Specially selected historic real estate for old house enthusiasts.

December 2, 2022: House Shares & Chit-Chat (Supporter Thank You!)

Added to OHD on 12/2/22 - Last OHD Update: 12/9/22 - 259 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is the weekly post where you share your old house finds, articles, or just chit-chat.

Sharing Guidelines…
1) To share an old house for sale, paste the link in the comment box below. Include the city & state, build date, price, and what you are sharing.
2) No tiny URL's. Link to the agent's site or a listing site (Redfin, Realtor, Zillow, etc.) No sites that require an account to view.
3) To keep comments from spam folders, limit your comment to no more than 10 links per comment.

!!!Not all shares can be featured on OHD.

Feel free to discuss houses, gardening, history, and related topics. NO political topics.
Special thanks to this month's OHD Supporters!
67drake
2ChihuahuaMom (Betty)
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older the better
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With thanks to JimH our history hero!
In memory of John Clifford, John Foreman & Phillip DeLong.

And those who have chosen not to be named. Thanks to all!

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Lancaster John
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
1 month ago

If you died in 1996, even mentioning a special friend as a survivor was pretty daring. Of course Palm Springs would have been somewhat ahead of the curve on this.

AmyBee
Reply to  Lancaster John | 1146 comments
1 month ago

No worries.😉

ddbacker
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
1 month ago

5 Purple Hearts! Thank you for your service, PFC Hanlin.

Kimberly62
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
1 month ago

I love the story of baby Hanlin and his life. The house is beautiful, I wish I could see inside when the photo was taken. The proportions on the house are nice and I love all of those beautiful details including the chimneys.

Gregory_K
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

What a remarkable guy. I wish people would complete oral histories. That line of medals is really impressive. Five Purple Hearts, a Bronze Medal and a Silver Medal. He and his friend must have been really impressive.

I had the stone carver put “Beloved Friend” on my friend’s grave. It’s been 26 years.

Gregory_K
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Thanks very much folks.

M J G
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
1 month ago

Great posts here. What a nice little home. Mouth watering iron work and tall windows. Probably not its original front porch.

Wow what a hero we have here. Great story on him.

SonofSyosset
Supporter
1 month ago

Has this 1820 house in Ruther Glen, VA, shown up here yet? The home needs considerable work—perhaps the biggest understatement on this website… ever—but with restoration and about ten acres (the listing says 181 but the fine print actually says ten), this could become somebody’s Old House Dream at a $298,414 list price.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/19559-Reedy-Mill-Rd-Ruther-Glen-VA-22546/223209770_zpid/

Kimberly62
Reply to  SonofSyosset | 235 comments
1 month ago

that would be a nice dream! I like it

BuffaloJules66
Reply to  SonofSyosset | 235 comments
1 month ago

Yes, it’s been on here.

M J G
Reply to  BuffaloJules66 | 40 comments
1 month ago

LOL that fluffy cat face makes me smile. someone is cosy

Gregory_K
Reply to  SonofSyosset | 235 comments
1 month ago

It has been here before, I believe just a few weeks ago, but this fine house is worth a second view. I have occasionally listed homes a second time because I was not able to read all the emails. Again, this seductive home is worth it. Thanks very much.

The brickwork has all sorts of interesting details that tell some of the structural history of this home, and there were many comments, so you may want to look up the other posting.

bobby white
Supporter
1 month ago

1908 $749,000
6bed 3bath 4,375sqft
1219 N Lopez St,
New Orleans, LA 70119
The listing: ”Once in a lifetime opportunity to restore an architecturally significant home in one of New Orleans most coveted neighborhoods -Bayou St John. Walk to Jazz Fest, restaurants, cafes, bayou and City Park! Zoned for 2-family, basement could serve as an apt or build-out as a grand single family home with guest space and entertainment area. The basement offers 4119 additional square ft. Many architectural details remain. Home has extensive fire damage but has a solid foundation. Potential tax credit project.”
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1219-N-Lopez-St_New-Orleans_LA_70119_M71376-70455

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Kimberly62
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

I remember seeing this one before, do not remember whether it was a share or I was just looking around. glad you are sharing it today

M J G
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

That’s sad. A lot of historic details in that house. Looks like combination gas/electric lights still on the walls and ceilings and that large fireplace is so unique. I hope this doesn’t end up demolished. Though I know a lot of people are turned off by fire projects. comment image

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

That massive textured fireplace is my favorite feature.

bobby white
Supporter
1 month ago

1897 Shotgun $440,000 
2bed 1.5bath 1,245sqft
2,801sqft lot
825 Desire St,
New Orleans, LA 70117 
I’m rather charmed by this nicely presented one. Really, really like the colors on the entry hall wall. Welcome home! I also like the other color choices on multiple walls. I see little I’d need to do other than move in and unpack. At a future point, though, I’ll give the kitchen some thought. The current cabinets do nothing for me. Was the refrigerator originally where the stove is now?
I’d like more land around this cottage but, after I change it to a walk in shower, the clawfoot tub can find a home out there. I’ve always wanted to grow bananas in a clawfoot tub. Bananas and clumping bamboo, underplanted with mint. 
I’ll think about exterior house color(s) the next time it needs painting. No rush.
From the listing: Elegant Bywater two bedroom side-hall shotgun home with gated PARKING. Layout includes an added living/dining room with floor to ceiling windows offering lots of natural light and second entrance. Original features incl. heart pine wood floors, high ceilings, fireplaces, mantles & medallion.”
Realtor has included the floor plan. The Property Details section says there is a pond and a greenhouse.
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/825-Desire-St_New-Orleans_LA_70117_M74464-59204

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Gregory_K
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

Very good comments, and I particularly like the part about “move in and unpack.” Living in an old house needn’t always require a half million dollars of backdating and repairs.

bobby white
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Agree. And…regarding aesthetic choices,it’s amazing how, as the years go by, creative solutions can be found for what could have had money thrown at it, if there were money to throw.
Case in point: I would have changed my kitchen cabinets early on,because I thought I didn’t like them. A few years went by and I discovered all I needed to do to be quite happy was remove the doors from the wall cabinets. I also had thought I wanted to change the tile countertops. When I had my epiphany about the cabinets, I discovered that I really like those yellow tiles even though they’re the result of a previous owner’s 1970’s project.
I love it when things like that happen. The end results always give me more pleasure than any store bought solutions.

Kirsten
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

Also agree. Sometimes things just grow on you. That layers of history thing can end up being so charming…  😊 

I love your solution of just taking the cupboard doors off, Bobby. Nice.

M J G
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

I agree. Especially if you don’t have the budget to start big projects, sometimes alterations can help. I’ve done it a ton of times. Modifying the things you don’t like into creative things you do on limited budge may end up becoming permanent solutions. May sound odd coming from me, someone who constantly talks about the major things I’d do to back date a house, but this is old house “dreams” so my dreams are big!

M J G
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

I’m with you Bobby White! I’ve done several modifications to things I hated to make them things I liked which turned into things I loved. .

Lancaster John
Supporter
1 month ago

1740 stone tavern on the outskirts of Kutztown, PA (a college town in Dutch Country) is for sale for 400K. Distressingly close to the road as many old taverns are, but it does have a nice open area out back and a bypass has been built which takes much of the through traffic off this road. Would make a great “live above the store” situation or just a large home. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/15305-Kutztown-Rd_Kutztown_PA_19530_M47573-60847

Gregory_K
Reply to  Lancaster John | 1146 comments
1 month ago

Ok, I admit I have lived a sheltered life. Why are there neatly arranged clothes hanging from the ceiling?

bobby white
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

A future Christo in the making?

Gregory_K
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

Great!!!!!!

Meg
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

I believe it’s for this type of workout, or something similar https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness/aerial-yoga

Snarling Squirrel
Supporter
1 month ago

1925 Cottage in Historic Braden Castle Park in Bradenton, Florida for $299K:
https://www.compass.com/listing/11-seminole-drive-bradenton-fl-34208/1157308713259360185/.

Thinking you’d like to be a snowbird after this recent cold snap? Consider this community of little waterfront bungalows built by the Tin Can Tourists of the World (yes, a real group who drove their Model T’s down to camp away the winter in Florida).

This perfect cottage has a view of the lagoon and is down the block from the castle ruins and fishing pier. Kudos to the realtor: Every once in a while, a very special property comes along. In Historic Braden Castle Park, where rows of unique, vintage cottages (circa 1925) reflect the charm of days gone by with the conveniences of today’s modern lifestyle, you will find such a home! Nestled on the point of land where the Braden River flows into the Manatee River, there is no other community like it in the area.

Community Tour:
https://sway.office.com/jsi6LzrkayPHGcso.

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Gregory_K

What an interesting site, and a great education. I simply had no idea.

Kirsten

Just back from a trip out east and poring through the shares. What a great little cottage, Snarl. And I’m with Greg…great education. Braden Castle Park was not a community I’d ever heard of before. I was already entranced with the 1920s character of the development, and then you said, “just down the road from the castle ruins,” Well, heck…I knew I had to go digging for more information. Here’s the online listing from Atlas Obscura, in case there’s anyone else like me who hadn’t run across this fascinating bit of history before:

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/braden-castle-ruins

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

Welcome back, and I hope you had a good trip.

I’m glad it sparked your curiosity in this fun and well-preserved community Gregory & Kristen. I’m crushing on it. I get the sense it really has a sense of community too, going right back to the beginning.

Castle Ruins:

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bobby white
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

I enjoyed looking at remains of/reading about the Castle. Sad history, including its beginnings. Atlas Obscura is always fun. I clicked on the random offering and got this:
Breakey MonumentEdward, Manitoba
Dedicated to the inventor of the paint roller.  
THE PLAQUE HONORING NORMAN BREAKEY, inventor of the paint roller, is located in Pierson, Manitoba.
Born in Pierson to William and Jane Breakey in 1891, Norman settled in Toronto, Ontario after serving in World Warr I, where he managed a hardware store and eventually invented the paint roller. This revolutionary painting technique was popular but unfortunately, Breakey didn’t patent his invention or wasn’t able to produce and sell enough to protect his patent.
Other manufacturers ran with the idea and produced their own paint rollers. American, Richard Croxton Adams, of Sherwin-William was able to secure the U.S. Patent after developing his own paint roller design. 
Fame and knowledge of his contribution to the world were awarded posthumously. He was listed in both the inventor’s volume of McClelland & Stewart’s Canadian Centennial Library and a Maclean’s feature called Who’s Who of Canadian What’s His Names in 1967.  
https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/breakey-monument

Kirsten
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

It is a sad history, indeed, Bobby. But then, I confess that I am drawn to melancholy tales.

