Specially selected historic real estate for old house enthusiasts.

January 6, 2023: House Shares & Chit Chat (Supporters, Thank You!)

Added to OHD on 1/6/23 - Last OHD Update: 1/13/23 - 187 Comments
Click here to jump to comment box.
Happy Friday! This is the weekly post where you share your old house finds, articles, or just chit-chat.

Sharing Guidelines…
1) To share an old house for sale, paste the link in the comment box below. Include the city & state, build date, price, and what you are sharing.
2) No tiny URL's. Link to the agent's site or a listing site (Redfin, Realtor, Zillow, etc.) No sites that require an account to view.
3) To keep comments from spam folders, limit your comment to no more than 10 links per comment.

!!!Not all shares can be featured on OHD.

Feel free to discuss houses, gardening, history, and related topics. NO political topics.
Special thanks to this month's OHD Supporters!
67drake
2ChihuahuaMom (Betty)
AJ Davis
Alana Murray
alf
Kate Sheldon
ALLALASKAN
Amanda Murray
Angie boldly going nowhere
Annabelle
Anne M.
annfelter
Barbara V
Annie K.
Becky Martin
Bethany
Bethster
Boilerguy1720
BlindOracle
Betsy Frisch
Braeden Fitch
Brad Galloway
Byron Barth
Candy
Cardstacker
Carolyn R
Cate
Cathy F.
Cathy W.
catlover
CBeebe
CharlestonJohn
clawhammerist
Clover
Cliff (Southwest Guy)
Connie
Couwenhoven1699
Cruiser
Dana
Darlene
David and Eva
David Backer (ddbacker)
David Dyke
David Sweet
Deborah Walker
Deedee
Diana Blackwell
Diana Lloyd
DianeEG
Donjamarie
Donna Reynolds
DreamOn
DRC
Elspeth Pi
Eric Neilson
Erol
Ethan Hagen
Fairmount
Fallsgirl
FlaOHDJunkie
Fluer
Gage
GearGirl
Gerig Huggins
Gina & Phil
Goffengel
Grant
Gregory Hubbard
GretaLyn
Gretchen
Guinan
handmaidn
Harley's Mom
Hope
J.A.
Jack Aubrey
James Michalowski,
Howard Hanna
Jan Matson
Janet Vodder
Jaybird
JDHRosewater
Jeanne Smith
Jenny Wiebler
Jerry Brancato
Jim
JimH
Joey Cain
Joan
John Dustin
John Shiflet
Joseph Griffin
JP Thompson
JRC
Julie
jumbojimbo
Karen Baker
Karen G
Karen H.
Karen S.
KarenZ
Kathryn Bell
Kelli
KellyDoe
Kevin O'Neill
​Katherine O.
Kim Carter
KimberFNP
Kimberly62
Kris Walsh
Laura Lewis
Laurie W
LBH
Leah S
Leigh
leighlev
Leroy
Les Fossel
Les Houston Ontario Canada
Lily
Linda S.
Lisa
Lord Mannyng
Lori A
Lori Taylor
Lucinda Howard
LuigiB
luluchicago
Lynn E.
M.Dortin
M.J.
M.J.G.
MaC
MaggieMay
Marcia Ames
Marcy
Mark
Mark Horine
Mimi
Mark Presley
Marshel Cunningham
Martha
Mary C.
Matt Ziehnert
MattD
Michael McNamara
Miss-Apple37
Mitchell Bailey
Monique
Morna
montana channing
Ms McShorty
Nancy C.
NancyD
natira121
nolalolo
NonaK
Noraj2774
Our Philly Row
P. Buckingham
PalJuicy
Paul
Paul Hayden
Pete R.
PhilW
Victorian Joy
Polly
QuiltingWitch
Randy C.
Ray Unseitig
Rhea
Rita L. from Lansing, MI
Robinjn
Robyn
Roo
Ross
Ross R
Roxanne
Ryan
Sadie
Sally
Sandra Lee
Sandy B.
Sara
Sarah Fox-Balts
Sassafras
shafer8
Sharon B.
Sharon Brause
Sharon Winters
Shawn Cripe
SheaBear
shellbell67
Shelley L. Scheuer
Denise
Shelly Horvath
Sheryl J. Moore
Son of Syosset
Sonja
Stephen S. Griffin
stevenf
Sue
Susan from New England
SuzyQ
TCMChickie
Teri W.
The Greens
TheDaringLibrarian
Tom Cutler
Tom Isenberg
Tommy Quinn
Toni Moya
Tonimar
Tony
TXJewel
Victorian Joy
W. Willis
Well Done! Realty
(Lancaster John)
indygreta
Wendy A.
Wendy Mills
Elizabeth Bjorklund
Jodi S
Alison Long
socalnanynan
Morna
Move with Molli
Laurie Shaw
Sharon
BrendainWI
Sally Bradshaw
Victorian Lover
Kathleen Davis
RBB
LuvOHD
older the better
Mark Nelke
Margaret
Ryan
Preservation Matters
Shelley from Canada
Michael W
Kirsten
Margaret Martinis-Wallace
Randall R Cummins

With thanks to JimH our history hero!
In memory of John Clifford, John Foreman & Phillip DeLong.

And those who have chosen not to be named. Thanks to all!

Subscribe
Notify of
187 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Kirsten
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
24 days ago

Hey, Kelly! Didn’t read your description till after I’d examined handwriting, I also came up with Union Ave. for the featured house postcard. I’m heading up and down Union Ave in Litchfield right now, and so far no luck finding it…but I haven’t give up. Hoping it survived that fire and is still a good home for someone.

Kirsten
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
24 days ago

Ha! Yes, virtually, via Google. I scoured and scoured, but I think it may be gone.

The closest I could come to anything that looked right was 609 E Union Ave. It has more than one door on the front and there were a few other structural similarities. But it’s definitely not the same. Window style and placement are wrong. Door frames are wrong. The projection on the left side of the house is missing.

JimH
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
24 days ago

A house that seems to match the photo in Litchfield ILwas on the SW corner of E. Union and Jackson, shown on Sanborns from 1886, and long gone. More info needed to identify which of two candidates who lived on E. Union from the 1870’s; merchant David Davis (1838-1898) whose widow Blanche was there for many years, and farm owner William Chancy Davis (1819-1905) whose daughters Ida and Leah were there into the 1940’s.

LitchfieldIL220EUnion1910.png
LitchfieldIL1874DirectoryDavis.png
Kirsten
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
24 days ago

I’m just not sure, Jim. That footprint you found is awfully close in a number of respects, but it has an angled bay that the one in the photo doesn’t have. It’s possible it was altered at some point. But it doesn’t look quite right to me. Forgive me if I’m totally off-base. Maybe you can help me see better.

JimH
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
24 days ago

You’re right, it’s not close enough, and I don’t see a better match on the Sanborn maps.

In the 1912 county atlas, B.K. Davis (Blanche Keating, widow of merchant David Davis) lived on the north side of E. Union at the eastern edge of town. I don’t see the house now but maybe that’s where it was.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/105928779/blanche-k-davis

DavisNorthLitchfieldIL1912.png
Kirsten
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
23 days ago

Another interesting possibility, Jim.

You are so good with plat and Sanborn maps. I’m regularly amazed at how quickly you’re able to garner information from those sources. I’ve looked at the online collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, for instance, but they seem to have limited holdings there. Probably more complete if I actually went to look at hard holdings, as it’s rare that an entire collection of anything is digitized. Have also looked at the Library of Congress, where there seems to be a decent collection for some states, but no Sanborns digitized for Wisconsin at this time.

If you don’t mind my asking, do you have a go-to source for plats/Sanborns…or a selection of sources? I’d love to be able to get some insight on how you’re able to access the maps that you do. You’re just amazing with this stuff, and I’d love to have even a tenth of the ability and speed that you do. Any pointers would be much appreciated.

JimH
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
23 days ago

Thanks Kirsten. As with most skills, if you do it every day for many years you get pretty good at it, and fast. There are many different resources depending on the location and time period. If there are associated names of residents, all of the genealogy databases are available, and local directories, histories, biographies and house write-ups also.
As for my method, I tell people who ask how I do it that it’s faster for me to research a house than explain all the steps – just give me the address!

The basic go-to lookup sites:

Google Maps, Wikipedia and HistoricMapworks.com for locations. You have to know precisely the county and township the house is in – the postal addresses given in listings are often misleading. Wikipedia also has more National Register info than any government site.

HistoricMapworks is also the best single source for early ownership info, especially in rural areas. Rural roads generally haven’t changed that much over the years, and the older maps were fairly accurate. HistoricAerials.com is useful for seeing 20th C. construction and context.

The LOC is great for maps and HABS info, and has by far the best online collection of Sanborn Maps, including almost 1000 for Wisconsin:
https://www.loc.gov/collections/sanborn-maps/?fa=location:wisconsin

There are many state and local history and preservation websites, though the data isn’t always reliable – usually my last resort. Finding old photos is a different task, mainly using Google with specific search terms after identifying location and owners.

I should mention that not all house histories are discoverable online. Deed and local history research may require a trip to the local Hall of Records or other archive. However, an hour spent searching online is often more productive than a library visit, that from someone who worked in libraries for years.

To Kirsten and anybody else: if you need a quick lookup on an old house, just message my profile and I’ll see what I can find – no charge!

Ranunculus
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
23 days ago

Jim, you are so generous with both your time and now your “trade secrets”!

Kirsten
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
21 days ago

First chance I’ve had to check in for a couple of days, Jim. Boy, was I excited to see you’d replied. Thank you so, so much for your insight and your willingness to teach. Truly grateful!

