July 10, 2020: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 7/10/20 - Last OHD Update: 7/17/20 - 150 Comments
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150 Comments on July 10, 2020: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11783 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    No idea on the location of today’s old house or the boy and his…dog.

    9
    • SharonSharon says: 253 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 Contemporary
      Sedalia, MO

      You just HAD to zoom in on the “dog.” You just HAD to!!! I can’t un-see it! I’m still looking at it… Seriously?! What in the ……….?! Like something out of a Stephen King novel! It might look innocent but …..

      20
    • ddbackerddbacker says: 508 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1971 Uninspired split-level
      Prairie Village, KS

      I think the dog is the photographer’s studio prop. I’ll call him Stuffy.

      27
    • MichaelMichael says: 2451 comments
      1979 That 70's show
      Otis Orchards, WA

      The fact that they planted a palm tree in the front yard would lead me to believe California or Florida.

      8
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5472 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Agreed, Michael. I think it’s more likely to be in California because of the wealth of exterior details on the house. California Queen Annes tended to be among the most ornate in the country. It helped that some of the early local architects like the Newsom Bros. firm (Canadian born Samuel and Joseph Cather Newsom based in San Francisco) popularized very ornate homes through their published plan books beginning in the 1870’s. They added an Los Angeles office after the mid-1880’s. The Newsom Bros. designed the William Carson Mansion in Eureka which remains one of the most ornate Victorian era mansions on the West Coast. Then again, there were Queen Annes built in Florida as well (in towns like Fernandina Beach) and along the Gulf coastal states where palm trees can survive. Still, my hunch is that this house was located in California.

        I’d date the home from around 1895 to the early 1900’s. The photo itself must have been taken around the WWI era when large Victorians began to receive the whiteout treatment. People back then thought white blended in the ornamental details and made old Victorians look more dignified. To me this is a lovely example of the towered Queen Anne style.

        20
        • MJGMJG says: 1805 comments
          OHD Supporter

          CT

          Agree. This house is most definitely a west coast Queen Anne. I love these. And although I have posted many articles from the period on people’s disdain toward white, there were still some people ignoring the trend. I collect 19th century photos and have seen occasionally white homes or just a solid light color with zero details outlines from 1880s and 1890s.(except for the window sashes) I think the popular trend was polychrome but there were the people who rebel against the trend, which in turn made the critics see red and continue to post best paint practices in periodicals.

          I know some on here that insist there is no way this house was ever white originally. This is just my observation from years of period research.

          The growth around this Victorian is pretty young. I wonder if the photo isn’t older than Ww1 era.

          12
          • MJGMJG says: 1805 comments
            OHD Supporter

            CT

            http://kr.wejc.com/genealogy/media/maxey_house_la_1880.jpg

            I wanted to provide an example before the hate reply’s come. Lol
            (Kelly can you add to my original post ?Was too late late and can’t add to my first response. )

            Here is a link example of a white Victorian and judging by their clothes we are definitely pre 1900. The dresses have an 1880s look.

            14
            • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 902 comments
              Admin

              1901 Folk Victorian
              Chestatee, GA

              I’m a slow poke with comments tonight, think your reply is good.

              5
            • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
              OHD Supporter

              1875 Italianate cottage
              Noblesville, IN

              I like the white houses too; and agree with you that there is plenty of antique precedent for it; especially in warm climates where heavy industrial age smokiness wasn’t a factor. Contemporary and recent, super loud, polychrome, technicolor dream coat, paint schemes absolutely give me a headache. Subtlety and restraint are always in service of elegance. I’ve taken my fair share for that opinion. 🙂

              16
              • Gregory_KGregory_K says: 466 comments
                OHD Supporter

                Chatsworth, CA

                My 1880’s Lucas Co. paint catalog advises against picking out every architectural detail in a different color, as practiced on the west coast, because that would be an ‘abortion’ of good taste. It seems in the 1880’s, lots of color was very popular, and on Californian homes, 19th century ‘Painted Ladies.’
                In my antique photograph collection, there are white houses, but there are also homes where there were lots of colors used to pick out trim and details..

                4
                • MJGMJG says: 1805 comments
                  OHD Supporter

                  CT

                  Exactly my point. Most homes show have color to them but you do see occasional white homes dotting the landscape to the horror of some from the time. Here is a wonderful book. My favorite is 126 and the next caption explains the different colors painted on each floor. But in this wonderful book you will also see a few White House’s but the dominating scheme isn’t monochromatic.

                  https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=ucbk.ark:/28722/h2cx17&view=1up&seq=1

                  4
                  • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1161 comments
                    OHD Supporter

                    1875 Limestone house
                    Langeais, Loire Valley,

                    The collection of gorgeous houses/mansions in this book is amazing, I’m both drooling over the pics and crying over Google Streetview because so many of them are gone and replaced by ugly structures… :'(

                    2
                    • MJGMJG says: 1805 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      CT

                      Oh good, i’m glad someone got use out of the link I sent 🙂 I go through these images quite often. I too looked up some of these homes and was horrified to see that most are gone or have been grossly altered beyond recognition.

                      3
                  • ctmeddctmedd says: 66 comments

                    Wow! I didn’t have time to get through the entire book, but thank you for sharing it. Those houses were humongous! San Jose must have been a mecca for wealthy folks back then.

                  • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5472 comments
                    OHD Supporter

                    1889 Eastlake Cottage
                    Fort Worth, TX

                    The same archival book was reprinted in 1987 as VICTORIAN CLASSICS OF SAN FRANCISCO, Alex Brammer narrative, and printed by Windgate Press, Sausalito, CA. ISBN #0-915269-05-08 I bought a moderately priced used copy online some years ago in like new condition. In a way, it’s kind of sad because so many of the grand examples were lost in the 1906 Earthquake while others were lost to “progress” and were demolished. The original descriptions indicate many of these grand homes were literally palatial inside.

                    • MJGMJG says: 1805 comments
                      OHD Supporter

                      CT

                      Compare the pictures to that book. I noticed some of the homes are different angles as well as some of these homes don’t exist in the book. This one is unique. Almost looks like this was the beginning collection. Some don’t even have descriptions and these almost looked like newspaper clippings.

        • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1002 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Definitely West Coast, and likely California. The wood-clad basement level pretty much nails it. The house appears to be fairly new in the photo… the plantings are still young and the sidewalks bright and clean. I wonder if this image is one half of a stereoview? The first image shows an arched shape surrounding the image suggestive of the way stereo photos were frequently mounted. If so, it would be fun to view this in 3-D!

          4
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      OMG – heheheh. What a delightfully ODD picture! That “dog”!! Lol. Everything about that shot is tripped out. The scene looks as if he’s stepping out of Dorothy’s front yard just as the storm is picking up steam. “Its just rain Toto, don’t be so dramatic”.

      13
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I don’t think that guy looks too happy about having that little dog in the picture with him.

      3
    • Miss-Apple37Miss-Apple37 says: 1161 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Limestone house
      Langeais, Loire Valley,

      The boy somehow reminds me of Belgian/French singer Jacques Brel when he was young, if any of you know who is was… https://www.lyonne.fr/migennes-89400/loisirs/disparu-il-y-a-40-ans-jour-pour-jour-jacques-brel-sest-produit-a-deux-reprises-au-cabaret-lescale_13009754/

  2. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 89 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    If there were ever a listing that could benefit from additional interior photos, this would be the one—especially with a $2.25 million price tag. Here we have a National Register fully-restored 1738 stone beauty with four bedrooms, four baths and enviable paneling on 1.7 acres in Palisades, New York, near the Hudson River. I wasn’t expecting the room depicted in photos 12 and 13, but I actually like it. And if you happen to live nearby, there is an open house from 1-4pm Sunday, July 12.

    Stay safe.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/201-Route-9w-Palisades-NY-10964/32396662_zpid/?utm_campaign=iosappemail&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=emailshare

    8
  3. https://matrix.brightmls.com/matrix/shared/391PFJ5MX6/103BroadSTREET

    Almost 2,800 sq. ft. 3 BR, 2.5 Baths with front porch and “carriage house” garage. Listed for $339,900. Home is situated in Berlin, Maryland, a small “Main Street” community named by OPRAH as one of the “60 Charming American Towns You Haven’t Heard of But Should Visit”. Additionally, HOUSE BEAUTIFUL magazine named Berlin the most beautiful small town in Maryland. And, that’s not all! Berlin is a short drive away from the popular Atlantic Ocean resort town of Ocean City, Maryland.

    NOTE-I am a licensed Realtor affiliated with Hileman Real Estate, Inc.
    11065 Cathell Road
    Berlin, Maryland 21811
    410-208-9200

    Please feel free to contact me on my cell phone-443-366-9177 with any questions or if you would like to see this beautiful home.

    LYDIA RITTERSBACHER, REALTOR
    “Equal Housing Opportunity”

    3
  4. shellyhorvathshellyhorvath says: 79 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Two from Jacksonville, FL today. I’ve never been to this Florida city, but now, after looking at so many charming houses, I want to visit.

    First: a sweet house with a beautiful kitchen, several cozy crannies, nice bathrooms and a cottage.

    1904 — $389,000 — Jacksonville, FL
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1217-N-Laura-St-Jacksonville-FL-32206/44476405_zpid/

    Second: a candy apple red house to chase away our isolation blues. Its been modernized, and the floors replaced, but it is just soooo cheerful!

    1908 — $449,000 — Jacksonville, FL
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/324-W-7th-St-Jacksonville-FL-32206/44476849_zpid/

    2
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The first house, I think I’d look into buying one of those grassy lots. I would not go in the ocean in this area-too many sharks! So, I’d need the room for a nice big i ground pool and spa. I think I like this house more than the 2nd. Maybe its the flooring…I do like the courtyard, and 2nd cottage to stick your relatives in!

    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’m not too keen on the decor of the house, but I love the basic lay out of it. And, the stone-I really like stone houses, especially old ones! Is that date i=right??? And, I love the lot-you have the nice big pool and patio area (is that an outdoor kitchen?), plus a nice big lawn area for your dogs to run around in.

  5. EricHtownEricHtown says: 395 comments

    Hello all! I’m excited to show this house because it’s the first of it’s style I’ve ever seen, Chinese Chippendale! The Sullivan house from 1859 is in Greenwood South Carolina. It is 1 out of 5 remaing Chinese Chippendale’s left. It’s priced at what I believe a reasonable $1.2 mil. After you see the pics you’ll see why I think it’s reasonably priced.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/109-Friendfield-Ln_Greenwood_SC_29649_M62229-61086?ex=SC2917133018

    14
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Interesting. I’ve heard of the style as it relates to certain latticework designs; but was unaware there was a particular sort of building style referred to as such. Did you find any historic info.?

      6
      • restoricrestoric says: 50 comments
        1851 Greek Revival
        Anderson, SC

        You’re quite right Rosewater ref latticework. And that was primarily the overall original fenestration; whose motifs could be described by some as ‘Carpenter Gothic’ If Miz Kelly permits my rant about the descriptive misapplication, you can peruse the handful of HABS photos showing the once charming abode built as a summer residence by a Charlestonian.

