June 19, 2020: Link Exchange

Added to OHD on 6/19/20 - Last OHD Update: 6/26/20 - 122 Comments
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Happy Friday! This is where you share your old house finds, articles or general chit chat.

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1) Include the city, state if it doesn't already show in the link. Also include the build date and price. A short comment about what you are sharing is helpful.
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3) Paste the link in the comment box below, no HTML knowledge needed. :)

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122 Comments on June 19, 2020: Link Exchange

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  1. Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11832 comments
    Admin

    1901 Folk Victorian
    Chestatee, GA

    Today’s old house location is unknown. The lady in the photo is unknown and not related to the home or family.

    I want to get this off my mind. This site has always been more about original and interesting architecture than price. I’ve felt pressured to post cheap houses not because they are interesting but because they are cheap. I hate spending time on a home not many will like, look at or barely discuss over a home that is way more interesting. Long after you have spent less than one minute looking at it I’m stuck with keeping it updated for days, weeks, months, years. If you are unhappy with what is being posted here perhaps you need to move on. Newsletter subscribers, you can find the unsubscribe link at the bottom of any newsletter. Social media, well, I’ve nearly stopped sharing on FB due to negativity fatigue but the unfollow and unlike buttons are there.

    Another thing, I tend to let some negative comments slide because it’ll contain a slip of positivity. I should not allow that. Owners and agents read here, there’s no reason for you to tell us what you hate about their listing/home. I’m tightening the rule of “Comments that do not add value to the conversation in a positive manner will not be approved.” I was reading a comment from a reader that if they dislike the home they just don’t comment. Great idea, let us all do that.

    Adding, I appreciate those of you that don’t do that, are kind and thoughtful and give insight into the things we are actually here for. 🙂

    48
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6545 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      >I’ve felt pressured to post cheap houses
      OMG – scrrrrew that! All this time I thought you were the one who was obsessed with posting all of those pointless shacks, and otherwise yawners. Good grief. Which is not to say that I personally don’t love a great little shack – because I do; heck, I live in one! Heheheh. Providing that they have aspects of architectural, historic, or other merit, (which mine does); they are actually some of my VERY favorites. The ones which are completely without merit should be ignored – without question. There are plenty of “cheap old houses” sites, pages and blogs out there for those who only dream about price. I might be equally interested in a home which has a $45K ask as I would be one at $7M: it’s all about the stories they have to tell. An interesting property is self evident; and you are a fine judge of that. Stick with that instinct, and let the whiners fall away…

      An excellent example of prime shack-flesh:
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2020/06/04/log-home-in-gerrardstown-wv/
      Fingers crossed for more pix!

      15
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1721 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        here, here! I spoke a share or two ago about how I am picking houses for the architecture and not for the deal. I am not looking for a house myself, maybe that would change my eye–for sure, but that is not why I post here, I post for the story, the architecture, interior, the style and from learning from all of you. Kelly, you post what gives you joy, that is why you created this site is my guess.

        2
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6545 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Your words sound strong and lively: sound like you’re feeling better.
      Hope so. Your good health has been on my mind, and many others as well I’m sure.
      🙂

      15
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
      OHD Supporter

      It’s absolutely impossible to please everyone; just post whatever the hell you want to and you will be much happier. OHD will gain even more focus in the process… both good things! 🙂

      All old houses are interesting; we’ll be happy with whatever you choose to present!

      10
    • CarebearCarebear says: 1145 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Whether a property is “cheap” (whats that, these days? I was on unemployment, now I’m on sick leave which pays even less, because of knee surgery, LOL!!!) or outlandishly expensive with taxes up to the ears of a 7′ man, I look at them all. And dream about them all! I might say, that a current owner’s color scheme is not my taste, but, hey, an imaginary few cans of paint, an imaginary painting party with my friends, paying them off with barbeque chicken on the grill and a big cooler of beer…Thats what its all about. I love looking at all the properties, and i get a kick out of comparing prices for comparable houses, all over the country, and seeing what taxes are in different areas. Keep ’em coming, Kelly!

      10
    • KARENWKARENW says: 1 comments

      You keep doing your thing, Kelly. Look forward to every issue and appreciate your hard work to be sure!

      10
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 916 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      Edit: Decided to remove what I wrote.

      16
      • mariebushmanmariebushman says: 234 comments
        1919 Bungalow
        Richmond, CA

        Kelly, just do you! I love this site and the work you put into it!

        4
      • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5470 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1889 Eastlake Cottage
        Fort Worth, TX

        Well stated, Kelly. I gravitate towards lower priced fixer-uppers because 1. that is where my budget range is; 2. because fixer-uppers have not been recently remodeled to suit someone else’s tastes. Depending on how much work these properties need, they may not be a bargain even at $1 but most houses are not in such sad shape. Many of us are still here because you are here and you are fair and reasonable and run this site well. I hope to continue to participate whether we ever sell our Texas Victorian or not as I strongly identify with this site and the nice people who are part of it. Here’s looking forward to many more years of old house dreaming.

        9
      • JimHJimH says: 5120 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Thanks for sharing your thinking with us! I’m sure you know, from stats and feedback, what kinds of houses get the best response and are most pleasing to your audience. I’ve seen you ping-pong between cool fixers that inspire the dreamers, to fixed up homes that are pretty to look at and may get big numbers. Both are interesting and getting the balance right in posting them can’t be easy for you.
        Personally, I’m a northeastern Yankee and love the New York/New England houses, but I too get fatigued with the price/taxes/climate comments and regional negativity. Yes, it snows in New York (and it’s humid in Louisiana!) Boorrring!!!
        As others have said, there are sites for Cheap Houses and Pretty Houses, so OHD should be true to your vision of what an Old House Dream can be. It’s not just what house would fit a budget, or what we might buy if we won the Lotto, but what’s interesting and inspiring, old house-wise. That covers a lot of ground but you have a great eye, and we trust your selection judgement. That’s why we’re here!

        Thank you for OHD, Kelly, and for being you!

        10
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6545 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        Whether shack or mansion, the ones that get my attention are the ones with interesting, unique or unusual, mostly original features (regardless of condition); sometimes having interesting antique or vintage updates. Houses which are primarily muddled or otherwise updated beyond what they should be; and houses which are just plain boring architecturally and decoratively; are the ones I skip.

