January 8, 2021: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 1/8/21 - Last OHD Update: 1/15/21 - 267 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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1) Include the city, state if it doesn't already show in the link. Also include the build date and price. A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful.
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3) Paste the link in the comment box below, no HTML knowledge needed. :)

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267 Comments on January 8, 2021: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Sorry folks, I’m still not ready to show what I mentioned last week. I feel like I’m close to finding out when it was removed, I have to keep going! And because I was not prepared, I’m recycling a featured home. Nope, didn’t forget the portrait people, just not at a computer with that on it. The featured home, from May 25, 2018.

    Sorry for the lack of posts, it’s just one of those weeks that everything went wrong. If you are wondering how my BIL is doing, we aren’t getting many updates and he is unable to tell us himself since he is hooked up to everything and cannot use his phone. The nurse flat out told MIL not to text him because he is having trouble sleeping so we aren’t getting up to the minute kind of updates. They put him back on a CPAP machine and his oxygen levels went back up. That’s all I know, they haven’t said how he is doing since this morning. Thanks for thinking and praying for him.

    Maybe next week will be a better posting week. My shoulder is better so now I can use the keyboard, mostly…mostly.

    Comment notifications! Yeah, sorry for that if you received multiples of the same. I had to transfer to another plugin for that, didn’t go as planned on transferring the old subscriptions. If you want your old subscriptions transferred to the new system, the only way I can do it is if you don’t mind an email when someone posts on that particular home you commented on before, no replies only notifications for old subscriptions. And the digests are no longer available with the new comment system…sorry. It’s nearly 2am, my mind is fried, if this doesn’t make sense, I’ll explain later.

    29
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Kelly, thinking of you and your family, and I hope you are getting some sleep now as I write this. Love

      11
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Thanks. 🙂

        I should not have stayed up that late, feel like I have a hangover this morning! lol I was really trying to tie up the pending featured home, I feel so close!

        7
    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Take good care of yourself, Kelly. Thinking of you and your family….

      8
    • MJGMJG says: 2265 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Totally ok with me personally. Its fun to wait. Like a gift.

      This is one of my favorite collections of yours. The high detail of this photo is exquisite. All my favorite features. Polychrome or “Parti-Colored” as it is referred to in many books from the period) paint scheme. The two toned chimney which is either painted corresponding colors or alternating brick colors, the dark trim which was indicative of this period, the front corresponding fence painted to match the house and what appears to be a stunning front door!

      16
    • SadieSadie says: 48 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Kelly, prayers for your BIL to feel better and come home soon. I join the rest of the OHD gang in saying how grateful you have you guiding our dreams in old houses. This is one of few emails I look forward to seeing everyday!! Hugs and best wishes!

      4
    • shellyhorvathshellyhorvath says: 106 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Kelly, please don’t worry about us. We’ll be fine with delayed gratification. Please just rest and accept our hopes and prayers for you and your family.

      1
    • PreservationMattersPreservationMatters says: 98 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1720 Saltbox>>Greek Revival
      Windham, CT

      It seems like everything “hits” at once. Dealing with the Covid onslaught here as well, in my friends/family circle. Will keep you and your family in prayer Kelly. Glad to see progress with your shoulder. Please take it easy so you can come back 100% and stay there.

      1
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1184 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I haven’t been on for a while-lap top is in the shop. Somehow, I managed to crack the screen, and because of that, neither the touch pad or the cordless mouse will work. Repair shop finally called with an estimate-$300 for a lousy piece of glass, labor, and tax!
      Plus, I broke my arm, and although I’m out of the cast ( finally). My arm is still pretty sore. And, a few friends have covid, but thankfully have been allowed to remain home. One, a nurse, just received her first vaccine, too! But she texted me this morning, to say, last night, she slept better than in some days, and she thinks she’s finally getting better!
      Kelly, I hope your brother in law soon is feeling better, and can come home! I pray he has no lasting effects, and is back being his old self soon!
      I’ve had both rotator cuffs repaired. It’s no fun, having shoulder or any kind of arm problems! Physical therapy helped me to recover immensely! Along with about a ton of ice and a lot of ibuprofen! I hope this week brings better times!

      1
  2. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 119 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    I am guessing that there are plenty of old-house lovers who have found this online community in the past 12 months, so please find below a slightly modified version of some thoughts I offered last January. Stay safe.

    Truth in posting: I do not know Kelly or anyone else who works on this website. With that clarified and as the year gets started, I wanted to suggest in the nicest possible way that those who have not yet done so please consider financially supporting Oldhousedreams.com. Elsewhere, we are required to pay for web content—I subscribe to The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and Amazon Prime, for example—and even though we have access herein to pretty much all aspects of this site for free and without subscription, I can’t help but think that even more of us really need to voluntarily support the person who has envisioned and maintained one of the best places around for those with a passion for old properties to gather virtually with so many others like ourselves: great daily houses for sale, wonderful resources and commentary, and always interesting reader-initiated listings and feedback. I am sure that visitors to this domain have very different financial circumstances, but assuming you find yourself returning to this website often and have the wherewithal to support Kelly’s work, I hope you will.

    For those who have already helped underwrite OHD, I stand with you for the fourth consecutive year. And for those who have yet to thank Kelly for her myriad efforts, perhaps you might do so today… or early on in 2021.

    I am SonofSyosset—also Kevin or K2—and I am proud to support Old House Dreams.

    37
  3. hearsetraxhearsetrax says: 237 comments
    VA

    just stay safe and leave us a trail of jellybeans

    8
  4. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2916-Cliffside-Rd-Kingsport-TN-37664/81205755_zpid/
    Here’s a stone-faced house in Kingsport, TN built in 1937 with over 4,000 sq. ft total living space.The inside has been tastefully updated (in my opinion) and it includes a River House/tree house guest studio high above the Holston River. Kingsport is in the upper right-hand corner of Tennessee in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.

    15
    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I love the treehouse…wish there were more photos of the interior of THAT! Any house with a library ladder gets bonus points in my spreadsheet. Thanks for sharing this one!

      6
    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 670 comments
      OHD Supporter

      This is simply an adorable house. How gorgeous does it look sitting there with its stone front (Photo #1!) I would like to pick it up and deposit it on the parking lot next door! I am delightfully surprised that this house has a lot more space than I initially expected and the 2:48 acres offer privacy and room to roam — and what a gorgeous location to roam in!! The River House/Tree House looks enchanting!! Wish there had been featured shots of it! Imagine living over a river amidst that scenery!!! Thanks, Sue, for a lovely share!

      3
    • BoobtubeBoobtube says: 298 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1984 Post and Beam saltbox
      NY

      That cliff-side cottage looks a bit scary. That deck is perched on some skinny timbers.

      1
  5. prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 189 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Kelly, thinking of you and yours and excitedly awaiting the surprise!

    Here’s a 1938 Art Moderne Community Center building on the National Register in Ely, MN – $97,000
    https://www.ely.mn.us/?SEC=2A345D75-06A6-4D32-A3C1-B9E321AFA731
    More pictures available here https://www.ely.mn.us/index.asp?SEC=700CE847-97AA-4B38-8C6A-ED9170E8ECFE
    National Register form https://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/16000280.pdf

    This building is fantastic. It was used as the public library until just a few years ago and the interior remains incredibly intact — I love libraries in general but when you get to see inside a cool old building at the same time that’s the best. The new library is a sad grey box compared to this. Fingers crossed this can remain a fantastic public space for the residents of the great little town of Ely.

    And just down the road in Tower, MN is this hulking 1902 former ice house for the Iron Range Brewing Company (repurposed more recently into the Iron Ore Bar) for $124,000
    https://www.edinarealty.com/commercial-real-estate-for-sale/715-pine-street-manor-tower-mn-55790-5667357
    Some good 60s (?) vibes going on inside. The listing has an old photo showing the brewery building which used to stand next to this.

    10
    • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1782 Quaker Georgian
      Worton, MD

      If ever there was a call to move to Ely Minnesota, this is it! It’s amazing the community is parting with such a 1930’s Moderne gem that’s so intact and multifaceted. The entry tower almost has Hollywood Regency style bevels, and the bas relief panels of noble workers are the epitome of the WPA. You must scroll through the National Register survey to see the detail photos and floor plans of all the community amenities that were stuffed inside (thank you for linking to it prettypaddle.). It’s notable the architect went more-modern in the final design revision, and the renderings were done by a woman delineator. Matching city hall. I could easily imagine it as an artisan guild house: potters, woodworkers, weavers, etc….like William Morris had.

      4
      • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Wouldn’t that be SPLENDID? I’ll put the word out to my friends in weaving guilds and see if there is somebody just waiting for a building like this to become available….

