish I had the time and money to take it back to its beautiful original state. It’s fabulous.

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  3. evers310evers310 says: 109 comments

    What’s the deal with that porch? That’s the craziest looking porch I’ve ever seen!

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  4. Qabbott says: 28 comments

    Very eclectic house! I like it. What is the term to describe a balustrade with the dipped down top railing?

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  5. Bethany says: 3468 comments

    Looks like a bit of remuddling on the inside but the outside is AMAZING! I can’t wait to hear John’s first-hand report!

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  6. Tuckerdog60 says: 6 comments

    Where is Norm Avery when you need him – this could be fabulous – a lot of wood rot on the exterior columns and porch ceilings – would have to be re-fabricated. I went through Logansport all the time when my daughter was n college and I have cousins that live there – not sure how the economy is doing – I do remember all sorts of one way streets and some beautiful old homes – could be a show place again!

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  7. Christa Walsingham says: 1 comments

    Please tell me that the woodwork was already painted over before who ever owns it now bought it…

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  8. Paul W says: 463 comments

    The house is an older Federal/Italianate home dating to the 1840’s , When it was built the back of the house was the front facing the Eel River. They added a street behind the house when the land was sold off and the house was reconfigured for a new entrance on the opposite side which explains the later 1890 “free classic” renovations.. A new 1 story “kitchen wing was added on the house. The Big Greek Revival Columns were removed and reconfigured to make the two story two level porch on the corner.

    By the way the railings on the second floor are metal as are the balusters and the top railing on the very top. I toured the house with John and Debra. It needs considerable work to undo the interior remuddling and the porches will require restoration and a restructure of that second floor porch area. This house has some great things going for it but needs someone dedicated to doing it right.

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  9. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12620 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Thanks Paul for this photo of the home.

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    • Sandra says: 285 comments

      Oh how beautiful with the trees around the porch! It makes the porch appear much more proportional to the house.

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      • John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

        Agreed, the house is in a pastoral setting but regrettably there’s no streetview of this pleasant neighborhood. With the lovely landscaping and unique residence on the large lot, a better combination would be hard to find in Logansport. As a bed and breakfast or fine private residence, the owners of this gem after a restoration would be the envy of the town.

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  10. RossRoss says: 2443 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
    Emporia, KS

    My reaction to all the exterior issues? Oh! I can fix all that!

    My reaction to all the interior “updates”? I cringed, and might have even emitted a quick shriek.

    My reaction to finding out that a carriage house was extant? Whoee!!!!!!!

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  11. JimHJimH says: 5652 comments
    OHD Supporter

    The history of the house is interesting as Paul’s info suggests. The original house and property were part of a 6000 acre farm owned by John Shields Tipton (1786-1839), a General in the War of 1812 and Senator from Indiana until his death. Tipton was in the area by 1830 so an early date for the house makes sense. His son George lived here for many years, made improvements, and platted the roads in the neighborhood by the 1870’s. The place was called Domicile Square on the early maps of Logansport.
    In the 1890’s the property was purchased by Peter W. Moore (1858-1909). Moore grew up in Lafayette the son of Irish immigrants, and came to Logansport as a young man. He opened a tavern and liquor business then ran a dry goods store, and he must have done well. An 1898 biographical sketch says “In 1896 he began the improvement of his present home, one of the most attractive and commodious in the city, in Maple Grove on North Street; and to this he has retired, even before the prime of life (age 38!), to enjoy the fruits of his successful business career.” Unfortunately, Moore died at a fairly young age and his widow sold the house for about $7000 in 1915.
    I’m not sure the Neoclassical porch columns are really relocated Greek Revival ones, but it makes a good story.

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  12. John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

    Thank you Jim for coming to the rescue with the historical narrative. Glad to hear the Double-decker (or doubled galleried if you wish) Neo-Classical porch, that is surely among the most impressive in the Hoosier state, dates from an 1896 remodel. Neo-Classical mania swept through American architectural circles after the nation saw the Great White City of plaster imitating marble at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. This sudden return to Classical roots effectively signaled the demise from rapidly changing attitudes towards Victorian architectural styles that would bring them to an end in a few years. Thus Mr. Moore as the new owner wishing to demonstrate his business success at a young age perhaps thought the best way was to add Neo-Classical details to his home that might impress the entire town. In my minds eye I can see this house decorated for the 4th of July with colorful buntings and flags on and around the prominent porch.