On the random offering from Atlas Obscura: Love it!

bobby white
Reply to  Bridget | 1 comments
1 month ago

1886 Patiently waiting to be loved again. $225K

Heidi Rauch
Supporter
1 month ago

This caught my eye the other day when I was looking something up unrelated to real estate. (I cant help looking) I love that it’s only changed hands twice since 1882.
Victorian 3,000,000.00

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1630-Central-Ave-Alameda-CA-94501/24861528_zpid/

Jkleeb
Reply to  Heidi Rauch | 213 comments
1 month ago

Well that’s wonderful! I love that it has one bathroom defying current house trends. Kudos to whoever wrote the listing description for using the phrase “zealously preserved architectural details”. Hope another zealot finds this lovely home.

Gregory_K
Reply to  Heidi Rauch | 213 comments
1 month ago

There are two very similar homes, one in San Francisco, the other in Oakland, both with the same exaggerated French window surrounds, porch details and cornice. Perhaps it is a pattern book design.

Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1913, Pasadena, CA, 2,298,000
Lovely patterned exterior shingles, and I love the columns on the porch.
310 Congress Pl, Pasadena, CA 91105 | MLS #P1-12082 | Zillow

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Oh, I just love the exterior of this house with its massive everything! Thanks for posting

The interior is pleasant and refined, and it has everything you’d expect to find in an upscale Pasadena “super bungalow”.

Kirsten
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

What a showstopper this house is. I like Snarl’s description of it as a “super bungalow.” Fits!

Adore all the light flooding into this place (which tends to be on the rarer side with bungalows, in my experience), the spaciousness, the wide front door, the French-door shelving in the bathrooms shown in photo 25, and so much more.

But I have to say, that chair in photo 10 has totally stolen my heart. Wish I could purchase that from the current owners! Wow…

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M J G
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

This place is a masterpiece for sure. I agree with everything you said. Only thing for me is to paint over all the institutional white walls and ceilings with craftsman colors!

Kirsten
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Will not argue with you on that point, M.J.G.

Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1911, Pasadena, CA, 1,050,000
I like this Arts and Crafts, Interior, lots of built-ins, some stained and leaded glass windows. Be nice to get rid of the painted woodwork, or at least on some bring back some color. Needs a loving hand.
990 N Oakland Ave, Pasadena, CA 91104 | MLS #P1-12113 | Zillow

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Yes please! Can you imagine that gorgeous sun-filled dining room with the wood restored (probably oak)? This is in the wonderful Bungalow Heaven part of Pasadena.

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Jefsndy

This gem is Bungalow Heaven adjacent-it is located in Orange Heights, a nice area as well. My husband & I were just discussing this house-I was born in Pasadena, and love this house. But-it requires about $500,000 in restoration I am afraid, still making it a good buy for Pasadena. My husband said”if I was younger I would strip that paint”…we did it once 20 years ago in our craftsman …we would need to call Brett Waterman…

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  Jefsndy | 134 comments
1 month ago

I’ll confess I just like saying “Bungalow Heaven”. I spent time at Bowen Court around the corner from this house in Orange Heights, in a former life.

CFelton

I think this is one of the prettiest rooms in the whole house. It will be stunning once restored (and all the paint removed). Replacement glass for the built-ins is pretty easy to find, but oh all that paint! I think it’s been mentioned in another post but the house is actually in the Orange Heights-Barnhart Tracts Historic District, about 3 blocks west of the Bungalow Heaven Landmark District. Definitely worthy of love and care to bring it back to it’s former glory!  🙂 

Gregory_K
Reply to  CFelton | 2 comments
1 month ago

Hope you’ll continue to comment….

Kirsten

I was thinking something similar. The think that caught my eye was these lovely windows, opening onto the porch. I dream about windows like this, but in Wisconsin originals of this kind can be a very rare thing indeed, as they tend to result in high heating bills in the winter.

When my parents moved into their Queen Anne in Baraboo, WI, in 1973, there were tall narrow ribbon windows that swung inward like these. They ran along the east and south walls of what became our family room at the back corner of the house, with brass latches installed at about half-height, According to a man we knew who’d grown up in the house, those windows were actually installed decades after the Turn-of-the-Century build date, probably between the 1930s and 1950s, as replacements for previous windows that had deteriorated. There were heavy curtains in that room, that the previous owners had left behind, and we quickly discovered why. Our first few winters in the house, you could literally see those curtains billowing out, due to the profoundly chilly draft coming through. Can’t even imagine how much chillier it would have been for us without those curtains! LOL!

When my parents finally did some remodeling and much needed structural repair around 1979, my dad ultimately chose to take those ribbon windows out, leaving no windows on the east wall of the room. He had just two weatherproofed double-hung windows installed on the south wall, Still wonder if there would have been a way to save the look of what was there previously. As drafty as it was, it sure was beautiful…and I’ve longed for something along similar lines ever since. This photo from the listing was thus, for me, both nostalgic and aspirational.

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Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

Thank you for pointing-out those inward-swinging original windows. You describe a perfect dad scenario of just eliminating the problem with a wall!

It’s not common to see inward-opening windows here like in Europe where the outside would have protective shutters. More common are outward-swinging windows that are thought to catch the breezes and not compete with curtains (but screens are trickier without a crank-out device).

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CFelton
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

It’s such an incredible house! I’ve been admiring it for quite some time. It’s clear it will require a lot of restoration work, but oh how it would be worth it to see it shine again!  😍 

JDmiddleson
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Great find, Kimberly! This is the kind of house most of us old house nuts would love to get their hands on. I can imagine what the original spaces looked like on the interior with the woodwork not painted and possibly some period correct wallpaper!

Gregory_K
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

I wonder if the shingles were originally unpainted? The shingles on the Gamble house have been cleaned of their paint. Perhaps that could happen here. An unpainted shingled exterior seems appropriate to me.

JimH
Moderator
1 month ago

New Paltz NY – $1.1mm
The Maj. Jacob Hasbrouck house was built during the Revolution, the addition during the War of 1812, remodeled in the Civil War era, always owned by descendants. A bit modern for the neighborhood but I’d take it.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/191-Huguenot-St-New-Paltz-NY-12561/32853462_zpid/

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Kimberly62
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

wow, I like this place, it makes me happy. I’d like to see the shutters all the way around. Last shot in the cellar, is that the top of a cider or wine press?

JimH
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Yes, I think it’s part of a cider press.

A lot of the early stone houses in the area got Gothic or Italianate makeovers, and I’ve always loved them.

Gregory_K
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

This area is lovely, absolutely lovely. I used to drive past this house all the time when I was at the C.I.A. If I had the means to move East, someone would have to pay me to not select the Hudson Valley.

Ranunculus
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Culinary Institute of America, right? Not the Central Intelligence Agency. 😉

Gregory_K
Reply to  Ranunculus | 468 comments
1 month ago

Yes, of course you are correct!

Many years ago, I was wearing a jacket with my C.I.A. patch on the shoulder when I went to vote. The deep blue and gold patch has a knife crossed with a steel, but they look like swords, The elderly gent working as a pole watcher spotted my patch, and eyes wide, said “Golly, I didn’t know you guys advertised!”

In my best deep wanna-be C.I.A. voice, I offered him a job. I’m the size of a football tackle, so I tried to look mean, like someone who’d topple governments. After that, the folks watching tracked me as though i was an officer about to give them a ticket.

Kirsten
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Now THAT story makes me giggle. Thanks, Greg.

Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1961, Squamish, BC, 1,499,900
Look at those beautiful mountains in the view. Second floor living space with the deck.
38316 Vista Cres, Squamish, BC V0N 1T0 | MLS #R2740185 | Zillow

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Amazing. It looks like it’s in Switzerland.

Kirsten

It sure does! Or Austria. Went through the mountains on my way to Graz once, and there were loads of houses that looked a good deal like this one, perched in the foothills.

Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1963, Portola Valley, CA, 2,995,000
Love the couch with the wall of windows and porch and the promise of a view, interior wood covered planters to have your plants one with the house-always neat. I do like how in an MCM the exterior materials are also inside, just how the windows bring the grounds indoors.
818 La Mesa Dr, Portola Valley, CA 94028 | MLS #ML81913781 | Zillow

Kirsten
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Literally picture perfect. Sent the link to a friend of mine who loves MCM architecture and furniture. Her jaw dropped.

bobby white
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

But I’m not sure I WANT to move!

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Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1906, Bronx, NY, 950,000
From the listing: “The House needs work as it is in the original state.
Wintertime helps us out here as the house is near completely covered in vines, we can sort of see the brick façade.
381 E 165th Street, Bronx, NY 10456 | MLS #3445962 | Zillow
 
1920, Brooklyn, NY, 1,499,000
Pretty façade, delicate details. Neat parquet floors.
44 Bay Ridge Pkwy, Brooklyn, NY 11209 | MLS #20223709 | Zillow

JimH
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

The Bronx house looks like a Chia Pet in the summertime. It’s an impressive home with quality woodwork and stained glass, including a nice laylight that needs to be cleaned up.

For many years it was the home of bank president Frederick A. Wurzbach (1868-1950) and family. He was a cheerleader for Bronx development during its boom years before the Depression.

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Kimberly62
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

thank you for adding this Jim, you made my assumption come real about the exterior with the “landscaping” on the surface of the house.

Daughter of George
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

A Chia Pet house! It does indeed look it. Thank you for the good chuckle this morning!

DJZ
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

Yeah if I bought this house, the first thing I’d do is remove all the vines off the exterior and let the light come back into the house. Then Id clean the laylight and find a proper clear cover for it to prevent debris from collecting on it. But for the most part, the interior looks amazing, it just seems the exterior is where the work would be focused.

Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1792, Colchester, CT, 369,900
From the listing: “HENRY CHAMPION HOUSE, designed by William Sprat a prominent early architect. Federal period architecture. This home is on the National Register of Historic Places since 1972.
Posting primarily for the exterior and its historic names attached. Inside, be patient until you can get past the kitchen pictures and into the dining room and beyond.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Champion_House
526 Westchester Rd, Colchester, CT 06415 | MLS #170538691 | Zillow

Ranunculus
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Some of the ceilings appear to have been dropped, right into the door & window trims. Anyone have thoughts on why?

TheDogsCar
Reply to  Ranunculus | 468 comments
1 month ago

Typically it is from sheetrocking directly over the old wood lath and plaster ceiling

Ranunculus
Reply to  TheDogsCar | 28 comments
1 month ago

Ah! Just like the issues AnneFL brought up below!