        4
        • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1782 Quaker Georgian
          Worton, MD

          You’re wonderful GretaLyn! That’s how magic can happen. I’d be all over this opportunity if I were looking to migrate to something new. The lower level even has marble-clad shower rooms to serve the Hooverville that sprang-up when the mines closed. The original 1930’s monogrammed china is still stored in the cafeteria kitchen! I wonder if a seasonal Hostel could supplement income for an artisan nonprofit. No doubt, there are grants for an elevator and HVAC update. Apparently the glass block walls were covered in drywall. The stairway could be stunning again if the blocks were uncovered and maybe covered in a double-pane. It would really make the gold-painted lobby ceiling and terrazzo floors glisten again!

          1
          • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
            OHD Supporter

            Happy to help! One of my greatest joys is connecting people with a synchronicitic opportunity! The word has been spreading, and a number of actually interested “nibblers” are doing more research. Many, MANY more people reported what a sublime experience they’ve had in the area….sounds like a “must see” if we are ever cleared for travel again….

            1
      • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 885 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Victorian Farmhouse
        Lancaster, PA, PA

        I have to ask you snarlingsquirrel, what is a Georgian Quaker?

        1
        • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1782 Quaker Georgian
          Worton, MD

          A Georgian Quaker is one who prefers peaches in his morning oatmeal! Cue the laughtrack!

          Perhaps you have a better descriptive word for this house type, as I know there are several stone examples in your neck-of-the-woods Lancaster John. The Quakers here migrated from the Delaware Valley mostly. The house is essentially Georgian in its proportions, construction, layout, and English culture. However, Quaker farmhouses were deliberately austere and generally devoid of neoclassical or wealth references. Quaker farmhouses here had open beam ceilings (probably milled in PA and floated down the Susquehanna), china cabinets without show-off glass, simple latch & plank doors, plain American woods, less symmetry, and a surprising lack of separation between the kitchen and living areas (think upstairs/downstairs in British period films). Some people mistake them for houses of the 17th century because they’re so “primitive”. Also, it seems the servants’ areas were relatively equal to the family’s areas in comfort. This was true in 1782, but I think things became more conventional by 1840 as Quakers started loosening-up (and breaking up). As always, urban houses were more conventional in keeping up with the Joneses (like in Philadelphia).

          Our house was actually “Federalized” around 1830 with lath-and-plaster, fancy mantles, tall windows, dormers, and paneled doors (stripped in the impressive 1980’s restoration). This ramble expresses my pedestrian understanding and explanation John. I welcome your insights as I always learn from your good comments. I should mention you’re actually looking at the original backside of our house in my profile image. The original front elevation has Flemish bond, and even a water table (fancier brickwork).

          4
          • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
            OHD Supporter

            I would love to see the front elevation…sounds lovely!

            1
          • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 885 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Victorian Farmhouse
            Lancaster, PA, PA

            Well, Squirrel, that actually was a pretty good joke about peaches and oatmeal. I had never really heard of a home style described as “Quaker.” And being a Quaker myself, as well as an oatmeal eater, I enjoyed your explanation as well as all the photos you posted of your beautiful house. I’m no expert on Quaker history, but I do know that a good number of them settled in eastern North Carolina, and the eastern shore of Virginia and Maryland, along with the more well-known and enduring settlements in the Delaware Bay side of New Jersey and of course in Philadelphia, PA which was originally a Quaker colony founded by a famous Quaker William Penn. There was a fairly significant migration of Quakers from Virginia into the southern parts of Maryland’s Eastern Shore which occurred due to Church of England intolerance in Virginia combined with an initiative on the part of Maryland to attract white settlers to the Maryland frontier. I looked up your town (Worton, MD) and it is indeed likely that this northern area was settled in part from Quakers heading south from Delaware and Pennsylvania. Your home does look like many homes of that era in eastern Pennsylvania. I will share with you (and OHDers who have gone this far down a Quaker rabbit hole) a link to Wyck house, which is now a museum of an early Quaker home in the Germantown area of Philadelphia, but was originally built as a rural farm home starting in 1690. It is notable in part for its continuous family ownership for nine generations until it was donated to become the museum in 1973. Definitely worth a visit if you are in Philadelphia. https://wyck.org/

            5
            • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 885 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1875 Victorian Farmhouse
              Lancaster, PA, PA

              And I’ll add on the Wright’s Ferry Mansion (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright%27s_Ferry_Mansion) which was built in the early 1700’s in the OHD-popular town of Columbia, PA by Quaker Susanna Wright, who was a very accomplished and influential woman of independent means who is actually more interesting than her house. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susanna_Wright. I’m itching to post the house next door, built by another member of the Wright family, but it’s not yet on the market. It’s “coming soon” in our MLS.

              4
              • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
                OHD Supporter

                oooo, *reaches for popcorn* I’m looking forward to that listing, Lancaster John!

                1
              • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1782 Quaker Georgian
                Worton, MD

                John, thank you for those places to explore. Like many of us, I am sincerely interested in visiting the historic sites to learn and be inspired.

                Let’s not forget John Bertram’s extraordinary house and dreamy botanical garden in Philadelphia! He was America’s original botanist, and he named and collected native plants for Monticello and European collections. Bartramnamed a beautiful flowering tree Franklinia, in honor of his friend. Quakers must be remembered for their [relatively] egalitarian view toward Native Americans in the frontier. They paid them for good land, and they hired them to show them natural resources. Because of this approach, the Quakers were successful in migrating early-on out into those frontier lands to establish communities as even Quaker PA became inhospitable for Quakerism.
                https://www.bartramsgarden.org/about/history/the-bartrams/

                1
            • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
              OHD Supporter

              I went back to school to study art and social justice at Guilford college in Greensboro NC….here’s some Quaker history from that area:
              https://www.wfdd.org/story/carolina-curious-quaker-roots-greensboro

              2
              • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1782 Quaker Georgian
                Worton, MD

                Thanks for this link Greta! I’ll definitely sit down with it and listen to the podcast tonight. I’m just now learning about the rich early Quaker community in NC, more in connection to their folk pottery traditions. There’s a traditional redware potter and academic expert on Quaker folk pottery in New Salem named Hal Pugh who has made a lifetime study of Quaker families in his area (just east of Charlotte). Apparently the families are deeply interconnected. Your recent comments are adding to a constellation of hints that I need to go down there and learn a few things when it’s safer.

                2
                • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  I spent a LOT of time in seagrove
                  https://ncpotterycenter.org/
                  when I lived in NC, and went to many kiln openings and I hope when it is safe to do so that you can get down there for some of them…SO inspiring! In the meantime, the museum has a great website at the link above.

                  1
                  • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
                    OHD Supporter

                    1782 Quaker Georgian
                    Worton, MD

                    Oh yes, I considered moving to Seagrove to apprentice with the old Jug Town potters there. They’re still working out of old log sheds and maintaining the old ways. What a special place, and mind blowing too (but nowhere near the sea!) thanks for sharing your memories there Greta.

                    2
            • RanunculusRanunculus says: 148 comments
              OHD Supporter

              Tucson, AZ

              in addition Quaker settlements were (are) also farther west in the foothills of Virginia, e.g., Waterford and Lincoln.

              1
              • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1782 Quaker Georgian
                Worton, MD

                Thanks Ranunculus! I’m seeing an emerging overlay with red clay, Quakers, and fascinating things to research thanks to you, Greta, and John. The Quakers were more successful than other European settlers in reaching into the frontiers because they interacted with the Native Americans as relative equals, not to mention worked together for the benefit of the entire community. I wonder why we weren’t taught much about them in school.

                2
                • RanunculusRanunculus says: 148 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  Tucson, AZ

                  I s’pose it depends on where you grew up. I learned plenty about the Shakers (a Quaker sect) growing up in–you guessed it–Shaker Heights, Ohio.

                  After I fledged, my family moved to the Philly area & my younger brother attended a Friends (Quaker) private high school, where a good half of the students were far from Quaker.

                  As an adult, I moved to Loudoun County (pre-developers) & learned of the history, connections, and extant buildings and culture of the towns mentioned.

                  Quaker communities are not extinct!

                  4
              • Sandy BSandy B says: 832 comments
                OHD Supporter

                2001 craftsman farmhouse
                Bainbridge Island, WA

                You mention Waterford, Va, which has a fascinating Quaker history……I adore that settlement and visit whenever I can. It had a devoted population when I was considering two different historic properties there. I love that they were able to achieve the view shed conservation easement to protect intrusion of rampant development. I attended a fabulous October Fest, juried craftsmen fair in the 90s.
                Do also read the link to the Philips farm.

                https://www.waterfordhistory.org/history/waterford-quaker-settlement/

                4
            • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1782 Quaker Georgian
              Worton, MD

              I’m glad you appreciated my joke.