    Now on to mention some specifics about the house. Anyone out there around seven feet tall or taller? Got a pet Giraffe or anything else that would benefit from an 8 or 9 foot tall entry door? No kidding, this is among the tallest residential doors I’ve ever seen. Making it a pair rather than a single would have made it even more impressive but available space may not have allowed two doors.

    Did anyone notice the nice piece of spanning fretwork? (more commonly called a spandrel) It’s not your run of the mill fretwork piece. Unlike some that are limited to scroll sawn and turned-on-a-lathe elements, here it appears to be also made of steam bent elements connected together with brass ferrules as was often seen in popular stick & ball furniture pieces from the 1890’s. It’s specific design leads me to believe it must have been made in a furniture factory or from wood components sourced at a furniture factory. The owners-sellers showed us a twin spandrel that needs to be reassembled but its all there. The two stained glass windows are not the most expensive but Mr. Moore probably wanted to walk a fine line between being tasteful and ostentatious. I especially like that last stained glass window photo because you can observe the combination of colors and glass textures that were carefully chosen. Topping it off is a beveled glass fan design.

    I would also kindly ask my friends here to limit criticism to the constructive kind. We spent some quality time with these nice folks who are selling this house (they had lived before along the Gulf coast) and they shared their candid views of how Logansport could become a better place. Since someone asked, it was this couple who stripped the white paint off the woodwork but more remains. They put a lot of themselves into this house and have it priced very reasonably for what is being offered. The original carriage house and very rare original Victorian Gazebo in the back are truly treasures. In creative hands, the carriage house with its funky old stairs could rival the main house. But the big ticket item is the distinctive porch. I see the need for some structural engineering work to determine how best to keep the porches from swaying or sagging and changing the purpose of the large columns from load bearing to ornamental. I.e., disguise some steel supports or concrete reinforced columns in the hollow columns but clad them around with the beam halves to conceal them. (yes, the columns may have to be cut in half down the length to be repaired and then reassembled into a column again.) This is not a two men with a crowbar, a 2 ton hydraulic jack, and some heavy rope type project to do it properly. Probably there would be a need for temporary supports, a structural crane, and heavy equipment to remove and carefully lay down each column for repairs. Best again to consult a structural engineer familiar with preservation construction to come up with the best and most economical solutions. Paul Hayden, with Indiana Landmarks-northern district out of South Bend, came down to revisit Logansport and tour the two houses we were interested in seeing. I think I’m safe in saying he was suitably impressed and we were honored to have him with us. Indiana Landmarks can refer historic homeowners to restoration contractors familiar with this kind of work. The necessary porch rebuild is a bigger ticket item but done right and you’ll never have to deal with it again.

    Logansport, which is north-northeast of Indianapolis is a charming town with potential. It’s just big enough to have an arts scene and several festivals a year. Some better restaurants are opening up as well. Kokomo, a bigger city, is short drive away as is Huntington, going further northeast towards Ft. Wayne. Logansport is in an area of historic towns lost in the past like Delphi, Attica, and Williamsport. The Logansport paper lamented recently that there were not enough preservation minded people buying up the town’s faded old architectural gems to keep some from going into oblivion. This home with a great history deserves someone who will preserve all of its links to the past. I think it could be an excellent bed & breakfast as it was a furniture store in the past (hence the white woodwork) and would have ample parking with its large lot. I’ll be very curious to see who buys this property and even more so to see what they can do with it. I’ll be happy to try to answer any questions you may have.

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12620 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks John.

      I’m confused. So did this house start out in the 1840’s and the columns are from that time or are they from 1896? Can you clarify?