Kimberly62
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
24 days ago

I was searching Litchfield too, I thought Litchfield before I saw the back of the photo, like I felt I have seen it before. I too thought Union Ave with the writing on the back of the card. Jim gets us closest thus far, I love this.
The photo of the young person, I thought that hair thing with the uplift and curl was only something that Alfalfa sported-enlighten me

MW
Supporter
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
24 days ago

Looks like a couple of Studebaker trucks front and rear trying to get the house across the bridge!

Cora
Moderator
24 days ago

1910 – The description says, “investor special” ( 😖 cringe) – but it appears just a bit of paint and some little things here and there would make a world of difference. The exterior is super charming. The interior has had some unfortunate alterations, but still has many admirable qualities. Very affordable, as well.

Topeka, KS
$65K

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1409-SW-Fillmore-St-Topeka-KS-66604/77464771_zpid/

Kirsten
Reply to  Cora | 2267 comments
24 days ago

Yeah, wow…what’s the catch with this one do you suppose, Cora? I agree it’s not in pristine condition, but it looks like it’s structurally sound. I totally agree that someone could do a lot with the inside of this one, but it sure doesn’t look, on the surface, like you’d be fighting an uphill battle. I sure don’t see evidence of water damage when I look at ceilings or walls.

I wonder if there are issues with the foundation/basement that we can’t see. No pictures of anything there, so it’s possible. Unless there’s something I’m missing, the foundation looks ok from the outside, at least.

If there are no problems, then I’d say this one is a real bargain,

John Shiflet
Reply to  Cora | 2267 comments
24 days ago

Thanks for sharing, Cora. Assuming the staircase landing stained glass window is original, such window designs were common in the 1880’s to early 1890’s. But in other respects, the rest of the house could be from 1910. Most likely, a c. 1890 house was built on the site and in 1910 the house had a major makeover. The house also almost appears to to be turned sideways-maybe to accommodate the lot configuration or perhaps was even moved to this site? Intriguing house that seems well priced.

KarenZ
Reply to  Cora | 2267 comments
24 days ago

I agree, Cora! I happen to love the bold exterior color, but inside needs some attention! This really IS a great bargain!

Cora
Moderator
24 days ago

Sharing mostly for the incredible views – but the house is very nice as well, with some original features intact.

Layton, UT
1901
$875K:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3049-W-Gentile-St-N-Layton-UT-84041/2060288850_zpid/

Cora
Moderator
24 days ago

And another in Utah that is share-worthy. This one is in good condition and has retained it’s beautiful fireplace and built-ins. It has a basement apartment that could be lived-in while renovations take place, but the house itself is just fine as is. Very grandma’s house-ish.

Brigham City, UT
1908
$425K:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/128-S-100-W-Brigham-City-UT-84302/85853869_zpid/

Cory
24 days ago

Mattoon, IL
1956
Check out these bathrooms! And the basement !
https://www.premier-realtors.org/idx/listing/IL-DEC/6225578/217-Circle-Drive-Mattoon-IL-61938

Cora
Reply to  Cory | 19 comments
24 days ago

I like the exterior as well! Really pretty.

KarenZ
Reply to  Cory | 19 comments
24 days ago

That basement would be amazing to roller skate in! This house has such a great look-I love it!

Kimberly62
Reply to  Cory | 19 comments
23 days ago

neat! that green bathroom is so cool

Ranunculus
Reply to  Cory | 19 comments
23 days ago

What an untouched gem! Looks like only the kitchen was ever updated! (Perhaps twice according to the basement workbench. Don’t you just love to look at workbenches to see what the previous kitchen cabinets looked like?) And the sunrom added on. The basement fireplace is quite handsome as well.

ddbacker
Supporter
24 days ago

I know times are tough and some of us can’t come up with the $28 mil needed to get the fantastic Nantucket Federal posted earlier. So how about this converted 1907 post office in a Kansas ghost town? Peace, quiet, and no nosy neighbors. $95K Clements, KS. I wasn’t able to post the actual listing but you can reach it from this article:

https://www.insider.com/home-for-sale-in-a-kansas-ghost-town-costs-95000-2022-12

Cora
Reply to  ddbacker | 522 comments
24 days ago

I drove by this last weekend! It’s fairly close to the highway, so it’s not that bad of a drive to get to Emporia, Council Grove, Eldorado, or the smaller town of Florence. Clements itself no longer has a post office, so I think the actual listing shows a Cedar Point address.

John Shiflet
Reply to  ddbacker | 522 comments
24 days ago

Here’s the Realtor dot com listing: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1513-G-Rd_Cedar-Point_KS_66843_M87082-55461 I can hardly complain about anyone saving a commercial building that survived against all odds but there are some issues. First, hat’s off for saving the rare Mesker Bros., upper facade and stamped tin rusticated “stonework” siding. However, it is not preservation in the accepted meaning but more of a remodeling with all that implies. Some tin ceilings survive but how much better it might have been if a more sensitive approach had been taken. I’m not sure if someone now could tie the old and new together in such a way to make it blend well. Once I saw this photo (attached) I knew exactly what to expect. Wouldn’t real pocket doors have been better? As a starter home, maybe the changes made would be acceptable.

The HGTV effect.JPG
M J G
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
20 days ago

Yes! 100 percent.

MrMike
24 days ago

Happy Friday!

A couple weeks ago I posted a Frank Lloyd Wright house for sale in Oak Park that came up for sale for the first time in decades.

One of the FLW conservancy groups has posted a very in-depth rendering of the house complete with new interior photos.

Enjoy!
https://savewright.org/exploring-the-george-smith-house/

Cora
Moderator
24 days ago

On the fence about this one…but something about it makes me want someone to love it. The part of the kitchen showing looks like it may have possibly been the old pantry at one time. Love the cabinets and hardware. The dirt-floor basement is a lil spooky, at least for me.

Astoria, OR
1918
$325K:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1476-8th-St-Astoria-OR-97103/86302284_zpid/

John Shiflet
Supporter
24 days ago

Happy Friday folks,

I wanted to share a final update about my efforts to save a highly endangered Gothic Revival cottage in Cadiz, OH (photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72177720303493951 ) The story is simple: a badly neglected c. 1850 Gothic Revival cottage that is soon going to be lost and demolished unless something is done to save it. I’m willing to, but I don’t feel comfortable trying to tackle such a major project alone. I do have a track record of successful projects completed in the past but none were entire house projects. The kind folks at Preservation Ohio have been sympathetic but are unable to connect me with someone willing to help. I’ve corresponded with a couple of nice people among the members here but still no luck. This morning, a sympathetic friend in northern California said he might know a man (neighbor) who would be interested but that seems like a very long shot, at best.

So, I’m asking among my friends and fellow Preservationists here for your suggestions and input on what you think could be done to change the outcome? Most often, funding issues are the biggest problem but I’m planning on funding the entire project. Besides. I’ve had the disappointing and somewhat embarrassing experience of talking to a banker about borrowing money to save a Victorian in Texas and remember how he just laughed and rolled his eyes. That said, if someone with a preservation construction/restoration business would be interested in a cooperative or collaborative effort, I’d love to hear your ideas as well. From my perspective, this could be a great opportunity for someone to get a solid grounding in Old House Restoration and construction techniques applicable to old houses. Some tasks (roofing and mechanicals) would be contracted out but those key aspects of preserving/repairing/restoring original historic details would be an integral part of the program. I’m also interested in a media tie-in of some sort but saving the highly endangered 1850 house is the highest and first priority.

My email address for communications is vintrest@yahoo.com (the vintrest part coming from my former business name of VINT-age Rest-orations.) I will provide additional contact information privately by email. Please rest assured; this will be the last time I bring this matter up because shortly, the house will be gone, so there will be no house to save and no need for help. I’m not looking to be a Preservation hero, but you could become one. Looking forward to hearing from anyone. Thanks, and everyone please have a great and safe weekend!

Court
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
24 days ago

That looks to be a tall order. In some areas the entire wall, floor, and roof structures will need to be rebuilt. My hats off to you sir for the willingness to save her from demo, I do hope you can find the necessary to get her rebuilt to her former self. I wish I had the skills needed to help.

Barbara V
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
23 days ago

John, this is the first time I noticed that you are offering to fund the entire project yourself, and I’m wondering if other potential partners for you may have missed that fact as well – ? (Or maybe I just need to pay closer attention.) With that on the table, though, it’s very surprising that you aren’t receiving more real interest. Are there other property owners in the area who might be motivated to see an eyesore brought back from the brink? Maybe appealing to aesthetics and nearby property values would be more successful than relying strictly on old house lovers to come forward…

Another idea – which is dependent upon your ultimate goal for the property – would be finding and enlisting the assistance of someone who has the skills you seek but has been unable to come up with the resources to purchase a place of their own by conventional means. Not sure how you’d go about finding them – maybe community bulletin boards and word of mouth..?

You have my best wishes for success.

Gregory_K
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
23 days ago

John, this is a wonderful house, with elegant details. My sincere complements to you for pursuing its preservation. This is just the sort project I’d expect you to undertake. I’m spread far too thinly to help, or I’d help you immediately. I hope and pray you find a partner in time.