        7
        • Gregory_KGregory_K says: 466 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Chatsworth, CA

          Restoric, Agreed, you’re right on the money. I didn’t know the history of that misuse of that architectural name.
          Actually, there a number of mid-1800s buildings across the east coast with up-swept roofs like those on this house. It was popularly used on Gothic Revival buildings. One of the best is the original New York Yacht Club building, now moved to their headquarters estate, Harbor Court, in Newport, R.I.

          https://www.britannica.com/technology/bargeboard
          https://nyyc.org/history-heritage/-/blogs/nyyc-s-first-clubhouse-1845-

          The new dormers, which probably made the second floor livable, were a clever use of details already on the gable ends.
          The ‘Chinese Chippendale’ porch posts and railings were actually a popular mid-Victorian porch style design, found in many pattern books, including designs published by Andrew Jackson Downing.
          I have never heard them described as ‘Chinese Chippendale’ before. ‘Chinese Chippendale’ was an 18th and early 19th century variation on Rococo designs, based on the work of the great English designer, Thomas Chippendale, (1718–1779). There are some Chinese Chippendale railings in the restored area of Williamsburg.
          This home’s renovation-restoration must have been very expensive.
          The new wallpaper in the dining room is a hand-block-printed edition of the French company Joseph Dufour’s design ‘Les Monuments de Paris,’ the original created about 1815. ‘Scenic’ wallpapers were all the rage in the early 19th century, and a surprising number survive on the walls of historic homes in Europe and the United States.
          There are papers on the walls of Wallingford house in Kennebunk, Maine, (I organized its preservation), the Moffat-Ladd house in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, now a museum, there are two sets in the White House in Washington, D.C., salvaged from an historic mansion in Maryland during its demolition, the John Philip Sousa House in Sands Point, Long Island, (I was a consultant on it’s restoration many years ago), and it’s now on the market so you can see the paper in the ads, the Robert Worthington House, also known as ‘Piedmont,’ in Charles Town, West Virginia, (I raised the alarm when the paper was about to be stripped from its walls), featured on Old House Dreams some time ago,
          https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/08/17/1784-charles-town-wv/

          and finally, Prestwould, in Clarksville, Virginia. This house is stuffed with remarkable early wallpapers.

          https://stephenmballard.wordpress.com/tag/prestwould/

          The new copies of these papers, like that in this house, are printed from the original 200 year-old hand carved wooden blocks, and the new sets are VERY expensive.

          7
          • restoricrestoric says: 50 comments
            1851 Greek Revival
            Anderson, SC

            Gregory_K-
            As you obviously have done, one has to go beyond their region to grasp that certain architectural features/styles/motifs were popular throughout many sections of the USA, and not necessarily limited to one specific area. What irked me in this particular case was/is the ardent defense of that phrase, “If you repeat a lie long enough and loud enough it eventually will become accepted as the truth”.
            Kudos to you for bringing up how ‘sawn work’ for porches and balustrades was widespread and featured in numerous publications of the time.
            I’m also appreciative for your mention, and provided images, of ‘scenic’ wallpaper installations. That is another subject of study where extant survivors are few and far between; though once more commonplace than credited, and often in the most unexpected locales. Ah-h-h “Prestwould”….I was fortunate to be among a select number invited to attend a three day symposium in the 90s outlining the discoveries, conservation, and reproduction of their original examples. You are to be congratulated for your efforts & expertise in salvaging the specimens quoted; many with which I am familiar if not seen.
            Yes – quite a bit of funds were expended on the house relocation under debate, and the architect/s undoubtedly showed sensitivity in re-use of original design elements. I didn’t dare bring up that divisive issue of ‘period’ exterior paint colors versus the cliché snow white & black shutters, else it would have blown up the comments portion 🙂

            1
            • MJGMJG says: 1805 comments
              OHD Supporter

              CT

              “If you repeat a lie long enough and loud enough it eventually will become accepted as the truth”

              I say this quite often. This is so true in so many cases. With architecture styles, objects from the period, use of the objects, people’s lives and how they lived it etc etc.

              4
      • I haven’t had time to do research but I’m going to so I can find out the other 4 houses and because I’m genuinely curious to know more about such a unique style.

        2
    • restoricrestoric says: 50 comments
      1851 Greek Revival
      Anderson, SC

      This house, or at least the center portion (without dormers), originally stood 1.5 blocks SSW of me. There is absolutely nothing ‘Chinese Chippendale’ about the place…..never was, never will be! The cockamamie appellation was cooked up by a deceased Clemson University professor too long in his cups and a flask short in architectural knowledge. Such flagrant stylistic ignorance was promulgated & amplified by an “over the top” local decorator for his own self aggrandizement purposes. It’s now become a bane to the community that whenever a steep swept roof is spied, the spandex set shout ‘Chinese Chippendale’. Look up the Sullivan House in the HABS on-line files under Anderson SC to see its appearance before disassembly, relocation, and expansion. At best once might liberally describe it initially as of ‘Gothic Revival’ inspiration – yet in a vernacular interpretation.

      8
      • I get what you’re saying about some Gothic aspects in the dormer windows but the mouldings around those windows is very unique and more elaborate than you’d usually see. The carved porch columns and railings look somewhat Chippendale to me and then the dormer roof lines are totally unique and as far as I know don’t exist anywhere else in SC in before the Civil War. I found 3 pics that show the house in it’s rougher state you mention but these pics show what I’m trying to describe.

        https://loc.gov/resource/hhh.sc0362.photos?st=gallery

        1
        • restoricrestoric says: 50 comments
          1851 Greek Revival
          Anderson, SC

          Dear Mr. Eric –
          I repeat, the dormers are NOT original. They are a creation of a modern, though sensitive, architect after the house was relocated and expanded from its initial form. You’re quite right in that the gable end window hoods are special & unique. The primary porch columns and balustrading are what was then termed ‘sawn work’ – and if one wants to surmise Chinese or Chippendale in them then it’s a case of the eye sees what it wants to see…I won’t debate the perception.
          If a style absolutely has to be applied to the house, the safest is “Romantic”; there’s a bit of Italianate, a tad of Greek Revival, and a smash of Gothic – all typical during the 1850s and once more numerous than what now survives. The steeply pitched roof line and extended bell sweep certainly could claim some influence from Chinese sources and Chippendale’s ornamental use of the genre. Is it unequaled in SC and particularly the ‘Upstate’ – to a certain degree definitely yes. There is another in the city holding certain similarities, and a couple more now demolished. To repeat again, the home was initially constructed as a summer ‘escape’ and such often had fantasy elements to them. Closer perusal of the HABS photos shows there were many more porches, later closed in or altered for other purposes. The large lot siting and compass orientation guaranteed consistent air flow & cooling breezes.
          It was undoubtedly a loss to the community’s architectural history when the house was moved away. I personally have a purist’s issue in how the content was overblown and rather diminished by additions, but in this HGTV age what can one do but accept what is.