        In the examples you posted; there’s just not much to see. I think the best course for you is just to go with what you find interesting; as well as what you know we’ll find interesting; and just leave other considerations behind.

        Here are a couple of my favorite shacks, (which are still threads viewable by all): the first of which I’m THRILLED to see has FINALLY sold after I can’t tell you how many years on the market! Yay!
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2017/03/12/c-1870-lancaster-ky/
        So happy about that! Now I want updates.

        Additional top-shelf shackage.
        https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2014/01/24/1849-gothic-revival-dover-ky/

        4
    • CateCate says: 248 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Milwaukee, WI

      Kelly, I so very much appreciate this site and all that you present!! I don’t care if it’s a “shack” or a grand mansion. If you consider it interesting, lovely, appealing or breath-taking, then it’s good enough for me. Let the whiners go find their own “cheap” houses. You do a great job. If I don’t like something here, I merely shut up (for the most part), and if it doesn’t appeal to me from the onset, I simply don’t click into view it. Easy-peasy. I love that old cabin in WV, and it set me to dreaming of the possibilities that would make it whole again–that’s part of the fun you present. So please let the whiners whine–or maybe just tell them what you really think of their request.
      Thanks for all you do!! I can’t imagine HOW you do it but I’m sure glad you do.

      10
    • roxxxroxxx says: 551 comments
      OHD Supporter

      When I first read about the pressure I thought WTH?
      This is your site. No one else’s. If people don’t like what you post, they need to form their own group and post what they like.
      This should never be up for discussion! It is your site. You do all the work and I must say a better job than the realtors do. Tell them to kindly F off. Kelly, you do not need to post this if you feel it is too negative or laced with salty language. I just want you to know how I feel and I support this site and you 100^.
      This is NOT an open forum or group owned site PERIOD. You should NOT feel pressured at all by people on the site.
      DAMN! Idiots gotta be idiots I guess.

      4
    • Barbara VBarbara V says: 934 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1800 cottage
      Upstate, NY

      Kelly, your selections are overwhelmingly top notch in terms of architectural interest and originality, and it is unfortunate (yet understandable) that various discontented comments leave you feeling pressured and drained. Is it possible that, after issuing a request that negative comments cease, you could simply block the “repeat offenders” rather than have to continue to waste time on each and every one?

      This is your site and you need to stick with what you like – no second-guessing. What I appreciate most about your selections is your emphasis on originality, regardless of price.

      Finally, very glad to see you are back and hopefully feeling better.

      1
      • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11832 comments
        Admin

        1901 Folk Victorian
        Chestatee, GA

        They are emailed so not comments on OHD and usually not the same person every time. Usually doesn’t bother me but they build up and the last one was the cake.

        Thanks. 🙂

        2
  2. StoneCrestVTStoneCrestVT says: 22 comments
    Agency Lyndonville, VT

    Nice! The kids are funny!

    2
  3. SonofSyossetSonofSyosset says: 96 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1798 Federal/Georgian
    East Dennis, MA

    This may be the wildest concept for historic preservation I have ever seen—and that’s saying something—as the Menokin Foundation is underwriting the cost of “saving” the 1769 home of Francis Lightfoot Lee (one of the Virginia signers of the Declaration of Independence) and his wife Rebecca Tayloe Lee. Think for a moment about what you have done or might do to preserve a house in pitiable condition… and then open the link below and check out the waaaaaay-outside-the-box strategy these people are using. Why do I think at least some of you will have comments?

    Kelly: you are a saint. Thanks for all you do for us Old House Dreamers.

    Stay safe.

    https://www.archdaily.com/941700/construction-begins-on-the-glass-house-project-a-new-take-on-historical-preservation

    15
    • Kelly, OHDKelly, OHD says: 11832 comments
      Admin

      1901 Folk Victorian
      Chestatee, GA

      I think it’s cool. It’s a way to show off the remains of the building in a way to educate, preserving what is left in the process.

      They aren’t taking anything away from it, here it is in it’s current shape, it really is a ruin:
      https://www.menokin.org/photo-gallery/
      https://www.menokin.org/home-2/house-in-structure/

      7
    • BethanyBethany says: 3498 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1983 White elephant
      Escondido, CA

      I think it’s brilliant! I would pay $ to visit sites like that.

      5
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Love it. Presenting the house in this way will really help people to better understand historic buildings and how they were built. Similar concepts have been used in Europe to turn ruins into homes and those are equally fascinating. Much better than letting ruins continue to fall apart — losing them completely.

      7
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1721 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        AO, this reminds me of a low key fix you spoke of for wooden out buildings, and that is plexiglass over the exterior wood to keep the water off, this was on your blog, but now, I cannot find. I shared it with friends in northern CA who have a ranch with numerous outbuildings. They liked the idea, but have not used. They had a construction company in SF. He has been working on the interior of his farm building turned shop and has made laminated beams, for example, for the structure and also to make a work table.
        AO, your contribution reminds me of this major not restoration, but preservation that we are looking at here. Any one who has not yet seen his website will be pleasantly surprised.

        1
        • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
          OHD Supporter

          There are lots of ways to arrest the deterioration of historic structures so that full restoration, if desired, will still be a future option! Here’s a link to the specific post you mention: http://architecturalobserver.com/stabilization-w-passive-solar-bonus/

          This is not a long-term solution, but will hopefully buy about another ten years for the former dairy barn. So far it has held up well, the only problem being a tendency for weeds to spring up behind the plastic here and there. It is what it is, but makes the place usable on budget. Plus it is fun to look at!

          2
          • Sandy BSandy B says: 758 comments
            OHD Supporter

            2001 craftsman farmhouse
            Bainbridge Island, WA

            AO…..having studied the effect of micro-climates on wooden buildings, especially with creating a barrier to air circulation, I’d be interested in how the above method affects the building long term….?

            1
            • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
              OHD Supporter

              I would be interested in that as well! The technique that I have used to inhibit further deterioration of this particular structure may not be suitable for all climates. I live in a semi-arid area, so that no doubt impacts the situation. Also, this building is so porous that there is still air circulation in spite of the corrugated cladding. I probably wouldn’t try this in a humid area without adequate ventilation. But for my locale, it has proven to be a successful experiment that I would gladly repeat (and plan to on another, smaller, structure which is very dilapidated).

            • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
              OHD Supporter

              Also, there are still operable doors and windows in this structure, so there is no real “barrier” to air circulation. As I said previously, this is not a long-term solution. It is a way to protect the building from the elements until a permanent solution can be implemented (buying time).

              1
          • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1721 comments
            OHD Supporter

            1936 Cabin

            AO, thank you! I wish I could have found the link myself but glad you did. I like the comparison. Whether a permanent fix or a number of years, it is all good to me. Practical, outside the box, new eyes. neat

            2
    • ddbackerddbacker says: 509 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1971 Uninspired split-level
      Prairie Village, KS

      Wouldn’t that be an inside-the-(glass)box strategy? Cool stuff, SOS. I always enjoy your Friday posts.

      1
    • Sandy BSandy B says: 758 comments
      OHD Supporter

      2001 craftsman farmhouse
      Bainbridge Island, WA

      Thanks for that!! I visit the site about fifteen, twenty years ago when still a pile of ruble, but the Foundation had great plans. Many significant pieces of the house had been put in storage years before.
      I visited again two years ago and saw great progress. Also they have established a headquarters/museum on the site. I love the new photos…..great interpretation for what is basically the ruin of a VERY significant house. I highly recommend a visit if you can.

      2
      • CarebearCarebear says: 1145 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Thanks a lot. I’ve just spent 3 hours looking at the Menokin site, and still haven’t seen all of it! What a piece of work! They have even traced the desendents of the slaves that lived at the plantation! I’m just fascinated by that. I love this kind of stuff. it breaks my heart, that this important house was allowed to go to ruin (I wish I could get ahold of the last occupants and give them a piece of my mind!), but I’m glad that someone is finally doing something, to teach the public, about the Lee brothers, their connection to the Revolution, the history of Menokin, going back to when Native Americans lived here. I’d love to go to see all they’ve done here. Thanks so much for bringing Menokin to our attention. If anyone has any spare bucks laying around, this might be a worthy place to contribute them to.

        4
  4. StoneCrestVTStoneCrestVT says: 22 comments
    Agency Lyndonville, VT

    3125 VT Rte 122 | Sheffield VT | Built 1900 | $59,900
    Old farmhouse on a great lot with much of the work already done including roof, newer on demand water heater, exterior paint doors and windows.
    Also has 1 bedroom apartment with own access on the side. Has been run as antique shop in the past. All contents could be included into an offer, but also could be
    broom clean at request of purchaser as well. Listed by Nate Bartlett of StoneCrest Properties
    https://stonecrestpropertiesvt.com/listing/4757577/3125-vt-122-route-sheffield-vt-05866/

    1
    • JessicaJessica says: 72 comments

      Well that’s certainly one way to do it! I’ve been to a museum where they did something vaguely similar over ruins.

      Kelly, don’t let the crazies on social media get to you.

      I do like the less expensive houses though. It’s nice to dream about restoring them to what they could be rather than just looking at pretty pictures of already gorgeous houses that I could never afford.

      6
  5. StoneCrestVTStoneCrestVT says: 22 comments
    Agency Lyndonville, VT

    113 South Street | Lyndonville VT | Built 1880 | $229,000
    This Grand Victorian home was designed by Packard and Thorne Architects in 1880 for Elisha Bigelow. The very same architect who designed the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury along with many other important buildings and churches in Vermont. This Victorian lady has been restored and updated with new electrical, heating system and chef’s kitchen with breakfast nook. The rich wood finishes and details are stunning and harken back to a time gone by when life was formal and luxurious. This light filled home features formal dining and butlers pantry, a parlor, a library with pellet stove, grand formal entrance, 5 bedrooms including a master suite with sitting room. Endless possibilities await with this property that additionally offers a barn that could become a home business. Walk to farmers markets and concerts in Bandstand Park, Lyndon Institute and shops. Short distance to NVU, Kingdom Trails, Burke Mountain and all the recreation available in the Northeast Kingdom.
    Listed by Vanessa Welch of StoneCrest Properties
    https://stonecrestpropertiesvt.com/listing/4794235/113-south-street-lyndon-vt-05851/

    5
  6. dunamovindunamovin says: 152 comments

    Good for you! Quality over quantity.

    3
  7. StoneCrestVTStoneCrestVT says: 22 comments
    Agency Lyndonville, VT

    20 Hall Road |Stannard VT | Built 1840 | $195,000

    Serenity now! Located on a dead end road, alongside Stannard Brook, this renovated antique cape is filled with natural light, custom woodwork and unique features. Relax on the amazing wraparound porch or brand new deck and listen to the soothing sounds of the water. The open floor plan on the main level is great for entertaining and family living. There are three bedrooms on the second floor plus a dedicated office on the first floor. Plenty of room for homesteading, gardens and animals. You’ll find endless uses for the large (3700sqft) insulated barn/garage which was constructed on site from locally harvested timber. Modern utilities include: 200amp underground electric service, drilled artesian well and engineered septic. Stannard is school choice for grades 7-12, and OSSU/Lakeview for grakes K-6. Seller is a VT licensed real estate agent.
    Listed by Scott DesJardins of StoneCrest Properties

    https://stonecrestpropertiesvt.com/listing/4811117/20-hall-road-stannard-vt-05842/

    3
  8. says: 17 comments

    Kelly, there are other sites that do cheap houses. This is your site, you do what works for you. You have magnificent houses on here and I dream about getting my hands on one someday 😉

    19
  9. Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1721 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1936 Cabin

    Greetings All! Here are a few that I found of interest this week:

    1875, Saratoga Springs, NY, 899,000

    Here is a house that I have admired for some time. I especially want to show it here hoping that perhaps some upstate, or someone looking for a Spa City summer home might find it here and care for it.
    Now tell me, I want to call this Italianate and second empire, what are your thoughts?
    Lovely front door, would love to see underneath the carpet. Medallion on the living room ceiling set for a new vintage chandelier. … Aaaah!, etched glass of a race horse, slide 9, (before we found out how they actually run through photography):
    https://americanhistory.si.edu/muybridge/
    I love to look at the windows at the mansard roof level. Sometimes miss living with them myself.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/432-Grand-Ave-Saratoga-Springs-NY-12866/32406174_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=9ce48c55-3057-4552-9987-13a8ccc384f2~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1909, Philadelphia, PA, 1,995,000