TheDogsCar
Reply to  Ranunculus | 468 comments
1 month ago

In my 1700’s, I have both. First pic they removed the lath (can see the black nail holes in the handhewn timber). The molding of the window went right up to the plaster … In another room, they did not remove it and just sheetrocked over it, and you can see loss of window molding. Removing is very messy (years of rodent debris will fall on your head), but the positive, you keep all your molding and potentially find treasure (they would hide valuables below the floor boards)

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Kirsten
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Ooooooo! Holy moly! I see what you mean about the spaces past the kitchen, Kimberly. My stars…just gorgeous.

Linda
Supporter
1 month ago

https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/501-N-3rd-St_Kentland_IN_47951_M32552-98400
It’s been remuddled to death but it’s still a nice house and for $170,000 you would have funds for restoration.
1896 build date

John Shiflet
Reply to  Linda | 493 comments
1 month ago

Linda, that is a beautiful house. I took a couple of photos of it in 2014: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/7270963716/in/album-72157629894166708/ and thought at the time that it could be a George F. Barber design. Another nearby Kentland house was this pink and white confection: https://www.flickr.com/photos/11236515@N05/22717232835/in/album-72157629894166708/ I felt even more strongly that it looked like a Barber design as well, Kentland is a small northern Indiana town north of Lafayette and very near the Illinois state borderline. Thanks for sharing the listing for this intriguing house.

Linda
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

I also wondered if it may be a Barber. Doesn’t look like it’s changed since 2014. The pink one looks like it would make a great project.
I’m honored that you liked my choice as you are one of our respected experts.

John Shiflet
Reply to  Linda | 493 comments
1 month ago

Me an old house “expert”? (blushing) and there I thought I was just an old house nut. Thanks for the kind words.
As for the Kentland houses, both have nice details. The larger of the two isn’t endangered. I did look into the smaller house which was vacant when I took the photos and it had peeling paint. I had noticed how ornate the house was and got a strong Geo. Barber design impression from it. I would hate to see this small pretending-to-be-a-mansion home lost to neglect. Kentland is a pleasant smaller town and not far from Chicago or Lafayette.

M J G
Reply to  Linda | 493 comments
1 month ago

Yes it has been remuddled but what does exist from its earlier life is really quite nice. I do like that staircase and floor. The front door is clearly from a later decade. Can’t tell whether or not they did a great job color matching the stain or is that just a result of this grotesque trend of washing out the photos so all the photos look as if they were sun-bleached.

Gregory_K
Supporter
1 month ago

The Elm Court Estate may or may not be for sale, depending on which real estate company or magazine article you consult at any given moment.
 
It was designed by the architectural firm of Peabody and Sterns for William Douglas Sloan and his lovely wife, Emily Vanderbilt, and completed in 1886. The architects were both famous and remarkably talented. Better still, they were working for the cream of society.
 
In the late 1870s, they designed the first “Breakers” mansion at Newport for Pierre Lorillard. Having commissioned a new “cottage,” Lorillard sold the “old” mansion to Cornelius Vanderbilt II, Emily’s brother. The house, designed in the shingle style, obligingly burned in November of 1892, taking with it all of Mr. Vanderbilt’s furniture, books and art. Cornelius commissioned Richard Morris Hunt, who was to became the Vanderbilt family’s favorite architect, to design the present largely concrete Breakers. The worksite and mansion were illuminated with arc lamps to allow construction to proceed 24 hours a day. Very sadly, Mr. Vanderbilt died in 1899, just four years later.
 
Frederick Law Olmstead is credited with the landscape design at Elm Court, but various structures, such as the columned pergola – now missing its trellises – have been added over the years. In addition, Olmstead and the architect Charles Coolidge were just beginning to work with Leland Stanford Sr. and his wife Jane on the plan and design of Leland Stanford Jr. University, so how much time did he have for this estate?

Leland Sr. died unexpectedly in 1893, and it was Jane who pushed the architectural style of the university, and the university itself, to completion. Jane Stanford, another great lady virtually forgotten today…..
 
Finally, the house began as a comfortably large shingle style structure. However, it quickly grew to 60,000 square feet, with perhaps 24 main bedrooms and vast entertainment spaces. To accomplish this, the Sloans had to be very wealthy. William Douglass Sloan’s father and uncle established the wildly successful firm of W. & J. Sloan before the Civil War, and the firm became one of the most important purveyors of fine furnishings and architectural fittings in the nation, designing for the White House as well as fashionable society’s homes and “cottages,” like Elm Court.
 
So, here is a list of web addresses for this extraordinary house:
 

  1. House for sale: https://www.forbes.com/sites/brendarichardson/2021/01/09/find-sanctuary-in-historic-vanderbilt-home-for-sale-in-massachusetts/
  2. https://www.loveproperty.com/gallerylist/132894/elm-court-tour-the-12m-vanderbilt-mansion-in-massachusetts-that-changed-h
  3. House for sale: https://berkshiremag.com/springfeat21/elmcourt
  4. https://www.google.com/search?q=elm+court+stockbridge&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiqtraczdr7AhUpMUQIHSkeCEAQ_AUoAnoECAEQBA&biw=1579&bih=748&dpr=1.1
  5. https://theberkshireedge.com/tag/elm-court/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elm_Court_(Lenox_and_Stockbridge,_Massachusetts)
  6. The Wikipedia house history: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elm_Court_(Lenox_and_Stockbridge,_Massachusetts)
  7. The proposed hotel, etc., that would completely overwhelm the house: https://travaasa.com/berkshire-county/

A. The house soon after completion in 1886.
B. The house as it looked after the final alterations. The original home is the section on the far right.
C. The same view today.
D. The family gathered for a portrait on a fine afternoon, 1895-1900.
E. An enormous but cozy room, the furniture arranged for small groups of friends to exchange news and gossip.

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Gregory_K
Supporter
1 month ago

Another photograph of Elm Court. I spent time describing the dining room because it is so typical of great rooms in the years before the turn of the twentieth century, perhaps 1885 to 1930:

F. The grand dining room, with a surprisingly mixed selection of furniture, but it appears to be largely in the style of late 17th-early 18th century French design. Interior designers of the era were working to create an “antique effect,” without needing to buy shiploads of antique furniture to furnish vast rooms. In addition, 19th century upholsterers dramatically improved upholstery springs through a series of inventions. Thus people did not have to sit on hard wooden boards padded with straw or straw in layers of animal hair.

The chairs along the walls and around the table, which could expand to seat oodles of guests, borrow from both French and English 17th century designs, but to me mostly in the style of the Régence period. The table is a “Creative Revival” borrowing from several sources to create a new design.

The swagged serving table, against the wall on the right, almost certainly covered in gilt gesso on carved wood, is in the style of the French Régence, 1715-1723, when Louis XV was too young to assume the duties of the king.

The tapestries are in early 18th century French Baroque style, probably inspired by Jean-Antoine Watteau, 1684-1721. They appear to show well-to-do folks engaged in politely rustic activities.

The ornamental wall decorations appear to have been executed in ornamental plasterwork.like the ceilings, not carved wood, although with their financial resources, the Sloans could certainly afford carved wood.. The walls were designed to resemble Baroque Boiserie paneling of the late 1600s.

All in all, a handsome room, but daunting in scale. This was a room to impress guests, not one designed to make them feel comfortable.

Other photographs.

G. & H., Condition of the house’s exterior before restoration began.
I. & J., the grand stairs, before and after restoration.
K. & L., The library after restoration
M. A restored mantel that had been heavily vandalized.

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JDmiddleson
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Thank you for sharing this, Gregory! I have admired this house for a very long time and have read quite a bit about the house and the people who built it. The house has evolved over several years and many changes. William Douglass Sloan had money but his wife, Emily Vanderbilt, did inherit some of her father’s vast fortune as well. I’m glad to see it is still standing but, as I understand it, there is still quite a bit of restoration to be done on the house as well as all the outbuildings!

Gregory_K
Reply to  JDmiddleson | 5050 comments
1 month ago

Thanks. I am afraid I’d commit murder to be able to buy it and save it from becoming the tail on a very new, and to my way of thinking, lumpy dog. A worse fate would be for someone to convert it to condominimals.

Perhaps the statewide preservation organization or some other knowledgeable organization could complete a study on how to reuse the house so it can pay for itself and the additional restoration that it deserves and is necessary, without it being ruined by being chopped up or reduced to a wing on a new development.

John Shiflet
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Thank you very much, Gregory, for such painstakingly in-depth research into the story of Elm Court. With added footnotes, it would be acceptable as an academic paper about this historic residence.

Where else can old house enthusiasts find this kind of content on a public accessible site? One reason I decided to return to Old House Dreams is because of the outstanding quality of the content and the site, generally. Thanks for adding so much to understanding and appreciating this important home-Newport is fortunate to have the Gilded Age architectural treasures that have made it legendary.

Gregory_K
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

Thanks. You bring a great deal of knowledge to this site. Glad you have been able to return.

JDmiddleson
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

Very glad to see you back, my friend. Your knowledge is greatly appreciated.

Ranunculus
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

::gasp!:: Paperbacks on those gorgeous library shelves?! How positively GAUCHE.

They certainly call for multi-volume hardback, or even leather-bound, sets of classics, like The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire, etc.

M J G
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Beautiful photos and writeup Gregory.

bobby white
Supporter
1 month ago

1911 Brown Shingle Craftsman $1,225,000

3 bed 1.5 bath 1,705sqft

4,000 square foot lot

2327 Webster St, Berkeley, CA 94705

A beautifully cared for and excellently presented offering. There is a pic of a tree framed by the window that evoked thoughts of well known local graphic artist David Lance Goines as well as of Maxfield Parrish. Artful and likely intentional.

I have a second story sunporch which is almost identical to this one and It’s given me great pleasure over the years. Also much loved by various resident cats. My last cat, Zeke, got to spend his final hours there, lying on his self heating body warmth reflecting pad, bathed in his beloved sunshine.

Note the realtor’s comment about refinishing the fir floors/stairs.