          3
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Lolz and more lolz. Thank you for the delightful explanation! I suspected some such thing was likely. I never have been one to accept the pronouncements of “professors” or “experts” at face value, and I never will. 🙂

        6
        • restoricrestoric says: 50 comments
          1851 Greek Revival
          Anderson, SC

          Sadly , such ‘pronouncements’ from the academic community are still happening today, and to a certain level increasing to near embarrassment. Equally the proliferation of self-appointed ‘experts’ is reaching plague proportions. Yet what can one expect in a time of “I saw it on TV” or “I read it in Wikipedia” is considered the ne plus ultra of authentication.

          4
    • messengerjsmessengerjs says: 13 comments
      Salisbury, MD

      That is one of the most amazing houses I have ever seen. Wow.

      3
    • JimHJimH says: 5033 comments
      OHD Supporter

      A few more old photos here:
      https://www.facebook.com/pg/PreserveSC/photos/?tab=album&album_id=25157964541

      Preservation SC calls it Chinese Chippendale, “so called for the steeply pitched roofs with flared eaves and the intricately patterned porch railings and columns reminiscent of 18th century Chinese-style.” It’s just a descriptive term, and the inspiration may not have anything to do with China or Thomas Chippendale. The house probably fits in the general category of Carpenter Gothic, which is very far removed from medieval Gothic design. They’re just labels and you shouldn’t read too much into them.

      6
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Well they certainly did take liberties with the thing: but all things considered, I’d say it’s a remarkable success architecturally. It really looks great. Very, very impressive. Is it better than original? Yeah – remarkably enough – I think it is. That’s a rare accomplishment indeed. The level of accuracy in reproducing the design and physical fabric of the original stunning. I’ll bet the resto/pres architect who worked on that project had a blast doing it.
        https://ap.rdcpix.com/e3d61f3cfdc6c30460bf3874c374500bl-m342677923xd-w1020_h770_q80.jpg

        3
      • restoricrestoric says: 50 comments
        1851 Greek Revival
        Anderson, SC

        JimH –
        Thanks for your voice of reason about architectural labels! And gratitude for your sleuthing out those old photos of the house under discussion. FYI the original ‘town villa’ size lot was subdivided into public housing units, leaving the structure alone amidst their proliferation. The developer offered the house to a local preservation organization, who moved it (in sections) to a then empty lot half a block away. Idealistic replication plans were created, but the funds weren’t forthcoming. So PSC was called in and they did indeed provide a salvaging of the unique building. However, there was a reciprocal association between the PSC director and the aforementioned ‘decorator’ promoting this absurd ‘Chinese Chippendale’ description; which explains the term’s repetition down to the present.
        You always impress us at the information you manage to uncover, and I’m not certain you consistently receive your just dues for doing so – you never disappoint!

        4
        • JimHJimH says: 5033 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Thanks! It’s sad that the house was moved from its native soil, although from what you say, it may have been lost entirely if not for the relocation and alteration. The resulting RestoMod is tasteful enough on its new cul-de-sac, and it’s sure to confound architecture buffs a hundred years from now.

          4
    • Sandy BSandy B says: 724 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      Gorgeous house and landscape…..and perfectly furnished. I also think it’s unbelievably priced…it’s irreplaceable at that price. Thanks for the post..Eric..!!

      3
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      WOW! I love it!

      1
    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 379 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Absolutely LOVE everything about this Chinese Chippendale house (although I’ve never heard of this type house before)!!! Just LOVE it, and the grounds are beyond magical. Thanks to the photographer for a superb presentation and thanks to EricHtown for adding it here. A dream and then some!

      1
    • Anne M.Anne M. says: 825 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1972 not a dream.
      Hopkinton, MA

      wow, that is a beautiful house! the art! the furnishings! just gorgeous!

  6. EricHtownEricHtown says: 395 comments

    Having a high percentage of American Indian ancestry I had to check out properties in Oklahoma after that surprising court decision.
    The first 2 were built by the Skelly gas family. They had a large chain gas stations made from their Oklahoma crude oil.
    First up is the city home in Tulsa. It’s a huge over the top 10,515 sf of excess. Built 1919 it’s a grand colonial for $2.2 mil.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/2101-S-Madison-Ave_Tulsa_OK_74114_M88329-13740?ex=OK2918049927

    Next is the 1931 Skelly Lodge on near 40 acres of hilly heavily treed land with a Swiss Chalet mansion made of of 7,362 sf with lots of pics, $1,950,000. What’s really cool about this place is it’s about 15 min east of their town house.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/27795-S-Skelly-Rd_Catoosa_OK_74015_M87996-21005?ex=OK2915414776#photo28

    5
    • shellyhorvathshellyhorvath says: 79 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I’ll take the cottage!

      3
    • JulieJulie says: 319 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1997 1 storey contemporary

      Both homes are very nice but I would definitely take the lodge. I love nature, trees and privacy and the rusticity of the lodge really compliments it’s surroundings.

      What court decision are you referring to? I no longer live in the States so don’t know but my paternal Great-Grandma was Cherokee and my maternal Great-Grandma was Lumbee.

      4
      • A Supreme court ruling on a murder that occurred 20+ years ago in Oklahoma. The defense has been claiming the murder happened on Indian land and therefore, the state had no right to try the man. The Supreme court ruled the state had no legal right to try the man because the eastern 1/3 of the state, by a 1907 legal mistake, belongs to the tribes that live there. Now state laws will not apply nor can they tax them, federal government either. It’s a massive win for the American Indians living there. They plan to open more casinos, lol.

        4
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The first house, I can’t really make my mind up about-not enough photos, I think. The 2nd, the lodge, would be neat to have, if you’re into hunting whatever it is they hunt in Oklahoma-mule deer and wild pigs? Looks like nice party house, too! Have you ever read Killers of the Osage Flower? I think thats the name of the book. I beleive the author’s name was Gran, or Gan. Its a true story, a horrible one, about a number of Osage Native Americans who were murdered I think mainly because they had discovered oil on their reservation. People were shot, poisoned, and disappeared, so some unscrupulous whites could get the oil and the money. I think a young J Edgar Hoover was the lead investigator on these cases, once the government finally beleived people that the murders were connected, and this was one of the FBI’s first cases. I read it when it first came out, a few years back, and I read that a movie is in the works. Its a gripping story.