John Shiflet
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
22 days ago

Thanks everyone for the suggestions and encouragement. I have a promising lead from out of state but at the moment it’s still a long shot. My only explanation as to why others locally are not interested is because of the location in small town eastern Ohio. The rescue and rehab of badly faded old houses is largely unknown around here. Demolition of old neglected structures has been the default method of dealing with architectural “eyesores” and “blight” for many decades. Some did need to be razed but so many more already lost had restoration potential. I realize the Gothic Cottage is something of an extreme example but to its credit, there’s not much modern inside to remove and post restoration it will be a picturesque home with history restored to last for several more generations. Nearby Wheeling, WV, has scores if not hundreds of homes and buildings awaiting rescue and rehab. So, there’s plenty of restoration work awaiting people willing to engage in it. I have cast as wide a net as possible in seeking help so if the project goes unfulfilled then it won’t be due to a lack of trying. I appreciate being allowed to share my plans with fellow Old House Dreamers.

MrMike
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
22 days ago

I really hope this pans out, John. I’ve spent the last three years on a building-restoration-slash-new-business project that’s come to a screeching halt (long story) and facing the realities vs. hoping for a different outcome (the head vs. heart) is what keeps me up at night.

John Shiflet
Reply to  MrMike | 93 comments
17 days ago

Thanks for everyone’s comments. As of right now, I do have a prospective helper coming from northern California but he has commitments until sometime in February so still a long ways to go before anything happens. In the meantime I plod along going forward hoping for the best but prepared for a different outcome. Sorry Mr. Mike that you encountered problems on your project. I was encouraged to read about a new preservation trades school opening up in Covington, KY which is just across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. (see attached) The personnel shortages in preservation construction trades are real and they are nationwide.

Covington KY Trades School.JPG
Cora
Moderator
24 days ago

This is a pretty house, but it’s hard for me to perceive the layout. I don’t know if this is due to the photo presentation, or to my cluelessness.  😬 
The first thing I would do is remove the wall of mirrors in the hall with the staircase. I would absolutely 💩 myself every single time I came down the stairs in a sleepy stupor and saw something moving in the mirror.

Le Roy, NY
1870
$168K:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3-Lincoln-Ave-Le-Roy-NY-14482/30484106_zpid/

Kimberly62
Supporter
24 days ago

1910, Pasadena, CA 949,000 price cut, under contract
From the listing: “Situated in the Bungalow Heaven landmark district of Pasadena, this single-story character craftsman home, in its authentic state since 1910…The home was constructed by one of the older local builders, Arthur Stephens. It is one of the oldest on the Bungalow Heaven tour in 2001…formal dining room has wainscot paneling, China cabinet built-ins, and authentic gas light…original California cooler cabinet, hexagon tile countertops, vintage stove, and authentic farmhouse sink”
Enjoy, look at the gas light smoke marks on the ceiling (last slide), I hope this one gets a very sympathetic hand
753 N Michigan Ave, Pasadena, CA 91104 | MLS #GD22244556 | Zillow753 N Michigan Ave, Pasadena, CA 91104 | MLS #GD22244556 | Zillow

DJZ
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
23 days ago

Oh she’s a beaut! I hope that the person buying it doesnt HGTV it, it has everything I’m looking for in a bungalow that i absolutely love

MrMike
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
22 days ago

I always wanted to live in Pasadena and/or San Pedro in a place like this. Alas, perhaps in another lifetime!

CvZ1200
24 days ago

As a lurker on this website for at least a year, I’ve truly enjoyed the listings and all the wonderful comments! I’ve finally plucked up the courage to contribute a comment of my own.

Unfortunately, the first thing I’ll share on OHD is an old house tragedy. A house I’ve admired for years has come up for sale in Farmington, Connecticut. (I’ll post the link for the current sales listing a bit later in this comment.) The house 107 Main street had been in the same family since the 17th century when it sold a few years ago. Here’s an archived link of that old listing: https://www.aryeo.com/v2/107-main-st-farmington-21658/branded. I think it sold for between $450K and $500K

The house displayed amalgam of features dating to the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries. (I couldn’t find much 17th century in the photographs; the claimed 1660 construction date strikes me as dubious.) The family members who owned the house for more than three centuries were clearly careful stewards of a lot of architectural history.

Well, the house clearly fell into the hands of flippers, and you can see the result for yourself: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/107-Main-St_Farmington_CT_06032_M33857-31308. For $899,900, you can buy a house with all the charm of a dentist’s waiting room.

Gone are the 18th- and 19th-century floors, the early paneling in the bedrooms, the staircase with its beefy newel post, the expressive trim, the fireplace mantels, early doors, etc. In fact, many of the walls have disappeared, too. In their place: ugly prefab flooring, cheap hollow-core doors, featureless gray sheetrock, pot lights, antiseptic MDF trim, and uninspired “open concept.” The flippers even disposed of a robust old set of wooden entrance doors and replaced it with a cheap metal-clad faux Victorian/craftsman confection.

This was vandalism. The realtor has the temerity to call the house a “piece of history” and then crow that the house was “completely remodeled down to the studs with the finest level of craftsmanship….” (You call that craftsmanship?) I’ve seen a lot of thoughtless remodeling jobs, but this one hit especially hard.

celeste
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
24 days ago

That is downright infuriating! Frickin frackin grey, argh! WHAT. IS. WRONG with people that they would consider that garbage butcher job okay?! My heart breaks for your poor house. 😿😾

CvZ1200
Reply to  celeste | 110 comments
24 days ago

“Butcher job” is an apt description of what happened. After some Googling, I found an article in a local Connecticut paper explaining that an investor bought the house at auction after it failed to sell for $350K. I didn’t get very far into the article before the paywall popped up, but it did quote the investor’s lament that the house was in worse shape than he thought and that it required a complete gut job.

That may be true from an investor’s point of view. Investors want to maximize their returns and don’t generally fuss with details that may not appeal to their median buyer, who may be unwilling to live with uneven floors or rattling hardware. It often takes more time and money to restore old paneling or reset an old newel post than it does to rip it all out and head to the Home Depot.

I’ll leave the feasibility of restoring the house at reasonable cost to others on OHD who have more experience than I do. Perhaps the house suffered from structural challenges that would have made restoration or even stabilization difficult, even for a more sensitive buyer in that market.

Still, it’s always worrisome when historic houses fall into the hands of investors who don’t plan to live in them. I suspect a more sensitive buyer would have found a way to preserve more of the house without sending the entire interior into a landfill. Buyers like that are generally willing to live with the quirks, as long as systems and structure are sound. We’re all too happy to live with wavy floors and doors that don’t always stay closed.

By they way, some sources estimate that the rear of the house was built about 1685 and the front almost a century later: https://historicbuildingsct.com/wadsworth-homestead-1685/.

Gregory_K
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
23 days ago

You are normally so diplomatic, and your comments carefully measured, but when appropriate, they have teeth and they’re always to the point. Here, in a single paragraph, your comments have captured our feelings exactly.

M J G
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
22 days ago

Exactly. Disgusting when you see this never ending crap on home! It’s infuriating how people just don’t get it.

Gregory_K
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
23 days ago

STRUCTURAL PROBLEMS????
If color was available, that question would have been in red!

Just a note on the supposed structural problems the investor (s) found in this house that provoked its virtual destruction to ‘save’ it.

Now I’ve shamelessly bragged on this blog that I did my first work in Historic preservation when I was 10, about 60 years ago. I’m certain you’re all plainly tired of it, but 60 years does have its advantages.

As typical of me, I have used nearly 500 words, when perhaps several dozen should have sufficed.

I just reviewed the very good photographs in the first listing, both outside and in. I do not see a single indicator of structural problems. I’m certain all of you noticed that as well.

Outside:

If there has been significant structural problems in the frame’s beams or walls, the impact would have been visible in the ridgeline and the walls.

In the photographs, every horizontal and vertical was just as it should have been. The ridgeline looked just about perfect, and considering the age of the home’s structure, that’s pretty good evidence there wasn’t anything seriously wrong. Look at the porch. The posts were also vertical, without rotten bases. The deck was nearly flat, the boards without any serious problems.

The windows had been replaced, indicating that the family had not neglected the house. Few people replace windows in a house in danger of collapse.

Interior:

The interior provided better evidence of a home in good condition.

In the portion of the building that preserved 18th century interiors, if you look at the thin gaps above and below the doors, they were all very nearly even and straight. The doors had not been trimmed to accommodate significant slopes in the floor, and then rehung to disguise the problem. In photographs 26 and 28, the overmantel panel had cracked, and there were other minor flaws and gaps. In summary, the very handsome 18th century paneling, inexcusably lost in the rebuilding, and I hope sold rather than lost to a dumpster, was very nearly straight and true.

Where there were cracks between the edges of the Victorian interior enrichments and plaster, they were thin. There was nothing that would indicate the structure had shifted.

The ceilings were in good condition, without any staining from leaks. There weren’t any significant cracks of the sort that are common when the frame of a house shifts due to structural problems.

This was a home that was, at the very least, in acceptable condition; it was probably in good condition. Perhaps the investor (s) photographed the extensive demolition required to reduce an historic home to a bad copy of a motel 6 lobby, which would have recorded the structural problems that cannot be seen in the level and well preserved structure shown in the first set of listing photographs.

This was a wonderful home, combining 18th and 19th century architectural fittings of much better than average quality. Based on the evidence in those photographs, this was a handsome home in move-in condition, worthy of full preservation.

CvZ1200
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
23 days ago

I’ll certainly defer to your assessment, Gregory! I’ve seen investors and developers exaggerate the flaws in historic homes to justify their demolition – and this renovation was effectively a demolition. As for the paneling, I’m guessing an investor who could be satisfied with that gut job didn’t spend any time gently prying 18th century paneling from the original structure to save it for future use. (And I can see no conceivable structural reason for removing that paneling. I guess that, once you they swinging that sledgehammer, it’s hard to stop!)