              You are a Quaker rabbit hole of wisdom John! You do possess the dynamic historical/geographical history that I’m just starting to wrap my head around. Their contributions to Early America are vast, and fairly forgotten, by lay people like me. I’m glad to know you are a Quaker, and it’s not surprising considering your thoughtful, peaceful online manner.

              https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/ED332689-54EE-4A24-82DC-4D32E909A1C6.jpeg

              The Cecil Meeting House next door, was built in 1696 along a tidal tributary to the Chesapeake. It seems they settled here (along with other faiths) to found a sort of peaceful agrarian community. Our neighbor’s 1740 house is called A Hopeful Unity, as its first family constructed a multi-faith church that continues to hold services (I.U. Church). I have reason to believe they held the seeds for an American utopia that became overshadowed by the wealth-focused plantation culture that came to dominate the Eastern Shore (and perhaps America on the whole). It’s documented that the members of the Cecil Meeting were staunch abolitionists and active in the Underground Railroad. Philadelphia Quakers found the Quakers here to be “old fashioned” in their language, dress, and ways as they persisted up to 1900. The creek has since silted-in, and the Quaker meeting was closed-and-dismantled eventually. Fortunately, the locals have long memories and good records. Thank you again John for sharing my enthusiasm and connection.

              2
      • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 189 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Yes, it is a real shame that the community is letting it go. I was in this building when it was still the library and it was fantastic. But they wanted a more modern space. I get it that the staff didn’t want to have to carry the books up and down stairs and they wanted a more consolidated space where it was easier to keep track of the books (and people couldn’t just walk off with them), but I sure was sad to hear it.

        5
    • SharonSharon says: 388 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      I vacationed on Burntside Lake north of Ely decades ago. I’ll always remember it as one of the most beautiful places on Earth. A part of my heart is there still. 🛶🌲

      4
    • jillieDjillieD says: 101 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1952 Ojai, CA

      These are so, so, cool. Thank you for sharing. Sounds like you know Ely. Do you live “at the end of the road?”

      1
      • prettypaddleprettypaddle says: 189 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Unfortunately, no, but we get to visit my inlaws up there for a taste of it a couple of times a year. It is always so very hard to come back to traffic and noise and endless asphalt and buildings after being up there.

        4
    • BoobtubeBoobtube says: 298 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1984 Post and Beam saltbox
      NY

      I can believe, as the description says, that the ice house was used as a bomb shelter in the 60’s. That is one hulking building. The community center building is a beauty.

      1
  6. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings all! I feel like we have such a wonderful family of folks that contribute. I learn something new every week.
    Here is what I found of interest this week:

    1906, Riverside, CA, 1,150,000

    Just from the exterior of this stone block home you can see from all of the lovely details that this one is something special. I love the roof which looks like some sort of tile topped with finials (?). Nice too to see the old photo of the house and interior shots. Inside, lovely stained wooden walls and decorative painting around the edge of the curved ceilings, stained glass and lighting. Big fan of the green tiled fireplace with its sturdy wooden columns holding up the mantle.

    https://www.riversideca.gov/historic/pdf/landmarks-WEB.pdf
    The above brochure lists the house as the Irvine House, built by architects Seehorn & Preston of LA.

    https://www.homesnap.com/CA/Riverside/3115-Brockton-Avenue

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3115-Brockton-Ave-Riverside-CA-92501/2076774168_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=894dab7e-b095-4446-ba94-5840d969f040~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    8
  7. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1917, Islesboro, ME, 3,850,000

    Lovely views of the water and Maine islands. Great fireplace (slide 8) with decorative brick interior in the hall. This house has the old European feel. Love the pantry, again with a view of the water and land-so nice, and special. Jay, brief glimpse of the large kitchen stove over the tin covered kitchen table. If I were to be a rich person in search of a Maine summer house, here I would be.

    https://www.philadelphiabuildings.org/pab/app/ho_display.cfm/66803
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/267-W-Shore-Dr-Islesboro-ME-04848/85020454_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=cdd32a34-5937-4447-8fb2-d3d0dabd7053~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    5
  8. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1870, Newport, RI, 7,900,000

    From the listing: “Villa Marina (aka Sanford-Covell House) – built in 1870 for Milton H Sanford and purchased 25 years later by William King Covell II is offered publicly for the first time since 1895”
    Quite the ocean views from that porch, and thus the price I guess. But why I share this one is the interior. The staircase with its grand newel post lamp and the gorgeous red walls with decorative trim is beautiful. Shot 13 has a hallway with a lovely museum feel. I love the decorative wooden ceiling, antique lamps, framed work hanging from cords from a picture rail and the grandfather clocks and furniture, rugs. The sensory stimuli goes on from there. Enjoy.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/72-Washington-St-Newport-RI-02840/2128477908_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=1fe62959-5345-4087-b19a-4b98a760e449~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    11
  9. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1830, Glen Gardener, NJ, 295,000

    I love what I can see of this home with all of its untouched natural color, but includes a newer copper roof and rebuilt chimney (says the listing). I want to see more pictures.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/130-Red-Mill-Rd-Glen-Gardner-NJ-08826/38851960_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=97689fe6-4efb-4502-b4b4-61965218a6a6~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    11
    • Sandy BSandy B says: 832 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      Kimberly……this is SUPER nice…would like more pictures too. Looks like mostly cosmetic stuff to do now.

      4
    • JimHJimH says: 5242 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Good catch on this one Kim! Looks very authentic and pristine. That’s a very desirable area, mostly developed on large lots but it still feels like the countryside.

      2
  10. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    1828, Moscow, TN, 1,975,000

    140 acres and historic mansion once used as a hospital for both sides of the Civil War, says the article below. Lovely interior shots and I love the dining room (to me, usually the show stopper besides the main entry hall). The dining room with its decorative walls, and window surrounds and curtains. On slide 21 interesting door surround, perhaps gothic? To the right of the stair on the way into the stuffed standing up on its hind legs Grizzley Bear. Hmmm. What they show of the stair is beautiful.

    https://www.atlantamagazine.com/southbound-articles/last-homecoming/
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/24545-Highway-57-Moscow-TN-38057/2077516247_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=1a8429fa-9df1-4023-b187-8466b28bf0d8~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

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  11. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I was typing gobbledygook after a while last night so let me better explain the comment notification situation.

    This is a WordPress based site and I rely on plugins from developers to help with certain things that are beyond what I can do. The problem with that is that if the developer abandons a plugin it becomes a security issue because no one is there to update it when a vulnerability is found. The comment notification plugin I was using (which I paid for, unfortunately), was abandoned by the developer and hadn’t been updated in a long time. He stated he no longer was going to update it so I HAD to find something else to handle comment notifications.

    I did find one that’s been around for years, but moving all the subscriptions over, the two plugins handle that differently in the database. While I thought I had cracked the way the old plugin handled storing subscriptions in the database, turns out that folks that only subscribed to replies to their comment was duplicated and that’s why some of you received multiple emails of the same comments for a day or two. I had to scrub all the subscriptions I transferred. For some of the most actively commented on homes, I’m doing it one by one according to what you originally signed up for (replies versus all comments on that post.)

    I still have the original list of comment subscriptions, over 50,000 individual rows of subscriptions so you see why it’s difficult to add each one. What I can offer is to add back your old subscriptions to those posts you commented or subscribed to if you don’t mind receiving an email whenever someone comments on that post rather than just to your replies.

    To clarify, this is just for old subscriptions, going forward if you subscribe to comment replies only, it’ll work that way from now on. But if you want your old comment subscriptions added back, you’d receive a notification when someone comments on that post not just to your comment. Again, that’s just for old subscriptions and not the ones you subscribe to moving forward, want to make that clear. If you are okay with that, contact me (email is best or just reply to my comment that you want that done.)

    The new plugin does not have the digest option, sorry for those that liked that. Maybe they’ll add it one day.

    Sorry this is long but I wanted to make clear why I had to switch over and why moving all the old comment subscriptions over isn’t possible. I don’t do this willy-nilly, there’s always a good reason why I make drastic changes like this. Hope y’all will understand. 🙂

    Thanks everybody! My shoulder is doing better so I can type again, yay!

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    • Feel free to reach out if you ever want help with DB migration or anything. I’m a programmer professionally, have maintained my own WordPress site for years, and happy to be volunteer tech support!

      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        Since there’s personal info (reader email addresses, etc), I’ll have to decline but I appreciate your offer! Thank you!

        1
        • Oh, yeah, don’t share that! 🙂 I meant more like “how do I rename this column/table?” or “How do I fix this PHP syntax error?”

          • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
            Admin

            1901 Folk Victorian
            Chestatee, GA

            Oh, I have no problems with that part, or at least usually. It was figuring out the comment subscription plugins for user comment subscriptions. One uses the postmeta while the other used their own created tables. The one that used their own tables is the one that abandoned working on the plugin. I did not find the comment id on the new subscription plugin for comment replies where the old plugin has it labeled as comment id. That’s why I’m able to easily add those that don’t mind replies to the post rather than their comment, it’s just a matter of going through and removing duplicate post id rows for that user and uploading via spreadsheet to the database.

