1898 Shingle Victorian in Des Moines, IA

Added to OHD on 6/9/15   -   Last OHD Update: 5/3/20   -   31 Comments
SOLD / Archived Post
Are you the new owner? Comment below, we'd love to say hi!

1045 22nd St, Des Moines, IA 50311

  • $125,000
  • 3 Bed
  • 1 Bath
  • 2317 Sq Ft
  • 0.24 Ac.
Contact Information
Pennie Carroll, Pennie Carroll & Associates
(515) 490-8025

State: | Region:

31 Comments on 1898 Shingle Victorian in Des Moines, IA

OHD does not represent this home. Comments are not monitored by the agent. Status, price and other details may not be current, verify using the listing links up top. Contact the agent if you are interested in this home.
  1. John Shiflet says: 5546 comments

    Late 1890’s design here so I wonder if the date numbers were transposed? In any case, the interior details are interesting. I would have expected the usual patterned parquet flooring downstairs but didn’t see any. Marble clad walls in the bathroom which seemed a way back then to show wealth. Unusual “modern” somewhat abstract form of interior fretwork here as well. Elaborate brick mantel pieces also became popular during this period and this is a nice example, thankfully never covered in white paint. A number of “Colonial sash” diamond paned windows as well as elliptical/oval shaped windows also characteristic of the Colonial Revival style, but the form fits the Queen Anne style so its a stylistic hybrid combining Queen Anne forms (the squat tower and asymmetric layout) with Colonial Revival design elements. It would have been very fashionable in the final years of the 19th century going into the early years of the 20th. The design is fairly sophisticated so it was likely by a local architect or may have been from one of the popular house plan books of the period. In summary, this house was considered “modern” for its time.

    0
  2. Mary Beth says: 37 comments

    Please allow me to express my gratitude to Mr. Shiflet for his knowledge and insights. It’s a delight to learn from such a well educated and generous group member.

    0
    • John Shiflet says: 5546 comments

      Thanks for the kindness, Mary Beth. Old houses and historic preservation have been passions of mine for many years. I have been privileged over the years to see many great old houses as well as encounter those calling out for help. I’ve tired to find ways to rescue them with the occasional success. I’ve worked professionally on a number of interesting historic houses over the years in different parts of the country but I’m not an architectural historian. Had I chosen to study architectural history rather than business management, I’d likely be a tenured professor of history in some stuffy institution rather than an aging exile from the corporate world. This blog never fails to bring something new and interesting. It would take a lifetime to see all of these old houses in person so I’m very grateful to Kelly for the labor of love that is her Old House Dreams. The unique comments feature allows “academic” discussions with other old house enthusiasts that I would otherwise probably never get a chance to meet. I learn new things in the process. The only downside is I spend far too much time engaged with the site so its something of a guilty pleasure. Comments like yours are what keep me coming back so I sincerely appreciate them.

      0
  3. Ernie says: 115 comments

    I see several architectural styles represented here. American/Dutch Colonial Revival side gables fans and diamond pane mullioned windows offset by stout and solid looking Richardsonian style turret and facade. The entrance hall hearth also has a very Romanesque feel. Inside we find Craftsman style door/window moldings and ceiling box beams. The Victorian stick and ball fretwork and classical revival columns and mid stair landing urn finial clash with the plain no frills stair case railing spindles and upstairs newel post.
    It makes me wonder if the interior wood work an evolutionary remodeling process carried out in the early decades after the home was built. I am well acquainted with a home that an almost identical Arts and crafts style interior. It was a “makeover” that changed almost the entire interior of the downstairs principle rooms of an 1880s Queen Anne from its original walnut Eastlake stick and ball fretwork arches and elaborate carved mantles to plain dark fumed quartersawn oak. It was commissioned by its original owner in 1914 to “Make the house more modern and up to date”. There are even before and after pictures.

    On a side note the pocket door at the base of the stairs is an interesting feature.

    0
  4. Veronica says: 13 comments

    What a beautiful and surprising house. That fireplace! I wonder what’s going on with the land behind this and the neighboring houses. Community garden? I’m not a fan of this property’s location, but apart from that, I think it’s a stunning home for the price (short of any major repairs).