Gregory_K
Reply to  celeste | 110 comments
23 days ago

This is an edited copy of my note to the agent. I had to work to hold my temper. This is undoubtedly one of the very worst renovation projects I’ve seen in my 60 years in this field.

This house is a brutal disaster! While that is my opinion, simply compare the photographs from the previous listing with those you have posted. The before photographs recorded a handsome, well-preserved home with an abundance of authentic historic detail.  Nothing from the 1600s was immediately obvious, but someone with experience such as mine, with decades in the business, would undoubtedly have been able to recognize early details in a walk though.
Why would anyone spend a large amount of money stripping an historic home of everything historic? You describe the home as built, or at least begun, in 1660. I dare you to find a single visible stick of wood, outside or in, that predates 2021 or 2022. As far as I am able to see, only the frame of this once historic home remains.
There were so many more successful ways that this could have been handled. For example, repaired, but unaltered, it could have been sold as home with a business on the first floor, and a residence above. It could have been used as an Airbnb, or a small inn. In any of those scenarios, as well as many others, at least a portion of the building would have been used for business purposes.  The single best tax deduction remaining is for the restoration of an historic building for commercial purposes, and the tax benefits are transferable. Any of those ideas would probably have made the people responsible for this mutilation more money. Above all, they’d have a building in tune with the character of Farmington.
Farmington is a wealthy town whose residents and the people its beauty attracts are knowledgeable about history and historic structures. One of the nation’s best house museums, Hill-Stead, its famous collection of great art, and famous gardens, is only the best known of the area’s many attractions. What clientele were your clients hoping to sell to? Of course, all of this is only my opinion, but look at the earlier listings and see what’s been lost.

CvZ1200
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
23 days ago

Kelly, I agree! I muttered many of those words myself. I would never have the stomach for investing in real estate if my financial interests were so destructive to beauty and history.

I’m seeing similar gut-jobs in DC, where we live–though none of them have wiped away 340 years of history in a few weeks. Here, the booming local economy contributes to the problem. Lots of cool kids with heavy piggy banks are moving into the city, and their tastes run to faux mid-century modern. Almost all of DC’s housing stock is older than that.

What results is Frankenstein creations with the vague proportions of a craftsman or Queen Anne and all the interior charm of a warehouse. White/gray kitchens occupy half of the ground floor, inlaid floors give way to manufactured hardwood, bathrooms overtake bedrooms, and walls disappear entirely, together with their trim. Add some trendy flourishes like Carrara marble and wire cable balustrades, and you have a $1.6 million house. Add some booths and cash registers, and you’d have an Arby’s.

I like my mid-century houses to have started life as mid-century houses, because those make architectural sense. The DC gut jobs, by contrast, remove all the meaningful sight lines, the overlay from room to room, large open casements, and other features that gave the interior spaces a sense of depth and dimension. Those gut jobs will be dated before the decade is out.

Kirsten
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
23 days ago

Hear, hear!! Welcome to the conversation, CvZ1200. While the case you’ve presented is indeed tragic, it’s wonderful to have your voice and passion in the weekly chat. Thanks for coming out of the shadows. You write beautifully, you argue passionately, and I’m delighted to make your acquaintance. I, too, was a lurker for months before finally chiming in a few weeks ago. I was amazed at how quickly I was welcomed and made to feel a part of the gang here. I hope you will feel just the same.

Gregory_K
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
23 days ago

Your description is superb. You’ve capture the destruction in a few paragraphs. Thanks.

‘White/gray kitchens occupy half of the ground floor, inlaid floors give way to manufactured hardwood, bathrooms overtake bedrooms, and walls disappear entirely, together with their trim. Add some trendy flourishes like Carrara marble and wire cable balustrades, and you have a $1.6 million house. Add some booths and cash registers, and you’d have an Arby’s.’

CvZ1200
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
23 days ago

Thanks to both of you for your kind words, Kirsten and Gregory_K! I enjoyed the contributions of both of you immensely while I was still a lurker. I’ve loved old houses as long as I can remember, and it’s fun to find like-minded people on this wonderful site.

Gregory_K
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
23 days ago

What is marvelous about this site is that the readers are all the sorts of people you’d welcome as neighbors, coworkers, bosses, even relatives.

There’s a passion for the larger human environment that is both wonderful and honest. Yes, there are readers who are professionals in this field, but the non-professionals in this field are just as knowledgeable, their comments just as observant and interesting.

What a pleasure it is to have met each of you.

CvZ1200
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
23 days ago

I’ve been returning to this site again and again to learn from professionals like you! It’s a wonderfully rich resource. Pleasure to have met you, too!

tyreval
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
23 days ago

I used to live in this town, and can testify that this house sits squarely in one of the most historic districts you could ever find. For the developer to ignore the setting as well as the nature of the house is frankly heinous. All he had to do was look around and realize he could shore up any damage to the structure and then sell it for very good money. People would run over themselves to offer it.

What remains a mystery is why the family ever sold the house to this developer. They should have held an essay contest and selected a winner with true passion for the place.

CvZ1200
Reply to  tyreval | 184 comments
23 days ago

Years ago, I lived about 30 minutes away, and I often admired Farmington’s historic district. I agree that the house fell into the wrong hands.

From what I’ve read, the family faced wrenching choices. The houses’ last resident required nursing care, and the children didn’t have the money to pay for it. The children had built lives in other parts of the country, and far-flung cousins didn’t have the resources or flexibility to take the house on. Apparently, bidding on the house stalled at $125K in 2019, so the buyers weren’t lining up.

I can relate. I fantasized about buying this house when it went on the market in 2019. It would have been wonderful to sift through all those layers of architectural history – like an archaeologist – while carefully preserving the house.

Still, I was too faint of heart, and probably too light of wallet, to take on something like that. I couldn’t relocate my family to Connecticut, and we certainly couldn’t carry a second house and full renovation.

Still, it’s hard to see such wanton destruction. If I were the current realtor, I wouldn’t pitch this house as historic, because it’s only a shell. And the reference to “craftsmanship” seems like the worst insult of all! To destroy so much carefully hand-made work, replace it with cheap Home Depot “product” – and then write about craftsmanship – is too much to take.

M J G
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
22 days ago

It’s completely disgusting. No shock here in my native state of Connecticut to see though. Watching people show zero regard for the historic fabric of a home and just turn it into every other modern hole is frustrating. If you want a big modern open floor plan… BUY A NEW HOUSE!

Kirsten
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
21 days ago

BINGO!

Gregory_K
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
23 days ago

Read my response below, as a note to both you and celeste

Kirsten
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
23 days ago

Oh no…

They’ve literally made it look like a McMansion inside. My jaw is dropping at the complete thoughtlessness this overhaul shows in the layers of history and architectural style that should have been evident within this house…the utter disinterest in the value those layers held.

Zippy Greff
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
22 days ago

The NRHP should protect ALL historic buildings, inside and out.

John Shiflet
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
22 days ago

Everything early and old has been “euthanized” for an HGTV look. Folks who know or appreciate nothing about old houses may decide this is THE perfect house but those people who like period details and visual evidence of the history embodied in the house will be disappointed. This complete modern makeover precluded any possibility of going back to a period look for the house. This is a glaring example of why 17th and 18th century homes that are relatively intact should be permanently protected from insensitive modernizations. Only outright demolition would have been a worse fate for this formerly historic home. Sad.

Rosewater
Supporter
24 days ago

[repost]

Bishop, GA rambler Victorian cottage from 2017 is back on the market and listing features a whole host of quality images! That delightfully weird porch turret is an absolutely unforgettable gem.

JohnS thinks it’s a G.F. Barber. Thoughts?

comment image

https://www.redfin.com/GA/Bishop/4851-Macon-Hwy-30621/home/139054154

Not sure if this link will work (for everyone).

https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2017/10/07/1908-queen-anne-bishop-ga/

ddbacker
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
23 days ago

Sometimes you don’t know what you want until you see it. Now I want a porch turret!

KevinP
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
23 days ago

Lovely images . . . but I am going to have to dock points for the lack of interior photos of the turret!  😂 

Ranunculus
Reply to  KevinP | 111 comments
23 days ago

There doesn’t seem to be any way to access the turret, nor to enter it upon arrival.

John Shiflet
Reply to  Ranunculus | 468 comments
22 days ago

During the 25 or so years that the Queen Anne style was popular, turrets, towers, and eyebrow windows/dormers were commonplace. The small turret on the end was obviously deemed necessary either by the builder or homeowner. I have seen at least one other example of a stuck on turret that had no function except ornamental and to tie the house more closely to the Queen Anne style. This happens more frequently on one story. less expensive homes while grander two story homes usually had towers and turrets integrated into room layouts with at least some functionality. As for the Barber design provenance, I’m less certain of that but it seems highly doubtful any draftsman at Barber’s Knoxville, TN offices would have added that turret out on the end in that manner. It could have been added by the owner as an observation spot, a children’s playhouse or a place for quiet and solitude. (that is, if the inside was finished out)

M J G
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
21 days ago

Kelly said in the old post of this house that they told her that turret is a recreation of one that was there from an old photo. So perhaps the original was open to the porch below. I have seen that before. I’d love to see that old photo that was mentioned.

DJZ
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
23 days ago

Fun thing, I’ve tried to look up Bishop, GA in Sanborn maps, but nothing comes up. Oddly enough, it was incorporated as a town in 1889, and the first census was done in 1890, but nothing for Sanborn. I mainly wanted to see if and when the porch underwent a modification.