The Listing: ”Classic Brown Shingle 1911 Craftsman with fir floors and built-ins: bay window seat in living room, china cabinet in formal dining room, high coved ceilings, original woodwork trim. Beautiful upstairs sunroom overlooks the level rear yard in search of a gardener or perhaps an ADU/tiny house builder? Off-street parking available, garage removed years ago. Great location close to Elmwood, Rockridge, UC Berkeley, BART and the special Halcyon Ct neighborhood park. Walk score website gives it 91-walk and 99-bike scores! Around corner from Whole Foods. Solar panels, upgraded electrical/plumbing! Sewer in compliance. The original beauty abounds throughout the home. The kitchen awaits your vision with great space and fine function for now! Bid in hand to refinish fir floors/stairs for just $3500.”

https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2327-Webster-St_Berkeley_CA_94705_M25769-70238

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bobby white
Supporter
1 month ago

1946 $1,649,000
3bed 3bath 2,507sqft
1.2acre lot
2447 Scout Rd,
Oakland, CA 94611

Oh My Goodness. From the listing:”’ Incredible abode on a rare 1.2-acre private, wooded oasis located less than 1 mile from Montclair Village. Epic stone fireplace anchoring the great room w/vaulted wood ceilings & hand-hewn posts & beams framing the space. Bespoke details throughout guarantee to inspire. Much of the Heartwood Redwood used in the house was repurposed from the original scout cabins of Camp Dimond that used this same land yrs ago. Chef’s kitchen w/original redwood cabinets…”
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2447-Scout-Rd_Oakland_CA_94611_M18828-54794

bobby white
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

I became curious about Camp Dimond,the Scout camp, and found this engaging article. There are also some pics. Here’s an excerpt:
F.M. Smith Reserve
Hugh Dimond died in 1896 and his son sold 474 acres of the land at the upper end of Dimond Canyon to Francis Marion Smith in 1907. FM Smith as he was known made his fortune mining Borax and was known as the Borax king. Smith was also involved in real estate and owned the Key System street car lines of the East Bay. The swath of land at the top of Dimond Canyon that Smith now owned was called the FM Smith Reserve and included two creeks where Smith could hunt and have picnics. Smith had planned to build his country estate on the property. The crest of the property also afforded Smith unobstructed views of Downtown Oakland as well as his own Smith Estate (known as Arbor Villa) which was located two blocks south of Park Boulevard near the present day location of Oakland High School. However by 1913 Smith over-extended himself due to short-term borrowing and had gone into bankruptcy. He was forced to turn over his assets to creditors who refused to extend the loans.

The first camping by the Boy Scouts on the property actually took place only one year after the Boy Scouts of America was officially organized in 1910. A small group of Scouts from both Oakland and San Francisco which had recently disassociated themselves with the American Boy Scouts and became associated with the Boy Scouts of America, camped on the Smith Reserve in March of 1911. Although it would be five more years until Oakland and San Francisco would officially organize their respective councils (and 53 years until the two council merged), this was the first combined outing of the future Scout Councils. According to the Oakland Tribune, each scout on the weekend campout, was outfitted with a “Billy,” which consisted of a tin bucket with a lid. In the bucket the scout carried a knife, cup, spoon and enough food for two days and a blanket. Army Lieutenant Edward Kendrick was in command and instructed the scouts in the ways of camp life and how to light fires and cook their food.
The area of the Smith Reserve where Camp Dimond would ultimately be located, was one mile south of the Montclair shopping village and where the present day Montera Middle School and Joaquin Miller Elementary School are currently located. The location was on a bluff at the top of the Dimond canyon and was populated by oak trees, pine trees and a large open field. The property also had a type of oak tree on the property known as Shea oaks which Smith had transplanted from Australia
https://localwiki.org/oakland/Camp_Dimond%2C_Boy_Scouts_of_America
The correct spelling is Shee Oak:
Why is it called sheoak?
Baker begins his section of Casuarinas with the note that: “Shee Oaks” (Not Sheoaks or She-oak) were so named “on account of the peculiar sound produced by wind when passing through the branches”. The term ‘oak’ comes from the wood.
https://www.google.com/search?gs_ssp=eJzj4tTP1TcwrSzKTTZg9OIozkhVyE_MLgYARMwGkA&q=she+oaks&oq=she+oaks&aqs=chrome.1.0i355i512j46i512l2j0i512l2j46i512j0i512l3j46i175i199i512.5725j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
:

annefl
1 month ago

My house was built in 1900. At one point the walls were covered with modern plasterboard, but the trim was not removed. This has resulted in most of the trim around doors and windows not sticking out and being rather flat against the walls. Has anyone seen this before? Any thoughts on how to deal with it?

bobby white
Reply to  annefl | 5 comments
1 month ago

What I’d probably try:

1.Buy a small piece of matching plasterboard, sufficient in size for the remaining steps
2.Remove a section of the trim
3 Use that trim to cut the plasterboard to the same size/dimension as the trim
4.Hold the plasterboard under the trim while attaching trim to wall
5 Stand back and assess

I know nothing about how to cut plasterboard but I bet someone else does and/or there is always YouTube.

Komiza
Reply to  annefl | 5 comments
1 month ago

They did the same thing to my house to living room/dinning room. – 1918. We removed it on one wall but left the other walls. It was such a mess to remove.

clasykl
Reply to  annefl | 5 comments
1 month ago

My circa 1908 house has 1/4 inch sheet rock applied over the original shiplap boards with wallpaper…1 to 3 layers of wallpaper…and they also did not remove the casings. There’s a nice detail at the top of the cap on the base boards which has been lost with the added sheet rock, Because the sheet rock is just 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch of the door and window casings are still exposed so that 1/2 inch gives enough definition between wall and casings. However, if 1/2 inch sheet rock was used, that would leave 1/4 inch exposed on the casings and give, as you wrote, “…being rather flat against the walls.”

My house in WA, had 1/4 inch, 3/8 inch and 1/2 inch sheet rock in various rooms and on various walls. The sheet rock was also added over wood boards…not shiplap…but 1″ rough boards and in some places, the exterior siding with back side of siding facing into room. All wood boards/siding was then covered with muslin or cheesecloth, not sure which the material was, and wallpaper.

However, there is a way to deal with it. Carefully, run a knife/box cutter between the edge of the sheet rock and casings and base boards. You then pull off the door/window casings and base boards. Add a wood filler piece the thickness of the sheet rock, to the door/window frame with a 1/8 to 1/4 inch setback between the frame and edge of the filler piece also add a filler against the edge of the sheet rock. Then, again with a 1/8 to 1/4 inch setback between the original casings and the filler, re-install the casings. If the frame and casings are stained, I’d try to stain the filler piece to match the original stain before installing. If painted, then caulk and paint the filler after installation. You’ll probably also have to fill nail holes.

With the above method of setbacks, the original casings will now cover the edge of the sheet rock by 1/4 to 1/2 inch so no work should be needed.

You can try to set the filler piece flush with the frames, but in a 122 year old house, frames are likely out of plumb. The setback of 1/8 to 1/4 inch allows for out of aligned frames and is the standard way of casing a framed opening. Your casing probably already has a setback between edge of casing and frame that is likely about a 1/4 inch..

If the baseboard has a 1/4 round or a shoe moulding at base to floor, you can likely, after installing a filler piece at bottom and one near the top of baseboard, set the baseboard up 1/4 inch to cover the edge of the sheetrock. If no 1/4 round or shoe moulding, add one. Or, if the top of your baseboard is square, add a base cap trim piece to top of baseboard and this will cover the sheet rock.

It’s not easy to do the above but it’s not that hard with patience and attention to detail. I’d do one room at a time with a little down time between rooms.

As an added bonus to the above, you could run electrical wiring (or cat 5, or?) in the space between the filler pieces on the baseboard to add more receptacles on the wall. Just be sure, in your nailing you don’t nail through the cables.

Gregory_K
Reply to  clasykl | 96 comments
1 month ago

This is a much better idea than what I was going to suggest.

Two comments. If you are employing a prybar or hammer to lift the antique casings and trim boards, may I suggest that you protect the adjacent antique trim and modern sheetrock by inserting a putty knife between your pry tool and adjacent surfaces. Sometimes it can be difficult to hold both the pry tool and the thin blade protecting the adjacent surface, and it can occasionally require two thin blades, one in front, and another one behind, with perhaps one wrapped in cloth for additional protection, so a cooperative and intelligent friend will be very useful. I find pizza works well as a bribe.

Powers
1 month ago

Very nice home. I see few like this one that are not altered. It looks like a mini-2nd Empire house. Maybe?

Barbara V
Supporter
1 month ago

1863 brick Italianate with carriage house on 1+ acres in Warsaw, NY, for $189,900:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/46-Park-St-Warsaw-NY-14569/32945911_zpid/

Gregory_K
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

Thanks for finding this wonderful italianate treasure. Its easy to see what a great house it is, with just 1 day on Zillow, and it already has 3,345 view and153 saves. My only changes would be the mantels. I’d buy one of the fine new copies of antiques. I’ve been in too many salvage shops where they couldn’t provide evidence that their architectural treasures were not stolen.

John Shiflet
Supporter
1 month ago

Greetings Old House Dreamers,

During my long absence, I’ve had a number of people inquire whether I would return to OHD, or not. First, I want to dispel any rumors that my absence was directly caused by any rift or misunderstanding between Kelly and I. For over a decade, I’ve had good communications with Kelly based on our mutual respect and the level of understanding between us. My return affirms that my respect for Old House Dreams hasn’t diminished.

The actual reason for my absence was unfortunately a very sad one. After several years of suffering from a debilitating illness, my spouse of many years passed away in July. Over a year ago I found myself assuming the role of an around the clock caregiver. Thus, keeping my spouse comfortable became the main focus of my life so I stepped back from OHD at the time. My apologies to everyone for not making a formal statement about this change but emotionally I wasn’t in a good place at that time. Now that I’ve had several months to grieve, I’m trying to pick up the pieces and get my life back on track again.

With this new reality there are also new possibilities and opportunities. I’ve made some ambitious future plans involving old house restoration but I now have an acute need for a help-mate. I have a historic home awaiting major restoration in the pipeline and a couple of others on the radar screen here in (Cadiz) Ohio. Therefore, the thought occurred to me that I might find and connect with someone compatible among OHD fans who shares my passion for old houses and history.

The ideal person I’m looking for is a creative, talented woman who loves old houses, is willing to put on gloves, and able take a hand’s on approach towards restoring old houses. Ideally, the woman would be healthy and fit enough to climbs stairs, ladders, and occasionally work off scaffolding. Some business/office experience would be helpful as well. An unmarried, unattached/without dependents lady would be ideal.

As for me, I think most of you have read my frequent comments here over the years. A few random things you may not know are…I have a beloved Bearded Dragon for a pet; I’m 420 friendly; (have a Ohio Med MJ card) and I play guitar. Want to know even more? Please send a personal message to my OHD inbox (do not reply below this post) and I promise I’ll respond to all serious inquiries. All messages will be kept confidential and private.

No matter what unfolds in the coming months, I intend to contribute and make comments whenever I have the time and it seems appropriate. The growing number of newer people who have joined OHD over the past year is very encouraging. We have some excellent new commenters on the message board as well as several seasoned OHD veterans who have been active and informative for years.