      1
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I read about the Supreme Court decision the other day. Its going to be an interesting next few years, in Oklahoma, and other areas of the country. This will affect all sorts of court rulings, I think. I’m wondering if anyone is going to cite this case as some sort of precedent, in my neck of the woods. We have some reservations here, Tuscarora and Seneca. The city of Salamanca, SE of me, I am pretty sure, is on Indian land.

      • RavennaGRLRavennaGRL says: 71 comments
        OH

        Because the crime was committed on Indian Land, the tribal counsel has jurisdiction and would sentence. Within the Oklahoma territory there are at least 6 Indian tribes, don’t know which reservation it was on.

        1
  7. EricHtownEricHtown says: 395 comments

    When I saw the first pic of this one I thought it was a school because of the flagpole and size but no, it’s a 12,332 sf house in Seminole OK. The style, I read, is Italian Renaissance, built 1928 and sits on 11+ acres with grape vines. The bathroom tile colors are mind blowing! $1.8 mil

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/612-E-Wrangler-Blvd_Seminole_OK_74868_M90205-54138?ex=OK2722177708

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    • briteyesbriteyes says: 69 comments
      Cottonwood / Millcreek, UT

      I am loving everything about this home!

      2
    • Anne M.Anne M. says: 825 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1972 not a dream.
      Hopkinton, MA

      This is a very interesting house, I had to keep going after I saw the elephants. It has a got kind of “The King & I” vibe mixed in with some Mexican-influence. Thanks for sharing it!

      3
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Well that is something to see! The exterior says small town grade school; but the interior says PARTY TIME. As unattractive as that double height + living hall is to the front elevation; inside it’s just marvelously dramatic and thrilling to the eye. I had to clip it and blow it up to get as good a look as possible at that chandelier.
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/seminole-ok.jpeg
      WOW. That house is absolutely overflowing with the very best, top-shelf, 100% original, stylistically appropriate lighting fixtures. That is a collection right on par with the finest movie houses of the age. Amazing.
      All of the iron work, tile, etc. in that house is super luxe, and in very fine condition. You’ve got to love that look to be a buyer; but if you’re into it, you’re in luck with this one. It’s like LIVING in a roaring 20’s movie palace!

      I can’t imagine this doesn’t get posted. Great find!

      5
      • 1920’s movie palace is exactly what I thought and also of Norma Desmond! The enlargement of the living hall look excellent enlarged. This house has that total Sunset Strip feel.

        5
    • JimHJimH says: 5033 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The Grisso Mansion was built for an oil tycoon and is listed on the NRHP, essentially as left by the family. I can see how someone would think it’s Italian Renaissance, though it was supposed to be Spanish, with Moorish decorative elements. Very cool – thanks!

      https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/NRIS/75001573

      8
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1639 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Eric, wonderful!

      1
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Not my style (too grand) but I do like that kitchen! All those cupboards!

  8. Anne M.Anne M. says: 825 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 not a dream.
    Hopkinton, MA

    I have been busy trying to figure out my classes for fall semester and so missed posting last week. I have kind of a back log so I will try to space my posts out a bit.
    1937 bungalow in Altadena, CA for $1,249,000 – love the wood & the tile. The kitchen is nice but as a cook, I am not a candidate for an all-white kitchen.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1926-Harding-Ave-Altadena-CA-91001/20921917_zpid/
    An 1897 fire house in Gardner, MA $490,000, the second floor has already be converted to living quarters, wood on the first floor and the exterior are really nice
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/58-Elm-St-Gardner-MA-01440/173765906_zpid/
    Grand 1883 in Winchendon, MA. $529,900 beautiful carriage house, original light fixtures, check out the marble sink in what must be a first floor powder room
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/12-High-St-Winchendon-MA-01475/57683622_zpid/

    6
  9. Anne M.Anne M. says: 825 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 not a dream.
    Hopkinton, MA

    A few from NH & VT
    1803 brick colonial in Achworth, NH $410,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/9-Hill-Rd-Acworth-NH-03601/119153481_zpid/
    1815 in Walpole, NH for $344,900 great workshop space (separate from main house) & original light fixtures are making me swoon
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/53-Whitcomb-Rd-Walpole-NH-03608/86737548_zpid/
    1855 in Montpelier, VT $499,000 my only concern with this is that for heating it lists “stove” don’t know how the folks in the room over the garage possibly stay warm!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5-Winter-St-Montpelier-VT-05602/75466552_zpid/
    This 1900 in Barre VT for $100,000 is accepting back-up offers, there’s a lot to work with here!
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/40-Jefferson-St-Barre-VT-05641/75463745_zpid/

    3
  10. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1639 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings All! I must say, I look forward to everyone’s shares on Friday and Kelly’s photos. Today’s young fellow is quite interesting. The small dog is…interesting for sure. I also enjoy collecting what is interesting to me and what comments you might have.
    We are looking forward to a vacation week and time spent at the cabin. With Fay driving moisture up the east coast. I should have plenty of thunderstorms to enjoy and lots of time floating in the pond watching the clouds.