    0
  5. memosonic says: 15 comments

    The large doorways keep the interior open, no need to take down walls to open up areas. doorways appear to be 40″ or 42″ makes getting around easy.

    0
  6. Joy Louters says: 111 comments

    I agree, Mary Beth! I have learned so much from John. His knowledge and insight on these gorgeous treasures is limitless. His passion is evident and appreciated. It’s always nice to find others who share your love of these old homes. Thanks again, John!

    0
  7. Ed Ferris says: 299 comments

    It seems that the realtor has stretched at least some of the photos side-to-side, so don’t count on the “large doorways”. Take a look at the front door in the photo showing it and the fireplace.
    This turreted design was actually a commonplace of late-Victorian pattern books, even with the dormer poking out above the porch. The John Lucas color cards have a sketch by Robert Shoppell like this house and D. S. Hopkins published a similar design. The interior is a very good Arts & Crafts. Isn’t that colonnade leading nowhere an insane extravagance? Not a single bullseye rosette in the place!

    0
  8. Joy Louters says: 111 comments

    What I love about this house is the grand fireplace, the large bedrooms, the front and back porches, the fact that there appears to be a walk-up attic, all the luscious woodwork, and, of course, the turret. What puzzles me is that the dormer appears to be an after thought on the home. It doesn’t blend like the others I have seen in these homes. The kitchen is a complete re-do and I cannot get used to the washer and dryer being in the heart of the home. Des Moines is great city. My husband lived there for a few years and loved it. Also, the fact that there is only one bathroom would have to be remedied! I do love the home, however. It has character and the things I don’t care for could be fixed rather easily.

    0
  9. says: 16 comments

    This house is technically in my neighborhood (Drake Neighborhood) but is in what seems to be the rental district. Fortunately it has not been chopped up and stripped down like many of the others of this era. Hopefully it finds a new owner who appreciates it’s beauty!

    0
  10. Darrin Engel says: 6 comments

    My first impression is that this is one of the earliest Frank Lloyd Wright houses, my second impression is that is one of his employees that did.

    If Mr. Wright did it the 1889 date will be very accurate. By 1889 he started working in Chicago for Louis Sullivan but did moonlighting work on private residences; many of these plans do not have Mr. Wright’s name on them so they are difficult to identify. He did not want Louis Sullivan to know he did work outside the office due to a contract he held with his employer. The turret form that merges into a steep 2 story roof is one of his popular themes. He also combined the Romanesque, Colonial Revival, Shingle and Queen Anne into a well balanced hybrid. There are also interior touches that are unique and the biggest one is the fireplace. He did some house designs in Iowa as it is very close to his boyhood home of Richland Center, Wisconsin – he later built Taliesin East in Spring Green on his family’s land. If Mr. Wright designed this home he would have been in his very early twenties and at this time he was very experimental with details and form as he was learning to design. Unfortunately I can’t access most of my Wright books to confirm anything. Because Mr. Wright may not have supervised construction of a house this far away from Chicago it may have been built slightly different from the drawings.

    If it is one of his employees (probably under his supervision at Adler Sullivan) it may be mid to late 1890’s. Or it could be a former employee at Adler Sullivan. There special touches to his house that show the unique touch of talented architect. This is not an ordinary custom designed house.

    0
  11. says: 16 comments

    Tax records show 1898 as the year built.

    0
  12. John Shiflet says: 5546 comments

    Frankly, (no pun intended) I would be dumbfounded to learn this was a Frank Lloyd Wright design. In 1889 Wright would have been a mere lad of 22! While this house was “progressive” and modern for its time, Wright eschewed anything Colonial Revival styled in his early “bootleg” Queen Anne commissions while in the employ of Adler-Sullivan. I also seriously doubt Louis Sullivan had a hand in its design, either. But Des Moines had a number of talented architects at the close of the 19th century. That arched (Romanesque) brick mantel does superficially resemble those in some of Wright’s early designs (but he preferred the thin “Roman” bricks to conventional brickwork) such as the 1902 Thomas-Dana House, but otherwise this house is world’s apart from his early work. I maintain this house was probably designed by a local or regional architect or was one of the many designs available from plan book sources of the time such as Scientific American magazine, (architect and builders edition) R.W. Shoppell, Herbert Caleb Chivers (St. Louis) all of these sources published similar designs to this one. Besides, as far as I know, I think every commission by Frank Lloyd Wright has been identified, even the early ones. For this to be an “unknown” Wright design would be extremely unlikely. This house has many merits but an F.L. Wright design provenance is not one of them to the best of my knowledge. I think with further research, the designing architect could be ascertained. I also feel confident the house dates from the 1890’s (just confirmed) rather than the 1880’s. Just my 2 cents worth…