            1
  12. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 885 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    This is a charming smallish 1850 brick home with two front doors, a style which is fairly common in this part of Pennsylvania. It’s located it an equally charming Lancaster county village, Conestoga, PA, which is cut off from through traffic and lots of development because it’s near the Susquehanna river. That said, it’s a convenient location to Baltimore and Philadelphia, and a bit further afield New York and Washington. Conestoga, PA 1850, $218K. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/3438-Main-St_Conestoga_PA_17516_M45945-84984

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    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Charming, indeed! I love a good Dutch door, and there are so many other boxes checked on my list with this house….thank you so much for sharing this one!

      1
    • RanunculusRanunculus says: 148 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Tucson, AZ

      But WHY two front doors?

      1
      • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 885 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Victorian Farmhouse
        Lancaster, PA, PA

        Some say that one door was for the preacher or other important people to enter directly into the “good” parlor, while everyone else could use the other one to go into the “family” parlor. I think it’s just people being practical, if you have two front doors you don’t need to waste space with a hallway or “foyer.”

        3
        • RanunculusRanunculus says: 148 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Tucson, AZ

          So kinda like our formal front doors and casual back/side doors! (Do they also have back doors for accessing the kitchen & other “utilities”?)

          I don’t know how one would know which one to select though since they look identical, unless one is always on the right & the other always on the left!

          I would think foyers would be essential the farther north one goes since there is so much transitioning to & from the cold in winter and one wouldn’t want the cold breeze of an open door going straight into an occupied room.

      • Here in Utah two front doors would signify that the house was the home of a polygamous family. There are quite a few examples of homes like this, especially in rural Utah. One front door for wife #1 and one front door for wife #2. My understanding is that each wife had her own parlor and bedroom with the rest of the house being a common area. Doubt very much you would find anything like this in PA but in Utah quite common in the early days.

        3
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 885 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      For those interested in historical trivia, it is believed that the famous Conestoga Wagon which was used to settle the West originated with German settlers in this area of Lancaster County. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conestoga_wagon

      3
      • RanunculusRanunculus says: 148 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Tucson, AZ

        I was today years old when I learned this vital fact:

        “The Conestoga wagon began the custom of ‘driving’ on the right-hand side of the road.”

        Thank you L.John!

        1
  13. mollyweinsteinmollyweinstein says: 3 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Thought this 1940s “Mid-Century Modern Mt Tabor” looked like fun…. thoughts on the basement, anyone?

    200 SE 65th Ave
    Portland, OR 97215

    https://www.redfin.com/OR/Portland/200-SE-65th-Ave-97215/home/26372831?utm_medium=share&utm_source=web_share&utm_campaign=copy

    4
  14. Hi all,

    This Victorian is going up for sale in Pasadena for $879,000. Built in 1890. The exterior looks like it’s straddling the Craftsman and Victorian styles in that it’s sort of understated for a Victorian, but the interior photos show that distinctive molding with bullseye rosettes, spandrils, cast iron fireplace, and really intricate brass hardware – especially the brass “dust corners” on the stairs, which I’d never seen before. Would love to hear opinions on the kitchen cabinets and built-ins. Can’t decide if they’re original or not.

    https://www.redfin.com/CA/Pasadena/303-Atchison-St-91104/home/7256825

    7
    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I thought the price would be much higher for Pasadena…so many incredible details. I hope some of our resident historians can walk us through some of them!

      1
    • JimHJimH says: 5242 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Hi JimB!
      The Pasadena house probably fits between the Vernacular and Folk Victorian categories; unfortunately the exterior has lost its original detail in subsequent “repairs.” The siding, exposed rafter tails and decorative brackets are recent work, and the paint job isn’t Victorian, so there’s little original left of the exterior beyond the basic form. This was a middle class neighborhood in the first growth spurt of Pasadena in the 1890’s. I can’t find the first owners, but later residents were working class renters.
      The interior is an attractive combination of period spaces and trim, mid-century decorating, and modern artifice. The floors, doors and casings appear original, which has to be pretty unique in Pasadena for an 1890 house. Preserving Grandma’s mid-century wallpaper was a recent design decision, and a brilliant one! The kitchen is a fair attempt at backdating – the cabinets are modern, good quality and vaguely Craftsman. The fancy hardware featured, the dust corners, and the lighting fixtures were likely from a salvage shop or EBay.
      It’s not an especially authentic house, but scores high in old housiness.

      6
      • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
        OHD Supporter

        “scores high in old housiness…” what a PERFECT description. Thank you for the history lesson.

        3
        • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1936 Cabin

          I love it when JimH offers up his knowledge and research. Thank you Jim! Saying that, I have yet to see the house, and am really looking forward to it from all of the conversation.

          3
      • Excellent analysis! Thanks!

        As far as the hardware – do you suppose it’s not original because it doesn’t match what would be expected of the period? I’m wondering now if the doorknob backplates look arts and craftsy…

        1
        • JimHJimH says: 5242 comments
          OHD Supporter

          There’s a variety of hardware there, roughly correct to the period but mismatched, so it’s impossible to tell what was original from a few photos. John S. or MJG might be able to identify the maker of the nicer Eastlake/Aesthetic items. Higher quality hardware was often used in the formal rooms and more utilitarian for the rest. The black porcelain doorknobs were standard grade and look right upstairs, or maybe they bought a batch online. Some folks spend decades trying to find matching vintage hardware.
          The mantel is a nice piece though I just noticed it doesn’t quite fit the hearth and the surround and cover don’t go with it. Don’t mean to be snarky – it’s difficult to put Humpty Dumpty together again!
          https://ssl.cdn-redfin.com/photo/45/bigphoto/533/PV20248533_4_0.jpg

          4
          • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Judging by that shot; (pocket door), it looks like they may have taken their better hardware examples with them. As would I have done if it was my collection. Though I would have at least replaced the missing pieces with lesser ones.

            1
        • MJGMJG says: 2265 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          For 1890 that is exactly what you’d see for the period. It was mass produced and could be ordered by mail and readily available at stores.

          https://archive.org/details/PennHardwareCoCatalogue1892/page/n85/mode/2up
          Take a look through this catalog for example.

          1
    • MornaMorna says: 74 comments
      folk vernacular Hamilton, MT

      I noted that this 1907 Idaho house has the “dust corners” on the stairs as well. https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/06/16/1907-spirit-lake-id/

      3
    • MJGMJG says: 2265 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Dust Corners were sold in the 19th century. I’ve seen them in some old photos from the period as well but they don’t appear to have been loved by everyone during those few decades.

      1
    • MJGMJG says: 2265 comments
      OHD Supporter

      CT

      Everything seems to be pretty standard for 1890 for the interior. Door hinges, escutcheons, ready made rosettes that you could even order and have mailed to you etc. The shape of the house is pretty standard shape for west coast homes as well. I’m not getting much of a craftman feel to the house.

      1
  15. GemmaGemma says: 109 comments
    2000 Farmhouse
    NC

    Does anyone know the location of the house featured in the Please Don’t Eat the Daisies series? The house used in the movie with Doris Day was a different structure.

    PDED is a delightful series that is sited in Ridgemont, NY, in an 1860s mansion that was used for the Underground Railroad.

    Kelly, sorry you and your BIL are having problems. My BIL and his family are all struggling with COVID-19.

    1
  16. MichaelMichael says: 2840 comments
    1979 That 70's show
    Otis Orchards, WA

    1904, Marysville Kansas, $149,500

    I don’t know if this has been shared or not but it’s as cute as a bug. The exterior looks original and unchanged.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1410-North-St-Marysville-KS-66508/105680780_zpid/

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    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      VERY cute. Thank you so much for sharing. I wish this house was in my target area….sigh. Funny story about why I can’t ever move to Kansas, though. My daughter (many, MANY years ago) believed that everything in Kansas was in black and white and was terrified of the thought of moving there and finding feet sticking out from under the house…I’m sure you can guess which movie we watched WAY too many times that brought on that belief. We can (almost) laugh about it now…

      3
    • shellbell67shellbell67 says: 138 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Love this one!

  17. CindyCindy says: 263 comments
    1866 Italianate/Queen Anne
    Brunswick, MO

    Kelly, I’m sorry about your BIL, hope he recovers quickly.

    4
  18. lexilexi says: 7 comments

    Sending all my goodwill to your family, especially your BIL rn.

    4
  19. CindyHCindyH says: 81 comments

    Kelly, thank you so much for this site – I can tell that it’s got to be pretty labor- intensive, and it’s so appreciated. When I open up my e-mail – this is the first thing I look for! I love to look at the photos, read the comments, and then go back and look at the photos again to see what I missed the first time. The comments are great – it’s like sitting in a room with a bunch of really cool people having discussions about things that we love which people who are not house-nuts don’t get.
    Thank you for allowing us to sit in front of the computer with hours of lovely daydreams. And thank you to all of the people and your comments! I didn’t even know what a pocket door was before I got on this site.
    Kelly, praying for peace and strength for you and your family. And if you need to slow down a bit with the website – do! Your health is a top priority, and we’ll happily wait while you take care of yourself and your family. You have a large and affectionate fan club, you know. Shalom.