    Over 16,000 sq feet of space,
    originally built in 1909 by steel magnate Henry A. Laughlin

    https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt:MSP33.B006.F04.I04
    Interior is large and looks to have been taken over by some kind of institution. Lovely metal railing, interesting windows, mouldings, still some beautiful details that want me to share. Some older pictures would be a delight here.
    Some of its history recorded:
    https://philly.curbed.com/2016/8/26/12642686/greylock-mansion-sheriffs-sale-chestnut-hill
    https://jackncb.wordpress.com/architecture/pittsburgh-area/greylock-mansion-chestnut-hill/
    https://www.chestnuthilllocal.com/2019/03/22/opinion-only-philanthropy-can-save-greylock/
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/209-W-Chestnut-Hill-Ave-Philadelphia-PA-19118/2136886400_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=59b9ae1d-9f65-41aa-96c7-8f54b033d64d~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1930, Pittsburgh, PA, 1,850,000

    Pretty brick Tudor with decorative brick chimney, diamond pained windows, great hall on slide 8, fancy dining room ceiling slide 12

    https://jljbacktoclassic.com/archives/611
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1250-Fox-Chapel-Rd-Pittsburgh-PA-15238/11528094_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=92fb7cac-98f6-44c8-a779-2cb85d6449bb~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1725, Newport, RI, 630,000

    Plaque says Christopher Townsend House and founded by Doris Duke. I like the old stair, paneled fireplace surround, inside shutters

    https://www.architecturalrecord.com/articles/14544-rising-seas-threaten-historic-houses
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/74-Bridge-St-Newport-RI-02840/65983456_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=f9efbfd5-37e2-4b03-8d30-0f41a5143128~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    1927, Port Washington, NY, 2,999,000

    Tudor Revival with lovely staircase, decorative beams, paneling

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/61-South-Rd-Port-Washington-NY-11050/31081329_zpid/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-SendToFriendHDP-image&rtoken=59ab62e7-aa7b-4c1f-9e96-5167d60821ad~X1-ZUveo4kiegi2h5_46au8

    13
    • JessicaJessica says: 72 comments

      Gasped out loud when the exterior photo of that 2nd empire loaded. LOVE.

      2
    • Greylock, what a cool name of your first offering. Can anyone explain what the upside down UFO is in pics 27,29 and 30. Someone needs to buy this big beauty, quick, and pull off the tile roof and repair n re-felt it before the damage goes too far. Realtors drive me crazy calling a 3K sf home a mansion. To me at minimum a home needs 5K sf to fall into mansion category but this big beauty is more than 3X my mansion standard. I love it and what it can be again, plus it’s got an appropriate amount of land surrounding it to keep back nosy neighbors.

      2
    • JimHJimH says: 5120 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Thanks, Kim – an interesting group! For style and landscape, I like the 2 pre-Depression Tudors. The Sands Point house has a great lot and location, but needs a cosmetic upgrade, and removal of the 70’s addition. In Pittsburgh, that’s a pretty fair replica of a medieval Great Hall!

      1
    • JimHJimH says: 5120 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Kim, I had hoped to find some info on the Saratoga Springs house but came up empty except for the original owner, Charles G. Slade (1835-1914). He was a farmer and nurseryman who also owned a limestone quarry. The house was originally on 36 acres, part of a large tract of valuable property owned by the Slades on the western edge of town.

      I think the experts would label it a Second Empire house and leave it there, the Italianate details being common to the style, and it has a bit of Gothic flavor as well. It’s a beautiful home on a large lot, and I also hope it finds an owner that appreciates it for the fine Victorian home it is, rather than a contemporary designer showcase that someone with too much money might make of it.

      3
      • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1721 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1936 Cabin

        thank you Jim, if I could do a house history at the library now-now not available, I might have some help and find something—haven’t thought to look on line, but this might be the time to look at the libraries on line history room. And thank you for the bit on Second Empire vs Italianate. I will search some more.

        1
  10. 1887 Queen Anne – San Diego, California | $5,500,000

    Britt-Scripps house. Located in Bankers Hill and very near to Balboa Park. Receives Mills Act property tax abatement benefits.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/406-Maple-St-San-Diego-CA-92103/2116844389_zpid/

    7
  11. JulieJulie says: 333 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1997 1 storey contemporary

    Kia Ora/Hello from New Zealand,

    This home is about 2 miles up my road in Kaipara Flats (about an hour north of Auckland) and I have always liked it. I can’t find a date(I estimate early 1900s) but it used to be the village general store back in the day. It was last sold in 2012 and I liked the way it looked inside back then much more than I do the way it is now – it had much of it’s original features and charm and the owner had decorated it in a way more sympathetic to it’s age. The current owners have put in a new kitchen but the rest of the place needs work. I have ideas of what I would do if I got my hands on it – strip back the paint on the ceilings so that it’s original kauri wood is exposed. Ditto with the french doors. Repaint all the walls (no white for me) and work on the wood floors. It is worth mentioning that it is next to an old stone railroad bridge but the train comes through maybe once or twice a day. Asking price of US$468,508.00.

    https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/property/residential/sale/listing/2651805473?bof=7Ndq4GlX

    Riverside Farm in Clevedon just south of Auckland. I don’t have a date for it because the source I use no longer gives that information but I am guessing 1880’s. It’s an impressive property and has much to offer in terms of the beautiful home, land, a cottage, pool, stables, tennis court, etc. Price is by negotiation and it has a valuation of US$2,888,000.00

    https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/property/residential/lifestyle-property/listing/2397954077?bof=AF7AZ4eh

    “AYALA, the famous Champagne House in France, was the name proudly given to this marvellous classical home built in central Auckland in 1914 by the original importers of the champagne. To fulfill a country dream, AYALA was relocated from Remuera to a lifestyle block in Whitford in 1975.

    After ownership of 20 years, the vendors are planning their new journey in retirement, which makes this rare opportunity for the lucky purchaser to own the unexplored Kiwi treasure.