    0
  13. Joy Louters says: 111 comments

    Thank you, John. My knowledge is extremely limited but I did not think of FLW, either. I would agree that it’s most likely a local architect who did the design.

    0
  14. John Shiflet says: 5546 comments

    William Plymat. Jr. researched and self-published the VICTORIAN ARCHITECTURE OF IOWA. (1976 with a newer edition in 1997; I have a 1997 copy but this house is not in it) I’ll see if I can track him down on Facebook or by some other way. Perhaps he could shed light on the architect for this residence. If I find anything, I’ll share it here.

    0
  15. Darrin Engel says: 6 comments

    Frank Lloyd Wright moved to Chicago about 1887 and started his apprenticeship with Louis Sullivan, he was a young prolific workaholic. The following are designs of his that use Colonial Revival, Queen Ann, Dutch Colonial Revival and Shingle Style: Unity Chapel (1886), Emmond House, Gale Houses, Mr. Wright’s own Oak Park house prior to it’s extensive remodeling’s (1886), Hillside Home School (1887 Spring Green, WI), George Blossom house – almost pure Colonial Revival (1892 Chicago), Irving Clark House (La Grange,IL 1893), Frederick Bagley house(1894 Hinsdale,IL), Goan House, Mitchell House (1894 Racine WI) http://fulltimervtravel.com/2011-rv-travel/full-time-rv-travel-frank-lloyd-wright-in-racine-wisconsin/ , Warren McArthur House (1892). His styles changed rapidly and progressed into his more recognizable Wright style in the late 1890’s.

    As for discovering Wright houses, it is rare, but one was just discovered: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3114066/Milwaukee-couple-shocked-discover-suburban-Midwest-home-ve-lived-22-years-Frank-Lloyd-Wright-masterpiece.html . I know of this house for many years but never thought it to be a Wright design.

    As for the one comment that this house is 1898 I am willing to believe that because the interior doors have 5 horizontal panel doors which weren’t available till the late 1890’s. This rules the house out as a Wright design. I looked at some interior photos of the Wright houses mentioned above and they have 4 vertical plus 1 horizontal panel door which places them in the late 1880’s through the 1890’s. As an 1898 house it may have been designed by someone who worked for or with Mr. Wright or heavily influenced by a few his houses.

    0
  16. Ernie says: 115 comments

    In browsing the internet stimulated by other comments here I came across FLW’S mid 90’s Walter Gale house which shares many of the same exterior features including soaring high pitched dutch style gables, steep roof line all firmly anchored in place by an elongated rather than fully rounded right handed turret.