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Thank you! 🙂 I appreciate that.

      2
    • MichaelMichael says: 2840 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      Cindy, I couldn’t have said it better myself. Here I thought I was the only one who looked for Kelly’s blog first when I opened my e-mail. I should have known better, especially with the fellow old house nuts I talk to every day in this blog. Thank you Cindy for confirming I’m not the only obsessed old house nut and thank you Kelly for all the amazing work you do. It can’t be stated enough how much it is appreciated!

      6
  20. GardenStaterGardenStater says: 262 comments
    1865 Gothic Revival
    Charlotte, NC

    Macon, GA, 1901. The “Crisco House.” Built by the man who invented Crisco. A few years later, owned by a man whose nickname was “Big Daddy.” Tennessee Williams wrote “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” while living in the house. $1,645,000. Simply amazing. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/M59234-02247

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    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      That was a lovely tour, of a LOT of house, wow. I wish they all came with over a hundred photos. I have to admit, that royal blue stove is the star attraction for me.

      4
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Very cool history and house.

      3
    • briteyesbriteyes says: 78 comments
      Cottonwood / Millcreek, UT

      The front of the house in Stunning. Then you see the interior, not a huge fan, i am sure this house was absolutely stunning before some one decided that it needed to have a modern feel, with some paint and decor to bring it into the 21st century, which is all reversible, but with a huge price tag. I have to agree with Gretalyn, the stove in the kitchen is the star attraction. The basement was pretty cool as well.

      3
  21. DianeEGDianeEG says: 561 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1896 Farmhouse W/Swedish roots
    Rural, IL

    I don’t think it’s easy to understand all that you have to do to keep your OHD sites going unless someone has actually done it. I do a simple garden blog “For the Love of Gardening Bishop Hill” and the blog site unexpectedly changes which throws off formatting. The stats are eliminated every time I do any computer file cleaning. Occasionally it won’t format correctly or accept attachments/pictures. It has deleted replies a couple of times and other times prevented them from being posted. Sometimes, it just doesn’t work. It starts out simple and fun and then mushrooms into a lot of work. I know what you do is much more complicated so we may all be entertained. Kelly, we are all here just because we love this site and what you do. It’s always a reality mind vacation that’s informative, educational and often simply beautiful. Wishing you and your family improved health. Blessings.

    8
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Yes, I’ve gone through glitches that took HOURS to figure out. I do more behind-the-scenes stuff than actual posting houses.

      Thanks, glad you and so many others find enjoyment in the site. It helps keep me motivated to get houses up everyday, although lately it’s been one thing or another. I appreciate everyone’s patience.

      8
  22. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I hate reporting news like this…
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2020/12/24/c-1900-queen-anne-in-sioux-city-ia/

    The fabulous exterior Queen Anne in Sioux City was burned in a fire the other day. Total loss although the owner is going to salvage what he can.

    2
    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      How sad. I can’t click the like button on this one….thanks for sharing it though. Being responsible for an older home often includes these added risks, which is why insurance can be prohibitive….I haven’t read the article yet, but I do hope there wasn’t any loss of life.

  23. Anne M.Anne M. says: 951 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    1845 in Sandwich, NH $495,000, listing calls it a “New Englander” a term I am not familiar with. Postcard pretty all around – love the floors, staircase and the den especially.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/13-Main-St_Sandwich_NH_03227_M98077-85225
    1825 farmhouse in Tamworth, NH $799,000. Comes with 22+ acres and barn; I think they may have built the house around the kitchen stove.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/38-Gardner-Hill-Rd_Tamworth_NH_03886_M49410-79710
    1917 in Lincoln, MA $925,000 on 3+ acres. Rooms are huge, needs sprucing up
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/22-Lincoln-Rd_Lincoln_MA_01773_M46449-96113

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    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The Sandwich house is charming. I love the staircase and the LIGHT. Lots of bookshelves is always on my list….

      The stove (and really the whole kitchen) in the Tamworth house is GREAT! My sister (and her horses)would have LOVED this house.

      1
    • JkleebJkleeb says: 303 comments
      Seattle, WA

      The Lincoln house brings up so many questions for me (what’s going on in the kitchen with the stove top, the grate in the dining room fireplace, etc). It has so much potential.

      1
  24. Anne M.Anne M. says: 951 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    1915 rustic house in Alford, MA $469,999 with 11 acres and a spring house. Not many interior pictures but the property is wonderful
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/402-West-Rd-Alford-MA-01266/59247741_zpid/
    1926 brick Colonial in Pittsfield, MA $459,900. lots of charm!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/32-Brunswick-St-Pittsfield-MA-01201/55946351_zpid/
    1850 brick cottage in Waterville, VT $265,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3042-State-Route-109-Waterville-VT-05492/299560173_zpid/

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  25. Anne M.Anne M. says: 951 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    1850 Gothic Revival in Falmouth, MA $620,000 was built as the Methodist parsonage – great old photo included
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/485-W-Falmouth-Hwy-Falmouth-MA-02540/55886524_zpid/
    1883 church in Richford, VT $119,000 so pretty!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/43-Church-St-Richford-VT-05476/2076860237_zpid/

    Have a nice weekend, everyone! Be well!

    6
  26. GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
    OHD Supporter

    These are both great finds!

    1
  27. MornaMorna says: 74 comments
    folk vernacular Hamilton, MT

    Hi All. I’ve been looking at OHD for a few years now, but only discovered the Link Exchange this summer when I go internet at home. I thought I’d introduce myself and explain a little the roots of my love of old houses.
    My formative years were spent in a 1910 brick and shingle Craftsman with lovely unpainted wood, pocket door, little closets next to the dormers, an amazing linen closet, interesting wall angles,layers of wallpaper on the stairwell, hideous green shag carpet downstairs,no fireplace whatsoever,steam radiator heat with an oil furnace that replaced the coal furnace well before my parents bought it. That house really influenced my taste in houses. I was bereft when I returned from a year away at 14 to find that Mom had remuddled the downstairs half bath and replaced the original random “pattern” linoleum with 1970s orange and yellow floral stuff.
    That year away at 14 included volunteering at a living history museum, interpreting houses form 1800, 1836, and 1850. (the museum had other buildings, but those were the ones I worked in.) I dipped tallow and beeswax candles in a huge kettle on the hearth of the 1800 cabin, cooked and baked on an open hearth in the 1836 scullery, and cooked for a crew of 12 on a wood burning stove in the summer kitchen of the 1850s house. I had left Idaho for school after trying to get my 8th grade history teacher fired for making History boring, and I was thrilled with the museum.
    Since 2006 I’ve rented an old homestead house that may be 2 line shacks that were hauled in and jammed together. You can see the odd roof lines on my profile page. I have wood heat only, a wood fired cook stove, and an outhouse. A well did get put in about 30 years ago, so I have running water. There is an old linoleum carpet in the bedroom, all other floors are wood, and in the winter I put down home made wool rag rugs. This place is small, and there’s no room for the rug loom, the piano, or a guest room.
    I keep hoping I’ll find a place I can afford near a community that would work for me. I’m severely chemically sensitive, so that really complicates things, and I can’t live in town. I love he older kitchens, as most of my cooking involves either canning kettles or cast iron.
    I’ll probably be sharing odd and simpler houses, but since I’m new to this, I don’t know if some of the places I’ve earmarked have been shared before. I look forward to learning more from the community that Kelly has drawn to OHD.

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    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 1009 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Welcome! Thanks for introducing yourself, nice to “meet” you! Share away!

      1
    • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      Morna,

      Welcome kindred spirit! After having looked at your photos, I’m just grinning. My mom lived in Hamilton, and now lives in Stevensville. And your place is very much like mine, which you’ll see when you look at my photos.

      And…. my house is 866 sq ft, and I have THREE looms. One is a huge old barn loom that I rescued and restored.

      I look forward to seeing whatever listings you find. If you’re like me, and I think you are, you won’t find many, but that’s okay, it’s fun to dream which is why we are here! Since joining this awesome community of like-minded people, I have discovered I love Colonials, Second Empire, and Italianate the best, the more original the better. And I want a double set kettle. *grin*

      4
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        — Just try not to be too jealous of Julie’s rad kitchen. 🙂
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/kitchennorthafter-scaled.jpg
        All that gorge wood finish is 100% Julie.

        3
        • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1877 Vernacular
          Columbia River Gorge, WA

          Thank you Jay! And looking at that picture, I realized I need to post newer pictures! The trim is done now, and it’s all old growth fir, my favorite. I’ll get on that right now!

          2
          • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1877 Vernacular
            Columbia River Gorge, WA

            And done! And now there are pictures of my living room as well. Everyone please look and comment!