Zippy Greff
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
23 days ago

Oh yeah! I am definitely getting Barber vibes from this. It looks very similar to a Barber posted recently.comment image

Edison
24 days ago

407 W, Main St. Robinson Illinois – $375,000

On the MLS for only a couple of weeks, this sprawling 1913 home has some beautiful mission style details throughout, gorgeous oak and leaded art glass work. Whomever has been living there has put a lot of care into its restoration and updating. And that white marble bathroom; wow.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/407-W-Main-St-Robinson-IL-62454/105591229_zpid/?

5b6cf51da52466c4ac60ff5a828bcc00-uncropped_scaled_within_1536_1152.jpg
Kirsten
Reply to  Edison | 46 comments
23 days ago

Gosh…from the outside, I didn’t expect to like this one as much as I do. Where you like the white marble bathroom, Edison, I love the tile bathroom at the end of the photos. Also, while it’s not a part of the house, per se, I love the idea of using old dark-stained cabinetry as freestanding shoe storage. Creative AND beautiful!

Also, that grooved, outer front door…? Gorgeous!

SonofSyosset
Supporter
24 days ago

We have walked by this house dozens of time over the years—it’s diagonally across from the William Paca House in Annapolis— and wondered about the inside. Now we know (gulp): $999,999 to buy this 1760-ish home, plus … well… considerable restoration costs. The interior photos start with image 37.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/195-Prince-George-St-Annapolis-MD-21401/36134350_zpid/

CvZ1200
Reply to  SonofSyosset | 235 comments
24 days ago

We’ve also walked by this house, which looks well preserved from the outside. $1 million is a steal for that much space at that location in Annapolis–but the restoration costs could be substantial.

What a beautiful house, though! High ceilings, large rooms, lots of early material, and a substantial yard for that urban setting!

Kimberly62
Supporter
23 days ago

1954, Saint Petersburg, FL, 1,900,000
From the listing: “designed in 1954 by prominent architect William B. Harvard, an AIA gold medal winner and designer of many historic local landmarks, and this mid-century marvel has remained in the family to date…At the time of its construction, important environmental issues influenced the unique design of wide overhangs to prevent direct sun intrusion, and large jalousie windows to provide 100% ventilation…Cypress and mahogany paneling throughout…pantry bar serving the living room reflects the mid-century entertainment style…”

This house to me is fabulous-a lot to admire said in the listing. I have a connection to the town. My great grandparents who built my family cabin retired to St. Pete. I visited them there many times at their home at the Suncoast Manor. They took their 1965 Chrysler New Yorker by train every year up to MA to spend the summer (the car later came to be mine in the early 80’s via my grandparents-my first car). I remember the Pier in St. Pete with its lazer light going out to the ocean. Also the Salvador Dali museum which I went through with my Great Grandmother and I enjoyed her comments on the work. She was an artist of which I am the fourth artist down that line. Another thing to note is their use of cypress (in the house I am sharing here), and my family cabin’s floor in MA is cypress-smile.

801 37th Ave N, Saint Petersburg, FL 33704 | MLS #U8166527 | Zillow

bobby white
Supporter
23 days ago

Places to hunker down for a rainy winter. All have Flood Factor™ Minimal Risk rating except the Beverly Hills one where the rating is Moderate.

1949 $899,000
2 bed 2 bath 1,782sqft
1.04 acre lot
45215 Indian Shoals Rd, Mendocino, CA 9546
”Tucked behind coastal cypress trees is an artistic retreat where the sound of distant ocean waves hum in the background. Wander the garden paths and hidden orchard, or enjoy the sun on the south facing deck. When you’ve fully soaked in Nature’s splendor, retreat into the warmth of rustic rooms lit by ample windows and skylights and enjoy a cozy fire.”…
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/45215-Indian-Shoals-Rd_Mendocino_CA_95460_M93728-70190

1817 $3,750,000
3 bed 3 bath
2,329sqft
4 acre lot
100 Boronda Ln, Monterey, CA 93940
”Built in 1817 by Don Manuel Boronda during the Spanish imperial period, and known to be the first private residence in Monterey…The well-appointed living spaces include the main historic adobe, the carriage house, and the guest cabin known as Casa Vaquero.”…
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/100-Boronda-Ln_Monterey_CA_93940_M22179-14992

1923 $32,500,000
7 bed 9 bath
12,220sqft
1.14 acre lot
1005 Woodland Dr, Beverly Hills, CA 90210
”Classic design, majestic proportions, bucolic setting and unrivaled amenities add up to a Beverly Hills compound of style, substance and impeccable pedigree. An address known for its legendary entertaining and industry cachet, the Harry Warner estate has hosted dignitaries of stage, screen and state since the late 1920s”…. 
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1005-Woodland-Dr_Beverly-Hills_CA_90210_M28629-68552

1915 $4,655,000
5bed 3.5bath 2,862sqft0
.64acre lot
1570 Virginia Way,
La Jolla, CA 92037
”Built by the Helms Family from Los Angeles early in the 20th Century, this American Lodge emanates a life well lived and much enjoyed. The seaside ambiance offers a unique, warm and comforting lifestyle…the home is currently in the review process of historical designation.”
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1570-Virginia-Way_La-Jolla_CA_92037_M26579-61112

Harry Nilsson Everybody’s Talkin’

I’m going where the sun keeps shining
Through the pouring rain
Going where the weather suits my clothes
Banking off of the northeast winds
Sailing on a summer breeze
And skipping over the ocean like a stone..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzFM_-1moSo

Kirsten
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
23 days ago

Bobby, you always deliver the goods. Can’t wait for Snarl to see some of these…He’ll flip!

If it were me, I’d re-do the kitchen in that Mendocino property to give it a more rustic character that would jibe better with the rest of the house. I’d also want to do more with that guest house to make it come alive. But wow, what a cool property!

The house in Monterey is pretty much pitch perfect. Someone thought about that one a lot. I’m not a big fan of bright red in large quantities, so I’d probably change that in the kitchen. But overall, WOW! Plus a fountain, a carriage house, and a tiny little guest house…? Amazing.

On the Beverly Hills property…I’m frequently partial to 1920s homes, and there were some architects in that era who really knew how to do mansions right. This example is no exception. The sense of age that comes from the floor treatments and masonry arches to all of those beautiful ceiling beams and joists…Marvelous! Plus an elegant staircase, understated mantelpieces, French doors, and exquisite grounds. Its enough to make one gasp. The kitchen is pitch perfect for the house, in my view, and that’s a room that’s often hard to get right.

The kitchen in the La Jolla house is also really well done, in my opinion. I particularly like this room. And what an interesting Toleware lamp they’ve got there. I had to think about it for a bit. Wasn’t sure it worked, at first. But the more I think about it, the more I kind of like the quirkiness of it.

Screen Shot 2023-01-07 at 1.56.39 PM.jpg
Kimberly62
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
23 days ago

Bobby White, the Mendocino I love, the La Jolla I was going to post, but very glad you did. Harry Nilsson is a favorite in our house. There is a good biography out there on his life. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0756727/

DJZ
23 days ago

This 1920 house is in a recently being revived neighborhood of Annapolis. What makes this interesting is its listed as 185, but it was registered as 187 back in 1921. The side portion was added on sometime after 1921 but there are no sanborn maps after 1921 to show when that was put on. Im assuming that when the side portion was added is when the address changed from 187 to 185 as the lot the side portion was on 185

185 Clay St, Annapolis, MD 21401 | MLS #MDAA2051000 | Zillow

Barbara V
Supporter
23 days ago

“1800” Greek Revival on 2+ acres with barn and apple trees in Great Barrington, MA, for $949,000 – a significant reduction from the $1.3 million it was originally listed at, albeit still far beyond my budget. Not for the purist, but quite charming and in a lovely setting:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/34-Seekonk-Cross-Rd-Great-Barrington-MA-01230/63437320_zpid/

comment image

Kirsten
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
23 days ago

What a lovely property you found, Barbara. I agree. Not for the purist. But it’s full of light and warmth and feels very welcoming–inside and out. It’s certainly a place I can picture myself being happy.

Barbara V
Supporter
23 days ago

Hope this is OK to share: Historic Albany Foundation in Albany, NY, is looking for a part-time administrative assistant, in case any OHDers live in the area and are interested.

https://www.historic-albany.org/news/2023/1/4/administrative-assistant-job-vacancy

And, btw Historic Albany’s Parts Warehouse is a great not-for-profit place to find all sorts of period architectural items, from doors and windows to hardware and plumbing fixtures, moldings, radiators and you name it…

Tony Bianchini
23 days ago

Senoia, GA, built 1890 (looks more like 1850-69ish), $425K, already pending. TANTALIZING, dreamers!

https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2876-Gordon-Rd_Senoia_GA_30276_M52030-54756

celeste
Reply to  Tony Bianchini | 241 comments
23 days ago

Nice one, Tony! And you’ve definitely got the date right, one of my (more) favorite periods, and with that gorgeous land. Dreaming dreamer, here….

John Shiflet
Reply to  Tony Bianchini | 241 comments
22 days ago

Agreed…no later than the 1870’s but likely late Antebellum period. Very intact looking inside but the ornamental front porch is phenomenal. Thanks for sharing.

CvZ1200
22 days ago

Two interesting houses in the Upper Valley of Vermont and New Hampshire. These might be white elephants, but I keep coming back to them.

422 NH Route 10, Orford, NH–“1770”: $729,000.
https://www.trulia.com/p/nh/orford/422-nh-route-10-orford-nh-03777–2285662839

This handsome (and huge) brick federal has been on the market for many months, and the price has been dropping steadily. It looks more like 1810-1830 than 1770, but there may be an 18th-century house hidden within it. According to the listing, it’s in move-in condition–and the photos seem to bear that out. Orford is a beautiful and prosperous small town near Dartmouth College, so it would be interesting to know what’s keeping buyers away. Ten bedrooms and bathrooms spread across nearly 7,000 square feet is more than I’d be able to handle, but perhaps it can attract a striving innkeeper somewhere with a healthy bank account.