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      • John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

        Good questions. I consider myself fairly proficient at old house forensics especially for 19th century homes. I have no reason to doubt the veracity of Jim H. and others historical narrative about this house. However, that said, despite a rather careful search for evidence of earlier 19th century structural elements down in the basement, as best as I could determine the oldest structural pieces (joists) seemed to be regular full dimensioned sawmilled boards from the 1870’s or later. Others, dating from the mid-1890’s remodel, were of thinner stock consistent with the dimensional changes in boards that was occurring as our vast American virgin forests in the 19th century began to become depleted in the 1890’s. Thus a 2 x 4 inch board which measured a full two inches by four inches before the 1890’s was now reduced to an inch and 7/8ths thick and 3 and 7/8ths inches wide. (they have gotten even smaller today) But for a house dating from the late 1830’s or early 1840’s one might expect to find evidence of a thick timber framed house rather than a balloon framed house as seen here. (balloon framing existed in some areas but traditional timber framed houses continued to be built in some areas right until the Civil War in the early 1860’s.) In summary, if the core of a much older house exists here inside, I had difficulty finding it. I know and have seen examples of some old houses being deconstructed and to everyone’s surprise an embedded much earlier log cabin was discovered behind interior walls. More investigation is needed here to make any conclusive determinations.
        The columns are an easier subject to discuss. Consider first if they did date from the 1840’s or 1850’s that they would have been 50 years old or more during the mid-1890’s remodel. Since Mr. Moore wanted to have an impressive, fresh looking home in the latest architectural fashion, would it make any sense to use then 50 year old columns in new construction? If there’s any evidence these columns are indeed from the Antebellum era where would they have been on an earlier version of the house? Greek Revival houses almost always were symmetrical rectangles like the ancient Greek Temples that inspired them. But one could argue I supposed that the mid-1890’s remodel was so total in nature that it completely changed the footprint of the earlier house. If Sanborn maps from before the mid-1890’s remodel exist then they might show an earlier footprint for the house. Besides, there’s no evidence of extensive repair or conservation work on these fragile columns which if from the Antebellum era would now be over 150 years old. No wood species that I’m aware of could survive as large structural columns without repairs or conservation work for over 150 years. The Antebellum Greek Revival plantation mansions of the Deep South retaining their original columns have almost all had regular repairs and maintenance over the years. The Adamesque Classically inspired swags seen between porch decks are likely to be pressed tin or plaster/compo ornaments and are consistent with the 1890’s. So too the metal balustrade on the upper deck which cleverly mimics a wood version of the same from that period. As of today, those columns need immediate conservation work and I feel their fragile condition does not allow them to be the sole structural supports for this great porch in the future.

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        • JimHJimH says: 5652 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Thanks John, for an excellent analysis which supports a later build date. The original General Tipton house, built around 1830, was down the street:
          http://contentdm.acpl.lib.in.us/cdm/ref/collection/coll6/id/2428
          This property was definitely the Domicile Square residence of George T. Tipton (1827-1873) and shown on maps in the 1860’s. Although not the home of the most important figure in area history, General Tipton had owned the land and the house was built by his son who developed a large section of Logansport.

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          • John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

            Jim, that’s an amazing find of the General Tipton’s house photo taken during the Flood of 1913. Assuming little had changed since the home’s early days, it was an architecturally sophisticated late Federal design, far removed from any crude log cabin days. If this house (2018 North Street) was inundated during the flood of 1913 then some additional changes may have occurred then. I believe Paul W. explained to us that flood control measures have taken place in more recent years but it would be a good idea to see if this house is still considered to be in a flood plain as it will impact insuring it. There’s a town named Tipton between Logansport and Muncie, IN. We visited the small town bearing the General’s name just as the local Pork Festival was happening in the Courthouse square with literally hundreds of people clogging the streets and backing up traffic. I certainly can’t fault them for having a good time, though.

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    • Cody H says: 133 comments

      Speaking of Delphi…if any of you kind folks want to be blown away, look up the Delphi Opera House on Google and/or Facebook. They are wrapping up a multimillion dollar restoration and it looks fabulous. It’s going to be an amazing tourist attraction and public space for the city. The preservation society went to great lengths to bring the space back to 1865, or as close to that as they could get. Seriously, check it out!

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      • John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

        Cody, We were itching to see Delphi but our busy travel schedule is always a compromise and we did not get to visit your historic town. In all likelihood, since this was our final Midwest visit (unless we can sell our Fort Worth Victorian home) I’ll never get another chance to see Dephi’s treasures but if somehow a return trip becomes possible I’ll not skip Delphi again, I promise!