            3
          • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Nicely done you! Lord, the place looks – dare I say it – FINISHED. 😉

            https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/DSCN2682.jpg

            Wonderful that! So very cozy. I’m pulling up a chair at the table for tea with you and Jim. Throw a locust log on the fire and lets kick back. 🙂

            I love your aesthetic. All those wonderful wood finish choices blend together in a symphony of good taste. Well done. You’ve come a long way from those damn foot long nails. Heheheh. I’m afraid my efforts here pale in comparison due to my lethargic disposition to this house lately. I didn’t do hardly squat in 2020. I need to either sell it or get busy…

            4
            • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1877 Vernacular
              Columbia River Gorge, WA

              Thanks so very much Jay, it was a buttload of work, but a lot of fun! I still have ONE room to almost completely rebuild: My little office, AKA The War Room, off the kitchen. I was going to do it this past fall, but decided against it…. it’ll be WAY easier to do in the summer when I can take everything out and do it all at once, rather than piecemeal. And I’m terrified of what I am going to find under the floor! It’s a mystery at this point.

              I’ve still got a bit of trim work to do in the pantry, bathroom, and in the cupboard bed.

              And if you show up on my doorstep, you’ll get the Grand Tour, a nice fire, and something good to eat!

              3
          • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1197 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1800 cottage
            Upstate, NY

            Julie, just had the chance to look at your photo updates – your little house is wonderful! I’m not sure what I like more – your kitchen or the brief glimpse of those fabulous irises! (More garden photos, please!) Actually, I think it’s the overall “honesty” of your home that I find most appealing: Honest materials, honest work, honest accomplishments – with a beautiful and comforting result.

            These days it seems that far too many people thoughtlessly create their surroundings based upon fad and fashion primarily to please and impress others, and it feels very false to me. Your house and lifestyle reflect my belief that homes are for living, not for showing off, and it is incredibly encouraging and inspiring to me to see your amazing accomplishments. Thank you!

            2
            • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1877 Vernacular
              Columbia River Gorge, WA

              Thanks so much Barbara. I’ll post garden pictures later this year. We revamped the veggie garden last year, and it’s been the talk of the neighborhood *grin*

              I think your ‘honesty’ comment is best, and I thank you for it. Knowing what I know now about my house, there are things I would have done differently, but as we all know, you make decisions based on the info you have at that time.

              I have tried VERY hard to keep this place not original, but honest, as you say. I have reused as much as I could, and tried to keep things pratical and useful. It’s an honor to be the forth owner of a house that is 144 years old.

              2
              • Barbara VBarbara V says: 1197 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1800 cottage
                Upstate, NY

                Julie, I am also curious about your “cupboard bed”. My house is on the small side as well, and I often struggle for a way to create additional sleeping space. Any additional photos showing your bed creation in more detail would be very welcome!

                1
                • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  1877 Vernacular
                  Columbia River Gorge, WA

                  I will post pictures of my glorious cupboard bed soon. I want to get a few things done first…. like the doors for the underbed storage!

                  I can’t emphasize enough how awesome it is to sleep in there. We open the window at night, and the bed is built high enough that our pillows are level with the sill. The breeze (or wind!) blows right on us, buried under a thick down comforter and a wool blanket. It’s like sleeping outside!

                  It’s completely dark with the doors closed and the leather curtains drawn. And quiet. And because the ceiling is just over 9 feet, there is room for shelves above. Storage is important in a small house with no closets!

                  I smile every single night when I climb in to sleep. Every single night. It’s just such a perfect way to sleep in a cold ‘room’ while keeping the rest of the house warm.

                  Before, our room was cold. Really cold. To the point it hurt your feet to stand on the floor, and we always dressed in the living room. I found a bunch of cupboard bed pictures online and asked my husband what he thought, and he thought it would work, so I tore out the wall between the bedroom and living room and built the cupboard bed.

                  Now we have a bigger livingroom, and an awesome place to sleep. Perfect!

                  2
                  • MornaMorna says: 74 comments
                    folk vernacular Hamilton, MT

                    When I was a child, we had the Little Golden Book version of Hansel and Gretel, and the witch’s house had a cupboard bed depicted — the first I’d ever seen. I was immediately taken with it. “OK, she’s a witch, she’s supposed to be the villain, but That Bed!” I can’t wait to see your version.

                    1
      • MornaMorna says: 74 comments
        folk vernacular Hamilton, MT

        Hi Julie, I’d already admired the photos of your house and the temporary outdoor kitchen. If you’re in the valley (once the pandemic is in the past and we’ve had our vaccinations) I’d be delighted to show you this place.
        I do look longingly at the listing for minimally updated Colonial houses and farmhouses that still function as farm houses. I get grumpy when I see a cooking hearth relegated to a sitting room. I get serious outbuilding envy, especially for stone-walled spring houses. We moved to MD when I was in high school, and I was quite taken with the stone houses in PA, a friend’s 17th c house that used to be a stage stop in WV, and the houses I’d see when I was working near Saugerties NY and would tool around on my motorcycle. I have never been comfortable in modern houses.
        Your house looks about perfect. I can’t believe you have so little space with 2 humans and 3 looms!

        1
        • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1877 Vernacular
          Columbia River Gorge, WA

          Morna,

          I am hoping to see my mom again in the late spring. I’ll let you know!

          Spinghouses! Awesome! We have two springs, one with a non-descript box, and one with an equally non-descript “house”. The house one is maintained by the local school district, so I can’t do anything with it, but the springbox will eventually be renovated to include a small house addition so I can store food in there, other than the beer and sodas that are in there in the summertime.

          I’d kill to have a root cellar as well. I may do that someday…. there used to be one here.

          3
        • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1782 Quaker Georgian
          Worton, MD

          Moran & Natira, I can’t tell you enough how much I admire your chosen life that’s so close to the land. You work hard, stay curious, and live honestly without tons of stuff. You’re my heras. My 102y/o great grandmother came out West in a covered wagon when she was twelve (maybe a Calistoga Lancaster John), and I’ve always admired women with her grit . You give me nostalgia for the years I spent in a rustic mountain cabin with a wood stove and an outhouse.

          3
  28. MornaMorna says: 74 comments
    folk vernacular Hamilton, MT

    1910 Craftsman (?) in Idaho Falls ID, was listed at around $260,000, but is currently off the market, I’m not sure why.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/344-Poplar-St-Idaho-Falls-ID-83402/76907465_zpid/

    This house is 2 doors down the alley from where i grew up. I used to climb the lilac and go over the garage roofs to a childhood friend’s upstairs window. It’s been owned by the same family since about 1974. Somehow I never noticed that fan light (?) over the door for all the years I went in the front door for piano lessons. It wouldn’t take much to make this house glow again.

    1898 Victorian, Republic WA, $198,800
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/645-S-Kauffman-St-Republic-WA-99166/193866010_zpid/
    I rather like the exuberance of the gingerbread, though this not a style of house I’d normally be interested in, but the house is great, and there are a barn and a blacksmith shop on the property. I wonder what colors this house was originally?

    4
    • MornaMorna says: 74 comments
      folk vernacular Hamilton, MT

      The question marks are because I’m not quite sure about my designations. The houe in Republic may be more Folk Victorian. Not sure about the house on Poplar in IF.

  29. JulieJulie says: 379 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Kia Ora from New Zealand,

    The husband and I are on vacation up North in the remote Hokianga so I wasn’t going to post anything this week. And then I found out last night that the little 1880 cottage we are renting in the small village of Kohukohu is for sale so I thought I would share the listing. It’s for Negotiation but given it’s small size and how far away from everything this area is I would say around US$210,000.00. As you can see it has amazing harbour views.

    https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/property/residential/sale/northland/far-north/hokianga/listing/2841733393

    8
  30. RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    There is a specific term for a decorative arts, ceiling window lit from above by a separate skylight or lantern; and I can not remember / find it. Anyone?

    https://pi.movoto.com/p/310/MDBA535382_0_qAunEI_l.jpeg

    2
    • JkleebJkleeb says: 303 comments
      Seattle, WA

      I thought the term was laylight, which I have read and seen used by various old house experts. However, I looked the term up found this definition on the Merriam-Webster site:
      laylight: a glazed panel usually set flush with the ceiling for admitting natural or artificial light
      So it sounds similar to skylight except laylights don’t open. So I don’t know if laylight is actually the name of the decorative ceiling window or the window above that illuminates it. Or perhaps neither.

      4
    • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1782 Quaker Georgian
      Worton, MD

      Rose water, you ask an excellent question. You got me curious. I’ve seen them referred to everything from an oculus to a cupola, but I know there must be a specific term.

      1
  31. natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1877 Vernacular
    Columbia River Gorge, WA

    Here’s a cool link to interesting archtectural features in Butte, MT. Not was I was looking for, but fun anyway!

    https://www.loc.gov/resource/hhh.mt0040.photos/?sp=1

    3
    • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1782 Quaker Georgian
      Worton, MD

      Look at that Natira! A polychrome Venetian palazzo right there in Butte from the 1870’s! The architect must have been inspired by “The Stones of Venice”.