26 Main Street, Windsor, VT–1815: $835,000: https://www.trulia.com/p/vt/windsor/26-main-st-windsor-vt-05089–2004272561

This beautiful brick federal with nine bedrooms and baths has been on the market for the better part of two years. It’s operating as an inn. Windsor isn’t quite as prosperous as Orford, but it, too, is close to Dartmouth, and the countryside is just as lovely. The house looks like it saw substantial renovations early in the 20th century.

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

I’m going to take a different approach here, since so many old houses I find have lost so much of their originality that I usually pass on sharing them. I’ve decided from now on to share an appealing photo or two along with a remuddling disclaimer to spare everyone disappointment – ie, enjoy the photo(s), but pull up the listing at your own peril:

comment image

comment image

1816 (?!) on 47 acres in Homer, NY, for $579,000:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6192-Stevens-Rd-Homer-NY-13077/55749128_zpid/

DJZ
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

Heres another, gutted open floor plan in a oldie, but they saved the staircase with the original finish

6786 State Route 41, Homer, NY 13077 | MLS #S1432883 | Zillow

Rosewater
Supporter
22 days ago

Here’s another possibly G.F. Barber design house (somewhere) down South, “in rural Georgia”. Looks like the flat roof in the middle has lonnng since failed; but the rooms flanking the now nearly caput center halls are still in remarkably good condition. “Breaks my heart”. Indeed. But looks quite savable to me.

Kappy (unlike most), does a great job focusing on the architecture and ignoring the junk ‘left behind’, dead animals, scat, etc., unlike the majority of urbex YT-ers. He does however overdo it on the “wow”s. “Wow”, what wow? Muting is an option.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ChRI7TZekek

John Shiflet
Reply to  Rosewater | 8499 comments
22 days ago

Definitely a George Barber design. I looked carefully but nothing in Kappy’s video suggested an 1876 origin. Based on the brass plated “Colonial” door hardware, tiles, paneled doors, and other details. I would date this house from about 1900 to 1910 with it most likely being towards the middle between those dates. Sad indeed to see a fine fretwork spandrel near the staircase water damaged and in pieces. I think the pieces could be restored. (I’ve restored a damaged fretwork spandrel before) The newel post is missing but salvage versions from that era are fairly plentiful. I totally disagree with the commenters who wrote the house off as unrestorable. A new roof followed by carefully cleaning up the inside and then a straightforward repair and restoration could easily put this house back into use. A mantel was taken out but green tiles left. My concern is potential looters would see what remains in this house and would do further harm inside. Looks like an estate situation left the house in this condition. Still looks very much worth saving but doubtful that it will be. Thanks for sharing. BTW, sounded to me like Kappy was saying “Holy Cow” over and over again. I wonder how far the path is from being a roving explorer to being a preservationist? I see it as a fleeting opportunity for someone unless the house has already been demolished.

Rosewater
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
20 days ago

John, you should check out his channel. There a handful or more places he’s been in which are both interesting and very likely savable. He seems like a sweet guy; and I very much like that he focuses on the buildings and keeps the commentary to a minimum.

I agree with your assessment of the home’s vintage. The remaining mantles are to my eye the boldest indicator of that. I also very much agree with your assessment of it’s viability for restoration. Had the pitched roofs failed in a similar manner to the center, flat roof that would not be the case.

Meg
22 days ago

Portfolio of 23 Buildings, built 1865-1912, Cincinnati OH, $1,179,100

1 triplex, 3 duplexes, 1 mixed use, 1 church, 1 rectory and 16 single family homes. Seventeen of the twenty-three buildings are leased to tenants. In addition, there are 39 vacant lots zoned as residential.” Unfortunately no interior photos but lots of different styles of homes, also lots of brick! They are located in close proximity between 2 parks and close to the river. This is way out of my price range but I dream about restoring historical buildings and supporting a community at the same time. Hopefully this is bought by someone who will do right by both!

https://www.loopnet.com/Listing/Cincinnati-Portfolio-23-Blds-39-Lots/25522512/

John Shiflet
Reply to  Meg | 23 comments
22 days ago

Sedamsville is an old Riverside town on the southewestern outskirts of Cincinnati. A couple of decades ago the entire commercial district of the town along the River road was razed leaving a residential pocket neighborhood going up the hill from the River road. I visited the residential area and saw several nice 19th century structures in various conditions. One brick Italianate, as I recall, had a very impressive original interior. For a preservation minded developer, this would be an opportunity to save an entire 19th century neighborhood in an underappreciated part of the Cincinnati metropolis. I can only agree with your hopes, Meg.

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

Here’s a chuckle for everyone from the July 1914 Ladies Home Journal entitled “Good Houses Spoiled by Bad Colors”:

comment image

comment image

old codger
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
22 days ago

The diamond window at the top of the gable looks like a Walter Burley Griffin design.

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

Here’s another from the same source:

comment image

comment image

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

And:

comment image

comment image

M J G
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
22 days ago

I love these. What’s funny is if that was published in 1884 instead of 1914 the photos may have been revered in what is hideous and what isn’t. Always funny how every 10 – 20 years tastes change.
😂😂😂

CvZ1200
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
22 days ago

I agree! It’s especially striking how literally the author takes ornaments like the pilasters. In the third example, we learn that vivid contrasts make “the corner pilasters appear to be the only – and inadequate – support of the corners and roof….” Was that just the idiosyncratic opinion of this author? The thick pilasters certainly help the house seem substantial, but they seem distant enough from their classical forbears that we should relieve them of such weighty responsibility!

That said, I do prefer colonial revivals of the early 20th century to the colonial-style houses that filled suburbs in the 50’s through the 70’s, and that might have something to do with the earlier houses’ use of architectural details that lent them a sense of stability. In examples from the 50’s onwards, cornices, pilasters (if there were any), and door-surrounds were often paper-thin, like stickers on a doll-house. Perhaps they just weren’t bearing their share of the aesthetic burden.

M J G
Reply to  CvZ1200 | 64 comments
22 days ago

I totally agree. And while I don’t care for colonial styles as my first choice I certainly agree that the early 20th century over the later just like you said.

Barbara V
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
22 days ago

Exactly! What else is funny is that I found myself preferring the “unpleasant” color version in each example – especially the last one.

Kirsten
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
21 days ago

Me, too!

John Shiflet
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
22 days ago

By the 1920’s popular opinion (in the U.S.) held that Colonial style houses should be painted in a dignified white. It didn’t take long for that concept to be applied to older houses generally so by the 1950’s everyone was subscribing to the “dignified simplicity” of successful Colonial design. It wasn’t until the 1970’s that a few brave souls risked ridicule and scorn to repaint old houses in original period colors . After the Painted Ladies Movement was launched in San Francisco, it gradually spread across the country. Some folks went overboard with colors resulting in garish or gaudy houses with too many small details picked out in many colors but nowadays a more sensitive and informed approach has produced some dazzling examples. White will never go out of style, though.

Rosewater
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

Hah! Vindicated. Heavenly white for the score and the win. 😉

MrMike
22 days ago

I found this lovely 1910 house in Michigan City, Indiana, for sale for $135,000. The most interesting thing is that the longtime owner was, among other things, an engineer for the South Shore Railroad, which passes directly past the property. He added an office to the second floor of the outbuilding/garage which overlooks the tracks! I hope the new owner leaves that part alone because it’s definitely unique.

https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/123-Vail-St_Michigan-City_IN_46360_M40532-08482

DJZ
Reply to  MrMike | 93 comments
20 days ago

i lived in a older house that was 3 blocks from this house in the early 2000’s That area is an interesting neighborhood.

old codger
Supporter
22 days ago

My wife and I drove over to Fort Sheridan, IL on Chicago’s lakefront today to buy a Stickley cabinet at an estatesale. So we drove around and enjoyed a hike to the beach. Fort Sheridan has some great historic places. Looking at Zillow I saw this place:
2700 Point Ln, Highland Park, IL 60035 Built 1995, It isn’t old, but it was Michael Jordan’s. Fabulous full court gym, 9 bedrooms, 19 baths.

$14.8 Million, monthly payment $101,657. Property taxes only $27,234 per month.

If I win the 1.2Billion Mega Millions lottery I might consider it.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2700-Point-Ln-Highland-Park-IL-60035/2077748498_zpid/?

Alison
Reply to  old codger | 74 comments
21 days ago

It’s been on the market for several (or more) years. I’m not sure what I would put in place of the basketball court and gym. Hmm. Nah, were I to win the 1.2 billion Mega Millions I would want something more historic and classy. Sorry MJ.

Rosewater
Reply to  old codger | 74 comments
20 days ago

No doubt the agent would be thrilled if you did. Heheheh.