Remember, please direct any personal comments or replies to my personal OHD mail inbox. My heartfelt thanks to Kelly for allowing me to return and I’ll do my best not to let her or our esteemed Old House Dreams readers, down. Sincerely, John

Carebear
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

John, you didn’t owe us any explanations. I know its hard to watch someone suffer from an ongoing illness. My father passed after an almost 3 year battle with Chronic Demylinating Idiopathic Polyneuropathy, or CIDP. Its like a chronic form of GBS, has the same causes its thought, appearing after a virus or flu shot. Some people have remissions of years, and can lead normal lives. Others, like my dad, can have a short remission then relapse and just get progressively worse. When my dad passed, he was confined to a hospital bed at home, and nearly totally paralyzed. He lost the ability to swallow suddenly, aspirated some juice he was being helped to drink, and died of pneumonia 5 days later. CIDP is an autoimmune disease, and might have some genetic tendencies. It causes the body to attack the myelin sheath, which protects nerve endings. Without the protective sheath, nerve endings die, and the brain can no longer send messages and have them connect from nerve to nerve. Sometimes, in remissions, the body stops attacking its myelin; no one knows why it will stop, or start up again, nor is anyone even absolutely sure what starts the process to begin with. The only treatments are to infuse IVIG, an immunoglobulin, which sometimes gives some relief, steroids, and blood filtering. Even they don’t work for everyone, and are often of no use. ‘
Please don’t let this keep you fro getting flu or COVID shots, or any other vaccinations your doctor advises you to get. As we “grow up” (I don’t want to offend any of us in here “of a certain age”) we need vaccination boosters, and of course, its a great idea to get a tetanus booster every 10 years, I think its recommended-especially if you garden or are a hobbyist – or if you like to restore old houses! Its a very, very small percentage of people who have any bad reaction to any vaccination, other than maybe feeling like you got punched in the arm by a boxer, after a tetanus shot, for a few days! Why is that, anyway? Next time, I’ll ask the nurse to give me the shot in the butt-God knows I have enough padding back there!
John, it looks like you are now happy with your wonderful memories, and ready for the next part of your life. If I was retired, I just might pay your inbox a visit! But, I have a few years to go, and with my doctor telling me, no kore bending than absolutely necessary, bad shoulders, and a knee that needs replacing, and arthritis just about everywhere you can have it, I think I’d have to be a visitor to your houses, who stand there, beer in hand, asking, “Why not a pale yellow in this room?” or, “I love that other crown molding. You should really put that up in here.” Before long, you’d be throwing money at me, ordering me to go get a pizza for everyone!
Best of luck, Our Friend.

John Shiflet
Reply to  Carebear | 1737 comments
1 month ago

Carebear, thank you for the very thoughtful reply. I’m sorry to learn about your Father’s illness and passing. As for visiting, I’ve visited a number of old house dreamer’s homes over the years so it would be churlish of me to not reciprocate. All I would ask is a bit of advance notice but otherwise admirers of old houses are always welcome.

Gregory_K
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

I’ve been through something very similar, and you have my most sincere condolences and best wishes. Watching someone you love fade away, whether it is hard or quiet, is a dreadful experience.

I have missed your insights and thoughtful remarks, and I’m delighted you have returned.

I doubt anyone on this site thought that you’d had a disagreement with Kelly, but I for one, did wonder where you’d gone. I just figured you’d tell us if you thought it was something you wanted to share.

When that wonderful Italianate in Cadiz was posted some time ago, I used google to tour your region. It became obvious to me that you live in an architecturally rich region of America. I’m certain you have an exciting future ahead with someone special. Wonderful luck to you.

John Shiflet
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Thanks, Gregory for your kind words. That 1850’s cube type Italianate in Cadiz, OH, did sell to a younger man, a Navy vet, who saw the OHD House Dreams post and decided to check it out. He has much work ahead of him but has the right attitude and will surely do an outstanding job. There another house down the Street a bit that was also an Old House Dreams posting and a gentleman from Georgia bought it. I have several other houses in the needing considerable work category that I’ve talked to the owners about (anyone interested?) that are not listed with a realtor at the moment. The path going forward remains to be determined. One thing’s for sure; old houses will always be a passion for both of us.

bobby white
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

Welcome back, John. Your generosity of spirit has been missed. Condolences for your loss and what you’ve been through. Sincere best wishes for a gratifying future.

John Shiflet
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

Thank you for the kind words. It feels great to return to a place where I there are kindred spirits and people I have a lot in common with. It’s nice to be back.

JimH
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

Welcome back John! I’ve appreciated your input over the years and hope it will long continue, although I’ll admit to not always reading every word of your sometimes extended comments.  😀 

I’m sorry for your loss and I hope you’re managing well. I also have the fairly recent experience of caring for a dying loved one after sharing a home for many years. OHD provided some brief moments of respite during those months, for which I’ll always be grateful to Kelly and the folks here.

John Shiflet
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

Thank you Jim. Your input over the years has been of immense educational and informational value. An old house is always more than mere bricks or boards; every old house has stories to tell. My sincere sympathies are sent out to you for your recent loss as well. I’m looking forward to reading your insightful contributions and commentaries in the days ahead.

brindley
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

I’m so sorry for your loss. Processing such an enormous change of course takes time and mental space.

I’ve always enjoyed your insight here and will welcome any comments you have the time to make. And, I hope you find the partner of your dreams.

John Shiflet
Reply to  brindley | 4 comments
1 month ago

Thank you, Brindley, for your kind words and sympathy. I try to take each day one at a time. As for “partner”; I use that term loosely because lasting relationships take time to grow and evolve. That doesn’t conflict with the more pressing need to find someone who can actually help me restore old houses. Things like painting, measuring, lifting a 2 x10″ floor joist into place, pulling up old carpeting, replicating or refinishing staircase balusters (spindles) and dozens of other common tasks. I expect to get work underway by Springtime with some preliminary work as weather conditions allow even earlier. I have not closed on the property yet. And that does not include my personal residence which still has unfinished tasks to tackle. Therefore, I’m very open to ideas and suggestions. A shortage of skilled old house artisans and tradespeople seems almost nationwide based on the Facebook old house groups I occasionally participate in. If someone feels more comfortable, please look me up on Facebook, mentioned Old House Dreams, and I’ll gladly “friend” you.

Kimberly62
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

John, I am so glad you are back as I have enjoyed your sharing of knowledge. I remember when you went to your new home after selling your home, I think, in Texas? I assumed the new home had consumed your time, and also, folks come and go from the site, you are one I missed. I am sorry for your loss, and the journey you and she have had to take. Welcome

John Shiflet
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Thank you Kimberly. I’ve enjoyed reading your comments too. Yes, the house sale in Texas happened in 2020 and the Ohio house became our home in October of that year after looking at seven homes in three different Midwestern states. Might have made for an interesting old house search TV episode. I do in fact have an 4K HD Video camera and I’d like to find someone who could record and create sort of a pilot episode of an upcoming old house adventure but more about that at a later time. It’s great to be back here among friends.

M J G
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

No. I’m not PMing you. I am replying here to say that I too missed you from this site!
🙂

I missed our conversations, debates and educational sessions and I’m truly sorry for that incredible loss you have endured. I have also lost a lot of people and know sometimes grief means you need to take time away from thing. I also know time heals the wounds and yes they sometimes leave scars which this one will but the best medicine is doing what you love. And I know this is what you love! So Welcome back man. I missed you!

John Shiflet
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Thanks MJG! I always enjoy reading your comments because your tastes in old houses run parallel to my own. I too sometimes feel that the zenith of architectural energy and creativity occurred around 1880 with the short lived Aesthetic Movement. But authentic Aesthetic houses are rare for a reason. Not only was the fad short lived but creating a true Aesthetic themed house was an elaborate celebration of art and creativity. Even back then, such houses fit into the “other” category although vestiges of the artistic trends from that period lingered on years after they peaked in popularity. Some people objected to the complex marriage of art and architecture so within a decade, architects took a more conservative approach and toned down the “artistic” aspects of house design. Never again would such artistry attain the creative levels of that colorful era.

I too look forward to participating again in future discussions-I’ve loved looking at the old interior photos you’ve found from time to time. Now, if we could only figure out how to invent a time machine…

M J G
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

If anyone figures out that time machine, I’ll pay big money to do it! Just to get an actual vision into the real life instead of through black and white photos.

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

Welcome back John! Welcome back anyone we missed as well!

John Shiflet

Thank you kindly. It’s you and all the good old house people here that made me want to come back. A day with old houses to look at is never boring. I’ve enjoyed and appreciate your informative comments and looking forward to reading more.

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

Thanks for the good words and likewise.

DJZ
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

Welcome back John! I can definitely understand, well to some extent. I too was absent for a hot minute while i’ve been dealing with mental health issues. Coming back onto this site was a bit of a stress reliever. The joy of looking at older homes and dreaming of what i could or what i would do to it if it was mine gave my nerves a rest, plus not to mention the commentary from the others on here was great to interact with as well. Either way, glad to see you back!

Barbara V
Supporter
1 month ago

1908 12+ acre estate in Bedford Hills, NY, for $6.9 million:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/577-Harris-Rd-Bedford-Hills-NY-10507/33010470_zpid/

Gregory_K
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

Wouldn’t it be marvelous if all of us could live in homes this pretty?

Kimberly62
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

such a lovely property, thank you

Barbara V
Supporter
1 month ago

1760 Georgian on 6+ acres with early garage in Litchfield, CT for $1.749 million:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/73-North-St-Litchfield-CT-06759/197788475_zpid/

Kimberly62
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

I was looking at this one on Saturday, such a lovely special home, I am glad you shared with all of us.

Barbara V
Supporter
1 month ago

1907 on 9 acres in Farmington, CT for $3.35 million. Way too “polished” for my taste, but the grounds are gorgeous:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/49-Mountain-Spring-Rd-Farmington-CT-06032/58135539_zpid/

Kimberly62
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

I may align with your appreciation for “too polished” for my tastes. How often do I see an exterior that I imagine with its original interior only to find the updates that come after years. Still, a very nice home, thank you.

DJZ
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

The entry way is stunning, however, id like to see the vaulted area restored back to the warm wood tones, it would give this some much added warmth to the house.

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Barbara V
Supporter
1 month ago

1917 built for booklovers and lushly landscaped in Bronxville, NY, for $2.495 million:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/25-Oriole-Ave-Bronxville-NY-10708/69553239_zpid/

Jkleeb
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

Beautiful! Good to see a house with sufficient bookshelves.