    http://www.chicagoarchitecture.info/Building/1189/Walter-H–Gale-House.php

    0
  17. John Shiflet says: 5546 comments

    Based on the evidence presented by Darrin and Ernie, I’m coming around to believing this could be a Wright design. I do not have a single book on Wright’s architectural legacy as my area of interest has always been on Victorian architecture (yes, one could argue that Wright was a late Victorian era architect but is far better known for his Prairie Style and later 20th century work.) I was as surprised as the person commenting on 1894 Mitchell House who stated: “Seeing the Mitchell House it was shocking to believe this is Frank Lloyd Wright; however, with research in hand, it is.” He goes on to say the plans were signed by another architect who was covering for Wright’s clandestine design activities, but if it has been carefully researched and found to be Wright’s design work I cannot argue with that. The Mitchell house is decidedly in the Dutch variant of the Colonial Revival style. Online sources state there were 12 FLW designed structures in Iowa. I can only find information on four extant houses: Stockman House, Monona, IA, 1908; Paul Trier House, Johnston, IA, 1957-8; Lowell Walter House, (Cedar Rock) Independence, IA, 1950; and last, the Robert H. Sunday House, Marshallton, IA, 1957. When you start noting arcane details like the number of door panels to indicate or rule out a Wright design provenance, I’m at a great disadvantage. I’ve repeatedly stated I am NOT an architectural historian, but merely an enthusiast of Victorian era architecture. If either or both of you are academicians/architectural historians, then I’m at a great disadvantage because you have easy access to primary materials and published research manuscripts my eyes would likely never see unless I dedicated an extended period of time for self-study. I’m more accepting now that this house could have a FLW connection, but besides the paneled door indicating it is not a Wright design, what other primary documentary evidence do you have available? I suppose I could try to initiate a drawn out process of locating and corresponding with historians or preservationists in Des Moines, but I do not have the luxury of time to do so. I’m sure someone knows exactly who designed this house and perhaps they will be kind enough to share that information here. Therefore, these are my final comments on this property. Thanks Darrin for sharing the heretofore unknown Wright design in Milwaukee, WI. It shows that even someone as well studied as FLW and his work, at least one house he designed “fell through the cracks”.

    0
    • bethany port says: 21 comments

      If you ever come across a house that for sure designed by D.S. Hopkins i would be very grateful if you let me know. He is my great, great, grandpa and for the last 3 years I’ve been working on a book that is a body of his work. I have quite a few buildings and homes but always looking for more. Sometimes just trying to get pictures of existing homes is difficult enough. I have some posted on fb and pinterest if your interested. Just look under d.s. hopkins architect. Thank you.

      0
      • John Shiflet says: 5546 comments

        Hi Bethany,
        During our recent Midwest road trip I did photograph this D.S. Hopkins designed house in Anderson, Indiana (Historic 8th Avenue) https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/22071877658/in/album-72157659574840968/ (porch is a later replacement) There’s an almost identical Hopkins design in Mannington, WV: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tourismguy/10359319095/in/album-72157636714453683/ I was recently made aware of some online house plan books by D.S.Hopkins: (book No 4) https://archive.org/details/DSHopkinsHousesandcottagesbookno40001 and, book No 6: https://archive.org/details/DSHopkinsHousesandcottagesbookno60001 and book No 7: https://archive.org/details/DSHopkinsHousesandcottagesbookno70001 It is my understanding that Mr. Hopkins published at least 8 planbooks during his career. Probably his best known works are the Hackley and Hume Museum Houses in Muskegon, MI. I’ve also encountered some of his designs in archived editions of trade magazines like The National Builder, Carpentry & Building, and Inland Architect and News Record. In summary, David S. Hopkins was well known nationally in the last quarter of the 19th century but most of his works are still found in the Midwest especially around Michigan where he was based. I only know the professional architect, not the man and his family nor much else about him outside his profession. If you have a FB page about your Gr.Gr. Grandfather I’ll find it and “friend” it. I’ve also noted Hopkins designs in Centerville, Iowa and Terre Haute, Indiana.

        0
        • bethany port says: 21 comments

          Thank you so much for getting back to me. Both of those homes look to be design #15 which I’m finding was very popular, i now know of at least 6 that still Exist . i would like to use those pics in my book. Did you take them? Or someone else? Obviously i need permission and would give credit in my book. If you want you can email me zebby1977@gmail.com.

          0
          • John Shiflet says: 5546 comments

            Hi Bethany,
            You have my explicit permission to use the Anderson, Indiana (8th Street Historic District) photo as you see fit. (free download option is at the lower right side next to the photo-choose the largest size for maximum clarity. The Mannington, WV photo is by Bruce Wicks, a/k/a “Tourism Guy” who has almost 40,000 photos posted on Flickr. He can be contacted from his home Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tourismguy/ I made note of your email contact and will send you some more Hopkins items I have. Please let us know when your book comes out as David Hopkins is one of my favorite Victorian era architects. It would be interesting to learn about his family background and interests outside of architecture as well.