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

Another sad example – this one from 1904 in Cadiz, OH, for $89,000. (Got me checking out the area, John.) Encouraging staircase, fireplace and possible pocket doors, otherwise not a lot to get excited about.

comment image

comment image

Listing: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/253-S-Muskingum-St-Cadiz-OH-43907/107232021_zpid/

DJZ
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

This house is cute, actually. What some might find simplistic others can find charming and perfect. For me its the floors, the woodwork throughout, the finished attic, and the house layout

John Shiflet
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

Thanks for sharing. Cadiz is a town originating in 1803 (the year of Ohio statehood) that began when early settlers found shallow coal deposits near or on their properties. It is a quiet town with hard working people and no bad neighborhoods that I’m aware of. Good housing values can still be found here as seen on this house. I’m hoping with more of the historic housing stock being bought recently up by newcomers that collectively it will help bring prosperity back to our small town. Modernizations in this house are not excessive and much of the original historic fabric and details remain. It appears to be move in ready and is only a short couple of blocks to the 1895 county courthouse and downtown stores and restaurants. Streetview: https://goo.gl/maps/JVu8BtKwaSmgQYBdA I expect this one will not stay on the market very long at that price.

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

Here’s an 1858 Brick Italianate in Wheeling, WV, for $350,000. No kitchen photos, which hopefully means no recent updates – fingers crossed. Very appealing, with lincrusta and some nice antique-looking lighting:

comment image

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/827-Main-St-Wheeling-WV-26003/83840226_zpid/

DJZ
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

This house has everything i like going for it. As a victorian glass collector its wonderful to see 1890’s Geo. Duncan & Son shades on a gas fixture chandelier and what also looks like 1889 Gillander shades on another chandelier and Hobbs opalescent blown shades on the staircase fixture. If i had the money, id buy this in a mila sec. Plus not to nention id want to investigate why the wood floor decorative edging is cut off by a wall in the pink room. And im really hoping that the kitchen and bathrooms are somewhat untouched or modestly updated

old codger
Supporter
22 days ago

23 Scott Loop, Highland Park, IL
1890, 2.2M

Expanded, remodeled and recently updated Fort Sheridan Captains Mansion directly on Lake Michigan. Every single room in this house has unobstructed views of Lake Michigan!!

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/23-Scott-Loop-Highland-Park-IL-60035/51681935_zpid/

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

1913 in McMechen, WV, for $159,500. Lots of nice interior details, despite the vinyl siding and some unfortunate updates:

comment image

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/40-11th-St-McMechen-WV-26040/22854810_zpid/?

DJZ
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

Im just wondering why they removed the stairwell bench but left that one side. The other updates are easily fixable, overall, this house is beautiful and thankfully none of the woodwork was painted.

Rosewater
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

That must be faux bois. Gorge.

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

1830/1854 brick Greek Revival in Washington, PA, for $475,500. Pretty setting, but not for those of us who require patina in our old houses:

comment image

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/64-Skylark-Dr-Washington-PA-15301/49749555_zpid/

CvZ1200
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
21 days ago

I love this house! High ceilings, light, beautiful proportions, elegant, understated details…. I see more 1830 than 1854.

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago

“1900” Queen Anne in Washington, PA, for $270,000. Needs a period paint job on the outside, and paint stripping plus some backdating inside. Street view shows lots of nice-looking period properties in the neighborhood:

comment image

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/348-E-Beau-St-Washington-PA-15301/49769703_zpid/

John Shiflet
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
21 days ago

Barbara, Washington, Pennsylvania, the home of Washington & Jefferson College, is less than an hour’s drive away from my eastern Ohio home. When I’ve had the occasional visitor, I like to take them over to see Washington’s fine collection of historic homes including the one you shared. Here’s an album of photos I took showing some of Washington’s most picturesque homes: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/albums/72157719357469541

Barbara V
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
21 days ago

Thanks, John! Those are some gorgeous houses – I may need to schedule a road trip!

DJZ
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

This is what I’d like to call a livable fixer upper. Meaning all the back dating can be done while living in the house.

Barbara V
Supporter
22 days ago
M J G
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
22 days ago

You got me! 😉

DJZ
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
20 days ago

this is 2 houses down from the pink brick house she posted with the post only showing the chandelier

Dave
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
22 days ago

What a really gorgeous house, and so much of it still there and nicely restored. I love it.

Barbara V
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
22 days ago

OK, I’m an idiot. I was curious how Kelly could have missed these Wheeling properties, so looked them up after the fact. No surprise, Kelly didn’t miss them, I did. Not sure how, but had I been paying attention, the 827 Main Street Wheeling property would have been my hands down favorite for 2022. Can I still change my answer…?

Komiza
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
21 days ago

I love the ceiling!!!!!

Cora
Moderator
21 days ago

Here’s a cute little rural Kentucky schoolhouse that hasn’t been mucked up and looks quite livable, as is.

Even the chalkboard writing looks authentic.

Monticello, KY
1919
$50K:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/309-Jennings-Hollow-Rd-Monticello-KY-42633/234309314_zpid/

Cora
Moderator
21 days ago

I always feel like, when I see seafoam green carpet, there’s a fair chance that not much of the home has been remodeled…or at least not completely ruined if updates have occurred. That’s true for a good portion of this beautiful, and quite interesting home.

Weaverville, CA
1897
$1.1MIL:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/44-Court-St-62-Weaverville-CA-96093/2060188580_zpid/

Kimberly62
Reply to  Cora | 2267 comments
21 days ago

I like the kitchen and the library

Kirsten
Supporter
21 days ago

1905 in Sturgeon Bay, WI4789 sq ft on 2.7 acres$899,000

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6172-S-Shoreside-Cir-Sturgeon-Bay-WI-54235/229125476_zpid/

There’s a lot remaining to love in this house. There are certainly some things I would change. But jeepers, so much to work with here–and so much that someone has actually been careful to save. Love some of the lighting fixtures. The porch is amazing. Plus…a little bit of acreage.

Screen Shot 2023-01-09 at 7.31.58 PM.jpg
Barbara V
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
20 days ago

Interesting outdoor furniture!

comment image

Kirsten
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

INDEED, Barbara!

Anne M.
Supporter
21 days ago

The Springfield (MA) Preservation Trust is hosting historian Derek Strahan (author of Lost New England) with a live Facebook presentation on “Lost Colonial-Era Buildings”

Event by Springfield Preservation Trust
Public 
 Anyone on or off Facebook
The Josiah Dwight House, featured in an article in this newsletter, was one of the many important historic buildings that once stood in Springfield. Join Springfield historian Derek Strahan for a virtual lecture as he explores the history and photographs of some of the other lost colonial-era buildings from Springfield’s past. The lecture will take place on January 19 at 7 p.m. by Facebook Live.

This house was built in Springfield in 1754 & relocated to Historic Deerfield in 1950.

Josiah Dwight.jpg
Kimberly62
Reply to  Anne M. | 1394 comments
20 days ago

wow, that is a bit of a trip from Springfield to Old Deerfield, but glad it happened. I wonder what the historical movement was during the last century, because I believe that is where the last bulk of the preservation could happen.

Anne M.
Supporter
21 days ago

I got lost in pricey Los Angeles over the weekend (figuratively speaking)
1912 Craftsman $2,249,000 with a 2 br/1bath guest house. Clearly this house has been cherished over the years
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2003-Canyon-Dr-Los-Angeles-CA-90068/20807868_zpid/
***
1910 Craftsman $1,245,000 updated but lots of original charm left including a very handsome breakfront in the dining room
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1841-Cimarron-St-Los-Angeles-CA-90019/20602875_zpid/
***
1911 Craftsman $3,995,000 also with a guest house, all the wood is painted but it is definitely worth a look. Lots of curb appeal & the center hallway is also very appealing.
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/251-S-Norton-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90004/20779788_zpid/

2003 Canyon.JPG
Anne M.
Supporter
21 days ago

1916 Colonial Revival in Pittsfield, MA $499,000 classic exterior, graceful staircase
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/181-Bartlett-Ave-Pittsfield-MA-01201/108614568_zpid/
***
1924 in Holyoke, MA $380,000 not crazy about the kitchen but love the floors, the pantry and the aqua-tiled bath
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1780-Northampton-St-Holyoke-MA-01040/56177162_zpid/
***
1732 in Wilbraham, MA $319,000 Lots ! of ! exclamation! points ! in ! the ! listing! (it is a very nice house though and who can blame the realtor for being enthusiastic about an old house?)
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/648-Main-St-Wilbraham-MA-01095/62554773_zpid/

1875 Second Empire in Hampden, MA $399,000 love the original front doors & staircase
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/601-Main-St-Hampden-MA-01036/56174036_zpid/

Kimberly62
Reply to  Anne M. | 1394 comments
20 days ago

thanks for the Wilbraham, that fits in nicely with a number of my dreams-for some reason the wall paper caught my eye and the bookshelf with the scalloped edging.

ChrisICU
21 days ago

An iconic address doesn’t always mean a quick sale. Here’s a coop n NYC in the Dakota that’s been on the market for over a year. The building has been home to some important people including Judy Garland, Lauren Bacall, and John Lennon.

At 9.5M this two bedroom is surely a pricy pad and the Grandma style may not be popular today, but I thought y’all would enjoy seeing the amazing architectural interiors. No Central Park views, but it’s in a quiet part of CPW. The listing says there have been updates, but it still evokes a late 19th century vibe. Oak paneling may be out of fashion today, but I’m grateful that it hadn’t been painted. It will come back one day.

Taxes and monthly coop fees are astronomical but I’m sure those who could afford this aren’t worried about that.

https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1-W-72nd-St-Apt-47_New-York_NY_10023_M98150-21133

CvZ1200
Reply to  ChrisICU | 773 comments
21 days ago

Selling just one of those paintings could cover the taxes for a while! Unless those are copies – and who in the Dakota would own copies of anything? – that’s quite an art collection!

Barbara V
Reply to  ChrisICU | 773 comments
20 days ago

The lighting and finishings (and furniture) are gorgeous. I hope they don’t end up sacrificed to the gray and white fad.

comment image

M J G
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

Dang it… someone did a fantastic job on some of those ceilings, friezes, and wall fills. I can’t tell what is stencil or paper from the pictures but it’s all top-quality replication or restoration for sure!