Kimberly62
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

What a well lived in home. I agree with Jkleeb, this house has an ample amount bookshelves, I have books all around my house and it our cabin-the cabin has a special corner with a wing backed chair my grandmother so wonderfully covered in great fabric, and next to it an old side table with the books I left off with before closing down the cabin for the year. I do love the computer for research, but my books are very close to my heart and soul.

Gregory_K
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Lovely.

Kirsten
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

You are definitely of my tribe, Kimberly. I bet your collection of books is marvelous. My husband and I have books in nearly every room of our current living space. Our dream? To find a property where we can transform an existing outbuilding or build from scratch a free-standing library…with a giant fireplace, comfortable reading chairs, loads of stacks, and giant library tables…a space where we can spend loads of time and maybe even host lectures or seminars. It’s a big dream, we know, but if you don’t aim high…

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

Dreaming is why we’re all here! Your dream for a book sanctuary for fellowship and imagination sounds like what we all need. Your description brought me back to this room:
https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2022/11/09/1901-in-readfield-me/.

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Kirsten
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

Working my way through everything I missed while I was out of town…and oh! Barbara, this one is magnificent. Showed it to my husband, as we are both bibliophiles. We would love to find a house with as many lovely spaces for books as this one has. Thank you for finding and sharing this property!

Barbara V
Supporter
1 month ago

1929 mini-castle on 2+ gorgeous acres with pool in Irvington, NY, for $1.749:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/16-Lewis-Rd-Irvington-NY-10533/33024721_zpid/

Kimberly62
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

I am glad you shared this one, I saw it weeks ago when there were only a few pictures, including the newspaper clipping of Jones and Cassidy. I would hope that courtyard within the house is a wonderful place to sit and relax, but not lacking of a little breeze.

Kirsten
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

Barbara, you’ve done it again! Two beauties in a row! I’m literally longing to see this one in person and wander the property. Where the first property had all that lovely book space, this one has the wooded landscape that I’m longing to find. Just gorgeous. Thank you again!

bobby white
Supporter
1 month ago

Two beauties from Georgia. . 

1914 Equestrian Estate $6,500,000.   Very Enjoyable Video tour. Quite handsome living quarters…for humans as well as the horses.
2 bed 1 bath 1,599sqft
41.26 acre lot
1162 Gantt Rd, Alpharetta, GA 30004
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1162-Gantt-Rd_Alpharetta_GA_30004_M66535-61837

1920 Tudor $1,490,000
6 bed 5.5+bath
0.74acre lot
2665 Northside Dr NW, Atlanta, GA 30305
Sublimely beautiful interior,. Listing says there’s a secret room behind a grand bookcase. . The wooded grounds do not disappoint.
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2665-Northside-Dr-NW_Atlanta_GA_30305_M66458-98963

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Kirsten
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

That Tudor revival is astounding in every way. LOVE the bookcase hidden door.

Meg
1 month ago

2 houses from the 1700s!

Both are in New England, both built before 1800, both around $200,000, both need work and the listings contain the dreaded words tear-down and buildable lot  😖  Fingers crossed that these pieces of history find owners that will restore them!

The first one is in mid-Maine, the barn was built in 1794 and the house in 1795, 20 acres are included with 300 more available, the property needs some work, unfortunately part of the barn roof has failed. Best of all the listing contains 99 photos, including detailed pics of the house and pics of the beautiful surrounding area. First attached photo is of this house.

The second one is in Massachusetts and was built in 1744. In contrast the real estate photos of this one are terrible- only 9 pictures and not great ones at that. There is no photo of the front of the house but I grabbed the one attached from Google street view. I also attached a picture of the side of the house facing the road and of the outbuildings. The house does appear to be in a wooded area with some beautiful views. I’d be interested if anyone could tell from the photos if it’s really this old and if anything original is left.

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JK54VW
Reply to  Meg | 23 comments
1 month ago

There’s certainly not much original fabric left in the Maine house. The insufficient number of pics on the Massachusetts house makes that one a tougher call. That puny chimney poking out where there there was once a much bigger one to service the (at least) 3+ fireplaces that would’ve been attached to it, says that few, if any of those are functional. Looks bleak in terms of original fabric too.

Gregory_K
Reply to  JK54VW | 16 comments
1 month ago

Sharp observations. Thanks.

Gregory_K
Reply to  JK54VW | 16 comments
1 month ago

I agree completely with the your analysis of the Maine house. In fact, I question the early date for much of the existing structure.

I took the opportunity to examine the building more thoroughly, enlarging each photograph. To start, the siding, while worn, appears to be mounted with butt joints, a comparatively recent technique; so it is probably 20th century. Of course it is too easy to change old siding, so its age might not mean anything.

The timbers in the attic have a variety of saw marks, most suspicious are those of a circular saw. There are early hand squared timbers in the lower floor, so perhaps this home began life as a cape.

The view from the upper meadow is stunning. Reusing the existing structure would be less expensive than starting fresh, and much of it has genuine history. It could be backdated to the extent reasonable and the rest adapted. The foundation retains nothing of interest, so I would relocate the entire structure, including the barn, to the upper meadow, and reuse the stones in a new foundation. It would be criminal to subdivide this beautiful piece of property. I’d keep it as is, and enjoy it.

You are also on the money with the Massachusetts house. Also a thousand times more succinct than I am. I’ve always thought that it would be fun to pull apart a mutilated house to figure out exactly what was what, and then put it back together. I’d film the whole thing and buy time on HG to show how such a project should be done.

Kirsten
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

I love the hints you and JK just provided regarding the actual build date! Thank you both for some amazing insight. 🙂

John Shiflet
Reply to  Meg | 23 comments
1 month ago

Meg, my experience with real estate listings is if they mention a teardown, they really mean it. How some seller feel that a home dating from three centuries ago is expendable boggles my mind. Houses like these should never be used as pawns to sell land off to developers but sadly, still are sometimes. Thanks for sharing.

Barbara V
Supporter
1 month ago

Only in someplace like Cambridge, Massachusetts, would a 1910 Shingle fixer be priced at $2.8 million. According to the realtor, “Many redeeming features including intricate original Victorian trims, oversized original windows, hardwood floors, original stained glass and five fireplaces.” Oh, what I’d give to see this interior:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/48-Garden-St-Cambridge-MA-02138/113214914_zpid/

Gregory_K
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

I have emailed the realtor with regard to the lack of interior photographs. I’ve also told my family in Stoneham, but there are other great homes for less money.

Gregory_K
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

Wow, that was quick! I wrote the other message just moments ago. The realtor called, and I told him that at 2 mil. plus, there is plenty of competition from other fine homes, some for considerably less. I asked them to add more photographs. I don’t know if my relatives will be interested, but the Boston area is stuffed with good architecture. How will this compete?

Barbara V
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

That’s great, Gregory! I hope the realtor follows up. I agree that this area is full of great architecture. Sadly, though, despite an abundance of appealing original-looking exteriors, most of the interiors have been completely eviscerated – or at a minimum, white-washed and sterilized. It is heartbreaking.

Gregory_K
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

That is very sad. That is one reason why I depend on Kelly for good stuff.

Kirsten
Reply to  Gregory_K | 1286 comments
1 month ago

Just checked…nothing’s been added yet.  😐 

double R
Supporter
1 month ago

https://www.trulia.com/p/pa/titusville/332-w-main-st-titusville-pa-16354–2089443063

The house was built in 1889 by Joseph Seep as a wedding gift to his daughter Lilian and her husband Dr. Edgar Quinby. The addition to the left of the main house served as his office. Little has changed over time both Inside and out.

Titusville, PA is the birthplace of the modern day oil industry. The community is filled with Victorian era oil baron mansions.

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Gregory_K
Reply to  double R | 11 comments
1 month ago

Really nice, great house, great woodwork. This is probably the best 19th century doctor’s office I’ve seen, except for one in Newburgh, N.Y. which is in ruins.

realestate607
1 month ago

Absolutely gorgeous center hall gothic revival. No missed detail in this magazine ready home! Remodeled kitchen with shaker cabinets and new appliances. Huge island for prepping or gathering. Formal dining room. Huge double parlor with sliding doors out to screened in field stone patio. All new carpeting upstairs. Attached 2 car garage & additional 2 car detached garage. All on 8.56 park-like acres!
https://odbrmls.rapmls.com/scripts/mgrqispi.dll?APPNAME=Nyst&PRGNAME=MLSLogin&ARGUMENT=I%2BPN20lRJAmTtQLkttQsxraOBodtT4URb2LN%2BOqGsqQ%3D&KeyRid=1&SID=

Barbara V
Reply to  realestate607 | 1 comments
1 month ago

Gosh, I’d love to have seen this before the remodel!

Gregory_K
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

For me, this is too modern, too polished.

Kirsten
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

I’m with you Barbara. The outside is so appealing. But I’m having trouble sensing Gothic revival on most of the inside, with the exception of some windows and a bit of board and batten in a few rooms.

Question: If you were to start backdating this home, what would your first steps be?

Barbara V
Supporter
1 month ago

The former St. Theresa’s Chapel in Sagamore, MA, for $589,000. Built in the Arts and Crafts style in 1926, the church closed its doors in 2008. (It had been a thrift shop for many years afterward which I’d visited regularly on trips to the cape.)

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/914-Sandwich-Rd-Sagamore-MA-02561/2060562440_zpid/

Gregory_K
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

This a really handsome building. Thanks for listing it. The sanctuary is very attractive, with a great balcony and some nice paneling. The trusswork was the biggest surprise, well proportioned and nicely detailed. Far more style for a 1920s shingle building than I would have ever expected.

It would make a very nice and stylish place to live.

Kimberly62
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

very nice, I love the shingled exterior and love the interior roof structure, I am sure there is more to enjoy here but that is where I will start

DJZ
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

OH! Im in love! I would call this place home in a instant!

Kirsten
Reply to  Barbara V | 2003 comments
1 month ago

I could never get my husband to do it, but making a home out of an old church is one of my old house dreams. This would be a marvel, wouldn’t it?

Of course, maybe there’s some congregation that’s looking for a new church home and might care for it.

Prayers that someone does something great with it, either way.

DJZ
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

Yeah, I’m a bit obsessed with this church. Mainly cause i love the Arts & Craft period of bold lines and colors with the use of open framework. This church has all the ticks for me. The alcove would be a perfect book nook /audio sound system area. The side nooks would be great for easy conversion to a bedrooms/ bathrooms/closets. The basement is perfect for more additional bedrooms, plenty of room for a remodeled kitchen in the existing space and plenty of storage all while maintaining the integrity of the building without losing it character

natira
Supporter
1 month ago

Here’s an exterior shot of a cute house. You can’t have it, it’s mine! But it’s snowing today, and it just looks so Christmasy. And it always amazes me how small the house looks from the road….. I think I live in the Tardis, or the Weasley Family tent!