      1
  32. https://www.century21.com/property/1669-e-22nd-st-brooklyn-ny-11229-C2181983771

    1669 E 22nd St Brooklyn, NY 11229

    The Wyckoff- Bennett- Mont Homestead is a pre-Revolutionary War Dutch farmhouse built in 1766. In the heart of the currently known, Madison section of Brooklyn and sitting on a rare half-acre lot, this historic ranch is its own living museum.

    6
    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The typewriters all lined up in the hallway….was this a sale before the property went on the market? So many wonderful details in this house/museum! Thank you for sharing this!

      2
      • MornaMorna says: 74 comments
        folk vernacular Hamilton, MT

        It seems likely. One said that both Mr & Mrs Mont died recently, and their children were preparing to sell the property. From the pictures it looks like they had quite a collection of extraneous artifacts, besides the ones connected to the house.

  33. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    This is…something… 1967 $12+M. Designed by Edward Durell Stone. From the listing: “His most noted works include The Museum of Modern Art, Rockefeller Center & Radio City Music Hall & Theater, The Kennedy Space Center, The General Motors Building, The US Embassy of New Delhi, The Waldorf Astoria Lobby & Ballroom in NYC, as well as hundreds of other world famous projects. Villa Riele was one of only two private residential projects Stone took on. ”

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/32-Watch-Way-Huntington-NY-11743/59550533_zpid/

    5
    • JimHJimH says: 5242 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Interesting! It looks like the Metropolitan Opera House designed by Wallace Harrison about the same time.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropolitan_Opera_House_(Lincoln_Center)

      It was built for a society lady on land purchased from the Colgate estate.

      Zaleski – Long Island Modernism:
      “Gabriele Lagerwall, later to become “the Baroness,” is, in Zaleski’s description, “the sometime companion of numerous very rich men.” (And you thought people moved to Long Island because the schools were good.) In 1961, she buys 32 acres from the Colgates, and hires Stone, himself a member of her own international set, to design the perfect house: “a gilded getaway for a high-toned, insouciant crowd.” He does. The Villa Rielle, as it is known, has a central atrium with a large reflecting pool, where Miss Lagerwall entertains guests during the cocktail hour by taking a swim with them, the Holly Golightly of Long Island.”

      4
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Hard to tell who’s knocking off who here: not that it really matters with that “creatively” incestuous set of copycats; but I prefer Phillip Johnson’s Fort Wort, Beck house from this period. Granted, big oil money went a lot further with overall design realization than otherwise; but despite the variance in scale, I still prefer Phil in comparison. There are gobs of these sort of houses, even here in Indianapolis. There was a brief architectural movement on this theme, but I forget what it was called.

        https://10210straitlane.com/10210-strait-lane-photogallery

        3
        • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1782 Quaker Georgian
          Worton, MD

          Of course, nearly all architecture is referential to predecessors (even modern architecture). This and the examples you mentioned were called “New Formalism”. Lincoln Center/Kennedy Center are examples too. It was intended to convey a neoclassical sophistication and timelessness.

          Unfortunately, it drew from fascist precedent. Mussolini’s EUR modern capital city in Rome comes to mind:
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EUR,_Rome

          This reality has stained Philip Johnson’s legacy (among other reasons), but I think the other architects were just seeking to find an ultra-refined pure style. This house actually looks like Philip Johnson’s folly:
          https://theglasshouse.org/explore/pavilion-in-the-pond/

          I think Edward Durell Stone falls into this latter category because he did so much sensitive work. I can’t say I admire this listing, but the client may have played a role in drawing the refined temple tradition into the “new money” glitz of the Long Island coastline.

          4
        • JimHJimH says: 5242 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Yeah, those guys thought they were reinventing Classicism for awhile there. Maybe OK for public buildings but obliviously reactionary for houses. FLW would have barfed.

          3
          • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1782 Quaker Georgian
            Worton, MD

            We agree JimH. I do confess to being drawn to the West Coast version of New Formalism in bank pavilions and mid century car dealerships: lighter and less dogmatic. I think mostly this uptight style was in reaction to the unruly expressionism that was taking hold of disciplined modernism in the late 1950’s (Think of the Sydney Opera House). Even today, should a concert hall be designed by fun Frank Gehry or classical Renzo piano to express how cultured we are?

            Of course, the age-old puffy debate on classical architecture is, “Who is the inheritor of the awesome trajectory of Western Civilization, and all her greatness, going back to the Greeks and even Mesopotamia?” When we build a classical-referenced building, we’re claiming that inheritance for ourselves, not because we like fluted columns. For many of us today, it’s a bit creepy and loaded with assumptions of what that claimed inheritance means. A hundred+ years ago, it probably just meant that you believed in the stability of democracy, the Enlightenment, and refinement in the arts.

            3
            • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1936 Cabin

              Thank you for the dialogue here from all of you. I am learning, and like the folly.

              2
            • JimHJimH says: 5242 comments
              OHD Supporter

              NF was the style in vogue when I first became aware of architecture, and most of it was generally appreciated among all the glass and concrete boxes. Some theorists thought Classicism was dead mid-century but it never really went away. Stone was simply a great designer, Johnson too, and most of the work is exemplary across a few styles. (Radio City is an amazing place to see a show or film!)
              I grew up close to Manhattan, and I remember thinking Stone’s 2 Columbus Circle (early Post-Modern) was a bit odd when I first saw it, though it grew on me over the years, and they ruined it when they put the vinyl siding on – actually terra cotta:
              https://www.archdaily.com/476318/ad-classics-2-columbus-circle-edward-durell-stone-and-associates

              I get a whiff of Big Daddy and old plantations in monumental classically designed homes, and modern ones seem more than a little bit socially insensitive. That won’t stop some folks from building them for a few more centuries at least.

              5
              • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1782 Quaker Georgian
                Worton, MD

                JimH, I envy you for experiencing one of the great chapters of American architecture first hand, and in Manhattan!

                As a West Coaster, I admit I’ve never had much appreciation for Philip Johnson besides a couple choice masterpieces that indeed changed the rules (often rules he created for others to follow). As for modern formalism, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe & Louis Kahn blew them all out of the water in my non-objective book. Awe-inspiring

                2
          • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            Frank had a point, Jim. As regards humans and nature; this sort of building is innately anathema to the way he saw the world and how he very passionately wanted us all to live in it.

            1
            • JimHJimH says: 5242 comments
              OHD Supporter

              The big formal ones – absolutely! But some of the small Greek Revival houses we see are beautiful, wonderfully scaled, inspiring and as homey as can be. I get the distinction between Frank’s fine art houses and folk art ones but I don’t know if it would make us much happier, or better humans, to wake up in one every day.

              3
        • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
          OHD Supporter

          1782 Quaker Georgian
          Worton, MD

          Rosewater, I got to visit Columbus, Indiana over the summer. I’d be curious about your thoughts on Columbus’ surprising investment in modern architecture over the decades.

          1
          • RosewaterRosewater says: 7110 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1875 Italianate cottage
            Noblesville, IN

            >Columbus, Indiana
            Oh, how cool, Mike. I hope you enjoyed your stay there. Columbus is a lovely town. The contributions of the Miller family to it’s civic life and buildings is remarkable: not to mention their insistence that the base of Cummins manufacture remain there, despite likely economic incentives to move them elsewhere through the years. One thing is for sure; the buildings J.I.Miller is responsible for having built, contributing to, and encouraging, draw folks like yourself interested in seeing them in their fascinating context from all over the world. Architectural tourism is a curious thing in a little Indiana town, and a source of great pride and profit for the locals generally. Miller’s own home is remarkable indeed.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Irwin_Miller

            4
            • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1782 Quaker Georgian
              Worton, MD

              You reflect my own thoughts about Columbus, IN better than I could have said it Rosewater! It is an open air pleasure fair for those who love architecture (not just modernism). I had always wanted to see I.M. Pei’s iconic 1969 library and Henry Moore statue. I wasn’t prepared for the sublime experience of that perfect public plaza that’s created between the library and 1942 First Christian Church by Eliel Saarinen. Oh, and the church is loaded with surprising details, architectural articulations, and relief sculpture! I’ll get inside the house next time!

              The film “Columbus” came out a few years ago. The trailer gives a sense of the place as the movie is essentially a slow love song to the modern architecture there:
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3dcnV6Z9Zs

              2
              • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
                OHD Supporter

                1936 Cabin

                Thank you for the further continued conversation, it is late, but I look forward to the film share
                and Irwin Miller, Durell Stone
                links tomorrow.