            0
            • bethany port says: 21 comments

              Thank you again for everything. I love his victorian homes the best as well. but recently came across a plan book he did with a Mr. Davis in 1905 i believe. I’m not sure what the styles are but someone told me one was a Tudor. Its interesting to see how he was able to change with the times. Some in the book are actual photographs of the homes but it didnt list where the house was located. I would love to find 1 or 2 for my book. After about 1892 ish those architect publications stopped listing any homes hopkins was commissioned to build. At least the ones that I’ve been able to find on line. I keep hoping there’s some i don’t know about or new ones will get scanned in. Again, sorry for rambling on. 🙂

              0
              • John Shiflet says: 5546 comments

                Most notable Victorian era architects if they lived and worked into the 20th century they had to adapt quickly to changing tastes or soon fade into obscurity. George F. Barber sold 20,000 sets or more of house plans between 1888 and 1908 when his last house plan book came out. However, the lavish Queen Annes that were his bread and butter in the 1890’s were being replaced with Bungalows and Foursquares in the 1900’s. Intriguing that D.S. Hopkins was able to continue his practice past 1900. (he lived between 1834-1918) Worth remembering is that Frank Lloyd Wright’s very long and successful career was due to his extraordinary talent but more importantly, his ability to change with the times and remain in the forefront of architectural design. As for why the trade publications ceased using Mr. Hopkin’s designs it may have more to do with him publishing his own house plan books than a lack of interest from the magazines. Hopkins also changed with the times…his somewhat ornate houses of the 1880’s were increasingly toned down and simplified in the 1890’s. I have a facsimile reprint of his 1893 plan book and the designs lean towards fairly plain Colonial Revival and Shingle Style houses while a decade before he was designing ornate Queen Annes with towers and turrets.

                0
  18. Darrin Engel says: 6 comments

    I am also a lover of Victorian Architecture and became fascinated with Frank Lloyd Wright’s early work. Many of these homes were rediscovered in the late 70’s and early eighties. Their permits and drawings often did not have Frank Lloyd Wright’s name on them because he feared getting fired by Louis Sullivan. He actually did get fired but was fortunate to have enough work at that time to become self employed. The subject house could have been quickly done for a friend or relative or the work of one of his many employees he had at the turn of the century. A few of his best employees became famous in their own right, Miriam Mahoney is a good example. Often the houses designed by these people are mistaken to be Wright homes. I recently moved and most of my books are still in boxes so I can’t find what the ones that are important in his early career.

    My background is that I am an Architect and a Historic Preservationist. I am on my City’s Historic Preservation Board, owned designated historic homes, professionally restored significant commercial and government buildings. I have been a lover of Victorian homes since I was a child, my first house was a 2600 sf Milwaukee East Side 2.5 story Queen Anne with minor Colonial Revival detail and the two parlors have solid Birdseye maple woodwork – I miss this house! As a Wisconsin resident I also love Mr. Wright’s Architecture. My family vacationed in Spring Green and some of my older friends and relatives personally knew Mr. Wright; my Father has been inside the house at Taliesin while Wright was alive. Because of these people I have heard many of the stories about him and studied his work from a very young age. Other than architecture (and women) Mr. Wright loved automobiles and through this he was a legend amongst many people I know.

    The subject home is beautiful and I hope someone can find documentation on its original designer.

    0
  19. EllenDrews says: 57 comments

    All of you bring history to life on this site. I am fortunate to live in Virginia and LOVE to drive. My (adult) daughter and I do what we call “adventuring”, from Maine to SC and Georgia and as far west as Ohio. When we plan a trip, I like to come here and find a few houses to drive by. The first time I came to OHD, I was surprised to find several houses that we had seen on past adventures listed here! Reading other peoples comments gives me greater insight into the development of different styles. Thanks John, Kelly and everyone else who enable my old house dreams.

    0
  20. says: 9 comments

    I was able to tour this home twice while it was available on the market. It is just as gorgeous on the inside as the photos show. The doorways are actually nice and wide. There are so many more great details in the home not shown in the photos.

    0

Comment Here


To keep comments a friendly place for each other, owners and agents, comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved. Keep topics to the home, history, local attractions or general history/house talk.

Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.
Click here to read the comment rules, updated 1/12/20.

OHD does not represent this home. Price, status and other details must be independently verified. Do not contact the agent unless you are interested in the property.