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Jkleeb
Reply to  natira | 1131 comments
1 month ago

It IS very Christmasy—I like to imagine that you’re baking and the house is full good smells!

natira
Reply to  Jkleeb | 682 comments
1 month ago

No baking today! I’ve been playing in the snow with my dog and grandson, sledding down the hill, and putting up the Christmas Tree!

M J G
Reply to  natira | 1131 comments
1 month ago

I always loved red trim on gray body!

natira
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Me too!

That isn’t gray paint, it’s very weathered original clear fir siding that hasn’t been painted in so many decades all the paint is gone. I LOVE it, and it’s gonna stay until it finally gives up the ghost. When it rains, its a deep dark rich brown, which I also love.

I’ve been tossing around the idea of painting the sashes SW Rookwood Amber. I have to build new screens and storms this year (there’s no storms on now) and repaint the trim, so I thought I might change the sash color then.

M J G
Reply to  natira | 1131 comments
1 month ago

Why not. You can change it later if you don’t like it. I always prefer the sash color to be different from the trim.

JimH
Moderator
1 month ago

Austerlitz NY – $850k – 21 acres

Unfortunately no interior photos, but a lovely 1880’s towered rural manse built for merchant/gentleman farmer/politician Henry S. Ambler (1836-1905). The exterior is well-preserved and let’s hope the interiors are intact as well.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1896-Red-Rock-Rd-Austerlitz-NY-12017/2060684225_zpid/

M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

That’s a big sticker price for no interior photos but boy, if the interior reflects the exterior, this could be an old house dream for me! That house is quite stunning for sure!

John Shiflet
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

Intriguing design so obviously an architect played a role here. Seems like a very attractive price for such a grand home and 21 acres. Hope some interior photos appear before too long.

bobby white
Supporter
1 month ago

A fan is reportedly buying the ‘Goonies’ house in Oregon, which was listed for $1.7M
December 5, 20225:12 AM ET
ASTORIA, Ore. — The listing agent for the Victorian home featured in the The Goonies film in Astoria, Oregon, said this week the likely new owner is a fan of the classic coming-of-age movie about friendships and treasure hunting, and he promises to preserve and protect the landmark.
The 1896 home with sweeping views of the Columbia River flowing into the Pacific Ocean was listed in November with an asking price of nearly $1.7 million.
Jordan Miller of John L. Scott Real Estate said the sale is expected to close in mid January, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported. The new owner, a self-described serial entrepreneur, will make his name known at that time, Miller said.
Since the movie came to theaters in 1985, fans have flocked to the home in northwestern Oregon’s historic port of Astoria. The city celebrates Goonies Day on June 7, the film’s release date, and welcomes thousands of people for the event.
An offer was accepted six days after the house was listed, according to public record.
“After the word spread that the property was for sale, we received multiple offers, at asking price and higher, and we have a full backup offer,” Miller said.
Seller Sandi Preston is passing along movie memorabilia she has collected or has been given, and some of the furniture in the home, restored to its original 1896 style, may also be sold to the buyer, according to Miller.
Preston was known to be largely welcoming to visitors. But she lived in the house and the constant crowds were a strain that prompted her at times to close it to foot traffic.
After the film’s 30th anniversary drew about 1,500 daily visitors in 2015, Preston posted “no trespassing” signs prohibiting tourists from walking up to the property. She reopened it to the public in August.
Based on a story by Steven Spielberg, the film features a group of friends fighting to protect their homes from an expanding country club and threats of foreclosure. In the process, they discover an old treasure map that leads them on an adventure and allows them to save their “Goon Docks” neighborhood.
https://www.npr.org/2022/12/05/1140671828/a-fan-is-reportedly-buying-the-goonies-house-in-oregon-which-was-listed-for-1-7m

The listing shows as Pending
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/368-38th-St_Astoria_OR_97103_M18095-27889

According to Property History, this house last sold in 2001 for $92K.
Happy Retirement Ms Preston!

M J G
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

Good luck to the fan! I like it when fans buy famous movie houses and return them to their movie appearances.

John Shiflet
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Agreed, I think of one instance where art imitated life was the Brady Bunch house makeover. Most of the show’s actors were very pleased with the results. Then, some folks down in Waxahachie, Texas were obviously big Munsters show fans so they built a replica just as ookey and spooky as the TV version. (actually more so) When people see a towered mansard roofed Second Empire they often bring up the Psycho 1950’s Hitchcock or more frequently, the Addams Family movie houses. Victorian architecture is deeply embedded into the American cultural mind for better or worse.

M J G
Reply to  John Shiflet | 6379 comments
1 month ago

LOL… different opinions on which part of that is for worse… mostly the Addams Family and Psycho. And while I did enjoy Psycho and Hitchcock’s creative camera angles and hidden symbolism, I do cringe when people compare a beautiful Second Empire house to that. Though you and I have had that discussion, ad nauseum to many.

bobby white
Supporter
1 month ago

Former residence of Swedish ambassador lists for $19.5 million

1925 Mediterranean $19,500,000
7 bed 6.5+bath 11,212sqft
6.7 acre lot
3900 Nebraska Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016
The Swedish government purchased the property — in Northwest Washington’s American University Park neighborhood — in the 1950s. It has been home to 12 Swedish ambassadors, including Karin Olofsotter, who lived there from 2017 to 2019. She relocated the residence to the Swedish Embassy in Georgetown to be nearer downtown Washington and to have the added interior space needed to host larger events.
And speaking of not feeling obligated to do everything immediately:
Real estate agent Cara Pearlman said that the house needs an estimated $1.5 million in renovations but that “someone with a smaller budget could still make it shine.” 
How much ”smaller?”
Asking for a friend
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2022/12/02/former-residence-swedish-ambassador-lists-195-million/
Listing with 96 pics:
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3900-Nebraska-Ave-NW_Washington_DC_20016_M66165-89774

AMBASSADOR HOUSE FRONT DOOR.png
JimH
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

Thanks bobby! A real estate developer or institution couldn’t ask for a better property in suburban DC. It’s possible the house could survive in some form but it’s not likely the 7 acres will. The Swedes paid a consultant to tell them exactly that:

https://eastonarch.com/project/swedish-ambassadors-residence-3900-nebraska-avenue/

Designed by prominent architect Arthur B. Heaton for writer-publisher David F. Lawrence. Heaton’s own 1928 Colonial Revival home survives nearby:

https://househistoryman.blogspot.com/2012/06/history-mystery-solved-heaton-house-in.html

ArthurBHeatonHouse4861IndianLaneNW.jpg
DJZ
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

Ambassador Row in DC is absolutely eye candy of different architectural designs and era’s. Some of the residences were designed to reflect their nations heritage while keeping the currant design features of the decade/era it was built. Lots of grand homes and truly a delight to see during christmas time

bobby white
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
1 month ago

Do what you need to take care of yourself. There’s only so much trouble we can get into while you’re away…
Curl up with Bleep.*

*Your cat.

John Shiflet
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
1 month ago

Sorry to hear that, Kelly.I hope its very minor and you’re on the mend soon.

M J G
Reply to  Kelly, OHD | 14612 comments
1 month ago

was wondering where you were. good luck.

ChrisICU
1 month ago

Already contingent, but this mid century in New Hope Pennsylvania is worth a look. $1.85M bought the new homeowner a George Nakashima home. It has all the trademark details of this Japanese American furniture designer and architect. It’s hard to tell how much is original, but it certainly has a great vibe. I imagine it would cost a pretty penny to fill it with his works. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1886-Aquetong-Rd_New-Hope_PA_18938_M40751-82428

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  ChrisICU | 773 comments
1 month ago

That really is something interesting and probably reasonably priced and artistic enough for New Hope. Besides the woodwork you mention, I love those moon gate windows.

JimH
Reply to  ChrisICU | 773 comments
1 month ago

Fascinating – thanks! I’m thinking that the vinyl? siding probably wasn’t part of Nakashima’s vision.

The owner died last year at 86:
“Chuck was a quiet, gentle man, an engineer, an inventor with many patents, a dreamer, a trailblazer, a rock n’ roller.”

neighmond
1 month ago

So I hope I am doing this right; here is a nice modest little bungalow in Waterloo, Iowa, kind of out in Bungalow heaven. It was built in 1928, has about 880 square feet, and still has the wood siding and most of the original doors. The front room is oak, with a beautiful fireplace. The seller is asking 122,500. there are beautiful wood floors under the rug. New Garage too. Nothing is wrong with the house, my brother lost his battle with cancer this summer and as a consequence this sweet little housling is on the market. It had some real bold craftsman colours in the front two rooms but the realtor wanted it painted a more neutral colour. https://www.iowarealty.com/residential/wcf/20225495/2329-w-3rd-street-waterloo-ia-50701

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  neighmond | 16 comments
1 month ago

Many condolences for your brother neighmond. Sigh

Sometimes these modest bungalows contain surprising original details inside, like this one. I love the unpainted wood and cozy fireplace. Oh, and that coved ceiling and telephone niche!

The video tour is well done to give a sense of the home.

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Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1820, Hudson, NY, 425,000
Old house a bit muddled by the years, but lots of nice details remain.
116 Union St, Hudson, NY 12534 | MLS #144647 | Zillow

John Shiflet
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Almost seems comical to see the TV show whites and greys showing up mixed in with the remaining period details. No photos of the basement so hard to tell what’s down there. Hudson is a popular town and local real estate prices reflect that. I liked the Italianate style staircase balustrade and newel. I really couldn’t make a precise style determination. If it does date from 1820, by that time the Greek Revival style was extremely popular especially in (western) New York state judging by all of the examples still standing there. The older Federal style is most likely the category this one fits into but it may also be a local or vernacular variant. A fair amount of back-dating would be required for anyone wanting to recapture the original period look. Thanks for sharing.

Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1880, Hudson, NY, 1,100,000
Beautiful church, including a beautiful original parsonage, from what I can see.
18-20 S 6th St, Hudson, NY 12534 | MLS #143701 | Zillow

JimH
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Thank you Kimberly! The Emanuel Lutheran Church was actually built in 1893, according to church history and Sanborn maps. The church was/is still active with a website, and the sanctuary appears ready for services with hymn books in place. A local blog discusses the vinyl siding job done in 2010. Apparently, the most active local religion is Real Estate. (My family were Lutherans who settled in the Hudson area over 300 years ago.)

https://www.tclparish.org/esj

https://gossipsofrivertown.blogspot.com/2010/07/peter-wurster-and-vinyling-of-emanuel.html

The local architect was Michael J. O’Connor, who also designed the lovely Brennen/Ashbery House in Hudson:

http://vr.ashberyhouse.yale.edu/

BrennenAshberyHouse1895HudsonNY.jpg
M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

Wonderful photograph

Kimberly62
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

thank you Jim for your additions here to the church. Also, that Ashbery house is a wonderful thing to explore! I love all the Asian art and the butler’s pantry with its lovely marble sink and that kitchen with its old stove. I wish I could see more of the back stair leading upstairs from the kitchen. thank you thank you

Kirsten
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

Oh my, another gorgeous church. Wonderful find, Kimberly!