                1
  34. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 1009 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    For those wondering about my BIL, updates are alittle slow, guess because they are busy but… he has improved! They turned down his oxygen on his breathing machine and his levels are staying around 90ish. He was able to eat, sit up. Last night they said that they’ve done all they could and asked if he wanted to be put on a ventilator as that’s the next option. I’m not sure if they didn’t explain when he had 24 hours to decide that it was just a precaution incase he wasn’t able to speak not because he would need it soon but it freaked us all out. We found out today what it meant. Hopefully he’ll continue to improve. Thanks for asking about him and your positive thoughts and prayers.

    12
  35. AmyBeeAmyBee says: 823 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1859 Mod Vern Greek Revival
    Lockport, NY

    Some sweet old Kentucky homes!

    1856 Greek Revival $585,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1420-Bath-Ave-Ashland-KY-41101/105724371_zpid/

    1910 Tudor Revival $1.495M
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1564-Cherokee-Rd-Louisville-KY-40205/73456990_zpid/

    1869 Modified into Classical Revival $4.85M
    https://garrettsrealty.com/listing/1575998-1116-bellewood-rd-anchorage-ky-40223/

    2
  36. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    I ran across this video yesterday that brought me to some of the most interesting and unlikely NYC neighborhoods in the concrete jungle. One of the first they take you to is Tudor City, which is where my Great Grandparents lived for some time. It looks very intriguing, especially the upper floors. I wish I could find what the inside looks like-originally-on those upper floors.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tudor_City

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=NdERG5Oob0M

    1935, Flushing, NY 979,000

    I came across this one while searching listings for one of the areas on the film. I am taken in by the facade of the building, and then by the hanging lamps that flank the sofa. The kitchen is pretty neat, as is the bar/den in the cellar. But what really got me going was the bathroom, you will know which one.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6724-Ingram-St-Flushing-NY-11375/32002326_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=9243ed50-e4e6-40fa-8188-12a2cc17804a~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    4
    • BethanyBethany says: 3450 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      Wonderful video! Thanks for posting that! Even I would live in a city if it could be in one of those cool places.

      2
    • GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’m guessing you mean what we used to call the “Barbie” bathroom? Pink/black? I know exactly where this house is, neighborhood wise, and have been in so many living rooms just like that….thanks for the bit of nostalgia!

      2
      • snarlingsquirrelsnarlingsquirrel says: 64 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1782 Quaker Georgian
        Worton, MD

        I lived in a Jack-and-Jill apartment duplex from the same year (in the Jill apartment). It had the same bathroom tile and feminine architectural details (curvy arches and windows). Lucy, a kick of a woman, lived on the masculine side with jade-and-black bathroom tile and zigzag Art Deco details. I often plotted unsuccessfully how I could get Lucy to trade with me. I never should have given up that terrific place, even if it did have pink tile. It had a gas-powered refrigerator if you can believe it.

        6
  37. Anne M.Anne M. says: 951 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Couldn’t wait until Friday to post this!
    1901 Georgian Revival mansion in Fall River, MA $899,900 – it’ll knock your socks off.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/654-Highland-Ave-Fall-River-MA-02720/55984115_zpid/

    8
  38. GretaLynGretaLyn says: 196 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Here’s a sweet 1900 house in Columbus, IN for $74,900
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/741-Reed-St_Columbus_IN_47201_M43699-74068
    Can’t you just imagine this with a vintage stove and a period appropriate kitchen garden?
    Ok, maybe that’s just me.

    3
  39. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1897 Queen Anne Colonial
    Cadiz, OH

    Recent days have found me preoccupied with getting necessary electrical work done on our old house. A number of our circuits on the main floor downstairs were “dead” without any apparent reason. (breakers showed them as “on”) It was somewhat scary when one of the electricians revealed that one of the dead circuits was due to an old floor plug outlet being broken that was causing a short a long time ago resulting in leaving charred wood flooring around it. Apparently, a heavy piece of furniture had been dragged over it and the weight broke the old bakelite/plastic outlet causing a short contact. Other dead outlets were simply worn out from hard use since the early 1960’s so now almost everything is up to par and both the parlor chandelier and the dining room large stained glass “Tiffany” type fixture (old, but certainly not Tiffany) now lighten up when the switch is on. The electricians wisely suggested that I go with (Edison type) LED bulbs given the age of the fixtures and the multitude of bulbs each fixture has. (10 or more) The vintage Edison type LED’s look period correct but unlike incandescent bulbs, which generate a lot of heat, LED’s heat output is negligible. A 40 watt equivalent LED also uses about 12-13 watts of power, so it also saves on power consumption. The only negative is the cost with LED’s costing double or more the cost of a incandescent or “pigtail” florescent bulb. There again, the tradeoff is that LED’s typically last 5-10 years vs. every couple of years for the other varieties.

    I’ve noticed an avalanche of auction notices arriving in my inbox in recent weeks so online antique and art auctions are going at a brisk pace these days. Today, I received a sales circular from Ahlers & Ogletree, Inc. a well established firm in Atlanta. I was surprised that among their listings was a set of eight (hand printed in the late 20th century using wood blocks made in 1807) French Zuber scenic panels from their Hindustan series: https://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/zuber-hindustan-scenic-wallpaper-eight-panels-1034-c-5784b33b21?evg_experience_id=6aLl3&evg_item_id=5784B33B21&evg_campaign_id=W5SbT&evg_block_id=SeA53&utm_campaign=exclusive&utm_medium=email&utm_source=house&utm_content=evergageahl013121 The price isn’t cheap but is in line with what these hand printed 200 year old works of art usually sell for. For late 18th and early 19th century grand homes, nothing exceeds the opulence of Zuber papers. For those on tighter budgets, Bradbury and Bradbury makes decent papers (mostly Victorian era) as well as Mason & Wolf which is of equal high quality. More reasonable still is Aesthetic Interiors, a small Wabash Indiana based firm that makes quality papers for a range of styles and periods. Maybe when we have all of the electrical work done and a re-roofing of our wrap around porch, there will be something left in the budget for wallpapers but then wallpaper hangers don’t exactly grow on trees these days.

    It took me well over a month to arrange for electricians to come out. I still haven’t been able to find a Barber shop open around here (Ohio) so either I buy some clippers online or go back to a 1970’s shaggy look.

    8
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      John, enjoy your share on your new house. I love the wallpaper panels you share. I stop and think where in my home or cabin are there spaces I could use them…only in the large open spaces of the modern house, smile, better saved for another home

      1
    • MichaelMichael says: 2840 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      Glad you got your electrical issues solved, John. I’ve read to many stories of electrical fires in old, historic homes lately. Stay safe, my friend!

      1
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1897 Queen Anne Colonial
        Cadiz, OH

        Thanks, Kimberly, Michael. Any electrical work over 50 years old should be checked out professionally, IMO. I knew before we bought this place that the “rats nest” of wires coming out of the basement breaker panel box indicated some potential issues which turned out to be true. However, it was downright scary to find that one outlet which had shorted and produced enough heat to char the wood around it. Once the electricians come back to finish up their work, I can move on to the next project. The biggest disappointment, so far, is discovering under the green and beige carpeting another layer of old vinyl/linoleum tiles attached with black mastic (some have cautioned might contain asbestos) so I have no idea as to what condition the wood flooring is under them. There is a pronounced dip/sag in the floor (up to 8 inches) between the pocket doorway in the parlor and the middle of the dining room so I’m not looking forward to uncovering that. The basement ceiling under it provides no clues with it being relatively level. Could be broken/cracked floor joists from over-loading in the past or ???? When I called this place our “forever” house when we bought it, I did not know that was literally how long it will take me to restore everything.

        2
  40. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 12125 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    I didn’t see this one in my comment search if it was shared previously.

    1927 Condo.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1500-N-Lake-Shore-Dr-Chicago-IL-60610/158740711_zpid/

    $17,000,000, “Rosario Candela’s only residential commission in Chicago…” You have to see this to believe why it’s being listed at $17m. I won’t be posting this but felt it was worth a peek in the link exchange.

    9
    • natira121natira121 says: 727 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1877 Vernacular
      Columbia River Gorge, WA

      WOW. While I can’t imagine (like , AT ALL) living like that, it certainly is an absolutely fantastic place!

      Places like this aways make me think of all the old houses I would save if I had that kind of money.

      6
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 2081 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Such a museum space. This is one where I would really like to see the original service rooms.

      5
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5426 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1897 Queen Anne Colonial
      Cadiz, OH

      Palatial, Baronial??? I soon run out of superlatives to describe this modern day palace. There’s so much to take in on this place but it would likely not appeal to Millennials who often look back to the minimalist 1950’s for inspiration. This is a home where more IS more, unapologetically.

      1
  41. Loyal, WI, Built in 1921, listed for $70,000. Bungalow with unique footprint and history.
    Original hardwood floors in most rooms and original woodwork throughout. This home has an extra-large living room and dining area in addition to a family room. Bungalow has lots of built-ins and closet space and is filled with charm.

    Would be fantastic if this house sold to someone that would “love” it as much as I would!

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/107-W-Mill-St-Loyal-WI-54446/113646208_zpid/

    4

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