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  13. karrie says: 220 comments

    If I had to money and was 40 years younger, I would grab this one up and make it shine like it was brand new. Great house with cool history. looks and sound like it needs a lot of work. where is Nicole Curtis when you need her? I hope someone buys it and restores it to its original beauty and the carriage house as well.

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  14. Ed Ferris says: 297 comments

    Perhaps John S. was just being modest, but he has restored these kind of columns before. He knows what he’s talking about. In my experience, Indiana Landmarks doesn’t. Don’t take on this project with the expectation of getting any help from them.
    What a unique stair balustrade! Surely it was not originally painted.

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    • John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

      Thanks Ed, I try to be humble as too much hubris can often lead to humiliation. One definition of hubris: “(in Greek tragedy) excessive pride toward or defiance of the gods, leading to nemesis.” As for Indiana Landmarks, my only suggestion was to consult them for references to qualified tradespeople for this kind of specialized work. The interior stair balustrade white paint dates from the house during its furniture store incarnation. The current owners have spent a lot of time stripping the paint below the balustrade-personally, my approach would be to carefully heat strip the white paint off and follow up to remove the remaining paint residue with a chemical stripper like 3-M’s “Safest stripper” a citrus based stripper with water clean-up. Then stain and clear finish it all to reveal what a gem has been hidden by paint for all of these years.

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  15. Christine Schulze says: 24 comments

    Wow.. tons of potential in the proper hands. thanks the info John.

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  16. JimHJimH says: 5652 comments
    OHD Supporter

    John and Paul, thanks for spending time on this one, and for the photos. The local folks should spend some time documenting and publicizing their historic resources so that people know about them, and what’s at risk. Beyond a few landmarks I found almost no information or photos online of old Logansport houses.
    Obviously there are a lot of layers of history here, and to put together the specific construction sequence would require a lot more info and study. We’ve commented on whether other later porches are architecturally appropriate etc. I won’t go there again, but I usually think they’re important and worth saving. That said, if a buyer has to prioritize preservation goals for this property, saving the carriage house and fixing up the house itself maybe should come before the substantial investment required to rebuild the sadly neglected porch. It’s a tail wagging the dog at this point, impressive as it is.

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    • Paul W says: 463 comments

      The owners have the original abstract which provides some clues. The earliest Sanborn I could fine suggest more outbuildings than are there now. Logansport has never been completely documented as the last Landmarks inventory was decades ago and I have found that a lot of those were often done by local volunteers who could easily miss key structures. I have a small sampling of mostly Victorian era house photos here:
      https://picasaweb.google.com/115570938007829213936/LogansportVictorian

      I have been so busy with our own acquisition the 1884 Burgman Italianate store building that I have not had time to earnestly begin a documentation process of local architecture. Logansport is essentuially a “river town” like you might expect on the Ohio situated in a valley between the Eel and Wabash Rivers. The city has the only occupied island on the Wabash, “Biddle Island”.

      There is a great collection of historic photos at http://www.casshistory.com/

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  17. natira121natira121 says: 835 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    This house is amazing, and I’m sure I could spend hours poking around in it, if I could. Instead, I look at the pics, and learn TONS from all you people! I SO enjoy this your site, Kelly!

    And a huge thanks to all you historian/restoration posters as well, though I think you’ve completely corrupted me! I find myself carefully studying houses in movies, wondering if it’s authentically old, or a copy, etc. I also spend time wondering what to do with my own little 1877 Vernacular, which has been so badly remuddled over the years. I want to invite you all here, and pick your brains!