Kimberly62
Supporter
1 month ago

1802, Goshen, Ct, 3,995,000
74 acres, beautiful old grand home, love the lighting and the hear stones in front of slide 17’s fireplace, and I love the pool.
12 E St S, Goshen, CT 06756 | MLS #170168838 | Zillow

bobby white
Reply to  Kimberly62 | 3590 comments
1 month ago

For some reason, this gorgeous house has been languishing on the market since April of 2019. The sellers are holding fast with their price. It was on here as a share, maybe a year or so ago. I recognized the beautifully designed pool with its artful landscaping. A nice place to float and dream the day away…
Good to see house, grounds, and pool once more.

Kirsten
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

The grounds are absolutely stunning, agreed. And that pool is extraordinary. It is artful indeed that someone made it look more like an old reflecting pool than a swimming pool.

Anne M.
Supporter
1 month ago

1930 Tudor in Springfield, MA $289,087 wood floors & arched doorways, lots of built-ins and pretty white tile in the main bath, nicely trimmed in blue.
https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/33-Eckington-St_Springfield_MA_01108

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  Anne M. | 1394 comments
1 month ago

Link isn’t working for me, but this does:
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/33-Eckington-St-Springfield-MA-01108/56210144_zpid/.

I like the iron stair bannister.

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Anne M.
Supporter
1 month ago

1924 bungalow in Conneaut, OH $24,900. Rough, but looks like it has potential & you can’t beat the price:
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/375-Harbor-St-Conneaut-OH-44030/72392763_zpid/
****
1870 brick in Morristown, NY $25,000 another bargain, no interior pictures
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/401-Main-St-Morristown-NY-13664/32550710_zpid/

John Shiflet
Reply to  Anne M. | 1394 comments
1 month ago

The Morristown, New York, house may be a “sleeper” as there are no interior photos. The house may have had some updates around 1870 but to me it looks like a classic Greek Revival house with its triangular front gable with return ends. I suspect it may have had a columned porch originally and then (maybe in the later Victorian era) had the present portico type porch replacing it.

We have to remember that houses with few or no updates are seldom celebrated by real estate agents. Most of the time, the opposite is true-horribly remuddled houses are proudly shown with all of their “mod cons” while apologies are made for anything old fashioned or dated. In summary, until the interior appearance and condition are known this may or may not be a great house for old house lovers.
The Conneaut, Ohio house looks like a textbook Craftsman/Bungalow (quite possibly from a published design source) and in streetview doesn’t look too bad: https://goo.gl/maps/6M76iuiC5MA3tNcA6 It also illustrates the point I was trying to make about the previous house…it looks quite original and unmodernized to me. I’d try to keep those upper cabinets in the kitchen as they look original. No one has (yet) painted the fireplace bricks. Seems reasonably priced for everything offered. I appreciate you sharing the two listings.

bobby white
Supporter
1 month ago

The A Christmas Story house is up for sale:  
https://www.hoffleigh.com/listing/3159-w-11th-street/?f
Interesting write up, with images, about the house. An excerpt:
Twenty-one years after the film was released, entrepreneur Brian M. Jones, a native of San Diego, bought the house on eBay for $150,000. He used revenue from his business, The Red Rider Leg Lamp Company, for the down payment. It was, in the words of Old Man Parker, a “major award”: an opportunity to create a new kind of museum in Cleveland. Watching the movie frame by frame, Jones drew interior plans and spent $240,000 to reconfigure the structure as a single-family dwelling and a near-perfect replica of the movie set. Jones then stocked the interior with movie props. Entering the house, visitors now are greeted by the infamous leg lamp, the Parker’s decorated tree, a kitchen stocked with Ovaltine, and the sink where Randy hid. Upstairs, they can see the bathroom where Ralphie’s decoder ring and a bar of Lifebuoy soap reside. The back yard, where several scenes were filmed, looks just like the movie. Near the front entrance is a memorial bench dedicated to Clark. It sits on the exact spot where he had a cameo as a nosy neighbor.
https://clevelandhistorical.org/items/show/753

LEG LAMP.png
John Shiflet
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

Yet another example of life imitating art. Make me wonder if we may see another Storybook style housing revival? As for the shapely leg lamps? Hey, whatever floats your boat…

DJZ
Reply to  bobby white | 286 comments
1 month ago

I literally grew up looking just like Ralphie and would get asked if i was him. I used to hate this movie because of the references, but i grew to love it. And since i was 25 I’ve had the Leg lamp on my christmas list every year since. The sequel to this movie was great and followed the story wonderfully, lots of the original cast came back to reprise their roles, it was like visiting an old friend. Visiting this house is on my bucketlist of things to do in 2023

M J G
Supporter
1 month ago

I really enjoyed looking at this stunning old house built in the 1890s and thought I’d share it with everyone on here that loves this stuff and research. I went down a rabbit hole for sure. He didn’t follow any conventional layout of a formal front parlor or reception right off the front door like some more conventional design. Instead, he has a library, and dining room in the front, a living room, and a sitting room. The house was fitted with gas and coal furnace and a large kitchen with a toilet on the first floor in the back hall and full bathroom on the second. A staircase was also fitted to go up to the roof deck. Typical too, different woods for different rooms. All varnished, Pine in the living room, Ash in the Dining Room and Library, Cherry in the sitting room and Oak in the hall. Ash in the kitchen and back hall and butlery, and pine in the pantry.

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The owner drew on the floor plans with pencil he was building the house that he also wanted a “conservatory” off of the sitting room.
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And today….

Now for the bad news, this is what it looks like today. Almost unrecognizable. Clearly many changes over the years. The house was also moved over at one point to accommodate the large apartment building.
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Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Thank you for this study of a house. In seeing the current state, it’s a good example of how intricate and interesting so many of these old houses once were before time and life stripped them of their virtues.

This morning, I was revisiting this surprising survivor, and it’s still on the market:
https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2022/03/09/1908-in-shamokin-pa/

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Snarling Squirrel

Realtor has added a few more photos, I think. But this cupola!:

B7EC36A5-7C2D-4D4E-BDA8-CF8F77AE50BC.jpeg
JimH

I was delighted to see that copper marvel 10 years ago:

https://www.dailyitem.com/coal/image_be25b3eb-6b55-5264-85e8-6b30b56a127c.html

DJZ

Almost survived. Its missing the front cupola

Kirsten
Reply to  DJZ | 600 comments
1 month ago

Rats!!

Snarling Squirrel
Reply to  DJZ | 600 comments
1 month ago

Good eye DJZ. I didn’t even notice that in the street view! It would add a lot to replace it.

JimH
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Very quirky and cool! Where is it? I want to look it up.

I’d love to take the Time Machine to go back and look around. Kudos to the mason who had to build working fireplaces and a chimney from the drawing, and note the round hot air ducts from the basement:

ChimneyPlan.png
M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

Silly me. I was so into the house I forgot the guys name. Albert M Gardner’s residence in Boston Massachusetts. He owned a hardware store. I found these images on the Historic New England site and started a conversation with the folks there. It is on Montana St. It is a little confusing at first because the location of the house is odd in comparison to the old photo but when you look at the Sanborn map it clearly was moved or turned to accommodate that big apartment block. House on the left.

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I posted additional drawings and building specs of the house here
User – Old House Dreams

The shingle style house visible to the left in pic 1 and 2 is still standing but also mistreated though not as badly as this. The stained glass is still there, and the top floor porch was enclosed.
76 Cheney St – Google Maps

Jkleeb
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Thanks for sharing the spec documents! I love reading these. It’s always interesting to me to see that the language these can vary from specific to very general. I have frequently come across the phrase “to be completed in a workman like manner” which I think was a shorthand way to generally say to “do good job on this” so the writer could focus on the details they really wanted to call out.

M J G
Reply to  Jkleeb | 682 comments
1 month ago

Totally. I love reading that stuff. I also love their use of the English language and some of the differences to today (or to-day as I see it written a lot).

I have reached out to my contact and asked if there are more pages to that document. It looks like there are several pages of work documents to that piece that I want to read. I would love to read what specificity is written on the interior finishes. I also asked if there were unscanned interior photos or drawings though I doubt any exist. Several doorways on the first floor and most on the second floor have the word glass written in them. Makes me wonder if they’re referring to glass transoms… or glass doors. I do love 1890s glass doors. But glass doors into the bedrooms… that is a little different so it makes me pause. Glass doors in doorway on the first floor or into a public room isn’t out of the question. They’re not like the overused french ones we see of the 20th century.

I wish I could zoom in better to the art glass transoms as well on the first floor.

Kirsten
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

If you’re able to get more documentation, MJG, I hope you’ll update us. I look forward to seeing at least some highlights of whatever you obtain.

M J G
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

She said she’ll be in that location of the archives where these are stored and will check on Monday. She will take cell phone pictures if there are no scans. I will most certainly keep you posted. 🙂 I’m glad I can share in the passion with some here on this stuff. I’m usually alone in these obsessions.

M J G
Reply to  Kirsten | 389 comments
1 month ago

After going through all of the sanborn maps, it is clear that the house was rotated 90 degrees clockwise, demolishing the porches and conservatory and moved it much closer to the street so the apartment block could be built.
1897
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1919
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JimH
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Thanks! The architect was John H. Besarick (1844-1925), a native of Quebec who moved to Boston and trained with Samuel J. F. Thayer.

Another of Besarick’s designs in Roxbury, for Dr. Frank E. Green, now gone:

GreenDrFrankEHouseRoxburyMAdem.jpg
M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

That’s a beautiful house.

JimH
Reply to  M J G | 5508 comments
1 month ago

Another Besarick design, for inventor George F. Milliken in Dorchester, still standing:

MillikenGeoHouseDorchesterMAold.png
MillikenGeoHouseDorchesterMA.png
M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

oooooh, that one is really cool. I love this style. Very dramatic. too bad it lost its open tower!

M J G
Reply to  JimH | 7581 comments
1 month ago

43 Virginia St – Google Maps

Looks like someone restored it really nicely. Though I think the tree in front needs to be pruned up to not block this house. I would love to see that tower put back on the roof. How could was that!