    Cherished with love and admiration, AYALA has been fully refurbished throughout with the finest finishes and native timbers to match with the unique antique elegance of the original build, perfectly combining thoughtful tastes and customised decorations.”

    It is for Tender and has a valuation of US$2,454,515.00.

    https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/property/residential/lifestyle-property/listing/2643648403?bof=j1h2nMVf

    Kelly, I don’t care what the price of the properties you list are. It is of no significance to me. If a house appeals to me, I have a look at it, enjoy it and usually learn something about history, architecture, etc. I would not say something negative either. I watch shows on tv where people are viewing homes and they sometimes say horrible things – apparently it doesn’t occur to them the owners will eventually see the show and hear the comments. If a house doesn’t appeal to me I simply don’t look at it. Keep up the good work!!!

    8
  12. Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 828 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Victorian Farmhouse
    Lancaster, PA, PA

    I’m posting this mid-century NOT modern for two reasons: A lot of us grew up in houses like this (or had friends who did) and for ALL THE LOVERS OF KNOTTY PINE out there. It’s even in the bathroom! Seriously I hope the new owner appreciates this time capsule and keeps it intact. Painter, VA: 169K, 1950: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/17190-Main-St_Painter_VA_23420_M94410-11180

    9
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Just wow! This is the knottiest mid-century house I’ve ever seen… it’s even in the freakin’ bathroom! The ceilings are beyond fantastic! And all of this exuberant wood is quietly concealed behind the most unassuming of traditional exteriors — I do love a good dichotomy! Thanks for a truly fun share.

      5
  13. John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5470 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1889 Eastlake Cottage
    Fort Worth, TX

    We all appreciate the beautiful architect designed mansions of the past. However, mansions then and today do not reflect the houses average Americans lived in. The subject house in the photo above is closer to what average Americans lived in over a century ago. So called “workers cottages” and modest shotgun houses have been razed by the millions leaving us today with a slightly skewed idea of what the general housing stock was over a century ago. Landmark homes usually have a better chance to be saved and restored than a shotgun house or workers cottage for obvious reasons. However, their role in providing a humble home for American families should not be forgotten. In my own neighborhood, when we arrived about 31 years ago, there were a dozen or more shotguns and worker’s houses. In the interim, all have since been demolished and thus, part of the history of my neighborhood has been forever lost. Those of us who love old houses should think about these lesser examples too. Some of the 19th century homes would fit nicely into today’s tiny house movement yet they still have artistic and architectural merits.

    18
    • Lancaster JohnLancaster John says: 828 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Victorian Farmhouse
      Lancaster, PA, PA

      Glad to see you’re back, John.

      6
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
      OHD Supporter

      While I personally share your perspective regarding the importance of modest houses (which are of arguably greater historic significance than the architect-designed houses of the monied classes), this blog has always been about dreams. The vast majority of people dreaming about their fantasy house are not picturing a modest house; they’re dreaming big. I’ve found out the hard way (over the course of many decades restoring modest houses) that most people only care about history when it is decorative and pompous.

      When blogging begins to feel like work — instead of a passion — it’s time to change course. Kelly should be true to her own likes rather than trying to second-guess her audience. I love all old houses, big and small, and will be happy to look at whatever offerings she treats us too. There are plenty of modest houses available; if one is truly serious about them it will be no problem to look for them independently.

      7
  14. RosewaterRosewater says: 6545 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1875 Italianate cottage
    Noblesville, IN

    Another little treat from me today. 🙂
    Those of us of a certain vintage, or better, will likely remember the early 80’s, prime-time soap, “Dynasty”. I sure do. Even at 12 years old; I was enthralled. FILOLI, the location of the fictional Carrington family estate, has been a place of fascination for me ever since. It is a national trust property; and I hope to one day see it myself IRL. Short of that, I came across a couple of very nicely filmed tours this week of both the public rooms, as well as the STUNNING gardens. Hope you enjoy them as much as I did. 🙂

    Dynasty theme, (season 2), is probably one of the best show themes ever:
    https://youtu.be/wTA66L8rUTg
    Such sheer fabulousness of style and wit on that show.
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/8b/fb/ae/8bfbaebca2835b58788a5222454fb1a6.jpg

    FILOLI public rooms:
    https://youtu.be/teO6inTLLpc

    FILOLI gardens:
    https://youtu.be/7qR1SDoYNeo

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filoli

    Love fine old cars too?
    As a bonus +++ the same videographer at the 2016 Pebble Beach Tour d’ Elegance:
    https://youtu.be/scgNInrZWfc

    That same channel has a few other video tours which are attached to my watch later folder that I’m looking forward to seeing as well. I’d suggest checking out their catalogue of vids to see if any interest you as well.

    Cheers everybody! 🙂

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    • celesteceleste says: 49 comments
      OHD Supporter

      FILOLI; FIght for what you love, LOve one another and LIve a good life, or something akin to my paraphrase. So cool and as for the house and gardens???!!!! To die for, furry eels, so much so that when I exited the house and came upon the garden, I quite literally, for the first time ever, gasped audibly at the splendid, heavenly sight and then proceeded to cry tears because it was too beautiful. The house, too. Especially the kitchen and pantry and silver safe room and and and…! One of my all time favorites. I highly (stratospherically) recommend visiting if at all possible.

      2
      • RosewaterRosewater says: 6545 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1875 Italianate cottage
        Noblesville, IN

        “Fight for a just cause; Love your fellow man; Live a good life.”