    So for starters New York:

    1912, Yonkers, NY, 2,250,000

    From the exterior, I love the muted colors of brick, timbers and decorative wood. Massive five chimney cluster. Clusters of windows, I love along with the timbers. Inside, lovely paneled walls, beautiful stairway, leaded windows, vaulted subway tile ceiling in one bath, and Hudson River views.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/131-Alta-Ave-Yonkers-NY-10705/2097346608_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=fb07e8d8-c65b-43fd-a20d-30a11cde18b5~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1910, Brooklyn, NY, 1,975,000

    From the listing: “Designed by the Brooklyn architectural firm of Slee & Bryson, imagining some of the finest Colonial Revival and Neo-Tudor houses in the borough, this gracious home retains all of its original detail, including stained glass windows, carved wood mantels, pocket doors, beveled glass, inlaid floors, paneled walls, coffered ceilings, original bead and panel doors, plaster rosettes, and dramatic light fixtures. The stately great room allows entry to the front parlor which showcases an original gas fireplace and chandelier.”
    I like this house for its lovely patterned wood floors, built-in cabinets, paneling, stained glass windows, and light fixtures in the public spaces.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/74-Lincoln-Rd-Brooklyn-NY-11225/30664431_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=20476963-20a5-4b1a-9379-c5295131641c~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1899, Shandaken, NY, 1,750,000

    Sitting on 26 acres, long driveway and surrounded by state land. Unusual house, sort of Georgian in some exterior views, lots of interior tin decorative walls and ceilings, I love the brick fireplace in slide 10, it complements the tall room and windows. Elegant, decorative dark dining room, billiard room has a wonderful mix of colors and decorative elements. Then, the kitchen!! Big old cook stove, wish I could see its details better. The kitchen is a nice simple plan and I love the center wood table, big windows-one flanked by two high three pane rectangular windows. Upstairs a wonderful large rectangular window that takes in the view and a topographic framed print to the side of this window on another wall-I find this interesting, hoping the map is of this area. There is another cabin off to the side. What a wonderful family property this could be.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/15-Andrew-Ln-Shandaken-NY-12457/32872764_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=1adc27c9-0292-43f8-b3ec-6a7426587461~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

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    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The mountain house is really wonderful. Magical. I wanted so badly to love the range – but it’s been converted = FAIL! Should have just bought a contemporary propane stove to stick in a corner somewhere, and left that original unit alone. Now if you want / need to be off grid, you’re SOL. What a shame. Hate that. 🙁
      https://www.movoto.com/mount-tremper-ny/15-andrew-ln-mount-tremper-ny-12457/pid_jdtt7mnrjh/for-sale/

      4
    • Anne M.Anne M. says: 825 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1972 not a dream.
      Hopkinton, MA

      You always find such fabulous houses, Kimberly! The Yonkers mansion is a real treat – that pantry is bigger than my kitchen, and the bathrooms are great. I could happily live the rest of my life in that Shandaken house – such a dream.

      1
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      If the Shandaken house was a tar paper shack, I’d love it for the views alone. But, this is a pretty impressive house! Lots of natural light, which I love, and the decorating looks just perfect. If you want to get away from it all-there’s the 1/4 mile driveway-yet its an easy walk to a restaurant, from the back of the property. So, you can fool yourself into thinking you’re the only people around for miles and miles. Whoever sited this house here, was a genius!

      1
  11. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1639 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Now two that are Second Empire in look, and both from Hudson, NY, but one says it is from 1820:

    1820, Hudson, NY, 1,200,000

    Second Empire that appears from the description was built some 70 years earlier. I love the brick barn, it looks like a carriage barn with room for two driving horses and hay loft. The interior of the house is elegant and seemingly preserved.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/40-Main-St-Hudson-NY-12534/2078823099_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=cf51e8f1-ca72-4247-8a72-d05b29b3630b~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1890, Hudson, NY, 875,000

    From the listing: “The John C. Dubois House, a stately brick mansion, is located on the most beautiful, tree lined street in Hudson.”
    Another Second Empire, decorative roof and I like the porch how it heightens at the center

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/318-Allen-St-Hudson-NY-12534/2078843338_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=b85c031b-efad-4c0f-ad6c-353479704834~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    8
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      The last four pix of house 1 really get to me where I live. What an exquisite tease! I want to see it all; every centimeter.
      https://photos.zillowstatic.com/uncropped_scaled_within_1536_1152/ISjvbl2ntk3f0l0000000000.webp
      Sigh……

      5
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1639 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        I must tell you, seeing those pristine straight stalls, I wanted to see the rest of the barn. My family’s barn has a wonderful tool room, there is a wall of homemade bins that are stenciled w/ their contents, including a 1st aid bin filled with curiosities. You get the idea, the interest. Smile

        5
        • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
          OHD Supporter

          I wonder if there are box stalls in that barn. On the whole, the entire barn looks spotless! I want whoever cleaned it up, to come clean my garage!

    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      I really want to clip that carriage house, but can’t find a good link. Zillow and Trulia are it so far. Added to my list. So choice.

      1
    • JimHJimH says: 5033 comments
      OHD Supporter

      The first house is in Philmont, an industrial village east of Hudson and Claverack. It was built about 1860 for George Tobias (1830-1889), whose paper mill was behind the house.
      Across the side street was the High Rock textile mill, makers of socks and later underwear, and the county’s largest employer for decades. The owner’s granddaughter Miss Clara lived in the home for most of her life. While her wealthy cousins moved on and lived large on Park Ave and Palm Beach, Clara stayed in Philmont and built the local library and a youth center for the children of the factory workers. Clara never married and kept the house like it was when she was young, although it’s been updated a bit since she died 50 years ago.

      6
  12. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1639 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Now for some older NY:

    1839, Kinderhook, NY, 1,500,000

    From the opening shot of the exterior this Greek Revival spoke to me. There is something southern about this place perhaps. I love the tall windows with decorative paneling, symmetry and the center tower, perhaps for the view, or mild weather air circulation? The formal exterior continues inside with those tall rooms, present owners lovely sculpture, busts and furniture. Stunning. Newer kitchen, but relaxed and well-done.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2705-Route-9h-Kinderhook-NY-12106/2078813314_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=5887d1dd-d633-4546-9b69-9d3e771f1a45~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1814, Sackets Harbor, NY, 499,000

    Federal? I see the end chimneys with the stacked ends…I am sorry I have much to learn. Lovely decorative front door with sidelights and fan transom. I would love to have that door with its screen door over the top. Interior looks lovely and old, one sitting room has been papered with an outdoor scene.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/310-General-Smith-Dr-Sackets-Harbor-NY-13685/30553432_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=c28884eb-2148-47a7-a72e-bdb4f97b0e29~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    10
  13. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1639 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    16th Century NY:

    1762, Rhinebeck, NY, 1,250,000

    Lovely old stone house with neat shutters set into a bank where a screened in porch comes off of the second floor. Inside, lovely patina appears to be on the interior wood and paneling. Would love to see in the other barns and out buildings, though enjoyable photography for this listing.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/629-Ackert-Hook-Rd-Rhinebeck-NY-12572/2136876518_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=293107b7-9e8e-476d-a300-bdd81178b0f1~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1730, Wawarsing, NY, 1,950,000

    From the listing: “The original field stone section of this home dates to 1730. Historians know it as the Benjamin Bruyn House and it once sat on a 600 acre tract of land. The original 1730, two story field stone home was enlarged in 1780 and then again in 1830, making it three connected buildings. The property was in the Bruyn family a good 100 years. During the Prohibition the ball room was a local speakeasy! Silent film star Lillian Gish is known to have resided here. Most recently this old stone mansion was completely rebuilt in the late 80’s by an interior designer named Ben Schecter and the present owner has spent the last 20 years creating the beauty that you see now a days. Make note of all the fine molding and plaster work. Still proudly sited on nearly 50 acres of open pasture and woodlands with the main stone home, gorgeous guest house / studio bldg, beautiful 8 stall horse barn, 60′ heated in-ground pool and even a care takers residence.”

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1250-Berme-Rd-Wawarsing-NY-12446/198881658_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=857c1a6a-0daa-44c6-9514-d6e96ce0448c~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    7
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1065 comments
      OHD Supporter

      I don’t know which one I like more! I’d like to see more photos of the 2nd, including the caretakers’ residence. Is that open room, the former ballroom?

      1
  14. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1639 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    And now for something different:

    1942, Los Angeles, CA

    No, I did not forget the price, I just didn’t see the point. I am sharing for the intriguing houses and lore.
    From the listing: “The “John A. Van Pelt Residence.” 2 ½ acre Compound. 5 Residential Buildings. 12 fireplaces. 8 fountains. Parking for 14 cars. Not revealed in 45 years….Pelt, an original creator of our east-side love affair, he was a choral director, entrepreneur and developer; he subdivided his large tract into 71 parcels and family lore states he named it LYRIC. A preservationist, he salvaged the anchor, banister rope, and oars from Jack London’s boat ‘The Snark.’ He reclaimed clinker bricks from the LA cable car demo to build his walls/stone paths. Endless astonishing stories of a surviving Kingdom.”
    Storybook houses, I love the outdoor kitchen, this is kind of like Woodstock Handmade houses for LA, enjoy the adventure.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2131-Lyric-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90027/250336881_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=58550726-2777-4de4-ba4b-ee5130c2f814~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    8
  15. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1639 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Lastly, quietly back down to earth:

    1789, Rindge, NH, 169,000

    Lots of old rooms, and some sheet rocked surfaces

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/36-Old-New-Ipswich-Rd-Rindge-NH-03461/221740779_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=a313d385-6e2d-49c2-ad53-e00e1460c097~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    Enjoy your weekends, I will be sparsely visiting and missing the site after tomorrow. cheers!

    7
  16. Do you collect a fee from the realtors whose houses you list?

    That guy in the photos is young Norman Bates, and he is showing off his first taxidermy project.

  17. RosewaterRosewater says: 6326 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Well, if you made it this far down, let me know what you think about the stained glass in this church. The building really hasn’t much been touched; so I won’t even call it a conversion. The modern, abstract, rose window, as well as the triptych, seem to me to be very, very special. It’s a super rad structure overall. Looking to get far, far, away from the coming dystopia? Here ya go.

    1950 church / Parma, Idaho / $198K
    — Current listing:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/712-N-4th-St_Parma_ID_83660_M11637-65327#photo1

    — Older listings / more pix:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/712-N-4th-St_Parma_ID_83660_M26740-48108#photo0
    also;
    https://www.movoto.com/parma-id/712-n-4th-st-parma-id-83660-561_98588415/

    Rose window:
    https://pi.movoto.com/p/561/98740169_0_3avfUn_l.jpeg
    Triptych:
    https://ap.rdcpix.com/fcd2cc78a5735201c888cd6b18e30897l-m4151589774xd-w1020_h770_q80.jpg
    Gorge! Want!

    4
  18. JulieJulie says: 319 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Kia Ora/Hello from New Zealand

    Two years ago my husband and I rented this home while spending a week in the Southland region which is at the very bottom of New Zealand. It is located in the pleasant and slightly funky small seaside town of Riverton.

    It was built in 1910 and was and still is absolutely delightful. The owners, an Englishwoman and her Spanish partner have done a fantastic job of renovating it.
    Note the enormous leadlight bay window in the living room. The sun would come pouring in through them in the morning and they have fantastic views of the ocean across the road and the mountains of Fiordland (yes, that is how it is spelled) National Park in the distance. I looked forward to getting up in the morning and looking out even when the weather was lousy.

    Both my husband and I absolutely loved this place and said how much we would love to live in it. And here it is for sale. I envy the person or people who buy it and I hope they will continue to rent it out on Air BnB because we would love to stay there again.

    It is for Auction and has a valuation of US$236,500.00.

    https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/property/residential/sale/southland/southland/riverton/listing/2686840328

    3
  19. I’ve got 2 more. The first one is an 1877 Greek Revival cottage in Monroe LA for $500K, 3378 sf. Very nice house with beautiful grounds. This house contains 2 different sets of entry doors with side lites and transoms but the are beveled leaded glass of the most beautiful and intricate patterns I’ve ever seen. They are some of the best doors I’ve seen.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1702-N-3rd-St_Monroe_LA_71201_M79904-89840?ex=LA2912400261#photo24

    The second one is an 1825 Colonial? in Manning SC on 90 of the most beautiful acres. It has 4662 sf and priced at $2,250,000. This house is totally beautiful inside and out. If I had this backyard lockdown would be no problem. The big feature to this house is the staircase. I’ve never seen a double split spiral staircase that meets in the middle at the landing. I wish the realtor had taken more pics of it. My mouth automatically opened and I gasped, seriously it’s a good one.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/6295-Raccoon-Rd_Manning_SC_29102_M58766-94234?ex=SC2917350732#photo32