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  18. John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

    Jim, you bring up a curious issue. The American Midwest which I somewhat roughly define as beginning in Kansas in the West, Michigan and Wisconsin in the north, (Western)Pennsylvania in the east and Kentucky in the south has a vast collection of 19th century American architecture with isolated 18th and great 20th century examples as well. I have a fair collection of books pertaining to 19th century architecture across our great land but for some odd reason, the Midwestern region is always badly underrepresented. You’d think there’s the East Coast and the West Coast with a vast emptiness in-between; I have discovered it to be almost beyond comparison in my own travels and if I lived another half century I could not begin to photo-document all of the photo-worthy architectural gems existing in this large region. As for Logansport, I see it metaphorically as one in a string of historic town pearls beginning in Huntington in eastern Indiana and extending to Kentland in the western side of the state. To adequately photograph all of the fine specimens just along this string of towns might take a year or longer and its less than 1% of the larger area I outlined. As for the numerous neglected and largely unseen houses in this region waiting for someone to rescue them from oblivion, we’ve barely seen the tip of the iceberg. But Americans in this modern day flock to areas where jobs are more available and there again, the Midwest region has been short-changed. Up until most of our manufactured goods started coming from Asia or south of the border, the Midwest was where things were made in America. Anyone who has been to an estate or yard sale of elderly folks can get a grasp of how Midwestern towns and cities once made almost everything we use in our daily lives from scissors to automobiles. Almost all gone now and those towns left without this vital economic sustenance are coping with varying degrees of success during the post-industrial Age. Logansport is a charming town but is also part of this larger regional economic picture. If there’s any silver lining from the post-industrial Midwestern economic decline its the greater survival of its historic homes and buildings although widespread neglect and sometimes misguided community revitalization strategies continue to chip away at what still remains. You’ll find most local architectural salvage yards across the region are well stocked, especially around its larger cities.

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  19. says: 12 comments

    OH. MY… WOW! It looks like the exterior needs the most work. It will be SO worth it for whoever is willing to put in the labor and love. Thank you for all the photos, this house is really something special. The double porches are to die for! I agree that the updates are cringe-worthy, especially the light fixtures. The kitchen I actually like, but perhaps not in this house. I have to admit that some rooms I do like modernization in like the kitchen and bathrooms, but they have to be modern in a way that matches the home, if that makes sense.

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  20. Will says: 59 comments

    A close pal of mine is from Logansport. The demographics of the town are rapidly changing and investing in the restoration of a manse is not likely to pay off.

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  21. John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

    Will, I appreciate your input but if you mean expecting a handsome return on the money spent for a full restoration not paying off, then I concur. But much of what remains of our built past wasn’t necessarily profitable for the people saving it. That’s why in a “hard numbers” world most new construction can be measured in terms of profitability but old houses cannot, except for those rare old house markets like San Francisco or the Victorian era resort town of Cape May, NJ.

    If I may, I’d like to share this heart-warming story about the most unlikely survival of an 1860’s mansion once belonging to the Steele Family in Painesville, Ohio: http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,25205.0.html The derelict house had deteriorated so badly that the roof had failed and collapsed sending the second floor crashing down into the first floor. Locals were appalled that neglect had taken this once local landmark to the point of total oblivion, and very few felt there was any hope left of saving it. Yet, a preservation miracle occurred when a local family, the Shamakians, somehow had the vision to understand what it once was and see what it could be again. The family was blessed with the financial means to begin this impossible restoration and several years and millions spent later, the Steele mansion has risen from the ruins. After the family fortune was spent in a faithful restoration (as well as receiving many deserved historic preservation awards) the former grand residence is just now opened as an upscale boutique hotel, unique in Painesville. Those formerly harshest local critics are now among its most enthusiastic supporters after witnessing the seemingly impossible becoming reality. Profitability? Maybe in 50 years or so, but who’s counting? It was a win-win for Painesville and for the family who restored it. If I should ever make it to Painesville, I could not leave the town without staying there at least one night. I hope someone can see the same potential in this formerly grand home in Logansport which is in far better condition yet needs some work.

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  22. Paul; W says: 463 comments

    Will, I have to disagree, Logansport is changing and for the better. Since we opened our antiques showroom and period interior design business I have met dozens of recent transplants who have moved to Logansport from all over, specifically chose Logansport, because they were not “Location dependent” for their jobs and had the opportunity to buy a house that would cost them an arm and a leg anywhere else. Our sales in our shop have exceeded our expectations and I’m extremely glad to have bought our building, which would have cost me over a million in Indianapolis. While the locals complaining of “no manufacturing jobs” I have met a stockbroker who moved their family from Chicago and telecommutes, a couple from Santa Fe who bought a house six months ago, a couple of attorneys who moved from Rochester NY, a entrepreneur from Philadelphia, a web developer from LA, and several others. While many locals whine and complain, change is happening right in front of them. Most of the people I met at this years taste of Cass Co, held at Logansport Little Turtle riverside park were out of staters.