        I forgot to mention those kitchens and pantries were part of the tour as well. They are indeed well worth seeing. Hopefully someday I’ll get to do just that. Maybe by then the tour will have expanded to more family areas of the house as well.
        Cheers, Celests! 🙂

        3
  15. Sarah with a hSarah with a h says: 79 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1906 Victorian
    West Des Moines, IA

    Kelly, I’ve always loved the homes you choose for the site. They are a great cross section of older American homes that I feel blessed seeing.
    Our 1906 story and a half is a work in progress. After 18 years we are finally in a position that will enable us to tackle the kitchen. I am so excited!! I’ve saved pictures from your posts that I’ll be showing our contractor. I can’t wait to start the demo! Praying that we can use the original wood floors once we remove the cracked tiles, plywood subfloor and ugly linoleum!
    Also glad that you are back and hoping that you are feeling well!
    Sarah

    10
  16. Anne M.Anne M. says: 862 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    1850 Gothic Revival in Monson, MA. $129,900 not a lot of pictures but worth a look
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/33-Main-St-Monson-MA-01057/193646227_zpid/
    1933 Lodge in Sheffield, MA. with 3 acres $550,000
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1220-Berkshire-School-Rd-Sheffield-MA-01257/200255124_zpid/
    2 bedroom condo in a spectacular 1900 mansion in Stockbridge, MA $525,000 the tail end of the photos shows the foyer and other untouched public spaces- the condo is nice, too!not cookie-cutter
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/11-Prospect-Hill-Rd-C-Stockbridge-MA-01262/56816569_zpid/

    2
  17. Anne M.Anne M. says: 862 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1972 raised ranch.
    Hopkinton, MA

    1895 in Pittsfield, MA – huge, gorgeous, original fixtures, fireplaces, built-ins, etc. $960,000 https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/94-Dawes-Ave-Pittsfield-MA-01201/55946548_zpid/
    1868 Second Empire (looks like, exterior is not entirely visible) in Adams, MA $189,900
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7-Elm-St-Adams-MA-01220/56798366_zpid/
    “Ethelwynde” an English manor home built in 1929 in Lenox, MA $5,900,000. Comes with a mid-century guest house (sadly no pictures of the interior of guest house)
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/101-95-Yokun-Ave-Lenox-MA-01240/2079081434_zpid/

    3
  18. I’ve been visiting the site off and on for awhile. I like seeing the houses that are affordable for me … and I like seeing the houses that aren’t. I’ve especially enjoyed contributors’ warmth, knowledge, and enthusiasm for the properties they post and comment on.
    Follow your own vision as to what you want to post here. If someone doesn’t like that, they can look up their own houses to dream about.

    9
  19. I’ve lurked for a little while but never posted. This house demanded I post it.
    The house was built in 1900. It is in Chicago, Illinois, and is scheduled to be auctioned by the Treasury Department. It is located in a residential multi-unit district and looks like it also has a lobby area. Me, I’d turn it back into a single-family if I could afford it. Starting bid is $100,000.
    Flyer for terms:
    https://www.treasury.gov/auctions/treasury/rp/images/drexelblvdflyer.pdf
    U.S. Treasury site for bidding:
    https://www.treasury.gov/auctions/treasury/rp/drexelblvd.shtml
    Photos of the interior:
    https://www.treasury.gov/auctions/treasury/rp/drexelblvdphotos.html

    5
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6545 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      Yikes! Great facade. They always are. The vast majority of the interiors of Chicago, top-shelf, townhouses have been muddled beyond fixing. Not so this one!
      https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2019/12/20/1897-chicago-il/

      2
    • JimHJimH says: 5120 comments
      OHD Supporter

      That’s a great stone Romanesque façade – unfortunately, very little of the original interior remains.

      It’s wonderful that a house like this survives in Chicago, even totally altered internally. When I studied architecture in Illinois 40+ years ago, it was all about modern architecture – Mies, Wright, etc. – and preservation only applied to landmarks and streetscapes. Before and since, if an old building “had to be preserved” it was OK to “adapt” the interior to suit modern tastes, and so many great old interiors have been lost. The appreciation of historic interiors is a relatively new thing, and one of the reasons this site has great value.

      2
    • Bargain (below bargain, in fact) price for the area. New and rehabbed properties generally go for high six figures.

      1
  20. 1885 in Weyauwega, Wisconsin – $350,000 ~ Posting this beautiful 1885 Catholic Church converted to a single family home. Interior has original architecture with hard maple wood floors and 20 foot domed ceilings. Take a look. Love to hear your comments!
    https://circaoldhouses.com/property/1885-catholic-church-residence/

    2
  21. If you teleported the Laughlin mansion to the middle of England, it would not be out of place as a manor house. Beautiful!

    The Tudor Revival’s stair case is indeed lovely, as is the wood, and the surrounding woods.

    Kelly, I am an old house dreamer (here and in the UK), and as a dreamer, its the architecture that fascinates me. The number of digits in the price is immaterial to the dream.

    6
    • RosewaterRosewater says: 6545 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1875 Italianate cottage
      Noblesville, IN

      You should keep your eye out for the good UK listings for us, Keith. We used to have a reader who did that; and she had an impeccable eye for interesting properties. I really miss her posts.

      3
  22. ScottScott says: 339 comments
    1951 Grants Pass, OR

    How about a Lustron in Macomb, Illinois? With Lustron garage, too, for $34,900.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/217-Chandler-Blvd_Macomb_IL_61455_M82953-31149?view=qv

    And another Lustron in Macomb. This is the 3 bedroom model for $78,000.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/309-S-Edwards-St_Macomb_IL_61455_M87889-00459?view=qv

    Queen Anne with an imposing turret in the sleepy town of Blandinsville, Illinois for $99,000.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/320-E-Washington-St_Blandinsville_IL_61420_M81508-51090?view=qv

    5
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Fun finds! Lustrons always make me happy and the Queen Anne has a lot going for it.

      3
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5470 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      The short lived pre-fab Lustrons are are scarce. I always wince when I learn of another example being lost. They were an innovative, affordable, and technologically advanced solution to the post World War II housing shortage. To find two Lustrons on the market in the same small town is remarkable. I can only hope an appreciative buyer becomes their next owner.

      At one time, Queen Anne style homes were so heavily identified with having towers and turrets that a lot of money was spent to construct them knowing that they often had very little functional use. We’ve seen examples here of some turrets and the occasional tower added as an apparent afterthought. The Blandinsville example has the requisite tower and inside a very tight radius requiring curved moldings and curved windows. (another added expense) Overall, the house is a bit too modernized for my tastes but at its modest price I could envision someone spending the extra funds to make the house look more period friendly.

      3
      • AVoegAVoeg says: 92 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Craftsman, Prairie WI

        We have 3 Lustrons in my small Wisconsin town of 10,000. One of them has been resided and remodeled inside and looks nothing like a lustron anymore. I think they are so neat.