    8
  20. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 806 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    Exceptionally nice tudor revival in Lebanon, PA (189K) needs a bit of elbow grease and suffers from mediocre listing photos, but this could be a great home. The agent says built in 1950, I would think it’s earlier than that (1930’s) but I suppose it’s possible. https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/361-S-3rd-Ave_Lebanon_PA_17042_M38020-13010

    3
  21. Sandy BSandy B says: 724 comments
    OHD Supporter

    2001 craftsman farmhouse
    Bainbridge Island, WA

    1760 Colonial, Kingston, MA…..$895,000 on 1.43 acres. Beautifully done with great old barn. Many early features intact including gorgeous balustrade. I love the exterior color and restrained decor. The video tour is a treat.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2-Linden-St-Kingston-MA-02364/57194255_zpid/?

    Striking 1855 brick schoolhouse in village of Weare, NH…$225,000. Unusual cast iron entrance feature and curved staircase. It’s a beautiful building with tons of potential.

    https://www.zillow.com/myzillow/favorites#117798848

    1790 two-story Colonial on 32.9 acres in Weare, NH at $739,900. Beautiful barn, pool, and stone walls. A little too, “done” for me. I always recoil at exposed joists that were never meant to be without plaster. It also looks to have new flooring…..however……it’s a beautifully impressive property.

    https://www.zillow.com/myzillow/favorites#117798704

    Sweet 1911 Farmhouse, Lopez Island, WA, at $599,900 on a shy 3 acres. Has a guest cottage, scullery, root cellar, and views across the valley. Lopez is one of the beautiful Washington San Juan Islands and is accessible by a regular ferry run.

    https://www.zillow.com/myzillow/favorites#61003342

    1889 Creston, NC farmhouse on almost 33 across of cleared land with stream listed at $338,900. This is nice, with a very nice kitchen.

    https://www.zillow.com/myzillow/favorites#250752240

    1
  22. RanunculusRanunculus says: 16 comments
    OHD Supporter

    $3,995,000 | 6 bd • 6 ba Asheville NC

    Lots to love in this brick 8,000sf mansion, like the double staircase with its gallery balcony, the crenellated rooftop, the light-filled rooms, the lovely grounds & the wooded secluded lot, but the gold ceiling takes the cake for me! (Even so, I would have liked ved tp see it in its original finishes.)

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/193-Stratford-Rd_Asheville_NC_28804_M59886-33361?cid=eml_shares_core_ldp_android

    4
  23. Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 379 comments
    OHD Supporter

    My word, what a knock-out!

    2
  24. TonimarTonimar says: 75 comments
    OHD Supporter


    I hope the link works! Here is a relatively untouched MCM in Oak Brook, Illinois a wealthy suburb roughly 30 minutes west of Chicago. I know some of you will enjoy the MOD basement!

    22 Royal Vale Dr in Ginger Creek, Oak Brook

    $995,000 | 4 bd • 6 ba

    See details at: https://b1iw.app.link/pV24PUH137

    Or: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/22-Royal-Vale-Dr_Oak-Brook_IL_60523_M79373-62761?cid=soc_shares_core_ldp_android

    5
  25. Anne M.Anne M. says: 825 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 not a dream.
    Hopkinton, MA

    Found this interesting 1951 in Williamstown, MA for $579,000. I keep studying it because it appears that it might have started life as a ranch and then an addition was “wrapped” around the house to give it a more MCM feel. Take a look & tell me what you think:
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/60-Baxter-Rd-Williamstown-MA-01267/56818643_zpid/

    1
  26. RonnieHRonnieH says: 82 comments
    1910 Craftsman
    Medford, OR

    1909 Craftsman in Riverside, California. $998,000 (other words 1 million)
    My fiance’ and I own a 1910 craftsman and we both agree we would easily trade up for this beauty (our furniture is better at least…lol)

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4570-University-Ave-Riverside-CA-92501/17830859_zpid/?

    3
  27. QuiltingWitchQuiltingWitch says: 62 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1969 split level prisoner
    Great Falls, MT

    Great tile in the bathrooms and somewhat appropriate kitchen cabinets.
    Oakwood, Ohio @ $799,900

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/325-Haver-Rd-Oakwood-OH-45419/35076094_zpid/

    2
  28. Barbara VBarbara V says: 915 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1800 cottage
    Upstate, NY

    Hi, Everyone –
    I was killing some time perusing the archived Queen Annes, and came upon this:
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2011/10/27/1900-queen-anne-victoria-tx-324900/.

    It was before my time here at OHD, and is so striking that I looked it up and found some more recent photos. I think people might be interested in seeing the “After”, which, imo, is pretty nice, although not all of the exterior (which is what caught my interest) is shown:
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/200-W-Stayton-Ave_Victoria_TX_77901_M84852-71592.
    Please forgive me if it’s already been shared – I missed it and didn’t want others to do so also…

    3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5472 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Nicely done! The pre-restoration photos show a faded looking house. The post restoration images suggest a sensitive to history approach was taken in the work. Hat’s off to the diligent restorers. There’s no hint anywhere of an HGTV approach which for this house was a good thing. The exotic figured Pine staircase newel post is a work of art, IMO. I wish that all restored period homes were done this well.

      1
  29. GearGirlGearGirl says: 177 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Second Empire, Gothic, Tudor... Scottsdale, AZ

    Hi! Has anyone here dealt with mold remediation in your house (new or old)? Halp!

  30. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5472 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    The exterior suggests it may have been an Italianate in 1875 and was likely “Colonialized” around the turn of the last century with added Neoclassical details such as the porch columns and pediment. The interior is sadly ambiguous stylistically with very little visible to tie it back to the 1870’s. Perhaps the turn of the century makeover was intended to change the basic character of the house, and it did. Some more recent changes are also visible. In summary, you end up with a Classical/Colonial Revival house with its origins in the 1870’s.

    2

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