I’m going to do the virtual tour. I might be able to tell more from that.

Edit* Up close the front room, they copied the stenciling on the walls from the library of the mark twain house and looking at the ceiling it seems to be new application. Not sure if they mimicked an original ceiling or copied from other historic sites but I’m pretty impressed with the application in general.

I’m fearful too, that it will all be painted over for the white gray atrocity that is taking over the world today. Someone will paint all the rooms gray, the woodwork white, and sand down and stain the floors blotchy gray.

Robert
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
20 days ago

God forbid they should do that.

ChrisICU
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
20 days ago

I Hope you did the virtual tour – they did a great job

M J G
Reply to  ChrisICU | 773 comments
20 days ago

well all of the woodwork in that house and stenciling technically went out of fashion 100 years ago but its all historic so I too am hopeful no one doesn’t come in with the hideous gray trend.

Barbara V
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
20 days ago

If I owned this place, I’d find a way to insert and enforce a preservation covenant in the deed, and with that achieved be more than happy to knock 50% off the price. I mean, what’s the point of having money if you can’t accomplish something with it, right?

Robert
Reply to  ChrisICU | 773 comments
20 days ago

Call me Grandma. I could move right in!

M J G
Supporter
20 days ago

Fun to enjoy a moody interior photo from the late 19th century tagged as 1876. Looks like a blue agave in the window along with some other wonderful plants. I love the mixture of pots. The crude barrel, but the one housing the ferns is really stunning. Almost Egyptian. Tons of paintings hanging from picture rails on the wall are fun too juxtapositioning like so many homes. It was the trend and style to have layers and lots of things to look at. Even one on the door has a photo. Anyway.. thought I’d share.
comment image

DJZ
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
20 days ago

Interesting to see that even in the victorian times they covered doors that werent being used

M J G
Reply to  DJZ | 600 comments
20 days ago

They sure did. Even put furniture in front of them etc if they weren’t used. 😊

Kimberly62
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
20 days ago

I love this photo, the agave was immediately impressive, I guess I should learn more about how they had plants back then. I bring lots of plants in every winter, including bay laurel, avocado, fig, lemon, and they are all in the dark right now, so I might be missing a few of the big ones…the mixture of containers is impressive. Also, the lot of hanging pictures on the wall. I use my spaces similarly, though on a humbler scale. The cabin is uninsulated and inbetween the studs hang lots-collections of all sorts of things from topigraphical maps of the area the cabin is on or the depths of the pond, to oil and water colors of the cabin to various antigue prints & posters, pottery and old child’s toys, and family artwork. I am certainly not the sole colIector here, it took a family.I love the eclectic and group voice that shows up, just like my books that also line the walls.

Cora
Moderator
20 days ago

This southern mansion has an impressive entrance and much to love on the inside.

With all of it’s swagger, I feel like there’s some interesting history lurking in the walls (hint hint, JimH)…

Laurinburg, NC
1911
$280K:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/221-McRae-St-Laurinburg-NC-28352/228127558_zpid/

JimH
Reply to  Cora | 2267 comments
20 days ago

Built for clothing store owner Leonidas Eugene Benton (1876-1935) and family. After he died at 58, his wife Fannye Lee opened The Colonial there – “Approved by Duncan Hines.”

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/157528177/fannye-benton

ColonialLaurinburgNC1946.png
ColonialLaurinburgNC1946rev.png
Dave
20 days ago

This is from ChatGPT, the latest darling of AI, you can check it out at openai.com.

Why are historic houses better than new houses?

There are a number of reasons why some people may prefer historic houses to new ones. Here are a few possibilities:

  1. Character and charm: Many historic houses have a sense of character and charm that is difficult to replicate in new construction. They may have unique architectural details, such as moldings, fireplaces, or built-in cabinetry, that give them personality and make them feel like homes rather than just houses.
  2. Sense of history: Living in a historic house can also give a sense of connection to the past and a sense of place in the community. It may have a rich history and may have been home to notable figures or played an important role in the community over time.
  3. Quality construction: Many older homes were built with care and craftsmanship that can be hard to find in new construction. They may be constructed from sturdy materials and built to last, whereas new houses may be more focused on fast construction rather than materials longevity.
  4. Location: Often, historic houses are located in desirable, established neighborhoods with mature trees and other established features that can be hard to find in new developments.
  5. Space utilization: many older homes have space utilization that is designed in a different way than the current standard, some people find the layouts of older homes to be more practical and efficient than new homes.

It’s worth noting that while historic houses may have these advantages, they also have their own set of challenges such as needed renovations, lack of modern amenities, or even zoning restrictions and regulations. In the end, it’s a matter of personal preference and what you’re looking for in a home.

Barbara V
Reply to  Dave | 285 comments
20 days ago

 “In the end, it’s a matter of personal preference and what you’re looking for in a home.”

With that in mind, I pray that those who don’t love historic houses and their perceived inconveniences will do everyone a favor and buy or build new. God knows how many great old houses are eviscerated daily for those who are unable to appreciate and protect their inherent value. Once destroyed, they are gone forever.

Old Buildings Are Not Ours.jpeg
Kimberly62
Reply to  Barbara V | 2004 comments
20 days ago

very good Barbara, I like Ruskin’s words and yours here

Barbara V
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
20 days ago

Thanks, Kimberly!

BRE
20 days ago

Unadilla, New York
Yr. 1840

Looking to Spread Your Wings?This Circa 1840’s Unadilla 4 bedroom, 2 bath sits on a gorgeous .93 acre lot with outbuildings! There’s plenty of space for gardening and other outdoor leisure hobbies. There are beautiful trees, berry bushes and also fruit trees. Inside there are is an abundance of space as well. Two living/family rooms and besides the 4 bedrooms there are two rooms for offices or hobbies. One floor living is doable here too, there are both a bedroom and a full bath, that was recently renovated, on the first floor! And take note, there is a wonderful front wraparound porch with 2 entrances and also an enclosed back porch area. This home has that older charm & character and with a little work, it can be your forever home!

https://www.bensonre.com/real-estate/otsego-delaware-mls/residential/property/137216-292-main-street-unadilla-ny-13849/

1.jpg
BRE
20 days ago

Cherry Valley, New York
Yr. 1812

Steeped In History! If you have a LOVE for history and old houses, this could be the perfect match! The home, built in 1812 by prominent physician Dr. Joseph White, was a wedding present for his son, Delos White, who was also a physician. The house remained in the White family until 1852, when it was purchased by the Honorable George C. Clyde, grandson of Capt. Samuel Clyde of Revolutionary War fame.
A combination of 2 merging styles of architecture, Georgian and Federal are represented in this home. The 2 balanced wings demonstrate Georgian symmetry. The recessed arches, dental tooth moldings, fluted columns with recess carved urns, ball and stick porch and abutted plank siding are classic Federal motifs.
Entering the home from the front, you are greeted by a large foyer and the original curved staircase. The wrought iron railing was handmade by Ziggy Gohde. Living room has pine floors, crown moldings and built in bookcases. Fireplace is not in use but could be retrofitted for use. Just needs the chimney restored.Formal dining room has oak floors and crown moldings. Large, eat in kitchen features the original fireplace and bee hive oven. Counter tops and island are made from local blue stone. The kitchen island has an eat in counter and extra storage.Kitchen floor is poplar and was hand scraped and planed to give the appearance of age. Pantry pass through is convenient to dining room and kitchen. Office/craft room/storage room off kitchen could be used for a variety of things. Laundry and utility room is also off the kitchen area for added convenience. In the back of the home there is an 800 Sq Ft one story addition. Seller once used it for a small organic grocery store. There are built in shelves and this room. This space could be made into a small apartment, home business or whatever your current needs might be. There is a separate outside entrance to this area. If you need or like a first floor bedroom the seller is using a large, front facing room as a bedroom. Also a full bath on the first floor.
Enter the 2nd floor from the front curved staircase or from the back staircase off the kitchen. Entering from the front there is a spacious foyer area and 2 rooms on either side of this foyer that are large and are currently used for extra storage. 3 bedrooms on the second floor. All have wood floors. 2 Bathrooms on the 2nd floor as well. All 2 bathrooms have heated fans and heated towel warmers.
On the driveway side of the house there is a large covered porch. It’s the perfect place to relax or entertain friends. At the end of the driveway there is a 2 story barn. Front portion is used for storage and the back is a very large, heated workshop or studio space.
This home sits on nearly 1/2 Acre lot and is within walking distance to all that this quaint Village has to offer. Shops, Eateries, Museums and Art Galleries.Be The Next Owner Of This Piece Of HISTORY!

https://www.bensonre.com/real-estate/otsego-delaware-mls/residential/property/136757-41-main-street-cherry-valley-ny-13320/

1.jpg
Jkleeb
Reply to  BRE | 4 comments
20 days ago

I saw this house online a while back and it’s wonderful with the exception of that wrought iron railing on the staircase inside.

Jkleeb
Reply to  Paul | 139 comments
20 days ago

It is a waste of a great house but at least they are salvaging the house. I see a lot just thrown in a dumpster in my neighborhood. I have no use for that balustrade but really want to buy it.

Comments are reader and auto-moderated. If you feel a comment is inappropriate,
click the red flag at the top right of the offending comment. No political comments.

Commenting means you've read and will abide by the comment rules.
Click here to read the comment rules, updated 4/20/22.

OHD does not represent this home. You must independently verify listing details.
Send this to a friend