    Generally speaking people buy old houses because they want them, I might add according to the local MLS solds, that sales prices are up in Logansport as well. This particular house will require substantial investment but the benefits outweigh the costs long term , not to mention quality of life with low crime and people who still don’t lock their cars at night and can let their kids ride their bikes anywhere in town. Hard to put a dollar amount on quality of life.

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    • RossRoss says: 2443 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1894 QueenAnneFreeClassic
      Emporia, KS

      Paul, I agree with all that you wrote.

      We are indeed living in changing times. Today, the importance of Local Jobs is not what it once was. My own income is 100% derived from internet-based sales, and thus my income is independent of location. This was a factor when I was looking for a fabulous old house to buy. The HOUSE rather than LOCATION is what mattered to me.

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    • evers310evers310 says: 109 comments

      In my experience, locals are always the most pessimistic of a town’s potential. We live in Georgia and moved to a small town with a lot of potential in ’09. I became active in the city council meetings and became a board member of the newly reformed Downtown Development Authority.

      I met a group of people that consisted of other outsiders like us, and some people that were born and raised in the town but had just recently moved back there. We tried to create a downtown Historic District and Historic Preservation Commission. We even paid our own way through DDA training and HPD training so the city would incur no fees. We were fought every step of the way by many locals even though these things would have made them eligible for tax credits and and brought in all kinds of new businesses.

      After six years of fighting we decided it wasn’t worth it and found our current house, a beautiful Antebellum in the country.

      I go back there occasionally and it’s sad, now they are talking about tearing down City Hall, which was built in 1902, and moving into an ugly metal building. Soon there wont be anything left of the town but ugly metal buildings and they will wonder why more and more people are moving out.

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  23. Will says: 59 comments

    All I can tell you is that my friend grew up in Logansport and his parents still live there, and there is a reason houses like this are so cheap.

    To each his own.

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  24. nancy says: 1 comments

    Oh how I wish I had the money to restore this home. I was just in Logansport a month ago and drove by this and took some pictures. Love, love love it. It could be so marvelous!!! I need to ewin the lottery!!!

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  25. Andrew says: 1 comments

    I lived in this house in late 90s early 2000s.
    My friends would ask what apartment I lived in lol.
    Anyways. I loved it but….very very weird things would happen and my friends had their parents pick them up in the middle of sleep overs. If you’re catching my drift. I don’t want to say the “G” word but….I didn’t believe in any of that until living here.
    For what it was purchased for back then and what it’s costing now after what’s been done to it in 15 years is…..shocking to say the least.

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  26. says: 429 comments

    That wedding-cake porch is fascinating, but unless you find a really dedicated buyer, I wouldn’t be surprised to see it removed, rather than attempting the repair and on-going maintenance this will require.

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    • John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

      Joseph, I would hate for that to happen because for me at least, the over-the-top porch, though it was added in the 1890’s, is the most distinctive feature about this house. One has to also consider the historical context that might have some bearing at the time for adding this monumental porch: (Wikipedia about President McKinley from neighboring Ohio)”With the aid of his close adviser Mark Hanna, he (William McKinley) secured the Republican nomination for president in 1896, amid a deep economic depression. He defeated his Democratic rival, William Jennings Bryan, after a front-porch campaign in which he advocated “sound money” (the gold standard unless altered by international agreement) and promised that high tariffs would restore prosperity.” This imposing double galleried porch might have been inspired by the historical context of those times. American Imperialism was in full swing at the time with the short duration Spanish-American War just a year or two away. Whatever the sources of inspiration for the grand porch, after standing there for nearly 120 years I feel it deserves to remain; Logansport residents would also be appalled to see it removed. I know there are people who would and could restore this fine residence steeped in history so I hope they will see this page and inquire about the property.

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      • says: 429 comments

        Oh, it’s distinctive. In fact, I would save the porch rather than the house (which seems fairly ordinary and mucked up). Would I like to see it saved? Sure. Would I bet on it? No.