        2
  23. EricHtownEricHtown says: 395 comments

    Craftsman isn’t my favorite style or time period. I prefer 1870s to mid 1890s but this is a really good craftsman in Montgomery, AL for $298K. Beautiful setting and looks largely original to 1920, 3020 sf.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/332-Winthrop-Ct_Montgomery_AL_36104_M78345-30649?ex=AL2794587719

    1
    • mariebushmanmariebushman says: 234 comments
      1919 Bungalow
      Richmond, CA

      Why or why do people think they have to try and modernize these homes by painting the downstairs woodwork white? I bought a 1919 bungalow that had this done to it and didn’t have the time or energy to strip all of it. I’ve learned to live with it, but still don’t love it.

      1
      • AVoegAVoeg says: 92 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Craftsman, Prairie WI

        I can only imagine how lovely this would have looked with unpainted woodwork. I cringe every time I see beautiful Craftsmans with painted wood.

  24. EricHtownEricHtown says: 395 comments

    Another one that’s not from my preferred time period but this is a beautifully original 1960 home in original, elegant condition. On a big beautiful lot with the great live oaks over looking Bayou Teche in Louisiana. Almost 4000 sf for a very reasonable $450K.
    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/4214-Pamaleen-Dr_New-Iberia_LA_70563_M79448-07878?ex=LA2912342824

    3
  25. tcmchickietcmchickie says: 152 comments
    OHD Supporter

    TX

    According to Zillow, this old Canadian beauty is back on the market: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/9752-Main-St-Canning-NS-B0P-1H0/305632962_zpid/?

    Here’s our old listing that includes more pics than the new listing.
    https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2018/09/19/1864-1902-canning-nova-scotia-canada/

    Sadly, we still don’t know what the upstairs and bathrooms look like.

    6
    • JkleebJkleeb says: 281 comments
      Seattle, WA

      Love everything including the old house incorporated into the “newer” part.

      2
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1721 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      I LOVE this one! I am glad Kelly moved it to the front page today. It is now part of my bookmarked houses. I love seeing the forget me nots on the lawn. (now I go off on a tangent share)…. We spent last weekend at the cabin and the entire back lawn that gets the sun was a MEADOW—-beautiful, but can make the cabin look abandoned or not used. I first salvaged several bouquets of forget me not, buttercup, daisy, phlox etc. then out to the garage to find a scythe. With some practice, I learned how to use it and hayed my back yard (I love the smell of hay). I felt accomplished and happy -that I could bring out an older tool to get the job done. I also found an old two man saw, about seven axes and a couple of regular saws, along with some thick old door hinges about three feet long. I am looking forward to next weekend when I take everything out of the old garage (actually my great grandparents first cabin on the land), and get it all organized and identified. smile

  26. Built in 1935 in Frost, Texas
    Old American Foursquare-style construction.
    I am selling this home for $90,000
    45 minutes from Dallas.
    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/120-W-Park-St-Frost-TX-76641/114262475_zpid/

    4
    • I wish I could take on the repairs myself. I love this home and the views, I bought this at too young of an age. This needs to have someone that can spend the time and money. So much potential to be the gem of the small historic town it is located.

      1
  27. Built in 1880 in Shutesbury, Massachusetts
    Former church, meeting house and dance hall!
    Very unique home in the center of a classic New England town.
    https://www.coldwellbanker.com/property/16-Wendell-Rd-Shutesbury-MA-01072/35250842/detail?src=list

    2
  28. shellyhorvathshellyhorvath says: 84 comments
    OHD Supporter

    This is the first time I have posted a property, so here’s hoping. 🤞 This place in Vermont has been tugging on my heart for a while. Cozy rooms, well appointed, beautiful land. And I just love those New England homes with the barn built off the back.

    4 beds, 3 baths, lots of acreage for $850,000

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1884-Middletown-Rd-Grafton-VT-05146/2131844056_zpid/

    5
    • Kimberly62Kimberly62 says: 1721 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1936 Cabin

      Very nice house Shelly, thank you for sharing it with us.

    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 453 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Just look at this beautiful house! Even before I saw the rest of the photos I was in love with it. Standing there so majestic looking. If a house could smile, this one would be beaming.

      It has everything I’d look for in a home — age, fireplaces, lots of space, lovely decorated without detracting from the character of the home. I love the light, how comfortable the entire place looks.

      Then there’s the land, eight acres or so, which allows one’s imagination to run wild at the possibilities. I also love how the patio looks within the stone wall (Photos 20, 21). A house to love as it has been loved over the many years. I never get tired of houses from Maine and Vermont.

      Thank you for posting this one, Shelly!

      1
    • Angie boldly going nowhereAngie boldly going nowhere says: 453 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Whoops! That should have read 28 acres (or, well, 27.75). Sorry about that. I saw the 8 but not the 2 (heehee).

      1
  29. KevinONeillKevinONeill says: 154 comments
    OHD Supporter

    1884 Victorian Cottage
    St Paul, MN

    1884 Victorian cottage, Ramsey Hill, St Paul MN.
    You won’t have to update this one as it’s going to be razed in the next two days. Just when you think they don’t do this anymore in historic districts here we go. A developer who claims their company is “green” and “sustainable” I would argue the majority if not all of this house will end up in the landfill. Everything is still inside including the slate fireplace. It’s not a big Victorian mansion but it sits on its lot prominently along with other homes of the era. I can’t imagine what’s going to replace it.

    https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/633-Ashland-Ave_Saint-Paul_MN_55104_M73799-80919

    3
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Tragic. This a good reminder of two things: 1) The fact that most (but not all) historic designations for properties are merely honorary and do not actually prevent demolition, and 2) The “green” movement is often more a marketing gimmick to make money than a serious commitment to the environment. Renovation, restoration and rehabilitation are all infinitely more “green” than tearing down and rebuilding — even if the new countertops and floors are all made of officially-sanctioned “sustainable” resources and similar trendy (expensive) feel-good products. Thanks for yet another example of the twisted logic which is so characteristic of both the Preservation and Green communities. I’m saving this one to see what does eventually replace it!

      1
      • KevinONeillKevinONeill says: 154 comments
        OHD Supporter

        1884 Victorian Cottage
        St Paul, MN

        I was there today as they were tearing it down and I was right not one thing was salvaged. It was all loaded into multiple dumpsters. I took a couple of photos and I’ll try to post with this thread.