        But it reminds me of something one of the local artists said: “People love your paintings until you ask them to buy one!”

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      • Missy says: 4 comments

        The porch is staying ! Renovations to it will start this summer.

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  27. Cherleeco says: 20 comments

    This house is a few blocks away from me. Logansport has many beautiful homes and it just breaks my heart to watch them crumble away. The skills and cost required to restore a home is pretty insurmountable. Sadly, home owners will opt to build new instead. I would love to see this house restored.

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  28. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12620 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    An old photo of the house, thank you Paul!

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  29. John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

    Looks like those Lions have been guarding the entry for a very long time. It’s always great to see what these old houses looked like in their prime. Thanks Paul!

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  30. Diane Gibson says: 586 comments

    I’ve noticed historians always want to pigeonhole an old home’s design to what is correct for the period. Having restored an old historic home, we often found some things were the result of the personal (and often quirky) taste of the original owner. I think there are often architectual oddities that defy reason because (as today) the original owner wanted something not typical of the pure design. I call it the “hot tub on the porch” design feature. I’ve always enjoyed traveling through Logansport; it has an old beautiful city appeal. Love this thread – first time reading.

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  31. Taylor46901 says: 1 comments

    Lovely.. I may have to take a short drive and look for myself! Love this site and all the information you supply…Thank you, it is a dream come true for lovers of Vintage Homes!

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  32. Lori Taulbee says: 1 comments

    Is this home still for sale?

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  33. LoganBerry71 says: 1 comments

    The house was profiled in the April 2016 issue of This Old House magazine in its Save This Old House section (pg 98).

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    • Shannon says: 2 comments

      I saw that magazine and made the comment that they needed to come to Logansport to restore the beautiful old Victorian homes there before turning to the last page and seeing this house. I saw that as a sign!

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  34. cass says: 1 comments

    I’m scheduled to look at this home on wed. I can not wait to see what I can do with it

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    • Shannon says: 2 comments

      We are looking at this house this weekend. My husband is in construction management and would want to restore the home as original as possible. Cass, what did you think of the house?

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  35. Allen says: 2 comments

    Is there any current information on this house? Still for sale? Other than the porch and carriage house, what are the interior issues? Has anyone one came up with figures on the renovation? Consider me interested…

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  36. John Shiflet says: 5732 comments

    Contact Logansport realtor Memi Rennewanz. (contact info: http://mprrealty.net/staff/memi-perez-rennewanz-id-1 Ph: 574-992-8011 ) She and her husband Perry own this property and have worked extensively on it so they would have more information than anyone else. Big project, but its an impressive house. Good luck if you decide to look into it. I believe its currently off market but Memi could tell you if its still available or not.

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  37. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12620 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Any news, did this ever sell?

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    • Missy says: 4 comments

      Yes, I close next week on it ! And to all those wondering the porches are staying.

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      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12620 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        That’s great news, congrats!

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      • Paul W says: 463 comments

        Good to hear ! I’m sure you will be in the shop for stuff. Logansport Landmarks has its Preservation pitch in picnic May 20th on the grounds of the Burgman building. Hope you can make it

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        • Missy says: 4 comments

          Hi Paul
          Thanks for the invite – we will actually be in Wisconsin at the Al Ringling mansion doing stained glass restoration on site so we wonโ€™t be able to make it – but will definitely look forward to other events.

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  38. Paul W says: 463 comments

    Nope its been pulled off the market, it is ‘for sale’ but they literally were having multiple showings by non serious tire kickers. I do suspect they will relist it in spring. they want to sell it.

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  39. Paul W says: 463 comments

    Per the Realtor (and former owner) the house has closed and been sold as of yesterday. I have to applaud the efforts of the prior owners to continue to show this house and find a preservation minded buyer! This house was on the Logansport Landmarks Most Endangered list for 2017 and we are thrilled to see this home begin a new chapter!

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12620 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thanks for the update. Good luck new owners!

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      • Missy says: 4 comments

        Thank you !! We are so very excited to start the renovation process! Stay tuned ! The roof will be replaced soon and restoration of the porches will follow as well as new paint we hope to be on a 24-36month renovation plan. The carriage house will also be restored for those wondering !

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