        2
    • Architectural ObserverArchitectural Observer says: 1010 comments
      OHD Supporter

      Nice finds! The Art Moderne house in Michigan is delicious! I don’t care for some of the updates, but they are mostly cosmetic and reversible. What a house. One can only imagine the kinds of parties that were thrown here when this place was new…

      2
  30. GearGirlGearGirl says: 194 comments
    OHD Supporter

    Second Empire, Gothic, Tudor... Scottsdale, AZ

    Heyoo! OK so I’m considering a house that has been featured here. Problem is…well other than some items that need work I cannot for the life of me figure out the entry and staircase. The front doors are almost useless. The staircase ends right in front of them – although they are double doors, you aren’t getting anything larger than a person through that entry. You can’t get by the staircase.

    I have included 3 photos of the problem in my profile album here titled 33 Miner Ave. If anyone can help me figure this out, I’d greatly appreciate it!

    Note that the “room” right above the entry has been turned into a large closet for the master bedroom. Seems odd to have a random dead end small room like that (it has a door to the hallway as well as to the master bedroom). Maybe the original staircase layout was flipped??

    1
    • ZooZoo says: 533 comments

      I looked at the photos, and first, what a lovely house! I love the stairway and the pocket doors, bookcases, woodwork! Second, I’m not sure what you’re asking. It appears there is a tiny vestibule, then you turn left into the front hall, right? There’s very little space between the bottom of the stairs and the double doors to the living room/library, is that the problem? Or is the vestibule the problem? Can you remove the vestibule, and open it up into one large entry area? I don’t think you could get furniture through that vestibule, but surely there’s a back entrance to the house, yes? The stained glass looks intriguing too! Good luck!!

      1
    • John ShifletJohn Shiflet says: 5470 comments
      OHD Supporter

      1889 Eastlake Cottage
      Fort Worth, TX

      Obviously, some changes were made in the past. The parts look to be fairly old so they may have been taken from the original staircase or perhaps there was a back staircase that was later omitted? I now believe the changes were made for renters at one time. By having the staircase going upstairs very close to the entry, renters would not intrude into the landlord’s (homeowner’s) living spaces thus giving both parties more privacy. As also suggested, see in the building/planning/deed records departments if any kind of permit for the alterations was issued. If so, there might be a drawing showing the original configuration and the alterations. I believe the work was by a professional carpenter but with the reuse of old pieces, it becomes more difficult to determine later changes. Your notice of spacing between the staircase and entry being off seems true. Typically, such fine homes had plenty of space in what would have been the foyer to create a dramatic staircase effect. Perhaps there are some neighboring houses that remain unaltered which could give you an idea of what this one may have looked like originally? An old set of floor plans might show the layout if you can find any. Good luck.

      • If you look at old house plans, there were often “useless” rooms or open landings above the stairs above an entry vestibule – possibly a “dressing” room. Of course, you weren’t supposed to bring in anything other than people through the front door: all deliveries in rear, aka through the kitchen or back door.

        I assume the doors are to the left of the stairs in the photos head on, right?

        1
        • GearGirlGearGirl says: 194 comments
          OHD Supporter

          Second Empire, Gothic, Tudor... Scottsdale, AZ

          In the photo taken head-on of the stairs, the double entry doors (like French doors) are immediately to the left of the staircase just out of sight. There is no anteroom (no small room between outer front doors and these, and it appears there never was one). Only one set of front entry doors.

          See the burgundy wall to the left of the stairs? It’s approximately 22 inches wide. That is how much space you have between the staircase and the front doors.

          If you were to remove the front doors and stand on the front porch looking in, you’d be less than 2 feet from the bottom half of the staircase. That first step of the staircase falls right about the middle of the front doorway. The right door of the front doors is the only clear entry to the house from the front, the left door is basically blocked by this staircase. You can freely open the left door, but you have to move to the right to pass by the stairs. You cannot walk forward through the left door. The front doors are approximately 20-22 inches wide each.

          After thinking on the problem, what MAY have happened is the staircase was designed originally with triangular steps at the 2 landings. That would bring the entire lower section inwards 2 steps, which would give about 20 inches more open area at the front doors. Maybe at some point a decision was made to change to square landings of one large square step at each turn, thus requiring extension of the lowest section of steps? That would also explain why the lower stained glass window is so low in the staircase. A 2 step drop would place it higher relative to the person on the stairs.

      • GearGirlGearGirl says: 194 comments
        OHD Supporter

        Second Empire, Gothic, Tudor... Scottsdale, AZ

        I added a few more photos if you want to take a look. Gives you a better idea of how close those front doors are to the stairs.

        Also, as I went through the property again yesterday, I noticed that some nice baseboard detail is hidden away under the staircase. This makes me think that those stairs weren’t there originally. I can’t imagine putting such finishing touches on baseboard intersections that nobody would ever see. If you look at the last photo in the series, you can barely make out the piece of carved wood peeking out from the white paint.

        Oddly, the rear staircase behind the kitchen is a straight shot that is 3 feet wide, compared to this very narrow front staircase. It isn’t meant to be seen, though, as it is just steps sandwiched between walls with a railing attached to the right.

  31. lrosslross says: 2 comments

    Cool website, but unsure of the etiqette here. I have the home at the Matterport link below listed for sale for the owner, who has restored it in excruciating detail. It was built in 1860 in our lumber boom town of Williamsport, Pennsylvania in the Italianate style for Lucy Eutermarks and her new husband, by her parents Samuel and Emma Filbert. The current owner, the restorer, is only the third owner, and accomplished the work with the help of Samuel Dornsife, who did the American wing of the Metropolitan Museum. It’s at 915 W Fourth in Williamsport, a great little city on the Susquehanna River full of Victorians, Colonials, and Georgians. Modern plumbing, electrical, and HVAC. Brussels style carpeting made to order in British woolen mills, French silk window treartments, French & Italian wallpaper, crytal chandeliers, etc.. It’s worth checking out. Special attention to the handpainted ceilings:
    https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=p5fnHTAxG9f
    I have it priced at $329,000. Seller has three times that invested.
    Lawrence Ross 907-727-2227 Associate Broker at Premier Realtors
    PS We occasionally have nice opportunites in fixer upper Victorians here in central PA.

    1

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